Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Easter

TIP OF THE DAY: Purple Sweet Potatoes For Easter

For a festive Easter dish, look for purple potatoes. You can serve them baked, boiled with parsley, as fries, mashed or in other favorite dishes. You can make purple gnocchi and potato chips. Hash browns can become hash purples.

We turn them into a red, white and blue July 4th potato salad, mixed with white potatoes and red grape tomatoes. The starch level is medium, so purple Peruvians are an all-purpose potato. They have a creamy texture like russet potatoes and are rich in flavor. Some varieties have a charming nuttiness.

Once a rarity, purple potatoes can now be found markets nationwide. In addition to the Purple Peruvian there’s a purple-fleshed Okinawan sweet potato, a staple in Hawaii. Look for it in Asian markets.

 

Your favorite potato dishes can now be charmingly purple. Photo courtesy Wandering Chopsticks. Here’s the recipe.

 

Millennia ago, potatoes grew wild in the foothills of the Andes Mountains of Peru. Along with many other varieties of potatoes, they were cultivated around 3,000 B.C.E. by the Incas. Today, purple potatoes are grown around the world. Here’s more about purple potatoes and a recipe for a colorful purple potato and beet salad.

For Easter, how about a purple sweet potato pie? Keep it hidden and surprise your guests with the bright purple filling, evocative of jelly beans.

Here’s a purple sweet potato pie recipe from Stokes Foods, a North Carolina grower of purple potatoes, which includes a photo of the bright purple pie.

 

Purple Peruvian sweet potatoes. Photo by Mona Makela | IST.

 

PURPLE SWEET POTATO PIE RECIPE

Ingredients

  • 1 cup purple sweet potatoes
  • ½ stick butter, melted
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon all purpose Flour
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 9” graham cracker pie shell
  • Optional garnish: whipped cream
  •  

    Optional Topping

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons crushed pecans
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COVER potatoes with water in a medium saucepan. Boil for 45 minutes until fork goes all the way through. Let cool; peel and place in a large mixing bowl.

    2. PREHEAT oven to 425°F. Melt butter.

    3. ADD all other ingredients to mixing bowl with potato. Use an immersion blender to liquefy ingredients.

    4. POUR sweet potato mixture into pie shell.

    5. BAKE at 425°F for 5 minutes, then at 350°F for 10 minutes until firm.

    6. MAKE the topping while the pie is baking, Melt butter in a sauce pan. Mix in flour, brown sugar and pecans. Stir until thoroughly blended and set aside

    6. ADD topping to pie. Bake 350°F for 15 minutes until done.

    VARIATION

    You can use this recipe to make 12 mini pies using mini graham cracker pie shells. After adding the pecan topping, only bake for 10 additional minutes instead of 15 minutes.

    Find more purple potato recipes at StokesFoods.com.

      

    Comments

    EASTER: Jelly Bean Chocolate Bar

    Why make a decision when you can have both, our favorite thinking goes.

    Edward Marc Chocolatier is obviously of the same mind, with this jelly bean chocolate bar. It’s $3.50 for a 2.5-ounce bar at EdwardMarc.com.

    If you want to create your own jelly bean bar, head to Chocomize.com. For $4.75, you can make a 3.5-ounce jelly bean bar in dark, milk or white chocolate.

    You can add scores of other ingredients, too, including dried fruits, herbs, nuts, seeds, spices and specialty Easter decorations.

    Peter Cottontail would approve.

     

    An Easter chocolate bar. Photo courtesy Edward Marc Chocolatier.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Cooking A Ham

    Don’t overheat your ham! Photo courtesy Snake River Farms.

     

    Cured hams come fully cooked, but need to be heated (that is, if you want your meat to be warm or hot).

    Micheale Muse, culinary expert for Snake River Farms, producers of “the world’s best” Kurobuta hams, shares this advice:

  • USE MODERATE HEAT. To ensure that your ham stays succulent, heat it in a moderate oven (325°F) in a shallow roasting pan until it reaches an internal temperature of 140°F on a meat thermometer.
  • TAKE IT SLOW. Don’t be tempted to rush this process: A higher oven temperature will dry out a ham and the marbling and sweet rich flavor will be lost.
  • USE FOIL. If your ham starts getting too dark on the surface while heating, simply place a tented piece of foil over the top of it. Do not cover the ham tightly with the foil, however; keep it loose.
  •  

    The final tip:

  • SHARPEN YOUR KNIVES. Always carve your ham with a sharp knife for beautiful, juicy slices. If you don’t have a knife sharpener, pick one up—they’re not expensive.
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Better-For-You Easter Baskets

    If you’re running out today to buy all the fixings for Easter baskets, here’s some advice:

    Buy half the amount of candy and fill up the other half of the basket, bag or box with Easter- and spring-themed non-edibles. The temptation is to give a filled-to-the-brim basket of Easter sweets, but no one needs that much sugar.

