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TIP OF THE DAY: 12 Best Summer Cheeses & A Recipe With Ricotta

If you still want your cheese plate on a hot summer day, these are the hot weather cheeses recommended by Janet Fletcher of Specialty Food Magazine, combined with some of our own.

You can read her full article here, and create a more complex cheese course with the recipe below.

  • Crescenza. This oozy, briefly-aged cow’s milk cheese is modeled on the Italian stracchino (photo #1). Serve it with walnut bread, crusty bread or grilled bruschetta slices, with slices of grilled polenta, or for dessert with with peaches, nectarines or pears.
  • Feta. Serve it with kalamata olives, pickled beets and onions, and toasted pita wedges.
  • Fresh goat cheese. It’s sublime with artisan toasts, and a bowl of fresh cherries.
  • Fresh ricotta. Look for the drained version, which sits better on a cheese plate (photo #3), and serve it with berries and other fruits.
  • Fromage blanc. This fresh cheese was born to serve with fruit (photo #4), or on toasted bread with a drizzle of honey (more).
  • Mozzarella and burrata. Set it sliced (or a bowl of bocconcini), with sliced or cherry tomatoes, fresh basil leaves or pesto, kalamata olives and toasted crusty bread.
  • Pecorino marzolino. When a few weeks old, this young pecorino resembles a more acidic mozzarella (photo #2). Serve it with Italian crudités: fresh celery hearts, fava beans, sliced fennel and sliced raw artichokes dipped in olive oil. Turn it into an antipasto platter with salami, olives and peperoncini.
  • Queso fresco. This fresh cheese, typically crumbled onto Mexican food, goes nicely on a cheese board with avocado slices, hearts of romaine, pumpkin seeds and radishes.
  • Ricotta salata. The ricotta is salted (salata) and typically pressed into the classic ricotta mold (photo #3). Serve it with raw or marinated green bean, regular or pickled baby beets, and grilled zucchini.
  • Ripened goat cheese. Look for American favorites such as Bonne Bouche from Vermont Creamery or Coach Farm’s Green Peppercorn Cone. French classics include Sainte-Maure, Selles-sur-Cher and Valençay. Serve with raisin or walnut-raisin bread.
  • Stracchino. Serve with raw vegetables—avocado, celery and fennel slices plus radishes; as well as with the suggestions for crescenza, above.
  • Washed rind cheeses. These are heavier but recommended because they are made with milk from animals feeding on “primetime pasture,” which produces the richest cheese. Look for cheeses such as munster and livarot made from spring-summer milk, or ask your cheesemonger for recommendations.
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    RECIPE: CHEESE COURSE OF RICOTTA WITH MARINATED BERRIES & TOMATOES

    You can turn the cheeses above into a complex cheese course recipe, as well. In the example below, we adapted the idea from the inspiring Florida chef, Chef Adrianne.

    Fresh ricotta is whipped and flavored, then combined with marinated cherry tomatoes and strawberries. You can substitute fresh goat cheese or feta.

    Chef Adrianne further does a side-plating (photo #5), a practice among modern chefs who don’t think everything has to be centered on the plate.

    You may side-plate, or arrange everything into the center in a conventional plating.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

    For The Lemon Oil

  • 1 large lemon
  • 1 cup olive oil
  •  
    For The Salad

  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar (substitute white wine vinegar)
  • 3 tablespoons lemon olive oil
  • Pinch salt
  • Heirloom cherry tomatoes, mixed colors, halved*
  •  
    For The Berries

  • 1 pint strawberries or berries of choice, trimmed, rinsed and halved*
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons white or raw sugar or honey
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons lemon or lime zest
  • Optional: crushed mint leaves
  •  
    For The Ricotta

  • 1 cup whole-milk ricotta cheese, chilled
  • 2 teaspoons lemon olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  •  
    For The Garnish

  • Microgreens or torn basil leaves)
  • Grated fresh lemon or lime zest or panko bread crumbs†
  •  

    Stracchino
    [1] Stracchino, a briefly-aged cow’s milk cheese (photo courtesy Beanie Bumbles).

    Pecorino Marzolino
    [2] Before it’s aged into a hard cheese, fresh pecorino is a summer delight (photo courtesy Demagi).

    Molded Ricotta
    [3] While you may know ricotta only as loose curds, like cottage cheese, it is also made in molds of this shape, which allows the liquid to drain producing a firm cheese (photo courtesy Good Eggs).

