Make Cream, Types Of Cream | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: How To Make Cream From Milk – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
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TIP OF THE DAY: How To Make Cream From Milk

cream-cartons-wmmb-230
No cream? No problem! Make it from milk
and butter. Photo courtesy Wisconsin Milk
Marketing Board.
  Here’s a fun kitchen trick. Say you need some heavy cream for a recipe (or even a cup of coffee), but have none.

If you have whole milk and unsalted butter, you can combine them to make cream. The difference between milk and cream is the amount of butterfat. The butter, which is at least butterfat, supplies what the milk lacks.

This recipe makes heavy cream, approximately 36% butterfat.
 
HOW TO MAKE HEAVY CREAM AT HOME

Ingredients For 1 Cup

  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MELT the butter in the microwave or on the stovetop.

    2. PLACE in a mixing bowl with the milk.

    3. BLEND with electric beaters or an immersion blender.

    It’s that simple!

     

    BUTTERFAT CONTENT

    Butterfat, also called milkfat, is the fatty portion of milk. The components of milk include:

  • Carbohydrate, 4.9% (this is lactose, or milk sugar)
  • Fat, 3.4% (approximately 65% saturated fat, 29% monounsaturated fat and 6% polyunsaturated fat)
  • Protein, 3.3% (82% casein and 18% whey)
  • Water, 87%
  • Vitamins (cobalamin [vitamin B12], folate, niacin [vitamin B3], pantothenic acid [vitamin B5], pyridoxine [vitamin B6], thiamin [vitamin B1], riboflavin [vitamin B2, vitamins C, D, E and K)
  • Minerals (calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, zinc)
  • Minor biological proteins and enzymes (lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, lipases, lactase) [Source]
  •   Dairy Products; milk,cheese,ricotta, yogurt and butter
    It’s easy to make cream from milk and butter. Photo © Siberkorn | DRM .
     
    The USDA imposes federal standards for the minimum butterfat content of commercial dairy products. Here are the standards:
     

    BUTTERFAT CONTENT OF BUTTER

  • Butter, including whipped butter, must contain at least 80% butterfat.
  •  
    BUTTERFAT CONTENT OF CREAM

  • Half and half contains 10.5%–18% butterfat (average 12%).
  • Light cream and sour cream contain 18%–30% butterfat (average 20%).
  • Light whipping cream* (often called simply “whipping cream”) contains 30%–36% butterfat (average 35%).
  • Heavy cream* contains a minimum of 36% butterfat, up to 38%.
  •  
    BUTTERFAT CONTENT OF MILK

  • Skim milk contains less than 0.5% butterfat, typically 0.1%.
  • Lowfat milk (1% and 2% varieties) contain between .5% and 2% butterfat.
  • Whole milk contains at least 3.25% butterfat.
  •  
    BUTTERFAT CONTENT OF CHEESE

  • Dry curd and nonfat cottage cheese contain less than 0.5% butterfat.
  • Lowfat cottage cheese contains .5%–2% butterfat.
  • Cottage cheese contains at least 4% butterfat.
  • Swiss cheese contains at least 43% butterfat relative to the total solids.
  • Cheddar cheese contains at least 50% butterfat relative to the total solids.
  •  
    BUTTERFAT CONTENT OF FROZEN DESSERTS

  • Sherbet contains 1%–2% butterfat.
  • Lowfat ice cream, also called ice milk, contains no more than 2.6% butterfat.
  • Ice cream contains at least 10% butterfat.
  • Frozen custard contains at least 10% butterfat, but it also must contain at least 1.4% egg yolk solids.
  • ________________

    *For whipped cream, the higher the fat content, the thicker the cream is, and the easier it is to whip into stiff peaks. Higher fat cream is also more resistant to curdling, and thus a better choice for soups and sauces.
      




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