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RECIPE: No-Bake Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Stars

A patriotic dessert doesn’t have to be red, white and blue. And a cookie doesn’t have to be baked.

This recipe from McCormick makes chocolate chip cookie dough stars.

Since there’s no oven and no knives, you can delegate the task to a fledgling cook. Prep time is 20 minutes.

RECIPE: CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DOUGH STARS

Ingredients For 24 Cookies

  • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
  • 2/3 cup butter, softened
  • 1-1/3 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 2/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 4 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup miniature chocolate chips
  • 4 cups vanilla wafer crumbs
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREPARE a 15 x 10 x 1-inch shallow baking pan by lining with foil. With an electric mixer…

    2. BEAT the cream cheese and butter in a large bowl at medium speed, until light and fluffy. Add the sugars, vanilla and salt; mix until blended and smooth. Stir in the vanilla wafer crumbs and chocolate chips.

    3. PRESS the cookie dough firmly into the pan, in an even layer. Freeze for 1 to 2 hours or until firm.

    4. FLIP the cookie dough onto a cutting board and remove the foil. Cut into star shapes with 2-inch star-shaped cookie cutter.

    5. PRESS the cookie dough scraps back into pan, refreezing it if too soft, to cut out more stars. (If you eat them, we won’t blame you: We’ll join you. You can eat them with impunity since there is no raw egg).
     
     
    IF YOU WANT SOMETHING SWEET IN RED, WHITE & BLUE…

    HERE ARE MORE DESSERT RECIPES

    Cakes & Cupcakes

  • Triple Berry Biscuit Shortcake (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Cheesecake (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Cupcakes (recipe)
  • Red Velvet, White & Blue Cupcakes (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Frosted Layer Cake (recipe 1)
  • Red, White & Blue Grilled Angel Food Cake (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Layer Cake (recipe 2)
  • Red White & Blue Layer Cake (recipe 3_
  • Red, White & Blue Shortcake (recipe)
  •  
    Cookies & Bars

  • American Flag Cookies (recipe)
  • Oreo Cookie Balls (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Whoopie Pies (recipe)
  • Stars & Stripes Toll House Cookies (recipe)
  •  
    Ice Cream

  • American Flag Brownie Ice Cream Cake (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Parfaits (recipe)
  • Strawberry & Blueberry Parfait (recipe)
  •  
    Pies & Tarts

  • American Flag Pie (recipe)
  • Blueberry Cherry Pie With Stars & Stripes Top (recipe)
  • Red, White & Blue Tartlets (recipe)
  •  
    More

  • Pavlova (recipe)
  •  
     
    MORE PATRIOTIC FOOD

    For some red, white and blue recipes for other meals, head here.

     

    Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Stars
    [1] No-bake cookie dough stars from McCormick.

    Red, White & Blue Pie Recipe
    [2] A frozen patriotic pie from QVC (recipe).

    July 4th Pie
    [3] Make a custard or cream pie with a berry top (photo courtesy American Pie Council).

    Flag Layer Naked Cake
    [4] A flag layer cake from Good Eggs, in the trendy naked cake style (no icing on the sides).

    July 4th Pound Cake

    [5] The easiest red, white and blue dessert: pound cake, whipped cream and berries (photo courtesy Knudsen Dairy).

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Add Grilled Fruit To Your Cocktails

    Cocktails With Grilled Fruit Garnish

    Cocktails With Grilled Fruit Garnish

    If a cocktail uses a fruit garnish, grill the fruit first (photos courtesy Kenyon International).

     

    When your business is making grills, as it is at Kenyon grills, you’re always thinking of what to grill next.

    From the company’s test kitchen, here’s a way to add a subtle smoky flavor to summer cocktails. Grill the fruit!

    Here are two favorite cocktails, given the grilled fruit treatment.
    For both recipes, prep time is 5 minutes; total time is 15 minutes.