    Fromage Blanc
    [4] Fromage blanc with berries (photo courtesy Vermont Creamery).

    Whipped Ricotta With Tomatoes & Berries

    [5] Whipped ricotta and fruit as a cheese course. It is plated in a style currently favored by chefs: side-plated, following the curve of the plate.

    ________________

    *If the cherry tomatoes are jumbo, you can halve them.

    †The objective is to add a small amount of contrasting crunch, so you can also used crushed crackers or chopped nuts.
    ________________

    Preparation

    You can make the lemon-infused oil several weeks in advance, storing it in a cool, dark place.

    1. INFUSE the olive oil with the zest. You may already have flavored olive oil. If so, give it a taste test. To make your own, scrub the lemon surface thoroughly and pat dry thoroughly.

    2. USING a very sharp paring knife or peeler, remove the zest from the lemon. Note that you only want the bright yellow part of the peel, not the white pith immediately under it. Pith will turn the oil bitter.

    3. PLACE the zest and oil in a small saucepan and warm over medium heat. Do not allow it to warm enough to simmer or develop small bubbles along the side of the pan. Cook for 10 minutes. Remove the pan from heat and let the oil cool to room temperature with the zest. Strain out the zest and transfer the lemony oil to a sealed jar.

    4. MAKE the vinaigrette. Blend the vinegar, oil and pinch of salt in a container with a tight lid, and shake well to emulsify. Add the cherry tomatoes to the container and turn to coat them. Set aside, turning occasionally to coat all sides.

    5. MARINATE the strawberries. Unless they’re bursting with sweetness, marinating adds flavor that nature didn’t. Place the strawberries in a medium bowl and sprinkle the sugar over them. Toss to make sure all of the berries are covered with the sugar. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for one hour. Then add the balsamic vinegar, citrus zest and crushed mint. Cover the bowl, turn upside down to coat, and refrigerate for at least two hours.

    6. WHIP the ricotta in a food processor with the olive oil and salt. Blend until light and smooth, about 30 seconds. Scrape into a bowl and set aside.

    7. ASSEMBLE: Drain the tomatoes and strawberries and remove the mint leaves from the latter. Scoop 5 balls of the ricotta onto a plate, using a cookie scoop or spoon. Leave an equal amount of space between the ricotta, for the tomatoes and strawberries, and add them to the spaces. Sprinkle lightly with zest or crumbs, and serve with a peppermill.

      

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    RECIPE: Individual Spinach Soufflés With Sun-Dried Tomato

    Fresh Spinach Souffle
    [1] This spinach soufflé is made with sautéed whole spinach leaves (photo courtesy Bella Sun Luci).

    Fresh Spinach
    Fresh spinach, rather than frozen chopped spinach, gives the soufflé its pizzazz (photo curtesy Good Eggs).

    Sundried Tomatoes In Bowl
    [3] Sundried tomatoes should look like this: bright red and moist. If yours start to dry out and turn color, place in a container topped with olive oil (photo courtesy Bella Sun Luci.

    Bella Sun Luci Sundried Tomatoes Bag

    [4] Sealed bags keep give the sundried tomatoes a long shelf life (photo courtesy Bella Sun Luci).

     

    July 16th is National Fresh Spinach Day. You can make your favorite spinach recipe (dip? salad?) or make these individual soufflés as first courses or sides.

    If you’ve only used frozen, chopped spinach in soufflés, this recipe delivers a more intense spinach flavor.

    Why use sundried tomatoes in summer, when there are fresh, local tomatoes to be had?

    Because the intensity of sundried tomatoes better complements the soufflé than the more subtle flavor of fresh tomatoes. You can substitute the sundried tomatoes with cherry tomatoes, if you like.

    A BRIEF DIVERSION TO SUNDRIED TOMATOES

    Sundried tomatoes are a stock items in our pantry. You can use them at every meal: in omelets, with cottage cheese and yogurt, in green salads, as a garnish for proteins (marinated in olive oil), in a winter Caprese salad. You can also:

  • Make tomato soup (recipe).
  • Enjoy caprese salad or caprese pasta salad year-round (recipe).
  • Add them to potato salad (recipe #1), recipe #2).
  • Make a dip or spread (recipe).
  • Add them to braised greens (recipe).
  • Top pasta and pizza.
  •  
    Plus, use them as a plate garnish when the plate needs a color lift. Marinate them in olive oil (including flavored olive oil, like basil or chile) for a bright red, flavorful splash of color.