    We love delicious Easter candy as much as anyone, but know that we aren’t doing anyone a favor by overloading someone with it.

    So here are some additional ways to fill the Easter basket.

    SUGAR-SAVING IDEAS

  • Smaller baskets. There’s no need for Titanic-size gifts.
  • Hollow chocolate bunnies and eggs instead of solid ones.
  • Peanut butter-filled eggs instead of less nutritious fillings.
  • Easter-color beverages, like bottles of specialty diet sodas (look for Boylan’s) and Vitamin Water.
  • Sugar-Free jelly beans (available from Jelly Belly and Russell Stover).
  •  

    Instead of an open Easter basket that shows how much it holds, look for boxes or other containers to hold the Easter loot. This bunny box is from The Art Of Appreciation.

     

  • Mini fruits like clementines, miniature bananas and pineapples (kids love miniature fruits). Pomegranates are fun, too.
  • Nuts and dried fruits in grab-and-go bags (check out Peeled Snacks).
  • Easter themed apparel: socks, tee shirts and whatever else you find.
  • Kids’ favorite booty, such as stickers, soap bubbles and stuffed animals.
  •  
    Who says the Easter Bunny only brings candy!

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make Your Own Marshmallow Peeps

    Marshmallow Peeps are an Easter tradition in many homes. Even people with very refined palates reach for them, a grasp at childhood nostalgia.

    But over the years they’ve tasted worse and worse to us—artificial flavor, and more texture than flavor at that! Perhaps it’s the carnauba wax. The mass production has taken away their good looks, as well. Sorry Peeps, but you look too roughly stamped out of factory molds.

    The “Sugar Mommas,” authors of Sugar, Sugar: Every Recipe Has a Story, offer their own recipe for prettier, tastier homemade Peeps. Pull out the Easter cookie cutters and start mixing. The recipe must sit overnight, so don’t wait until Easter Sunday.

    Peeps® are a registered trademark of Just Born, a candy manufacturer in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The original Peeps were yellow chicks; but the popularity of the marshmallow candies led to other flavors and shapes for every season, including jack-o-lanterns, snowmen and Valentine hearts.

    HOMEMADE MARSHMALLOW PEEPS RECIPE

    Ingredients

  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Colored sugar crystals
  • Easter themed cookie cutters
  •  

    Make a tastier version of the iconic Peeps at home. Photo courtesy SugarSugarRecipes.com.

     

    Preparation

    1. Lightly spray a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Sprinkle gelatin over a small bowl filled with 1/2 cup cold water; let stand to soften.

    2. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, mix together sugar, corn syrup, hot water and salt. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring, until sugar has dissolved. Continue cooking, without stirring, until mixture reaches the soft-ball stage, about 240°F on a candy thermometer. Remove from heat and gently stir in gelatin mixture; set aside.

    3. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg whites on high speed until stiff peaks form. With the mixer running, slowly add sugar/gelatin mixture. Add vanilla and continue beating for 10 minutes until the mixture looks like marshmallow.

    4. Transfer marshmallow mixture to prepared baking dish and spread evenly.

    5. Generously sprinkle 1-3 different colors of sugar crystals across the baking dish horizontally, covering any exposed marshmallow.

    6. Spray a piece of parchment paper with nonstick cooking spray and cover marshmallow. Let stand overnight.

    7. Remove parchment paper and invert marshmallow onto work surface.

    8. Generously sprinkle 1-3 different colors of sugar crystals across the marshmallow horizontally covering any exposed marshmallow. Try to match colors on the other side of the Peep (although it’s fine to have mismatched sides).

    9. Use cookie cutters to cut marshmallows into various Easter themed shapes. Spray the cookie cutters with nonstick spray so the marshmallow releases easily. Wash the cookie cutters between colors.

    10. Transfer marshmallows to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper; set aside. Repeat process until all the marshmallow is cut into shapes. Use a skewer dipped in chocolate to make eyes, or use chocolate candies such as Valrhona Perles Craquantes for a more dramatic effect. Use marshmallow creme as “glue” to attach candies to your Peeps.

