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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Condiments

PRODUCT: Vegan Pesto From Sauces ‘n Love

Sauces-n-Love_Vegan-Pesto-230

Vegan, lactose free and cholesterol free
pesto. Photo courtesy Sauces ‘n Love.

 

Keeping a good jar of pre-made pesto at hand can make any dish extraordinary in only a matter of minutes.

Pesto sauce, traditionally consists of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, Parmesan and Pecorino cheeses and salt for seasoning. Add a dollop to dinner and suddenly you’re a fancy cook who understands how to dazzle with delicate herbs. Pesto is vegetarian, low in carbs and packed with fresh ingredients: a bright, healthy addition to your meals.

Pesto originated in the Italian province of Liguria, 220 miles of crescent-shaped Mediterranean coastline that is sometimes called the Italian Riviera. Liguria, the capital of which is Genoa, is home to superb produce, most notably the sweetest, mildest basil. Its people enjoy one of the freshest, healthiest cuisines in all of Italy.

Just as pesto can be made with different nuts (hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts) and greens (arugula, spinach)—or even non-greens, like red pepper pesto—it can be made vegan instead of vegetarian. One way to do this is to substitute vegan Parmesan.

 

But Sauces ‘n Love has creating a pesto condiment, dip and sauce that eliminates the cheese or cheese substitute. Using only extra virgin olive oil, sunflower oil, basil, pine nuts, garlic, salt and black pepper still creates a delicious pesto.

 

Why vegan pesto? Aside from accommodating the growing number of vegans, it’s a boon for non-vegans who are lactose intolerant, those cutting back on cholesterol, and kosher consumers who want to serve pesto with meat-based meals.

Sauces ‘n Love, a NIBBLE Top Pick of The Week is one of our favorite lines of Italian-style sauces, sold fresh in the refrigerator case. A sister line, Scarpetta, is shelf-stable and will stay fresh without refrigeration for nine months. Learn more at SaucesNLove.com.
 
MORE ABOUT PESTO

  • Pesto Overview
  • The History Of Pesto
  • Pesto Serving Suggestions
  • Homemade Pesto Recipe and Pesto Prep Tips
  • More Favorite Pestos
  •  

    Pesto-SalmonCakes-230

    Beyond pasta: Pesto can be used to enhance most savory dishes. Photo by Guyer Wood | IST.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Giardiniera

    Giardiniera (jar-dih-NYAIR-uh) is an Italian word that means “from the garden.” Veggies from the garden (or these days, from the store) are pickled in vinegar, herbs and spices (sometimes oil is added).

    The result is a pickled condiment used like other pickles on burgers, eggs and sandwiches, from the classic muffaletta of New Orleans to the Italian beef sandwich in Chicago to an everyday ham and cheese. (See more uses below.)

    Giardiniera adds crunch, tang, spice and often, heat, to perk up anything it touches. Low in calories and high in veggie nutrition, it’s a guilt-free addition.

     
    TYPES OF GIARDINIERA

    Bell peppers, carrots, cauliflower, celery, hot chiles and pitted olives are common, but you can add whatever appeals to you, including non-traditional ingredients like mushrooms and okra.

    In Italy, giardiniera is also called “sotto aceti,” which means “under vinegar,” a common term for pickled foods. It is often made with carrots, cauliflower, celery, onions and zucchini in red or white wine vinegar.

    There are mild and hot versions, the latter employing hot chile peppers.

     

    muffaletta-bettycrocker-230

    A muffaletta sandwich with giardiniera. Here’s the recipe. Photo courtesy Pillsbury.