    We love the soft sweetness of the sealed packages from Bella Sun Luci. When we’ve purchased sundried tomatoes from an open bin, even though we place them in a sealed container, we find that within a week or two, they begin to lose their succulence and color. They’re on the road to turning brown, tough and dry. A factory-sealed package is better.

    RECIPE: SPINACH SOUFFLÉ

    This recipe will taste even better if you grate the parmesan freshly, from a wedge.

    Ingredients For 4 Souffles

  • 1/2 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups baby spinach, de-stemmed (reserve four or more perfect leaves for garnish)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Pinch salt
  • 8 large eggs
  • 1 ounce heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon grated parmesan
  • Salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, or more to grease the ramekins
  • 4 pinches of flour
  • Garnish: 4 plump, bright red sun-dried tomatoes
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT a conventional oven (not convection) to 350°F. Heat the olive oil in sauté pan, and cook the garlic until it’s a light yellow color. Then add the spinach and a pinch of salt, and sauté until just cooked.

    2. DRAIN off any liquid, remove to a bowl and set aside until it cools to room temperature. As the spinach cools, prepare the egg-cream mixture. Beat the eggs with 1 ounce heavy cream, 1 tablespoon grated parmesan, salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste.

    3. COMBINE the cooled spinach with the egg-cream mixture; blend well. Grease the ramekins and sprinkle a pinch of flour onto the butter. Divide the soufflé mix among the ramekins. Top each with a sundried tomato.

    4. PLACE the ramekins into a baking dish and add WARM water, so the water is 1/4 to 1/3 of the way up the side of the ramekins (i.e., a bain-marie or water bath). Bake 7-9 minutes, until the eggs puff up.

    5. REMOVE from the oven, garnish each with a spinach leaf and serve hot.

     
    THE HISTORY OF THE SPINACH

    According to Mediterranean food expert Clifford A. White, spinach comes from a central and southwestern Asian gene center. It may have originated from Spinacia tetranda, which still grows wild in Anatolia.

    The plant, which does not like heat, was successfully cultivated in the hot and arid Mediterranean climate by Arab agronomists through the use of sophisticated irrigation techniques.

    The first known reference to spinach dates to between 226 and 640 C.E., in Persia. Over trade routes, spinach was introduced to India and then to ancient China in 647 C.E., where it was (and still is) called “Persian vegetable.”

    The first written reference to spinach in the Mediterranean are in three tenth-century texts. It became popular vegetable in Provence, and by the 15th century was common in Provençal gardens.

    It traveled north, and Europe became a spinach-loving continent.

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Julienne Or Shave Those Veggies!

    Give a new perspective to everyday foods with some creative slicing.

    In these dishes, Chef Jennifer Day of Upper Story By Charlie Palmer in New York City, juliennes the vegetables and serves them either cooked, as with roasted halibut in photo #1; or raw, as with the grilled chicken salad in photo #2.

    The vegetables, cut in julienne slices, are an attractive change from coins and other vegetable cuts.

    Julienne slices are often called matchsticks in the U.S.; although the French word for matchstick is allumette, there is no single word translation for “julienne” (which means “to cut into thin ”).

    While the classic julienne cut is 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch × 2 inches, we actually prefer a 3- or 4-inch version. There’s no name for such a cut; we call it as a “long julienne.”

    And, truth to tell, we usually cut the slices into julienne’s big brother, the batonnet, which measures approximately 1/4 inch x 1/4 inch x 2-2.5 inches. And yes, we cut a “long batonnet” ((the word means “little stick”). It’s a personal thing.

    READY TO JULIENNE?

    There are different options to create your vegetable slices.

    1. Use A Knife

    This is how chefs do it, and it’s a good opportunity to work on your knife skills. Check out the video below, an Americanized version of the French technique. Just be sure your knives are sharp (otherwise, they can slip and cut you).

    2. Use A Food Mandoline

    If you own one and never use it, here’s an opportunity to put it to work!

    3. Use A Food Processor

    The slicing disk of a food processor is designed to produce slices around a quarter-inch thick. Don’t use the shredding disk or you’ll end up with slaw!

    4. Use A Vegetable Peeler

    You won’t get the same cut as with the prior options, but you might like the result.

    Hold one end with your non-dominant hand and peel using even, heavy pressure. Once one side is finished, rest the flat surface that remains on a cutting board. This technique works for long vegetables with thin skins.

    There are also julienne peelers, with teeth (photo #5).

