Pink Russian Cocktail With Maraschino Or Cherry Liqueur - The Nibble Webzine Of Food Adventures Pink Russian Cocktail With Maraschino Or Cherry Liqueur
 
 
 
 
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Russian Cocktail Recipe With Maraschino Or Cherry Liqueur

Do a Google search for “Russian Cocktail” and the first 30 pages are for Black Russians and White Russians. We stopped looking at that point. No simple “Russian Cocktail” could be found.

But the folks at Grey Goose tell us that this Prohibition-era drink is the oldest vodka cocktail found in print. They shared the recipe below.

While the drink appeared long before flavored vodkas were available in the U.S., you can use a cherry flavored vodka for more cherry flavor. Grey Goose, Pinnacle, Skyy, Smirnoff, Svedka, Three Olives and UV, among others, make cherry vodka.

In addition to the cocktail recipe, we have a second recipe for homemade brandied cherries, below.
 
 
RECIPE #1: RUSSIAN COCKTAIL

Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1½ parts vodka
  • ½ part maraschino liqueur or cherry liqueur (see next section)
  • Crushed ice
  • Garnish: brandied cherry (see recipe below)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the two spirits in a cocktail shaker. Top with crushed ice and shake vigorously.

    2. STRAIN into a chilled frappe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry and serve.
     
     
    MARASCHINO LIQUEUR VS. CHERRY LIQUEUR

    We actually prefer generic cherry liqueur to the cherry-specific maraschino liqueur. Maraschino liqueur, such as Luxardo, is a clear, relatively dry liqueur made from Marasca cherries, including the crushed pits. The latter give it a subtle bitter almond flavor.

    If you like the note of almond, go for the maraschino liqueur. If you like things sweeter with more cherry flavor, head for the cherry liqueur.

       
    russian-cocktail-greygoose-230
    [1] The Russian Cocktail, pink for Valentine’s Day (photos #1 and #2 © Grey Goose).


    [2] Thanks to Grey Goose for the recipe. We’d never seen a “Pink Russian” before.

     
    The Original Maraschino Cherry

    The ubiquitous maraschino cherries that are a joke in some food circles were once quite elite. The cherries were originally preserved in the liqueur as a delicacy for royalty and the wealthy.

    The Marasca cherry (Prunus cerasus var. marasca) is a type of sour Morello cherry that grows largely in Bosnia, Croatia, Herzegovina, northern Italy and Slovenia. With a bitter taste and a drier pulp than other cherry varieties, they are ideal to make maraschino liqueur.

    The Marasca cherry tree is very fussy about where it will grow, so in the U.S., the Royal Ann variety is substituted for the Marasca to make maraschino cherries.

     

    SONY DSC
    [3] Homemade brandied cherries. Here’s the recipe (photo © Darla Cooks).


    [4] Luxardo brand maraschino liqueur. The liqueur is clear, not cherry-red like other cherry liqueurs (photo © The Whiskey Exchange).

      RECIPE #2: HOMEMADE BRANDIED CHERRIES

    You can buy brandied cherries (they’re pricey) or make your own:

  • Maraschino cherries in syrup: Drain 20% of the liquid from a jar of maraschino cherries and replace it with brandy. Place the jar in the fridge and let marinate for at least an hour.
  • With fresh cherries, thawed frozen cherries or canned cherries: Soak the cherries in your own [better quality] brandy or Cognac for an hour in the fridge.
  •  
    Here’s a recipe from DarlaCooks.com. Note that the aesthetically-pleasing stems come only with fresh cherries; so you may want to mark your calendar for cherry season, then get out your Mason jars and preserve them.

    You can also marinate the cherries in cherry liqueur or kirschwasser, a cherry eau de vie (fruit brandy).

     
    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BRANDY & COGNAC

    Both brandy and cognac wall into the category of grape brandy, distilled from white wine grapes. But cognac is a superior product.

    Cognac must be produced according to strict regulations, and only in the region surrounding the town of Cognac in central France. It must be made from a specific group of white grape varietals that are double distilled using pot stills, and then aged for at least two years.

    Brandy is a generic term for a grape distillate that can be made anywhere in the world.

    A good analogy is the difference between champagne, which must be made in the Champagne region of France, with specific grapes and techniques; and sparkling wines, which can be made anywhere in the world from any suitable grapes.

    Grape brandy can be made anywhere, from any grapes (brandy is also made from fruit and pomace). It does not require double distillation or long aging.

    While there are quality brandies, in general Cognac is a better product. The double distilling and aging rounds out the spirit and produces more mellow flavors.

     

      

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