    RECIPE #1: PINA COLADA WITH GRILLED FRUIT GARNISH

    A long-time favorite tastes even better with fresh, grilled pineapple and a squeeze of grilled lime.

    July 10th is National Piña Colada Day. Here’s the history of the Piña Colada.

    Ingredients For 2 Drinks

  • 1 cup fresh, sliced pineapple rings, plus two whole rings for garnish
  • 1/4 cup cream of coconut
  • 3 ounces white rum
  • 1 lime, sliced in halves or quarters
  • 2 cups crushed ice
  • Optional garnish: maraschino cherries
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the grill to medium-high heat. Place the sliced pineapple and lime on the grill for approximately 3 minutes per side, or until golden.

    2. REMOVE the limes off the grill first. Set the grilled fruit aside on a plate. Allow the pineapple and lime to completely cool.

    3. ADD the grilled pineapple, cream of coconut, rum and ice to the blender. Squeeze in the juice from the grilled lime. Blend on high until smooth.

    4. POUR into tall glasses and garnish with a slice of grilled pineapple and an optional cherry.

     
    RECIPE #2: GRILLED STRAWBERRY MARGARITA

    Enhance a classic Margarita with the flavors of grilled strawberries and a squeeze of grilled lime. Here’s the history of the Margarita.

    Ingredients For 2 Drinks

  • 1 pound strawberries, washed and hulled
  • Granulated sugar
  • 1-2 limes
  • 1 cup all-natural Margarita mix
  • 3 ounces tequila
  • Ice
  •  
    Plus

  • 2 skewers, pre-soaked
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the grill to medium-high heat.

    2. PLACE the strawberries on the skewers. Lightly coat with sugar and set aside.

    3. CUT the lime into 1/4-inch thick slices. Once the grill has preheated, place the strawberry skewers and limes on the grate and close the lid. Grill for approximately 3-4 minutes per side, removing the limes first. Set the fruit aside and let it cool; then remove the strawberries from the skewers.

    4. RIM the glasses with a piece of lime; then dip in either Tajin seasoning, salt, sugar or a mix of salt or sugar and cayenne or other chile powder.

    5. ADD the Margarita mix, tequila, ice and grilled strawberries. Blend until frothy. Pour into glasses and add a squeeze of grilled lime. Garnish with a grilled lime wheel.

    Now that you have the hang of it, consider “grilling up” your other favorite summer cocktails.
     
      

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    FOOD FUN: Deconstructed Ceviche & The Different Types Of Raw Fish Dishes

    Deconstructed Ceviche
    [1] Deconstructed ceviche at Seviche | Louisville.

    Ceviche Trio
    [2] A trio of ceviches with different mixes of seafood and vegetables, from Chef Ingrid Hoffmann.

    Sea Bass Ceviche
    [3] Sea bass ceviche with traditional ingredients from Coya | London.

    White Fish Tiradito

    [4] Tiradito: a fusion preparation with sashimi-cut fish and a non-traditional garnish (fried capers), at Raymi | NYC.

     

    June 28th is National Ceviche Day, so let’s have some fun with it.

    Ceviche is delicious “health food.”

  • Fish and seafood are high in protein.
  • Citrus juice is high in antioxidants including vitamin C; and is a good source of potassium and folate.
  • There’s no sugar or added fat.
  • Ceviche is low in calories. Most fish have 30-40 calories per ounce; shrimp and lobster have 30 calories, bay scallops 25 calories and octopus 35 calories per ounce. Other ingredients such as chile, cucumber, herbs, onion and tomato add negligible calories.
  •  
    And perhaps most important to some:

  • Ceviche is not raw fish. The fish is cured by marinating in citrus juice.
  •  
     
    DECONSTRUCTED CEVICHE

    Seviche Restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky serves a different ceviche any day. While there are traditional presentations, they’ve also served it deconstructed (photo #1).