    This one (photo #5) got rave reviews from someone we know. We tried it, but it wasn’t an instant success for us (we needed to practice, practice, practice). Here’s how to use it.

    If your peeler blade is dull, you’ll most likely need to buy a new one since they can’t be sharpened.

    Spend a bit more, and get a Kyocera Perfect Peeler, which has a ceramic blade that will stay incredibly sharp for 20 years or so.

    5. Use A Spiralizer

    The visual effect is different from a julienne, but just as tasty!
     
     
    WHAT VEGETABLES CAN BE TURNED INTO MATCHSTICKS

    The following are easiest to cut into short or longer matchsticks.

  • Asparagus
  • Beet
  • Bell Pepper
  • Broccoli stalk
  • Celeriac (celery root)
  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Fennel
  • Green beans, long beans, wax beans
  • Jicama
  • Kohlrabi
  • Long chile peppers (anaheim, banana, poblano)
  • Potato/sweet potato
  • Radish
  • Rutabaga
  • Salsify
  • Snow Peas
  • Summer squash (yellow squash, zucchini)
  • Winter squash (acorn, butternut, etc.)
  • Turnip
  •  

    Roast Halibut
    [1] Roast halibut on cooked (al dente), julienned carrots and green beans.

    Chicken With Julienned Vegetables
    [2] Sliced grilled chicken on a mound of salad with julienned vegetables (photos #1 and #2 courtesy Upper Story By Charlie Palmer | NYC.

    Julienned Vegetables
    [3] If you don’t like to julienne with a knife, there are two other options (photo courtesy Williams-Sonoma).

    Kyocera Perfect Peeler
    [4] This Kyocera Perfect Peeler has a ceramic blade that will stay sharp for 20 years or more.

    The World's Greatest Julienne Peeler

    [5] The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler, Julienne Slicer, Serrated Soft Skin Fruit Peeler and Straight Blade Vegetable Peeler—possibly the longest-named product we’ve ever seen, from Harold Import Company.

     
     

     
    Julienned Vegetables
    Video from iVillage |YouTube. Photo of julienned vegetables courtesy JuliennePeeler.info.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Authentic Greek Salad Recipe & The “American” Greek Salad

    Authentic Greek Salad
    [1] The real deal: an authentic Greek salad from Little Cooking Tips. Here’s the recipe.

    Greek Cobb Salad
    [2] We love how Dishing Delish has arranged the Greek salad ingredients like a Cobb salad. Here’s her recipe for the Best Greek Salad Dressing.

    Deconstructed Greek Salad
    [3] We also love this deconstructed Greek salad: an appetizer on a romaine wedge. Here’s the recipe from DeLallo.

    Creative Greek Salad

    [4] All the ingredients of an authentic Greek salad, with some creativity in assembly, from Stix | NY.

     

    Our favorite luncheon salad is a Greek salad, most often homemade, sometimes at a diner or similar casual spot.

    We follow the latter’s recipe: romaine, tomatoes, feta cheese, cucumber, green bell pepper, red onion, kalamata olives, peperoncini (the italian spelling; pepperoncini is the English spelling), and hopefully, a couple of grape leaves and pita or crusty bread on the side. For seasoning, a sprinkle of oregano and cruets of oil and red wine vinegar.

    We’ve been known to substitute balsamic vinegar for the conventional acidic red wine vinegar, and add fresh basil or other herb when we have it.

    We especially love a Greek salad in the summer, when the seasonal tomatoes are a joy in of themselves.

    THE AUTHENTIC GREEK SALADbelow, from Chef Amanda Cohen.

    Bloggers Mirella and Panos of Little Cooking Tips says: “The authentic horiatiki [Greek salad] is a very specific salad, with very specific ingredients.

    The Authentic Greek Salad Ingredients

  • Tomatoes (not cherry tomatoes; whole tomatoes, cut in wedges)
  • Cucumbers (peeled and sliced)
  • Red onions (thinly sliced)
  • Green bell peppers (thinly sliced)
  • Kalamata olives (whole, not pitted)
  • Traditional Greek Feta (in a big slice or chunk, never crumbled)
  • Extra virgin olive oil (for dressing)
  • Dry oregano
  •  
    The above exist in any authentic horiatiki you’ll be served throughout Greece. There are only two optional ingredients in addition to the ones above:

  • Capers (added mostly in horiatiki salads that are served in Greek islands)
  • Red wine vinegar (for people who want extra acidity).”
  •  
    There is no lettuce, no stuffed grape leaves, no peperoncini, no radishes, no anchovies—nothing that isn’t in the bullet points above. Here’s their authentic horiatiki recipe (photo #1).

