Tequila Trivia For National Tequila Day - The Nibble Webzine Of Food Adventures Tequila Trivia For National Tequila Day
 
 
 
 
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HOLIDAY: Tequila Trivia For National Tequila Day

Caballito & Margarita Glass
[1] The two special tequila glasses: caballito and Margarita (photo © El Jimador).

Watermelon Cocktail
[2] A tequila-watermelon cocktail. The recipe is below (photo courtesy Milagro Tequila).
Blue Agave Pinas

[3] After harvesting, piñas are roasted in a stone oven (photo © Casa Noble Tequila).

Pulque
[4] Pulque: what the Aztecs drank before the conquistadors taught them how to distill (photo © Mexico News Network).

 

July 24th is National Tequila Day. How about some tequila trivia?
 
 
THE AGAVE PLANT

  • The Blue Weber agave plants used to make tequila are pollinated by bats. They flower only once.
  • While the agave plant looks like a cactus, it is a succulent in the lily family.
  • The leaves of agave are so sharp that they are used as cutting instruments.
  • A blue agave plant matures in 6-12 years and weighs 90 to 150 pounds. The piña itself (photo #3) weighs from 25 to 50 pounds.
  • The piña is the part of the plant used to make tequila, and gets its name because it looks like a pineapple (piña in Spanish). It grows underground. It looks like a pineapple, so is called a pia.
  • The person who harvests the piña is called a jimador (HEE-ma-dor), which derives from the verb gemir, to groan with effort.
  •  
     
    THE TEQUILA

  • The nectar of the piña is called pulque (PULL-kay, photo #4). The Aztecs fermented the sap from the leaves of the maguey agave. It was drunk by people of rank during religious ceremonies.
  • Pulque remained popular until the late 19th century. Its sales declined in favor of beer, which was brewed by European immigrants.
  • The conquistadors, who arrived in 1519, taught the Aztecs how to distill agave into a spirit, now known as tequila.
  • There are four legally authorized expressions (categories) of tequila: blanco, reposado, añejo and extra añejo. Laws dictate the minimum and maximum aging period for each. Here are details.
  • For marketing purposes, some premium producers have created “hybrid” tequilas with new names, e.g., barrel select reserve blanco; or have created extra-extra aged tequila marketed which may be called, e.g. 5 years aged tequila, or El Magnifico. These are names bestowed by the distillery, not by law.
  • The longer it ages, the more flavors it develops and the darker it gets. Blancos, which are clear, can be aged for a few weeks for complexity, but so briefly that they don’t take on color.
  • The worm in the bottle (which is the larva of a moth) is not placed into tequila bottles, but into some mezcal bottles. These are cheaper, “tourist souvenir” mezcals, not quality brands.
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    DRINKING TEQUILA

  • The taste of tequila comes partially from its aging time in white oak barrels, but also from the volcanic soil of the Jalisco region, which imparts a spicy, earthy quality.
  • The traditional way to drink tequila is from a tall, narrow shot glass called a caballito (photo #1), which means little horse. Another name for the glass is tequilito, little tequila shots.
  • When drinking shots, the wedge of lemon or lime provided is to refresh the palate between drinks.
  • FLore has it that tequila shots cause fewer hangovers than cocktails with sugar, but this isn’t so. The alcohol hangover is caused by the dehydration effect from the alcohol itself.
  •  
     
    TEQUILA SALES

  • Tequila was first imported to the U.S. in 1873. It remained a niche product until Mexican restaurants began to open up outside of California and the Southwest, in the 1960s.
  • The United States is the largest tequila-consuming market (yes, even more than Mexico).
  • Almost half of the tequila is drunk by women (which may owe thanks to regular and frozen Margaritas).
  • The Margarita is the number one cocktail in the U.S., per The Spirits Business.
  •  
     
    OK, you’ve earned your drink. Happy National Tequila Day!

     
    RECIPE: TEQUILA-WATERMELON COCKTAIL

    If you are multiplying this recipe, consider pulsing the watermelon in a blender instead of muddling.

     
    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • 2 ounces blanco/silver tequila
  • ½ ounce fresh lime juice
  • 4 one-inch cubes fresh watermelon or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon agave nectar
  • Garnish: 3 watermelon balls on a pick or notched cucumber slice on the rim
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE the watermelon and agave in a mixing glass. Add the remaining ingredients and shake with ice.

    2. STRAIN into a martini glass and garnish as desired.
     
     
    MORE: TEQUILA COCKTAIL RECIPES, HISTORY &: MORE

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  • Award-Winning Tamarind Margarita
  • Bandera Shots
  • Beyond Salt: Different Margarita Rimmers
  • Bloody Maria Cocktail Recipe
  • Caramel Apple Pie & Cherry Pie Cocktail Recipes
  • Cranberry Tequila Cocktail Recipe
  • Cucumber Tequila Recipe
  • Deconstructed Margarita
  • El Vocho Tequila Shooters
  • Flavored Tequila
  • Margarita History
  • Mercadito Coctail
  • More Tequila Cocktails
  • Non-Cocktail Ways To Use Tequila
  • Original, Frozen & Other Margarita Recipes
  • Passionfruit Tequila Cocktail Recipe
  • Pink Tequila Cocktai Recipes
  • September 16th: The Real Mexican Independence Day
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  • Spicy Pineapple Cocktail
  • Spicy Tequila Cocktail Recipes
  • Spicy Watermelon Margarita
  • Sweet & Hot Tequila Cocktail
  • Tequila 101: The Five Expressions (Types) Of Tequila
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  • Tequila Christmas Cocktail
  • Tequila Cupcakes
  • Tequila Hot Chocolate
  • Tequila Lemonade Recipe
  • Tequila Expressions
  • Tequila History
  • Tequila With Maple Bacon Rim Recipe
  • Watermelon Tequila Fizz
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