    Instead of serving it traditionally—in a bowl or other container, resting in its marinade/curing liquid and topped with garnishes—the deconstruction in Photo #1 comprises:

  • Slices of cured fish set directly on a plate.
  • Topped with minced vegetables, instead of diced vegetables mixed in with the fish.
  • The marinade becomes a sauce, artistically place on the plate.
  • The plate is garnished with non-traditional garnishes—herbs, edible flowers, jicama, radishes, etc.—instead of cilantro or parsley, diced avocado, lime wedge or sliced onions.
  •  
     
    THE DIFFERENCES AMONG RAW FISH DISHES

  • Carpaccio is Italian for raw fillet of beef, not fish. Crudo is the term for raw fish or seafood. You will find fish “crudo” on restaurant menus, but that doesn’t make it correct. While raw fish consumption is ancient, beef carpaccio was based on the Piedmont speciality, carne cruda all’albese (raw beef Alba-style), created by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice. Using fine Piedmontese beef, he originally prepared it for a countess whose doctors had recommended that she eat raw meat. At the time, there was a local exhibition of the 15th-century Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio; hence the name of the dish.
  • Ceviche, seviche or sebiche, from South America, is a marinated raw fish dish that date to pre-Colombian times. Then, seafood was “cooked” (acid-cured) with a fruit called tumbo (Passiflora tarminina, a relative of passionfruit). The Incas cured fish in salt and fermented corn. The Spanish brought onions limes, which are essential to today’s ceviche.
  • Crudo is analogous to sashimi—plain raw fish, although the fish is cut differently.
  • Escabeche is not raw, but seared fish (or meat) that is then marinated it in a vinegar-based sauce redolent of herbs and spices. As with ceviche, there is always an acidic marinade. It is served cold or at room temperature.
  • Poke is a Hawaiian dish that recently has made its way from coast to coast. A mix of raw fish and vegetables are served as an appetizer or salad course. It is different from tiradito or ceviche in that the fish is cubed with a soy sauce and sesame oil dressing, and Hawaiian garnishes like roasted crushed candlenut and limu seaweed, along with chopped chiles. It is pronounced poe-KEH. Here’s more about it.
  • Sashimi is Japanese-style sliced raw fish, generally served with a bowl of plain, steamed rice (not sushi rice, which is prepared with vinegar and sugar). The word literally means “pierced body.” No one is certain of the origin, but it may have come from the former practice of sticking the tail and fin of the fish on the slices, to let it be known which fish one was eating.
  • Tataki is a fillet of fish that is lightly seared: Just the surface is cooked, with the majority of the fish eaten in its raw state.
  • Tiradito is a more recent dish, fusing the concepts of ceviche and sashimi. Fish is sliced in pieces that are longer and thinner than sashimi. They are artfully arranged on a plate on top of a light sauce, and garnished (with cilantro, fresh corn kernels, thin slices of hot chile, etc.). The name derives from the Spanish verb tirar, which means to throw (i.e., throwing together raw fish with a sauce). Here’s a recipe.
  •  
    Don’t worry if you can’t keep these straight: We saw a dish called carpaccio at New York City’s top seafood restaurant, that was clearly tiradito (with sauce and chile garnishes).
     

     

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF CEVICHE & TIRADITO

    In South America, marinated raw fish dishes date to pre-Colombian times, when seafood was “cooked” (acid-cured) with a fruit called tumbo (Passiflora tarminina, a relative of passionfruit). The Incas cured fish in salt and fermented corn.

    In the 16th century, the Spaniards arrived with limes, onions and bell peppers, three essential ingredients in basic modern ceviche. Lime juice cured the fish, and marinating the sliced/diced onions and bell peppers mixed in with the seafood. Large kernels of roasted Inca corn are a common garnish.

    Ceviche is found in almost all restaurants on the coast of Peru, typically served with camote (sweet potato, which originated in Peru). It has been called “the flagship dish of coastal cuisine,” and is one of the most popular dishes in Peru [source].

