Chickpea Salad Recipe | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food RECIPE: Chickpea Salad – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

RECIPE: Chickpea Salad

You can round out the Moroccan Chicken recipe we just published with a green salad, and you can also add another cold salad.

We’re not sure how this Chickpea Salad recipe came to us. Easy and tasty, it’s from Meaghann McGoun of Love With Food. Thanks, Meghann.

We especially like this as a spring and summer side with anything Mediterranean-inspired, including simple grilled proteins. Chickpeas themselves, which are seeds of the plant, are also high in protein.
 
 
RECIPE: EASY CHICKPEA SALAD

The recipe can be made a day in advance. Prep time is 30 minutes.

You can add more veggies to the salad: carrot and, celery, for starters.
 
Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 2 cans chickpeas (15 ounces each)
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1/2 red onion (better for the color) or 1 bunch green onions (scallions)
  • 1 bell pepper (color of choice)
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro
  • Optional: fresh jalapeño chile
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon sugar (we omit it)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. DRAIN and rinse the chickpeas.

    2. CHOP the tomatoes, cucumber, onion and pepper to bite-sized pieces. Finely chop the jalapeño and cilantro. Combine the chickpeas and vegetables in a large bowl.

    3. WHISK together the oil, vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper and and cilantro. Add to the bowl and mix until the salad is coated. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour for the flavors to blend.
     
     
    HISTORY OF CHICKPEAS

    The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 print reference to chickpeas (“Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tongue.” But the bean has been eaten since long before recorded history.

      Chickpea Salad Recipe

    Dried Chickpeas

    Fresh Chickpeas
    Top: A nutritious and toothsome Chickpea Salad (photo courtesy Meaghann McGoun | LoveWithFood.com. Center: Dried chickpeas from Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans. Bottom: Fresh chickpeas from Melissas.com.

     
    Chickpeas were among the first crops cultivated by man, known as the eight founder crops of the Fertile Crescent. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

    (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae family, known variously as the legume, pea, or bean family. You may have seen some of its other names: ceci or cece (Italian), chana or Kabuli chana (Northern India), Egyptian pea, garbanzo or garbanzo bean (Spanish), gram or Bengal gram (British India).
     
    The Evolution Of The Name

    The word chickpea in English came from the French chich, found in print in English in 1388. “Chick-pea” is found in print in the mid-18th century.

    The name evolved from traces through the French chiche to cicer, Latin for chickpea. Fun fact: The Roman cognomen Cicero came from cicer. Yes, the great orator Roman Marcus Tullius Cicero—also a consul, constitutionalist, lawyer, philosopher, political theorist and politician—was a member of the Chickpea family.

    More seriously, a cognomen was the third name of a citizen of ancient Rome—the hereditary name that we call a surname, which passed from father to children. The second name—the family name or clan name—identified a particular branch within a family, or family within a clan.
     
    IS THE CHICKPEA A BEAN OR A PEA?

    Peas and beans are both legumes and seeds, both members of the Fabaceae botanical family. Chickpea, also called garbanzo bean, is actually a bean. Some key differences:

  • Pea plants (genus/species Pisum sativum) have hollow stems. Beans (genus/species Cicer arietinum) have solid stems.
  • Peas have leaf tendrils which they use to twine. In general, beans lack tendrils.
  • The taller varieties both peas and beans need trellises to support them as they grow. Most beans just twine themselves over their supports while peas use their tendrils to climb. At each node along their stems, they generate two or three one-inch-long tendrils, which grab and then wind themselves around something a narrow trellis.
  •  
    Read the full article on DifferenceBetween.net.

      




    Comments are closed.



    © Copyright 2005-2019 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.