     

    USES FOR GIARDINIERA

  • Appetizer: Time to revive the antipasto plate and relish tray.
  • Bloody Mary: Stir some in and provide a cocktail pick to spear the veggies.
  • Condiment: Place a bowl on the table with the main course. Giardiniera is especially delicious with grilled foods and casual foods (burgers, franks, sandwiches).
  • Eggs: Fold into scrambled eggs and omelets; serve as a condiment with other egg dishes.
  • Pasta: Toss giardiniera with any cooked pasta; add to oven-bound stuffed shells or other baked pasta recipes, including lasagna.
  • Pizza: Spoon it on! If making a frozen pizza, spread giardiniera over the top before placing it in the oven so it bakes right.
  • Salads: Add giardiniera into a tossed salad, tuna or chicken salad, pasta salad or potato salad for instant punch and color.
  • Sandwiches: grilled cheese, meatball, muffaletta, submarine or any basic sandwich
  • Side: make “Italian cole slaw” by mixing with shredded red cabbage
  • Snack: Tangy and crunchy!
  •  

    italian_Mix_Giardiniera_mezzetta-230

    You can buy giardiniera in almost any food
    market. Photo courtesy Mezzetta.

     

    RECIPE: MAKE YOUR OWN GIARDINIERA

    Enjoy it at home and bring a jar full as a house gift. After you make the first batch, you’ll be able to adjust the ingredients to create your ideal “signature” blend.

    You can cut the vegetables as you like, from chunky to a more finely diced relish.

    Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup table salt
  • 1 cup small-diced carrots
  • 1 cup cauliflower florets
  • 4 to 8 serrano chiles, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced small
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced small
  • 2 cups wine vinegar (red or white)
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  •  
    *Use good vinegar, and never distilled white vinegar.

     
    Plus your choice of these optional ingredients:

  • Fennel
  • Gherkins
  • Jalapeño chiles, sliced
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Olives, green and/or black olives, pitted and halved
  • Oil: canola, olive, soybean or vegetable
  • Pimiento (roasted red bell pepper)
  • Spices: parsley, red pepper flakes
  • Pepperoncini
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE water and salt in a non-reactive bowl; mix to dissolve. Add the vegetables and garlic. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

    2. DRAIN and rinse the vegetables. In a clean bowl, mix together the vinegar with the oregano and pepper. Add the vegetables and mix to combine. Allow to marinate overnight in the fridge, or up to two days.

    3. MOVE to an airtight container. Giardiniera improves over time, and will keep in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks or longer.
     
    THE QUESTION OF OIL

    Classic giardiniera does not contain oil, but some people enjoy the extra richness it provides.

    Note that if you use oil in your marinade, it will cloud up in the fridge. But will become clear again at room temperature.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Spray-On Garlic

    It’s National Garlic Day, so our tip is: Try this wonderful spray-on garlic juice from Garlic Valley Farms.

    It brings the flavor of fresh or roasted garlic to anything from salads and pasta to veggies, fish and meats. Spritz away!

    You might be suspicious of garlic in spray form, but this product rocks.

    There are actually two varieties of garlic juice, Cold Pressed and Roasted. The flavor difference between the two is quite distinct.

  • Cold Pressed Garlic Juice tastes like fresh garlic. It’s highly fragrant and reminds us of the simple pleasure of raw garlic cloves rubbed across a hot toasted baguette.
  • Roasted Garlic Juice is a real marvel: It tastes just like roasted garlic, but you don’t have to turn on the oven! It’s wonderful on everything from steaks to popcorn.
  •  

    roasted-garlic-juice-spraywww.healthysupplies.co.uk-230sq

    Spray on the garlic! Photo courtesy HealthySupplies.co.uk.

     
    The products are all-natural and certified kosher by OU. And they’re virtually calorie-free.

    Look for them in natural food stores/health food stores, or buy it online:

  • Cold Pressed Garlic Juice
  • Roasted Garlic Juice
  •  

    Read our full review of Garlic Valley Farms, plus the health benefits of garlic.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Try Arrope

    arrope-beauty-mieldepalma.com-230

    Arrope syrup. There’s also an arrope
    preserve with pumpkin (see photo below).
    Photo courtesy Miel de Palma.

     

    Arrope (ah-ROE-pay), a cooking and condiment syrup, is a product that few of us have in our kitchens. Yet, if you’re a serious cook (or eater), it’s an ingredient you should know about.

