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RECIPE: Pumpkin Sage Polenta With Roasted Vegetables

If you’ve never cooked polenta, it’s a great comfort food—and gluten free, too. We don’t know why Americans don’t eat more of it—and more parsnips, too, while we’re at it.

(Parsnips [photo #2] are one of the delicious fall vegetables roasted for this recipe.)

Fall and winter months beg for a dish of warm, creamy polenta.

Roast your favorite fall vegetables to top this recipe—and roast extra, so you’ll have them for the next day or two.

Then, set it off with a rich pumpkin cream sauce, with notes of cinnamon and nutmeg.

We’ve also made and enjoyed the recipe without the cream sauce—but substituted lots of freshly-grated parmesan.
 
 
RECIPE: PUMPKIN SAGE POLENTA WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES

Ingredients For The Polenta

  • 1-1/2 cups water
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 box (9.2-ounces) instant polenta (photo #4)
  • 1 cup pumpkin purée (photo #3)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  •  
    For The Roasted Vegetables

  • 2 large parsnips, peeled, quartered and sliced
  • 1 small butternut squash, peeled and sliced (photo #5)
  • 1 turnip, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
  • 1 large red onion, dice into large pieces
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  •  
    For The Cream Sauce

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin purée
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 375˚F.

    2. ROAST the vegetables. Toss the vegetables with olive oil in a large mixing bowl and arrange on a nonstick baking sheet. Sprinkle with sage, salt and pepper.

    Roast the vegetables for 25-30 minutes, or until soft and caramelized. Meanwhile…

    3. MAKE the sauce. Warm the heavy cream and butter in a saucepan. Once the butter has melted, stir in 1/4 cup of the pumpkin, the parmesan, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt.

    Keep warm on a low simmer until it’s time to serve.

    4. COOK the polenta. In a sauce pot, bring the water, chicken stock and butter to a boil. Slowly whisk in the polenta. Continuously stirring, cook for about 1 minute, or until the polenta begins to thicken.

    Remove from the heat. Stir in 1 cup of the pumpkin, the sage and salt.

    5. SERVE. Divide the polenta into individual bowls and top with the roasted vegetables and a generous drizzle of cream sauce.
     
     
    MORE POLENTA RECIPES

  • Cheesy Polenta Bowl With Jammy Eggs, Roasted Tomatoes & Red Peppers
  • Chicken Thighs With Polenta
  • Fried Eggs With Polenta
  • Ham & Cheddar Polenta Fries
  • How To Make A Grain Bowl: A Template
  • Olive Oil Polenta Cake
  • Polenta Pesto Lasagna
  • Things To Do With Polenta Slices
  • Ways To Serve Polenta
  •  
    MORE ABOUT POLENTA

  • What Is Polenta?
  • Polenta Vs. Cornmeal
  •  
     
    ________________

    *Parsnips belong to the Apiaceae family, which also includes anise, asafoetida (a spice used in Indian recipes), caraway, celery, chervil, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel and lovage, among others. Why don’t Americans eat more parsnips, a delicious vegetable?

     


    [1] Pumpkin Sage Polenta: It’s a beauty (photo © DeLallo (photo © DeLallo).


    [2] The parsnip, Pastinaca sativa, is a root vegetable closely related to carrots and parsley* (photo © Good Eggs).

    Canned Pumpkin
    [3] Make sure you use canned pumpkin purée. Pumpkin pie filling has added sugar and spices (photo © Jessica Gavin: Culinary Scientist).


    [4] Instant polenta is a great time saver. If you can’t find it locally, order it from DeLallo (photo © DeLallo).

    Butternut Squash
    [5] The recipe calls for a butternut squash, easy to find and easier to cut than acorn squash. But you can substitute any winter squash, including fresh pumpkin (photo © Hawk Haven Vineyard).

     

      




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