RECIPE: Stout Doughnut Holes With Bacon Jam | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food RECIPE: Stout Doughnut Holes With Bacon Jam – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

RECIPE: Stout Doughnut Holes With Bacon Jam

doughnut-holes-bacon-jam-2-southwaterkitchen-chicago-230
Doughnut holes filled with bacon jam. Photo courtesy South Water Kitchen | Chicago.
  June 6th is National Donut Day, commemorating the “donut lassies,” female Salvation Army volunteers who provided doughnuts—and also writing supplies, stamps, clothes-mending and home-cooked meals—for soldiers on the front lines.

Approximately 250 Salvation Army volunteers provided assistance to American soldiers in France during World War I, starting in 1917.*

The Salvation Army’s Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance cleverly thought of frying donuts in soldiers’ helmets. With limited resources, these treats were fried, only seven at a time.

 
*In 2013, 30 million Americans received assistance from The Salvation Army’s 3,600 officers, 60,000 employees and 3.4 million volunteers.

 
Here’s a treat for today, and for your consideration for Father’s Day breakfast or brunch: stout-accented doughnut holes stuffed with bacon jam. It’s gourmet “man food.”

The sweet and savory doughnut creation comes from chef Roger Waysok of the South Water Kitchen in Chicago, which specializes in pairing craft beers with its cuisine. Not surprisingly, there’s beer in the recipe.

 
RECIPE: STOUT DOUGHNUT HOLES WITH BACON JAM & SALTED CARAMEL GLAZE

Ingredients For 13-16 Doughnut Holes

  • .5 ounce fresh yeast
  • 1 cup stout
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2¾ cups all-purpose flour
  •  

    Preparation

    1. DISSOLVE yeast in warm beer (make sure beer is 100°-120°F).

    2. ADD flour and sugar; mix in a stand mixer with dough hook attachment.

    3. ADD vanilla and egg yolks one at a time, allowing eggs to incorporate into dough.

    4. ADD cream and butter, mixing well, slowly increasing speed to high. When dough pulls away from the side it is ready.

    5. COVER dough in a bowl and keep in at room temperature; allow to rise and double in size.

    6. PORTION dough and roll into small balls about an ounce in weight. Place on a parchment lined cookie sheet and cover.

    7. REFRIGERATE for one hour, then deep fry at 350°F until golden brown. Set on paper towels to drain. Fill with bacon jam (recipe below).

      doughnut-holes-bacon-jam-southwaterkitchen-chicago-230
    Another view of doughnut holes with bacon jam. Photo courtesy South Water Kitchen | Chicago.
     
    RECIPE: BACON JAM

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound bacon
  • 2 cups balsamic vinegar
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup stout
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK bacon and onions together in a pot until slightly brown. Add beer, balsamic and sugar. Reduce heat to low and continue to cook until slightly thick, about 30 minutes.

    2. BLEND mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth and thick. Cool and mixture will thicken as it cools. Once cooled, fill doughnut holes with bacon jam using a piping bag.

     
    WHY STOUT?

    The darkest and heartiest of beers, stout is differentiated from other ale by its brown-black color, chocolate-coffee flavors and fuller body. This is achieved by brewing with barley that has been dark-roasted to the point of charring (think of espresso beans, compared to a medium-roast coffee).

    Stout is thus both darker and maltier than porter, has a more pronounced hop aroma, and may reach an alcoholic content of 6% to 7%. Stout originated in Ireland, where most traditional stouts are very rich, yet sharp and slightly bitter.

     
    DOUGHNUT VS. DONUT

    An old word for ball was nut; a doughnut is literally a nut (ball) of dough. The name was first used in print in 1809 by American author Washington Irving (using the pen name Diedrich Knickerbocker). The pastry he described resembled what we call doughnut holes today, rather than the styles of fried dough that evolved into rings or filled pastries.

    The spelling “donut” appeared some 100 years later but did not immediately catch on. That impetus goes to Dunkin’ Donuts, founded in 1950.

    Donut is a easier to write, but we prefer the old-fashioned elegance of doughnut. Take your choice.
      




    Comments are closed.



    © Copyright 2005-2019 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.