    If your parents are serious cooks/eaters, it’s an idea for a Mother’s Day or Father’s Day gift—so much tastier than another scarf or tie.

    And if no one cooks, there’s a delicious arrope pumpkin preserve, a recipe that derives from the ancient use of arrope to preserve or stew fruits. The pumpkin is cooked in the arrope until it is candied. It’s delicious as a sweet-and-earthy bread spread or a condiment with creamy goat’s or sheep’s milk cheeses (see photo below).

    In fact, when you go to purchase arrope, you need to be specific. Otherwise, you can easily be sold the preserve instead of the syrup, or vice versa. Tip: If the word “pumpkin” appears, it’s the preserve.

    WHAT IS ARROPE

    A reduction of grape must, arrope is a condiment that dates to ancient Rome, where it was called defrutum or sapa. It survives as a gourmet Spanish condiment. The name comes from the Arabic word rubb, syrup.

     
    Arrope is closely related to saba (also called sapa, mosto d’uva cotto and vin cotto). This group comprises ancient precursors to “modern” balsamic vinegar, which appeared in the 11th century.

    So if you’re a balsamic vinegar fan, chances are good that you’ll be happy to discover arrope.

     

    Like honey* and saba, in the days before sugar was widely available arrope was used to add sweetness. Today it is used in everything from drinks to salad dressings to sauces to desserts (try it with fruit salad or drizzled over ice cream). We use it as a glaze for roast poultry and meats. It easily substitutes in cooking for sweet wines such as sherry and marsala.

    As civilization embraced massed-produced foods over artisan products in the latter half of the 20th century, the craft of making arrope—which involves carefully cooking down the must into a syrup over a period of weeks—has almost disappeared. It survives among a handful of artisan producers, carrying on family traditions. (Before modern times, arrope was made by the cook of the family.)

    In Spain, the few remaining artisans produce arrope syrup (grape must reduction) and preserved pumpkin.

    While it’s no leap to combine arrope in Spanish recipes, you can port it over to any cuisine—just as with Italy’s saba and France’s verjus.

     

    arrope-jam-forevercheese-230

    A Spanish cheese plate with typical condiments: fig cake, fresh figs, and in the back, a bowl of arrope preserve with candied pumpkin.

     
    *Honey is sweet and syrupy straight from the hive (or straight from the hive and pasteurized). Arrope and saba are cooked to develop sweet-and-sour flavors including notes of cooked caramel.
     
    HOW ARROPE IS MADE

    It starts with a large quantity of grape must, freshly pressed grape juice that still contains all of the skins and seeds and stems. The must is very flavorful with high levels of sugar.

  • The fresh-pressed grape juice can be strained and sold as verjus, where it is used instead of citrus juice or vinegar.
  • Or, it can be cooked down into arrope or saba.
  • To make arrope, the must is boiled until the volume is reduced by at least 50%, and its viscosity is reduced to a thick syrup. There is no added sugar or pectin.
  • Saba is similarly boiled down into a syrup.
  •  
    Ready to try it? Check at your local specialty food market or order it online:

  • Arrope syrup (grape must reduction)
  • Arrope with pumpkin (preserve)
  •   

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Ballymaloe Irish Ketchup

    ballymaloe-in-bowl-230

    A ketchup so rich and complex, it can be
    used as a dip. Photo courtesy Ballymaloe.

     

    In Ireland, it’s called Ballymaloe Country Relish: a tomato-based condiment served with burgers, fries, cold meats, cheese, sausage rolls, salads and sandwiches.

    Its ingredients include tomatoes (41%), tomato purée (5%), vinegar, sugar, onions, sultanas, sea salt, mustard seed and spices.

    In the U.S. it’s called…ketchup.

    But what a ketchup!

    The layering of flavors is magnificent: fruity from the tomatoes and the sultanas, pungent from the vinegar and mustard seed, oniony from the onions. It’s sweet enough for American palates used to Heinz.

    (By contrast, Heinz ketchup ingredients are tomato concentrate, vinegar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, salt, spice, onion powder, natural flavoring and Tabasco.)