    11. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

     
    Find more Sugar Mommas recipes at SugarSugarRecipes.com.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Use An Avocado As A Bowl

    Turn an avocado into a bowl for eggs. Photo courtesy Avocados From Mexico.

     

    We love using avocados as an “edible bowl,” stuffed with salads (bean, chicken, citrus, corn, egg, rice, seafood, tuna), chili, as a shrimp cocktail bowl and as a salsa holder with a side of tortilla chips.

    But we hadn’t considered eggs until we received this avocado poached egg from Avocados From Mexico. It pairs an egg and a heart-healthy avocado with a smoky tomato sauce called Diablo Sauce. Make it as a delicious and fun dish for Easter breakfast.

    The recipe was developed by Chef Ina Pinkney of Ina’s Restaurant in Chicago. It yields two portions.

    AVOCADO POACHED EGGS WITH DIABLO SAUCE

    Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • 1 can (15-ounces) fire roasted crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked sweet paprika, plus more for garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 large avocado
  • 2 medium eggs, room temperature
  •  

    Preparation

    1. Prepare Diablo Sauce at least 20 minutes before starting eggs. In a large skillet, heat oil until hot. Add garlic; cook and stir until fragrant. Stir in tomatoes, paprika, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil; reduce to a simmer 20 minutes, stirring frequently. When sauce is almost finished, place a steamer basket over one inch of water; bring water to a simmer.

    2. Meanwhile, cut avocado in half and remove seed. Cut a thin slice from the bottom of each avocado half to create a flat surface. Carefully scoop out about half of the avocado flesh without breaking through the flesh at the base; reserve for garnish, toast spread or later use. Season with salt.

    3. Into each avocado half, crack one egg; season with salt. Place avocado halves in steaming basket; cover until eggs are poached, about 5 to 7 minutes.

    4. Transfer each avocado half to a serving plate. Sprinkle with paprika and serve with Diablo Sauce.

    Find more egg recipes in our Egg Section.

    Find more avocado recipes at AvocadosFromMexico.com.

      

    Comments

    VIDEO: Alton Brown’s Secret Ham Crust

     

    Contemplating how to cook the Easter ham? Consider Alton Brown’s favorite way, with his grandmother’s “secret” ham crust recipe.

    The secret is now out of the bag: brown sugar, mustard, bourbon and pulverized ginger snap cookies.

  • Brush on a layer of mustard (we prefer deli-style or Dijon)
  • Pat on a layer of brown sugar
  • Spritz bourbon in a spray bottle (we repurposed a small pump spray, instead of the large one Alton uses in the video)
  • Pat on a layer of ginger snap cookie crumbs
  •  
    Watch Alton do it!

       

       

  • Want a different ham crust? Take a look at these ham glaze recipes.
  • How much do you know about ham? Here are the different types and cuts.
  • Take our Ham Trivia Quiz.
  • After tasting 20 “gourmet” hams, our favorite hams.
  • Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Have An Easter Chocolate Strategy

    Chocolate bunnies. Photo courtesy
    Burdick Chocolate.

     

    If large amounts of Easter chocolate are bestowed upon you and your family, develop a strategy for consuming it. Otherwise, it’s easy to overindulge.

    Forget all the media hype about chocolate as an antioxidant food.* Chocolate is not health food. It’s high in calories and fat. A 1-ounce serving of plain chocolate has from 140-160 calories and about 12 grams of fat. A 1.5-ounce Hershey bar, in comparison, has 210 calories, about half of which come from fat. (Note: Sugar and fat content varies by manufacturer.)

    *Most antioxidants can be processed out of chocolate, unless deliberate care is taken to preserve them.

    Jelly beans seem like a better bargain: 35 pieces have 140 calories and 0 grams of fat. But they’re composed almost entirely of sugar.

     

    Our personal Easter chocolate strategy: one or two servings a day for adults, three ounces a day for children. It’s a good way to teach kids about portion control and an equally important lesson: Ration your treats and you’ll be able to enjoy them longer.

    HAPPY EASTER

    HAPPY SPRING

    FROM THE NIBBLE EDITORS

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Pomegranate Seeds

    Pomegranates are an unusual fruit. There’s no flesh, per se, inside that big red globe. Instead, there are scores of seeds, each covered with a translucent, ruby-colored juice sac.

