Pairing Wine & Food | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: Pairing Wine With Food (Non-Traditional Matches) – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.




TIP OF THE DAY: Pairing Wine With Food (Non-Traditional Matches)

Today’s tip is to step outside your comfort zone and try different wines than the standards you serve with particular foods.

If you drink wine often, you no doubt have a favorite to drink with your favorite foods, from snacks to mains to desserts.

What happens if you step out of your comfort zone? You may discover grape varietals you haven’t had before, and pairings that you like even better.

While it’s common wisdom that the wines of a particular region pair best with the foods of that region, don’t let that impede your decisions. The most important pairing is with the food and its preparation (light or heavy, herbal or spicy, etc.).

Entire books have been written on the topic, but here’s a brief overview from DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com. You can search online for recommendations, or ask your wine store clerk: an invaluable source of information and recommendations.

If you’re not familiar with the grape varietal, look it up. Wines in France, Italy and elsewhere are often named for their region of production, not for the varietal labeling of Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the U.S.

  • In France, you’ll find bottles of Red Burgundy and Sauternes—the regions rather than the grapes Pinot Noir and Semillon.
  • In Italy, you’ll find a mixed system: Brunello di Montalcino instead of Sangiovese (which is also the main grape in Chianti), Barolo and Barbaresco instead of Nebbiolo; but with Pinot Grigio, it’s the name of the grape.
  •  
    It gets much more complicated than this, involving history, law and other factors. But let’s get on to the wines.
     
    WINE & FOOD PAIRINGS FROM A TO Z

    Some are red wines (R), some are white wines (W), and some are both (R&W).

  • Albariño (W): Pair with light summer foods or foods that want fresh acidity because they’re fatty/oily, mildly spicy, rich or salty; plus tart recipes with capers, tomatoes and vinaigrettes.
  • Barbera (R): Pair with smoked salmon, grilled mozzarella and prosciutto, and flatbread with fresh tomato, basil and roasted garlic.
  • Cabernet Franc (R): Pair with a classic beef stew, aged Gouda, and rosemary-rubbed pork tenderloin.
  • Cabernet Sauvignon (R): Pair with grass-fed beef, whether grilled, roasted, braised or stir-fried.
  • Chardonnay (W): Pair with white fish, shellfish and free-range chicken – especially with creamy, buttery sauces.
  • Chenin Blanc (W): Pair with seared scallops, chicken in coconut curry, or sliced ripe pears with fresh or slightly aged sheep’s milk cheeses.
  • Dessert Wines (R & W): Pair with nuts—almonds and hazelnuts—as well as chocolate tortes, vanilla custard, peach cobbler and ricotta cheesecake. In general, aim to pair sweet dessert wines with sweet desserts, and light dessert wines with light desserts. foie gras, lobster, and seafood in a butter or white cream sauce.
  • Gewürztraminer (W): Pair with smoked white fish, spicy stir-fried dishes, or slightly sweet desserts. See our full article on pairing desserts with wine.
  • Grenache (R): Pair with any grilled shellfish as well as salami, sliced ham and other charcuterie.
  • Grenache Blanc (W): Pair with crab, squid, or clams with garlic butter as well as grilled snapper with lemon zest.
  • Malbec (R): Pair with classic rack of lamb, beef fajitas, and roasted root vegetables.
  •    
    Wine, Salami, Olives

    Wine & Sushi

    Wine & Grilled Cheese Sandwich
    [1] An Italian red is a traditional pairing with salami, olives and other nibbles. But why not try a Cabernet Franc, Malbec or Zinfandel (photo courtesy Rebelle | NYC)? [2] Don’t want beer or saké with your sushi? Try a light white wine, such as Albariño or Chenin Blanc. Our personal favorites are Gewürtztraminer and Riesling—more assertive, because we just can’t get enough of them (photo by Lognetic | Dreamtime). [3] With a well-seasoned grilled cheese sandwich, try a medium-bodied red: Barbera, Malbec, Merlot, Rhone blend, Sangiovese, or the lesser-known Montepulciano.

     

    Spaghetti & Red Wine
    Red Wine & Chocolate
    [4] For pasta, match the wine to the sauce. With a meat sauce or meatballs, Sangiovese, Rosso di Montalcino and Barberas are popular in Italy. But a good old American Zinfandel is also a popular match. [5] Wine with chocolate? Absolutely: We have an entire article on pairing wine and chocolate, as well as pairing wines and desserts (photo courtesy Taza Chocolate).

     
  • Marsanne (W): Pair with creamy potato-leek soup or roasted butternut squash with cinnamon butter.
  • Merlot (R): Pair with sautéed duck breasts or roasted pork tenderloin.
  • Mourvèdre (R): Pair with roast duck or squab, seared New York Strip steak with cracked black pepper, or a tangy blue cheese.
  • Muscat/Moscato (W): Pair sparkling and late-harvest Muscat with fruit tarts, vanilla custard, dark chocolate torte, or rich cheesecake.
  • Petite Sirah (R): Pair with sweet barbequed chicken, a cold roast beef sandwich with mustard, or mild blue cheeses.
  • Pinot Blanc (W): Pair with pan-fried fresh trout, seared tuna, or smoked salmon.
  • Pinot Gris (W): Pair with pasta with a light tomato-based sauce or spicy noodles with shrimp.
  • Pinot Noir (R): Pair with wood-smoked bacon, roast leg of veal or grilled wild salmon. It’s our favorite with rare lamb.
  • Red Blends (R): Pair with pulled pork tacos, barbecued chicken wings, or slow-cooked short ribs.
  • Riesling (W): Pair with Thai spring rolls, spicy stir-fried chicken or a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich on rustic country bread.
  • Rosé(R & W): Pair with everything from spicy sauces to crisp, light salads.
  • Roussanne (W): Pair with honey-glazed ham or butternut squash ravioli.
  • Sangiovese (R): Pair with sausage and caramelized onions, or pork chops with plum conserve.
  • Sauvignon Blanc (W): Pair with wild mushroom soup, grilled red snapper, or asparagus – especially sautéed in garlic.
  • Semillon (W): Pair dry Semillon with fresh halibut or mushroom couscous. Pair sweet Semillon with peach cobbler or pears sautéed in butter.
  • Sparkling (R & W): Pair with everything from Szechuan stir fry to triple crème cheeses.
  • Syrah (R): Pair with robust, hearty foods—from black bean chili with pork, to buffalo sliders or rich beef stews.
  • Tempranillo (R): Pair with dill-poached salmon, pork tenderloin with cilantro pesto, or steamed mussels.
  • Viognier (W): Pair with smoked oysters or mussels, or herb-roasted free-range chicken, goose or duck.
  • White Blends (W): Pair with fresh seafood, cold roast chicken, creamy polenta, or a range of cheeses—from ricotta to triple crème, from goat cheese to dry Jack.
  • Zinfandel (R): Pair with barbecued free-range beef, lamb, pork, chicken or spicy sausage.
  •  
    PAIRINGS FOR FAVORITE FOODS

  • Pairing Cheese With Wine & Beer
  • Pairing Wine & Chocolate
  • Pairing Wine & Desserts
  • Pairing Wine & Ice Cream
  • Pairing Wine & Sorbet For Cocktails
  •   




    Comments are closed.



    © Copyright 2005-2020 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.