    Over time, fruits were incorporated; most popularly, tomatoes (native to Peru) and mango.

    The influx of Japanese immigrants to Peru in the 1970s brought with it chefs who cut and treated the fish in the manner of sashimi. A fusion dish developed called tiradito, with seafood cut sashimi-style (but thinner and longer), a spicy dressing incorporating Peruvian chiles, and more elaborate garnishes.
     
     
    CEVICHE, CEBICHE, SEBICHE, SEVICHE

    Ceviche is variously spelled with a c or an s, with a v or a b.

    In Peru, cebiche is the spelling in Lima; although ceviche is used elsewhere in the country, and is the most common internationally.

    However, seviche was actually declared the proper spelling in 2004, by Peru’s National Institute of Culture.

    Additionally, historical texts refer to the dish as seviche, including those by the Academia Peruana de la Lengua (Peruvian Language Academy), founded in 1887 [source].

    Since even in its homeland, the national dish has multiple spellings, don’t argue with anyone over which one is “correct.”

    Lobster Ceviche recipe
    Make Your Signature Ceviche Recipe
    More History Of Ceviche
    Shrimp Ceviche Recipe
    Trout Ceviche Recipe
    Wasabi Ceviche Recipe

     

    Ceviche MartinI Glass
    [5] Presentation in a Martini glass with plantain chips, at Elegant Affairs Caterers.

    Ceviche Grilled Lime

    [6] A modern update garnished with fresh tarragon, fried Chinese noodles and a grilled lime wheel.

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Uses For Smoked Fish

    Soba Noodles With Smoked Trout Recipe
    [1] Soba noodles with smoked trout. Here’s the recipe from Food Network.

    Smoked Trout Canapes Recipe
    [2] Canapes or snacks: Granny Smith apple slices with smoked trout. Here’s the recipe from Cooking Light.

    Smoked Trout Tartines

    [3] Here’s the recipe from Dang That’s Delicious.

     

    Do you have tins of smoked fish in the pantry? Do you need inspiration to use them?

    We opened our cupboard and found a few tins that came in a gift basket two years ago. They were still there because when we need smoked fish, we buy it fresh-smoked at the smoked fish counter (we’re fortunate to live a few blocks from a store with a large supply of smoked fish, hand-sliced to order).

    While canned anchovies, tuna and sardines don’t sit for long on our shelves, canned smoked fish requires some thought. So we thought:

    Rather than come across the same cans in another two years, we’ll make lunch with them until we use them up. The list of options we drew up is below, along with a recipe for avocado toast with smoked trout.
     
     
    SMOKED FISH TRIVIA

  • Types of fish that are sold smoked (although not necessarily canned): bluefish, chubs, cod, herring, mackerel, sable (black cod), salmon, sturgeon, trout, tuna, whitefish and whiting.
  • Napoleon Bonaparte is the indirect father of canning. He is responsible for the initiative that led to the canning of food. Here’s the history of canning.
  •  
     
    15 USES FOR CANNED SMOKED FISH

    Breakfast

  • Bagel with cream cheese and onion.
  • Scrambled eggs or Eggs Benedict.
  •  
    Lunch

  • Green salad with yogurt-dill dressing (mix yogurt with seasonings and dill; thin with milk or lime juice as desired).
  • Mixed with mayonnaise, like salmon or tuna salad.
  • Sandwich: regular, open-face (a.k.a. tartine—photo #3) or wrap with cream cheese or dill-sour cream/mayo spread and raw vegetables (arugula, sliced radishes, snow peas, whatever).
  •  
    Appetizers & Snacks

  • Canapés, on a base of apple (photo #2), cucumber or toast.
  • Dip with crudités.
  • Mixed with cream cheese, sour cream and dill and and stuffed into celery or endive leaves, or atop cucumber slices, or served with crackers.
  • Rillettes (recipe).
  • Smoked trout mousse (recipe).
  •  
    Dinner