    Of course, there are other popular salads in Greece, including:

  • Lahanosalata, cabbage slaw, dressed with olive oil, lemon juice and garlic.
  • Maintanouri, parsley salad, usually used as a condiment.
  • Marouli, lettuce salad with onion and dill.
  • Pantzarosalata, boiled, sliced beet, sometimes with the beet greens, dressed with olive oil and red wine vinegar.
  • Patatosalata, potato salad with finely sliced onions, dressed with olive oil and lemon juice or vinegar.
  • Revithosalata, chickpea salad.
  • Roka salad, arugula/rocket (roka) dressed with olive oil and red wine vinegar or lemon juice, sometimes with added anchovies.
  •  
    Cypriot salad, native to the island of Cyprus, has similar ingredients to the horiatiki, exchanging the oregano for flat-leaf parsley.

    The other ingredients in Cypriot salad: finely chopped tomatoes (not sliced, as in horiatiki, capers, cucumbers, onions and feta cheese, dressed with olive oil and lemon or red wine vinegar.

    The bell peppers and olives: lost in translation.
     
    THE HISTORY OF GREEK SALAD, HORIATIKI

    Horiatiki is primarily a summer dish, using lush tomatoes off the vine. Since lettuce only grows in Greece during the cooler, winter months, a horiatiki salad does not include lettuce (source).

    And while horiatiki is ubiquitous in Greece, it is a relatively new combination. Some of the ingredients are thousands of years old, others as new as the last century.

  • Bell pepper—all peppers, including peperoncini and hot chiles—are new world produce. Pepper seeds were brought back to Spain in 1493 after a member of the Columbus expedition tasted hot chiles and called them “pepper,” after the heat of the black peppercorns used in Europe (the native name for the category is chilli). From there the pepper spread to other European, African and Asian countries. It may have gotten to Greece in the 16th century.
  • Feta cheese may be the oldest ingredient in the salad. References to Greek cheese production date to the 8th century B.C.E., and the items used to make cheese from sheep’s or goat’s milk, described in Homer’s Odyssey are similar to those used today’s handmade feta [source].
  • Lettuce was first cultivated in Egypt for food around 2680 B.C.E. Romaine lettuce was bred on the Greek island of Cos, an alternative word still used for romaine [source]. Romans usually cooked their lettuce, and the plant became known as Roman lettuce due to the Roman belief in its healthful and healing properties.
  • Olives have been cultivated in Greece for thousands of years. Kalamata olives are just one variety from a specific region. Greece produces both green and black olives, in addition to the purple kalamata. Here’s more about Greek olives.
  • Onion’s origin cannot be established for certain. The wild onion is extinct so botanists lack the markers used to track its origin and spread. Traces of onions recovered from Bronze Age settlements in China indicate that onions were eaten as far back as 5000 B.C.E., and may be a point of origin. Archaeologists, botanists and food historians point to are central Asia or Persia as the site of early cultivation. Onions have been cultivated for at least 7,000 years, and were probably simultaneously domesticated around the world [source].
  • Tomatoes didn’t arrive in Europe until the 16th century…but not planted until 1818 in Greece. They were brought back by from the New World by the conquistadors in 1529, but as a member of the Nightshade family were first thought to be poisonous. They were used as houseplants and not eaten for another two centuries. In Greece, they weren’t widely cultivated until the early 20th century [source]. Here’s the history of tomatoes.
  •  
    Now, on to a salad from one of America’s great vegetarian chefs, Amanda Cohen of Dirt Candy, in New York City.

    Her “American Greek salad” is layered with some ingredients that no Greek chef has likely thought of (photos #5 and #6).

    RECIPE: AMANDA COHEN’S GREEK SALAD

    “This recipe, while it might look intimidating, makes this salad a party on your plate,” says Chef Amanda. “Sumac and za’atar give this recipe its zip. Sumac is a dried berry with a bright citrusy flavor, and za’atar is a vibrant, intensely herbal seasoning. You can find them at any Middle Eastern or Indian grocery store.

    “You can always leave them out, but this salad is a lot more fun if they’re invited to the party.”

    In addition to sumac and za’atar, this recipe invites pickled onions and fried onion rings with a preserved lemon drizzle.