     

    The texture, the rich fruity taste and the impeccable seasoning make Ballymaloe a ketchup you can eat from the spoon (if you’re so inclined).

    It’s ketchup the way it used to be, when it was a homemade condiment—before it got “blandified” by big American brands into tomato paste blended with high fructose corn syrup.

    Ballymaloe ketchup is the house recipe from the Ballymaloe Country House in Cork, Ireland. The Country House is a former private home, renovated into a hotel and restaurant (and it looks absolutely charming).

    You can buy the ketchup online at the BallymaloeUSA.com website; $5.29 per 8.5-ounce bottle.

    It is also available at select retailers, including A&P, Dean & DeLuca, Fairway, Food Emporium and King’s.

    Learn more about Ballymaloe on the company website.

     

    ballymaloe-ketchup-kalviste-230

    Bring a bottle as a house gift, or give them as stocking stuffers. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    MORE KETCHUP
    The history of ketchup, how ketchup is made and reviews of our favorite ketchup brands.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Spicy Peanut Sauce Marinade & Sauce

    If you like sesame noodles or satay with peanut sauce, here’s another delicious use for it: in a marinade.

    Marinating beef, chicken, lamb, pork or tofu in a peanut sauce-based marinade adds dimensions of flavor.

    Just create a marinade from chicken or other stock, peanut butter, soy sauce, oil, ginger, chili flakes and garlic (see the recipe below). You can also add sherry and honey.

    And certainly, serve a side of peanut sauce for dipping. See the recipe below.

    WHAT IS “SATAY SAUCE?”

    Satay is actually the grilled meat with which the spicy peanut sauce is served. The sauce is based on ground roasted peanuts; peanut butter can be substituted.

    Spicy peanut sauce is popular in the cuisines of some African countries, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. The term for the sauce in Indonesia is bumbu kacang; elsewhere it is called pecel or sambal kacang.

     

    Grilled pork skewers, marinated in peanut
    sauce marinade and served with a side
    of peanut dipping sauce (not shown). Photo courtesy National Pork Board.

     

    Peanuts were introduced to Southeast Asia in the 16th century by Portuguese and Spanish merchants. The peanuts came from Mexico, and thrived in the tropical climate.

    They soon were turned into a sauce in Indonesian cuisine and other countries followed. Indonesian peanut sauces are considered to be the most sophisticated (layered with ingredients).

     

    Grilled chicken breasts marinated in peanut
    sauce and served with more sauce on the
    side. Photo courtesy Swanson’s.

     

    RECIPE: PEANUT MARINADE

    This recipe is courtesy Swanson, maker of both conventional and low-sodium broth and stock.

    Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons soy sauce†
  • 1/3 cup plus 4 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper or pepper flakes
  • 2 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger root
  • 1/2 cup Swanson chicken broth or chicken stock†
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Garnish: chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE marinade. Stir 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 2 tablespoons peanut butter, the oil, 1/2 cup soy sauce, 1/3 cup lime juice, half the garlic and 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or chili flakes in a shallow, nonmetallic dish or a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add the chicken and turn to coat. Cover the dish or seal the bag and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight. Remove the chicken from the marinade and discard the marinade.

    2. LIGHTLY OIL the grill rack and heat the grill to medium. Grill the chicken for 15 minutes or until cooked through, turning the chicken over once halfway through the grilling time.

    3. MAKE the sauce. Stir together the remaining brown sugar, peanut butter, soy sauce, lime juice, garlic, cayenne pepper, coconut milk and ginger root in a 3-quart saucepan. Cook and stir over medium heat for 15 minutes or until the mixture is thickened. Stir in the broth and heavy cream.

    4. SPRINKLE the chicken with cilantro and serve the sauce with the chicken.

    RECIPE: SPICY PEANUT SAUCE

    Here’s an alternative recipe for spicy peanut sauce. The sauce can be made a day ahead of time, and will keep 3 to 4 days in the fridge.