  • Asian broth bowl with noodles and vegetables (photo #1).
  • Brandade, a French dish of smoked fish with mashed potatoes (recipe).
  • Fish tacos or tostadas.
  • Mixed with rice or other grain and vegetables (recipe).
  • Pasta, tossed with olive oil and lots of fresh-cracked pepper. We also threw in vegetables at hand: mushrooms, peas and scallions.
  •  

    RECIPE: AVOCADO BUTTER TOAST WITH SMOKED TROUT

    Here’s a variation for lovers of avocado toast: avocado butter.

    The mashed avocado is mixed with soft butter for a richer spread, that pairs perfectly with smoked or grilled fish.

    We received this recipe from the California Avocado Commission, developed by Jessica Koslow. “Smoky trout and creamy avocado butter combine perfectly for a delicious breakfast,” she says.

    For lunch, we adapted it with a layer of marinated onions—delicious with both the fish and the avocado.

    Ingredients Per Serving

  • 3 teaspoons shallots, very thinly sliced
  • 1/2 ripe, Fresh California Avocado, seeded and peeled
  • 1/4 tablespoon unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice, divided
  • 1/8 tablespoon salt, divided
  • 1/4 tin (3.9 ounces) oil-packed smoked trout, drained
  • 1 slice 3/4″-thick rye or seeded bread
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 3 teaspoons Italian (flat leaf) parsley
  • 1/4 tablespoon fried capers (see make-ahead recipe, below)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • Optional: marinated onions
  •  
    For The Fried Capers

  • 1/4 tablespoon capers in brine
  • Canola oil, as needed
  •  
    For The Marinated Onions

     

    Avocado Butter On Toast
    [4] Avocado butter on toast with smoked trout. Photo courtesy California Avocado Commission.

    Halved Avocado

    [5] A ripe, creamy California avocado. Photo courtesy California Avocado Commission.

     
    These onions are a wonderful garnish for just about anything. We suggest making more than what is required here. They’ll keep in the fridge for two weeks or longer.

  • 1 small sweet or red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon minced parsley
  • 1 tablespoon red wine or apple cider vinegar
  • ¾ cup olive oil
  • Pinch of salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MARINATE the onion an hour in advance or overnight. Place the slices in a container and top with the oil, vinegar, parsley and salt to taste. Cover and shake to combine; then let sit at room temperature until ready to use (or refrigerate overnight).

    2. MAKE the fried capers. Place the capers on a paper towel and set aside to dry for 30 minutes. Then, add an inch of canola oil to a pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add the capers and fry until no bubbles appear around them. Remove and place on a plate lined with paper towels.

    3. PLACE the shallots on a paper towel to drain, and set aside. (You can do this while waiting for the capers to dry.)

    4. MAKE the avocado butter by thoroughly mashing the avocado, butter, 1/4 tablespoon lemon juice and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Blend until smooth.

    5. DRAIN the liquid from trout and set aside.

    6. BRUSH the bread with the melted butter and lightly toast each side.

    7. SPREAD the avocado mixture onto the toast. Place the trout on top of the avocado; layer the shallots and parsley on top. Sprinkle with the remaining lemon juice and garnish with the fried capers and lemon zest.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Cut The Calories In Thai Iced Tea & Thai Iced Coffee

    Thai Iced Tea

    Thai Iced Coffee
    The milky swirl of Thai iced tea or coffee is a visual treat (photo #1 courtesy Wife Mama Foodie, photo #2 courtesy Hella Good).

    Homemade Sweetened Condensed Milk

    [3] Want to make your own sweetened condensed milk? Here’s the recipe, from Gluten Free On A Shoestring.

     

    June is National Tea Month, time for an article on a type of iced tea not yet as broadly served in the U.S. as we think it should be. The easy recipe follows.

    For those who already know and love Thai iced tea or coffee but not the overload of sugar, we have a solution below. But first, some history about the drinks.

