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RECIPE: Pinot Grigio Spritzer

What do you do to make a bottle of an already-popular Pinot Grigio leap on the shelf (figuratively speaking)?

You hire a top fashion designer to create an alluring, limited-edition bottle design.

One of our favorite designers, Christian Siriano, has created Ecco Domani’s third annual designer label for summer, inspired by the glamour of 1960s Palm Springs.

Covered in fanciful palm leaves in chartreuse and fuchsia, it’s a summer celebration in a bottle.

The Christian Siriano Ecco Domani bottle is now available nationwide, with a suggested retail price of $10.99.

When we went to the debut of the bottle design, we were treated to a wine cocktail—a winetail—so delicious that we had two!

We already had the cocktail ingredients at home; but don’t hesitate to buy the Cappelletti and orange bitters to make it.

We almost guarantee that you’ll race through the ingredients in short order. It’s our signature summer cocktail for sure—even though the signature is Ecco Domani.
RECIPE: ECCO DOMANI’S PALM SPRINGS SPRITZ

Ingredients Per Drink

  • 3 ounces Ecco Domani Pinot Grigio
  • 1 ounce Cappelletti Aperitivo (see below; substitute Campari or Luxardo)
  • 2 dashes orange bitters
  • Sparkling water/club soda (the difference)
  • Optional garnish: dendrobium orchid or notched strawberry for the rim
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE both wines and the bitters in a standard red wine glass; stir to combine.

    2. TOP off with sparkling water. Garnish as desired and serve.

      Ecco Domani Christian Siriani Cocktail

    Aperitivo Cappelletti
    [1] The Palm Beach Spritz cocktail with the limited edition Christian Siriano bottle (photo courtesy Ecco Domani). [2] Cappelletti Aperitivo, a noteworthy aperitif wine. Here’s the cocktail recipe for the Ginger Specialino from Nugget Markets.

     
    WHAT’S CAPPELLETTI?

    It’s the name of a shape of pasta that resembles little sailor hats; but it’s also the name of an apéritif wine: Cappelletti Aperitivo Americano Rosso.

    Produced in the Alto-Adige region of Italy by the fourth generation of the Cappelletti family, Aperitivo Cappelletti is a deep red apéritif wine.

    It can be sipped on its own over ice, mixed with club soda for a spritzer, or mixed into cocktails. Use it for a less-sweet Negroni.

    Made from mostly trebbiano grapes, the nose is round and very full, captivating with just a hint of bitterness and herbs. The texture on the palate is generous, providing a slight bitterness from notes of citrus peel.

    It has a hint of bitterness (from citrus peel), gentle herbality and a slight sweetness—which is why we like it more than the better-known, sweeter Campari.

    Unlike Campari, Cappelletti is a wine-based apéritif, instead of grain-based (distilled alcohol). This gives makes it more complex, with a richer, fuller flavor profile.

  • Instead of a cocktail before dinner, try an apéritif. Combine 2 ounces of Cappelletti and 3 ounces of soda over ice, and garnish with an orange twist, wedge or wheel.
  • For a sparkling apéritif, combine 3 ounces of prosecco with a 1/2 ounce of Cappelletti over ice. Top off with club soda and garnish with the orange twist, wedge or wheel.
  •  
    WHAT’S AN APÉRITIF WINE?

    An apéritif is an alcoholic drink taken before a meal.

    Long before the cocktail was invented (in the mid-19th century), people of means enjoyed an apéritif before dinner.

    Spirits were not desired, because high alcohol dulls our taste buds. An apéritif wine, on the other hand, was designed to stimulate the appetite in anticipation of dinner.

    An aperitif should be very dry (low in sugar), since sugar also dulls the appetite for the dinner to come.

    Apéritif (French) or aperitivo (Italian) derives from the medieval Latin aperitivus, from the Latin verb aperire to open.
      




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