    The seeds in the juice sac are called arils, a term that refers to a specialized outgrowth that covers the seeds. The edible parts of the mangosteen and the mace of the nutmeg seed are other examples of arils.

    Boxes of pomegranate arils, ready to eat, are available at many supermarkets. They’re an easy way to add sophistication to a variety of dishes.

  • Toss them into a green salad or fruit salad.
  • Garnish ice cream, sorbet and hot or cold soup.
  • Sprinkle onto dinner plates or platters.
  • Drop into clear cocktails such as Martinis.
     
    Two simple Easter desserts:
  • Ice cream or sorbet sprinkled with arils and a mint leaf.
  • Pound cake topped with whipped cream, arils and a mint leaf.
  •  

    A pomegranate and its arils—juice sacs
    covering the seeds. Photo by Kelly Cline |
    IST.

     

    As with raspberries, some people enjoy the crunchy seeds and others don’t. But the seeds are wholly edible—in fact, they provide fiber. Those who don’t like them can enjoy the juice, then remove the seed from their mouth with a spoon.

  • An overview of the pomegranate: history, health benefits and how to eat a pomegranate.
  •   

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: National Jelly Bean Day

    Jelly beans are mostly sugar. No wonder
    they are so popular! Photo by River Soma |
    THE NIBBLE.

     

    Today is National Jelly Bean Day. It’s also the 35th anniversary of the best-known brand of jelly beans, Jelly Belly, which petitioned for the holiday.

    JELLY BEAN HISTORY

    Many sugared confections are the ancestors of jelly beans. Turkish Delight, which is jelled sugar and rosewater coated with powdered sugar, is one well-known candy that, according to CandyWarehouse.com, is mentioned in the Bible (see the photo for the resemblance to jelly beans).

    Centuries later, an unknown confectioner switched the powdered sugar for granulated sugar, added some flavors, and created the gumdrop.

    Then, in the 17th century, a French confectioner invented a process called panning, which created a hard sugar coating by stirring candies in a mixture of sugar and syrup. Nuts were panned (such as Jordan almonds); later, chocolate was used to create chocolate-covered nuts and other candies.

    Take a gooey mixture called a sugar slurry, add a coating and you get a jelly bean. Jelly beans are made from sugar, corn syrup and starch, with small amounts of anti-foaming agent, flavoring, lecithin and salt. To make them shiny, they’re coated with edible wax and confectioners’ glaze.

     

    The modern jelly bean is believed to have been invented in the U.S., sometime after 1850. The earliest recorded advertisement for jelly beans is from Boston confectioner William Schrafft, who may have also been the creator.* The ad promoted sending jelly beans to Union Soldiers engaged in the Civil War (1861-1865).

    By the early 1900s, jelly beans had become a staple penny candy. Possibly, they were the first bulk candy. They became part of the Easter tradition in the 1930s, when somebody connected their egg shape with the eggs symbolic of the spiritual rebirth of Easter. Their festive colors made them a perfect celebratory candy.

    During World War II, much of the chocolate produced in the U.S. was sent overseas to soldiers. Americans focused on other sweets; flavorful, colorful jelly beans became popular.

    And, if you’re old enough to remember, they were the favorite candy of president Ronald Regan. He persuaded the Jelly Belly company to make a blueberry jelly bean so that he could serve red, white and blue jelly beans in the Oval Office.

    Here’s some jelly bean trivia:†

  • Americans will eat some 15 billion jelly beans over the Easter holiday.
  • Boys are more likely to eat a handful at a time while girls like them one by one.
  • Given an assortment, most people eat them in this order: red, purple, green, yellow and black.
  •  
    JELLY BEAN BARGAIN
    Through Easter Sunday, April 24th, 2011, Jelly Belly is offering a 35% discount on all merchandise on JellyBelly.com. Just use the code 35YEARS when you check out.

    Happy National Jelly Bean Day!

    *Schraft’s candy company was established in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1861, by William F. Schrafft. Succeeding him in 1898, Frank Shattuck expanded the company to include restaurants, most located in Manhattan. The ice candy and cream sundaes were very popular when Pet, Inc., makers of Pet evaporated milk, purchased Schrafft’s in 1967. They broke the ice cream, restaurant, and candy operations into separate companies. Alas, the businesses ultimate ceased operations.

    †From CandyWarehouse.com.

      

    Comments

    « Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact
    Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com