    WHAT IS THAI ICED TEA?

    Thai iced tea, known as cha-yen in Thailand (cha is the word for tea), is served in Thailand, Vietnam, elsewhere around the Pacific Rim and in Thai restaurants around the world. It is made from strong-brewed black tea—typically Ceylon tea—and sweetened condensed milk, which adds creaminess, body and mouthfeel.

    For visual appeal, the deep amber tea and white sweetened condensed milk (and often, evaporated milk) are swirled together or layered. The drink can be topped off evaporated milk, coconut milk, half and half or whole milk. It is sweetened with lots of sugar (local to the the South Pacific), and often served over crushed ice.

    The brewed tea can be enhanced with spices, such as cardamom, clove, nutmeg, orange blossom water, star anise and tamarind. If you like chai tea with milk and sweetener, you are likely to enjoy Thai iced tea.

    The countries where it’s most popular are known for hot, steamy summers. Thai iced tea is a welcome refreshment—and a complement to spicy food. If your neck of the woods is as hot and steamy as ours is, it’s time to try the recipe.

    THE HISTORY OF THAI ICED TEA

    In hot countries before refrigeration, where fresh milk was hard to come by, evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk were used in coffee, desserts and other recipes requiring milk (including Key lime pie).

    The precise birth date of what is now known today as Thai tea is uncertain. Americans and Europeans living in Asia brought evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk—first available in 1856—for their tea and coffee [source].

    One source suggests that “It was probably introduced during the time of Field Marshall Pibul Songkram [1938 to 1944] who seemed to favour Western habits as being civilized” [source]—hence the ice and milk in tea, previously only a hot drink.

    Tea is a relatively new crop in Thailand, brought in by the Chinese in the 1880s to supplant opium as a cash crop to [hopefully] curb drug trafficking. The tea became a street food staple [source]. The British and other foreigners in Thailand had their own supply of tea.

    Why is the tea often very orange in color? After the tea was brewed for the master, the domestic workers took used leaves that would have been discarded, to brew tea for themselves. The flavor and color of this second infusion were faded, so orange color and flavoring were added to make a more appealing brew.

    The tradition of orange color became a tradition of Thai brewed tea [source]. (See photo #4, below.)

    Thai iced coffee followed much later, in the postwar 20th century.

     
    WHO INVENTED EVAPORATED MILK & SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK?

    Both products were invented by Gail Borden, who subsequently formed the dairy company that bears his name.

    In 1852, Borden was traveling transatlantic when the cows aboard ship became too seasick to provide milk (there was no refrigeration in those days to keep milk fresh). He began to experiment, and two years later produced a canned milk that did not go sour at room temperature for three days after the can was opened.

    Borden received a patent for sweetened condensed milk in 1856 and began commercial production the following year. Unsweetened condensed milk, now called evaporated milk, took more time to perfect since it didn’t have the sugar to inhibit bacteria growth. It was finally canned successfully in 1885.

    In the days before refrigeration, both evaporated and sweetened condensed milk were used more than fresh milk in households, because they were less likely to spoil and harbor harmful bacteria.
     
     
    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN EVAPORATED MILK AND SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK

    The quickest explanation is in the names: sweetened condensed milk has added sugar and evaporated milk doesn’t. It is also much thicker: Evaporated milk pours like regular milk, but sweetened condensed milk pours like molasses. They are not interchangeable in recipes, but both can be used in coffee.