    Ingredients For 1-1/4 Cups

  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth†
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce†
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 teaspoon red curry paste*
  • 1 shallot, peeled and roughly chopped
  •  
    Preparation

    1. ADD all ingredients to a blender or food processor and process until smooth.
     
    *You can use low-sodium ingredients because the other ingredients add more than enough flavor. But if you have full-sodium products on hand, feel free to use them.

    †Find red curry paste in the Asian products section of your market.

      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Artisan Pickles, The Best Pickles

    Many foodpreneurs are making small batch,
    artisan pickles. Photo by Lindsay Landis |
    LoveAndOliveOil.com.

     

    There are significantly more than one hundred small companies producing pickles all across this great land of ours. They’re small batch, hand packed and much tastier than mass-produced pickles.

    For most of us, pickles have been a commodity condiment: inexpensive, readily available, and something we didn’t spend a lot of time pondering. While most of us familiar with the big national brands—Vlasic, Claussen and Mt. Olive, for example—how many of us can name a small, local pickle producer?

    Take a look at our review of almost 50 artisan pickle brands. You’re sure to find stocking stuffers, host and hostess gifts, teacher gifts and anything else you need.

    There are sweet pickles and spicy pickles, pickle chips and spears.

    And the best news: pickles are low in calories, a guilt-free gift.

     

    Here’s the full article, including the history of pickles, how pickles are made, terms and buzzwords, and the scoop on whether or not pickles are “healthy food.”

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Radish & Beet Chutney

    This radish and beet chutney from LoveBeets.com is delicious with turkey sandwiches plus cheese, cold meats, on a baked potato or with sausages.

    It’s also a nice gift for your Thanksgiving host, who in turn may send you home with some leftover turkey. The recipe makes enough for 6 gifts or more, depending on the size of the jar.

    RECIPE: RADISH & BEET CHUTNEY

    Ingredients For Approximately 4.5 Pounds Of Chutney

  • 3.3 pounds raw beets trimmed, peeled and diced
  • 20 shallots, quartered
  • 40 radishes, quartered
  •  

    Yummy beet and radish chutney. Photo courtesy LoveBeets.com.

  • 2 eating apples, peeled and grated (we used Granny Smiths)
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 27 ounces white wine vinegar
  • 20 ounces balsamic vinegar
  • 1-1/2 pounds light brown sugar
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE all of the ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cook for 1 hour, stirring occasionally, until the beets are cooked and the juices have thickened.

    2. SPOON chutney it into sterilized jars* and seal the lids while it’s still hot. Use immediately, or keep, refrigerated, for up to 6 weeks. The flavor will improve if stored for a few weeks.

    Find more beet recipes at LoveBeets.com.

     
    *To sterilize jars, run them through the hottest cycle in your dishwasher or boil in a pan of water for 10 minutes.

      

    Comments

    GIFT: Marina’s Cranberry Chutney

    For a party favor, stocking stuffer or a pantry
    staple, to enjoy quality cranberry sauce all
    year long. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE
    NIBBLE.

     

    Cranberry jelly is easy to figure out, but what is the difference between cranberry sauce and cranberry chutney? How about cranberry conserve? Cranberry relish?

  • Cranberry Conserve is a generally mixture of more than one fruit (added oranges, for example), often with added nuts and raisins, that is cooked until it becomes thick.
  • Cranberry Chutney, made with fruit or vegetables, usually includes vinegar, onion and spices. It’s of Indian origin (chatni is the Hindi word for strongly spiced). While people who only know Major Grey’s Mango Chutney (a British concoction in 19th-century India) may think of chutney as sweet, it does include vinegar, lime juice, onion and tamarind.
  • Cranberry Jelly is simply sweetened and jelled fruit juice, a clear, bright product. It is generally made by cooking fruit juice and sugar with pectin as a jelling agent and lemon juice as an acid, to maintain a consistent texture. Jelly is firm and will hold its shape.
  • Cranberry Sauce. A sauce is cooked; the fruit softens and is bound buy a syrup made from the fruit’s juices, water and sugar. Optional spices can be (and should be!) added.
  •  

  • Cranberry Relish. A relish is not cooked. In the case of cranberry relish, the cranberries are chopped, mixed with sugar and other ingredients: apples, oranges/zest, lemon juice/zest, brandy or Grand Marnier, fresh ginger, etc.
  • So there is an official difference, even though one person’s conserve may be another person’s chutney.