    Thanks to Wüsthof for the recipe. Wüsthof is Chef Amanda’s cutlery of choice; and THE NIBBLE has more than a few in its knife rack, as well. Brush up on your knife skills with these Wüsthoff videos.

     

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

    For The Pickled Onions

  • 1 large red onion, very thinly sliced
  • ½ cup lime juice
  • ¼ cup kosher salt
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 3 cups extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup red wine vinegar
  • ½ cup fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  •  
    For The Salad

  • 1½ cups plum tomatoes, diced
  • 1½ cups hot house cucumbers, diced
  • ¾ cup fennel, very thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped
  • 1½ tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh oregano, chopped
  • 1 cup sliced black olives
  • 1 cup crumbled feta cheese
  •  
    For The Preserved Lemon Mayonnaise

  • ¼ cup chopped preserved lemons, seeds removed
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  •  
    For The Mushrooms

  • 2 trumpet royale mushroom
  • 1 can (12 ounces) seltzer water
  • 8 cups canola oil
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 cup panko crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon sumac
  • 1 tablespoons za’atar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  •  
    For The Garnish

  • 1 teaspoon sumac
  • 1 teaspoon za’atar
  • 2 tablespoons toasted pistachios, crushed
  •  
    Plus

  • Pita or crusty rustic bread
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the pickled onions. Massage 1 tablespoon of the salt into the onions. Keep massaging until liquid starts to seep out of the onions and then squeeze all of the liquid out. Wash the onions a few times and repeat a second time. Then, add 1 tablespoon of the salt and ¼ cup of the lime juice to the onions and let sit for a few hours. Squeeze all of the liquid out of the onions. Repeat the above sequence. When ready, onions should be a bright pink color. If they are not, repeat the process again.

     

    Amanda Cohen Greek Salad

    Amanda Cohen Greek Salad
    [5] and [6] Chef Amanda Cohen’s take on “the best Greek salad” (photos courtesy Star Chefs).

    Vertical Greek Salad
    [7] Daunted by Chef Amanda’s recipe? Then take on this one, served at Death Ave in New York City. Just stack on a piece of toasted rustic bread and serve.

    Wusthof Serrated Chopper

    [8] One of our favorite Wüsthof knives: the serrated chopper, available at Williams-Sonoma.

     
    2. MAKE the dressing. In a blender mix the garlic, mustard, red wine vinegar, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt and black pepper. Slowly stream in the olive oil. Add the oregano and blend until it is broken up into small pieces.

    3. MAKE the preserved lemon mayonnaise: Place all ingredients in blender and blend until very smooth. Put the mixture into a squeeze bottle.

    4. MAKE the salad. In a bowl mix the tomatoes, cucumbers, fennel, herbs and olives. Add the feta and adjust the salt levels.

    5. MAKE the mushroom rings: Slice the mushrooms into ¼” thick rings and punch the centers out, leaving about ¼” for an outer ring, so that each ring is ¼” thick and ¼” wide. Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed pot until it reaches 375°F.

    Mix the flour and the seltzer in a bowl. In a separate bowl mix the panko, the salt, the sumac and za’atar. Dip the rings in the seltzer mixture first and then dip them in the panko mixture. Fry in batches for about 2-3 minutes each. When done, the mushrooms should be golden brown on the outside.

    6. ASSEMBLE: Toss the salad with the dressing; taste and adjust the salt level. Divide the salad onto four plates. Place 4 onion rings on top of each salad. Squeeze a few lines of the preserved lemon mayo across the salad. Garnish: Sprinkle with the sumac, za’atar and the pistachios. Place a tablespoon of the pickled onions on the side of the plate. Microwave the pita and you’re ready to eat!

      

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    FOOD HOLIDAY: National French Fry Day

    Types Of French Fries

    [1] Can you name the fries? From the top: tots, chips, waffle fries, curly fries, frinkle fries, sweet potato fries and what most Americans think of as the classic French fry, the baton (photo courtesy Idaho Potato Commission).

    Truffle Parmesan Fries

    [2] We love truffle fries, coated in truffle oil and topped with some parmesan cheese (photo courtesy Flex Mussels | NYC).

    Spiral Cut Fries

    [3] Want to make spiral cut fries? Try this recipe from the Idaho Potato Commission.

     

    July 13th is National French Fry Day. In previous years we’ve created a glossary of the different types of French fries, and a variety of recipes from the Canadian favorite, poutine, to the two new recipes below.