  • Evaporated milk is fresh cow’s milk from which about 60% percent of the water has been removed by evaporation. It’s then homogenized, fortified with vitamins and stabilizers, canned and sterilized. The heat from the sterilization gives the milk a bit of a caramelized flavor, and makes the color slightly darker than fresh milk. Evaporated milk was originally called unsweetened condensed milk, although that term is no longer used.
  • Sweetened condensed milk also has about 60% percent of the water removed, then sugar is added as well as vitamin A. Condensed milk contains 40% to 45% sugar, but it means that no (or less) added sugar is required in the recipe. Condensed milk requires no sterilization, since sugar is a natural inhibitor of bacteria growth. It is darker and more yellow in color than evaporated milk.
  •  

    THAI ICED TEA OR ICED COFFEE RECIPE

    Substitute strong-brewed coffee for the tea, with spices as desired (here’s the recipe for Thai Iced Coffee).

    You can chill the drink in the fridge, for enjoyment without the dilution of ice cubes.

    Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup black tea leaves (approximately 3 ounces)
  • Optional spices: cardamom, ground tamarind, nutmeg, star anise or others (cinnamon works for us), to taste
  • 6 cups boiling water
  • 1/2 cup sugar (or equivalent noncaloric sweetener)
  • 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 cup evaporated milk to top (you can substitute coconut milk, half and half or whole milk)
  • Crushed ice
  •  
    Preparation

    1. STEEP the tea leaves (and any optional spices) in boiling water for 5 minutes. Strain out the tea leaves. Using an infuser (tea ball) makes this step easier.

    2. STIR in sugar while the tea is still hot, until dissolved; then stir in condensed milk.

    3. COOL to room temperature or ideally, chill in the fridge.

    4. ADD ice to tall iced tea glasses and pour in tea mixture until glasses are roughly 3/4 full. Slowly top off glasses with evaporated milk.
     
    VARIATIONS

    If you find yourself in the Pacific Rim, you can have what Americans think of as iced tea.
     

  • Dark Thai iced tea (cha dam yen) is simple iced tea without the milk, sweetened with sugar.
  • Lime Thai tea (cha manao) is dark Thai iced tea flavored with lime. Mint may also be added.
  • Boba Thai iced tea, a modern fusion, adding the black tapioca balls used for Chinese bubble tea.
  •  

    Thai Iced Tea

    Thai Iced Tea Pops Recipe

    [4] Thai iced tea and [5] iced tea pops with added boba (tapioca balls). The orange color is a Thai tradition. Here are both recipes from Pineapple and Coconut.

     
    For Low Sugar Thai Iced Tea

    If you’re looking for unsweetened iced tea in the Pacific Rim, you may be out of luck. It’s the birthplace of sugar.

    But use the low-calorie or low-glycemic sweetener of your choice (Splenda, agave), and use evaporated milk instead of sweetened condensed milk.

    You’ve created a low-calorie Thai iced tea.
     
     
    A BRIEF HISTORY OF SUGAR

    Sugar is native to Southeast Asia. Three species seeming to have originated in two locations: Saccharum barberi in India and Saccharum edule and Saccharum officinarum in New Guinea.

    Originally, people chewed on the raw sugar cane stalks to enjoy the sweetness. Refined sugar appears around 500 B.C.E., when residents of what is now India began to make sugar syrup from the cane juice. They cooled it to make crystals that were easier to store and transport. These crystals were called khanda, which is the source of the word candy.

    Indian sailors carried sugar along various trade routes. In 326 B.C.E., Alexander the Great and his troops saw farmers on the Indian subcontinent growing sugar cane and making the crystals, which were called sharkara, pronounced as saccharum.

    The Macedonian soldiers carried “honey bearing reeds” home with them. But sugar cane remained a little known crop to most Europeans for the next thousand years, a rare and costly product that made sugar traders wealthy.

    In the 12th century, Crusaders brought sugar back to Europe from the Holy Land, where they encountered caravans carrying the “sweet salt.” Venice began to produce sugar in Lebanon to supply Europe, where honey had been the only available sweetener (beet sugar was not isolated until 1747). By the 15th century, Venice was the chief sugar refining and distribution center in Europe.
     
    HOW MANY TYPES OF SUGAR HAVE YOU HAD?

    Check out the different types of sugar in our Sugar Glossary.

      

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