    There are textbook terms, and then there are mis-uses by people who inherited the misuse or weren’t likely to do culinary research. In olden times, the distinctions weren’t codified; hence, Boston Cream Pie is a layer cake, and cheesecake is a cheese custard pie.

    Sometimes, people choose names that they think have more sales appeal. We’ve received pies called crumbles (a pie has a bottom crust, a crumble does not), jams called preserves (the difference), buttercrunch called English toffee (the difference), etc., etc. So if you care about being correct, look it up.

    MARINA’S CRANBERRY CHUTNEY

    Marina’s Cranberry Chutney is made from cranberries, sugar, onion, oranges, raisins and walnuts, seasoned with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, salt and cayenne.

    Her prime business is raising pork, and the lovely layering of flavors in her cranberry condiment is a beautiful complement to pork or poultry.

    Given the multiple fruits, raisins, nuts and lack of vinegar, we’d call it a conserve, not a chutney. But to paraphrase Shakespeare’s Juliet: What’s in a name? That which we call a chutney by any other name would taste as good.

    The onion is a delightful touch and the cayenne is so subtle that heat-avoiders won’t even know it’s there. Sold in 16-ounce jars for $5.99, it’s available from Marina’s website, CircleBPork.com. It’s available on Amazon for $6.99.

      

    Comments

    GIFT: Umami Sauce

    Umami sauce, an asset in the kitchen and at
    the table. Photo courtesy Omni Hotels.

     

    “Umami” was a trending word in America a few years ago, a Japanese word coined in 1908 to indicate a brothy or savory taste (umai = delicious, mi = taste). Lauded as “the fifth taste” after sweet, sour, bitter and salty, the term seems to have faded into the background since its heyday here in 2006. If you need a brush-up, here’s an umami overview.

    We consume “umami foods” every day: anchovy paste, asparagus, beef stew, bouillon, cured ham, ketchup, lamb shank, miso sauce and soup, MSG, mushrooms, Parmesan cheese, ripe and sun-dried tomatoes, soy sauce, steak sauce and Worcestershire sauce, among others.

    Umami is part of Western culture. Beginning in Greece and appearing in nearly every ancient Roman recipe as early as the 7th and 8th centuries B.C.E., garum, a fermented fish sauce, was the universal condiment to flavor food.

    Fish sauce is an Asian staple, and things came full circle when Captain Henry Lewis Edwardes (1788–1866) brought the recipe for a fish sauce condiment home after travels in India. It somehow got to John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, two dispensing chemists (pharmacists) in Worcester, England, who created the first “umami sauce” sold commercially, in 1837.

    THE NEW UMAMI SAUCE

    Continuing the tradition, a team of chefs from Omni Hotels & Resorts has created “Umami Sauce”—a sophisticated steak sauce—as a table condiment for its customers.

     

    The chefs worked tirelessly for six months to create a sauce that “perfectly combined the essential ingredients to achieve the umami factor.”

    This secret sauce was then bottled, wrapped and set out on restaurant tables for customers to use on everything from scrambled eggs in the morning to a late-night burger.

    We cooked with it. It vastly improved a chuck pot roast—we tested it with an Umami Sauce marinade on one half, massaged it into the crevices of the meat, and salt and pepper on the other half. The marinated side tasted so much richer that we next stirred Umami Sauce into a wild mushroom risotto, with similar happy results.

    Umami Sauce can be purchase for $9.95 at select Omni Hotels, and is available online. The sauce is all natural and gluten free.

    So if you’re looking for a special food stocking stuffer, head to the Omni Hotels website.

      

    Comments

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