    This year we have two new recipes, one of which is part of a trend to Asian fry garnishes, based on Asian twists with American French fries. These examples were reported by Flavor & The Menu, a magazine for chefs.

  • China: Chinese chain restaurants serve stir-fried fries, tossing fries into the wok with other ingredient. Examples: shoestring fries with Sichuan chicken, waffle-cut fries with roasted goose.
  • Indonesia: A&W Indonesia offers a side of “duo fries,” a combination of curly and straight fries in one package. Other restaurants similarly combine different forms of fries. Want combo fries with that?
  • Philippines: Potato Corner, a franchise chain, has been serving customized fries since it began in 1992. There are choices of seasonings, from chile barbecue and cinnamon to garlic and parmesan and sour cream and onion. Fries include original and sweet potato, plus loopy, which are circular, like calamari rings. Want to try them? There are outposts in 10 American states. Here’s the menu of fries.
  • South Korea: McDonald’s serves honey butter fries, a sweeter flavor profile. Pizza Hut launched a potato-sausage pizza topped with seasoned, straight-cut fries. Rival chain Mr. Pizza has honey butter potato pizza, with a topping of potato chips. WaBar, a Western-style pub chain, has a potato-filled menu that includes bulgogi potato pizza, made with crinkle-cut fries and bulgogi (marinated, grilled beef_.
  •  
    FRIES IN THE U.S.

    Fries have always been on the menu in the U.S., and they’re moving on up. According to recent data from Technomic’s MenuMonitor, fries have shown a 46.5% growth on menus at better restaurants since 2010.

    Americans consumers are eating even more fries today than a few years ago. Technomic’s MenuMonitor finds an increase in the number of appetizer fry items on menus, as well as in the number of side fry items at fine-dining restaurants, up by 5% since 2013.

    Rather than using grapeseed oil or canola oil, some top chefs are frying their potatoes in duck fat or goose fat, even beef fat, each of which give frie a distinctive, luxurious flavor. Another trend…

    Loaded Fries

    Taking inspiration from the loaded baked potato, loaded fries continue to expand as a menu choice.

    “Fries as a base are a no-brainer,” says chef Charlie Baggs of Chicago-based Charlie Baggs Culinary Innovations. “If you use fries like you use bread in a sandwich, you have the base, garnish, protein, sauce. If we look at fries like that—and you vary the color, temperature and textural elements—you can build exponential flavor systems.”

    Poutine, the beloved Canadian dish of fries topped with cheese curds and gravy, is currently the fastest-growing way of loading fries, according to Technomic.

    Regional or global flavor profiles also prevail, such as:

  • Berliner fries at Spitz in Los Angeles, topped with Berliner red sauce, tzatziki sauce, cabbage-carrot slaw, cucumber, tomato, feta, olives and pepperoncini—with a choice of meat as an option.
  • Paleek paneer fries at Potato Champion in Portland, Oregon, topped with curried spinach and paneer cheese, and cilantro chutney. The restaurant also services PB&J Fries, topped with satay sauce and a smoky chipotle-raspberry jam.
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    The only limit is your imagination.

    Chef Brian Goodman of Sawyer’s Street Frites and The Greenhouse Tavern in Cleveland advises:

     
    “Anything that can be on pasta, you could also make into a frite dish.” His carbonara frites are inspired by the pasta favorite—with black pepper, pecorino cheese and pancetta pepato—and are a huge draw at Cleveland Browns’ FirstEnergy Stadium.

    Fast-food versions of loaded fries have also been noted, often as limited-time offers, such as Wendy’s BBQ Pulled Pork Fries and Baconator Fries, topped with cheddar cheese sauce, bacon and shredded cheddar.

    Add Some Heat

    As Americans consume more and more hot sauce, spicy fries—like Five Guys’ Cajun fries—have become a popular option at chain restaurants.

    You can shake cayenne or hot sauce on your fries, or use sriracha ketchup, but here’s what the professionals are doing:

  • Kimchi fries can be found across the country, and recipes abound online.
  • King Noodle in Brooklyn, New York serves Mapo Tofu Chile Cheese Fries. combining the numbing heat of Sichuan peppercorns with chile and American cheese.
  • Log Cabin Inn in Harmony, Pennsylvania serves Fire Fries, with a hot-hot crunchy cayenne crust and a mouth-cooling ranch sauce alongside.
  • Furikake fries, Japanese style fries with sriracha mayonnaise, bonito and other Japanese ingredients, emulate Japanese street food.
  •  
    Now, how about some recipes?

