Honey & Raspberry Mojito Recipe | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: Honey + A Raspberry Honey Mojito Recipe – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

TIP OF THE DAY: Honey + A Raspberry Honey Mojito Recipe

September is National Honey Month. Celebrate by replacing table sugar with honey in your tea, in baking and other recipes.

But don’t do it because you think honey is better for you. Truth to tell, honey and sugar are so close in calories, nutrition (both have none or marginal nutrients) and glycemic index* that it really makes no difference.

Some websites maintained by honey enthusiasts or vendors—as opposed to nutritionists or healthcare professionals—tout the vitamins and minerals. But these are only trace amounts. Here’s more information.

So why use honey? For the flavor, of course! Start with this Raspberry Honey Mojito:

This recipe is from Bee Raw Honey, which used its delicious Wild Raspberry Honey in the recipe. You can substitute the honey you have on hand.

RECIPE: RASPBERRY HONEY MOJITO

Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1 tablespoon fresh raspberries
  • 10 mint leaves
  • Juice of one half lime
  • 1 tablespoons Bee Raw Wild Raspberry Honey
  • 1 shot (1-1/2 ounces) white/silver rum
  • 2 shots (3 ounces) cranberry juice
  • Ice
  • Garnish: mint leaves, raspberries
  •    
    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/honey spoon beerawhoneyFB 230
    Celebrate National Honey Month in every way you can. Photo courtesy Bee Raw Honey.
     

    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE the raspberries, mint leaves, lime juice and honey in a cocktail shaker.

    2. ADD the rum, cranberry juice and ice. Shake well and serve in a Collins glass with fresh ice.

    3. GARNISH with a sprig of mint and a few whole raspberries.

     
    *The glycemic index of agave is 32 GI and 60 calories per tablespoon (but it’s twice as sweet as sugar, maple syrup is 54 GI and 52 calories per tablespoon, honey is 58 GI and 64 calories per tablespoon and sugar is 60-65 and 48 calories per tablespoon. Calorie data source: NutritionData.Self.com.

     

    raspberry-mojito-top-beeraw-230

    Raspberry Honey Mojito. Photo courtesy Bee Raw Honey.

      HOW TO SUBSTITUTE HONEY FOR SUGAR

    Honey In Cooked Food & Drinks

  • Up to one cup, honey can be substituted for sugar in equal amounts. For example, replace a half cup sugar for a half cup of honey.
  • Since honey is sweeter than sugar, you can also use a little less. If you prefer less sweetness to more, experiment until you find the substitution proportion that suits you.
  • If the recipe calls for more than one cup, use 2/3 or 3/4 cup of honey for every cup of sugar.
  • You can also match the type of honey to your recipe. Here are examples of honey-food pairings.
  • In general, the darker honey, the more assertive the flavor. Lighter color honeys are have more subtle flavor. Check out Bee Raw Honey to see the different colors of the “honey rainbow.”
  •  
    TIP: Before measuring the honey, generously coat measuring spoons and cups with cooking spray to prevent the honey from sticking.
     
    Honey In Baking

    In baking, honey typically makes the product more moist and flavorful. Because baking is science, and the chemistry must work, it’s better to look for a tested recipe rather than doing your own replacements. Reduce the oven temperature by 25°F when using honey in place of sugar.
     
    MOJITO HISTORY

    The Mojito (mo-HEE-toe) hails from Cuba; the name comes from the African word mojo, which means to cast a small spell. One story says that slaves working in Cuban sugar cane fields in the late 19th century invented the drink.

    However, historians at Bacardi Rum trace the cocktail’s roots to 1586, the year that Sir Francis Drake and his pirate crew made an unsuccessful attempt to sack Havana. Drake’s colleague, Richard Drake (no relation), was said to have invented a Mojito-like drink known as El Draque (The Drake). The recipe included aguardiente (a spirit similar to cachaça), sugar, lime and mint. As with most drinks of the time, it was initially consumed for medicinal purposes.

    Sometime in the mid-1800s, with the refinement of rum, rum was substituted and El Draque became known as El Mojito.
     
    MORE MOJITO RECIPES

  • Beet Mojito Recipe
  • Classic Mojito Recipe
  • Cranberry Mojito Recipe
  • Pomegranate Mojito Recipe
  •   




    Comments are closed.



    © Copyright 2005-2019 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.