     

    RECIPE #1: DAIGAKU IMO JAPANESE FRIES

    Daigaku imo is a Japanese dish of caramelized potatoes, traditionally made with sweet potatoes and black sesame seeds. The name translates as “university potatoes”: The dish was a popular snack at universities in Tokyo in the early 1900s.

    This recipe, which came to us from the Idaho Potato Commission, is from Chef Eric Yung of Elite Catering in Dayton, Ohio. He uses white russet potatoes and “tones the sweetness of the dish down to a kettle corn level.”

    Ingredients

  • 1 medium russet potato
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon corn syrup or honey
  • ½ teaspoon soy sauce
  • 5 tablespoons gomashio (black sesame seed, salt and sugar)
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the sugar, syrup and soy sauce in a small pot until the mixture is reduced and nappe consistency. Nappe, a French term meaning “layer,” is a consistency that allows a sauce to coat the food evenly. It should be neither too thick nor too thin.

    2. SCRUB the potato well and cut into wedges, leaving the skin on for color (you can peel it if you want). Place the cut pieces in cold water. When ready to fry, drain the pieces and pat dry. Place in the fryer until cooked through and lightly browned.

    3. REMOVE the potato from the fryer, drain and combine with the syrup mixture. Toss to coat (you can stir the potato into the syrup); the potato will shine if coated properly. Sprinkle with some gomashio. Separate the potato pieces so they don’t get stuck to each other, and serve.
     
     
    RECIPE #2: CARNE ASADA FRIES

    This recipe, from food blogger Jonathan Melendez of The Candid Appetite, was also sent to us by the Idaho Potato Commission.

    In his take, Jonathan tops French fries with all the ingredients for Carne Asada (not unlike the Chinese-Peruvian dish, lomo saltado, photo #6). To save time, use store bought salsa and guacamole.

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound Idaho potatoes, peeled and cut into thin fries
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 2 pounds flap steak or skirt steak
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons granulated garlic
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons granulated onion
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1-1/2 cups sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1-1/2 cups Monterey jack cheese, shredded
  • 2 tomatoes, diced
  • 1 cup guacamole
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • Optional: 1/4 cup sliced pickled jalapeños
  • Optional: 1/4 cup crumbled queso fresco (substitute mild feta*)
  •  

    Daigaku Imo Fries
    [4] Daiguko imo, recipe #1: a long-standing Japanese recipe that caramelizes the potatoes (photo courtesy Idaho Potato Commission).

    Carne Asada Fries
    [5] Carne asada fries, fully loaded: recipe #2 (photo courtesy Idaho Potato Commission).

    Carne Asado With Fries

    [6] Lomo saltado, a Chinese-Peruvian beef stir-fry, topped with French fries. Here’s the recipe from Skinny Taste.

     
    Preparation

    1. HEAT a Dutch oven or other large pot over medium-high heat. Fill it a bit less than halfway with vegetable oil. Attach a deep fryer thermometer and heat the oil to 350°F.

    2. PEEL the potatoes and slice them into thin fries. Immediately place the fries into a bowl of cold water to prevent them from turning brown, and to rinse away the excess starch. Drain the potatoes and dry them thoroughly with a clean kitchen towel. Make sure they’re completely dry; you don’t want any moisture in the oil.

    3. FRY the potatoes in batches until light golden brown, about 3 to 5 minutes. Stir with a slotted spoon and transfer to a wire rack set over a baking sheet. Continue frying the rest of the fries. Heat the oil to 375°F and fry the potatoes a second time (also in batches) until deep golden brown and crispy, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the fries back to the wire rack and sprinkle with salt to taste.

    4. HEAT an outdoor grill or a stovetop grill pan over medium-high heat until hot. In a large bowl, combine the flap steak with the salt, pepper, granulated garlic, onion, paprika, oregano and Worcestershire sauce. Mix until evenly seasoned. Cook the meat until charred on both sides, about 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and allow to rest for a few minutes before chopping.

    5. ASSEMBLE: Arrange the fried potatoes on an oven-safe platter, baking sheet or individual ramekins. Sprinkle with shredded cheese and place in a 350°F oven for about 5 minutes to melt the cheese. Top with chopped carne asada, sour cream, guacamole, tomatoes, pickled jalapeños, cilantro and queso fresco. Serve Immediately.
    ________________

    *If the feta is to salty, soak the block in fresh water for 15 minutes. Rinse, taste, and soak again as necessary.

      

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