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TIP OF THE DAY: American Bruschetta & Beet Swath

This beautiful plate from Gardenia restaurant in New York’s Greenwich Village is a composition of grilled mackerel, butternut squash and endive, garnished with baby greens dressed in vinaigrette and a dollop of pesto.

But what really stood out to us is what we’ve named “American bruschetta,” a square of crustless white toast, topped with pickled vegetables, a gherkin and an herb leaf tossed in vinaigrette (shown on the bottom left of the plate).

If this is “American bruschetta,” what’s Italian bruschetta? Here’s the scoop, including the difference between bruschetta and crostini. (NOTE: Pronounce it broo-skett-a, not broo-shett-a.)

You don’t need a baguette or other crusty loaf that serves as the foundation of classic bruschetta.

  • Toast anything—from ordinary white bread to raisin walnut bread.
  • Top it with anything that complements the entrée. Look in your fridge, pantry, freezer.
  • Use up leftovers.
  • Have fun with your creation.



    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/grilled mackerel gardenianyc 230

    Check out the crustless toast topped with veggies. This bruschetta, along with the, orange squash and swath of burgundy beet purée, add vibrant color to the plate. Photo courtesy Gardenia Restaurant | NYC.

  • Cheese: goat cheese, crème fraîche, fromage blanc or other mild cheese on raisin bread or walnut bread (or a raisin-walnut-semolina combination)
  • Condiments: chutney, compound butter, olives
  • Fish: anchovies, caviar/roe, sardines, shellfish
  • Meat: bacon, sausage, other charcuterie
  • Spreads: egg salad, guacamole, Middle Eastern (babaganoush, hummus, tzatziki, etc.), spreadable pâté, tapenade, pimento cheese or other cheese spread
  • Vegetables: fresh (baby arugula, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers or watercress are easy), pickled, puréed cooked vegetables
  • Whatever you have at hand (yesterday we used leftover creamy polenta garnished with sliced olives and pimento

  • Butter, mayonnaise, mustard, olive oil, vinaigrette, yogurt or other binder as needed, to anchor dry ingredients to the bread
  • Garnishes: sliced chiles, herbs, gherkins, spices, etc.

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    Duck breast with carrot purée. Photo courtesy



    1. ASSEMBLE the ingredients. Grill or toast the bread (in a toaster or under the broiler). Remove the crusts as desired.

    2. SPREAD a binder, if necessary, on the bread.

    3. TOP with the featured ingredients and serve.

    Painted swaths of fruit or vegetable purée are clever ways to add color to a plate. Use them along with entrées that are beige, brown or white—which includes every protein we can think of except crab, shrimp and lobster (fish, meat, poultry, seitan, tofu).

    That also goes for most standard starches: beans, potatoes, noodles, white and brown rice and most other grains.

    Even if you have another bright color on the plate—butternut squash, carrots, corn, green beans, etc.—you can round out the plate with a swath of a different color.

    No time to cook vegetables for your color splash? Canned beets and carrots work well: Just drain and purée.


  • Bright colored fruit or vegetable—green, orange, red, yellow
  • Seasonings to taste—anything from salt and pepper to curry, garlic, etc.

    1. PURÉE and seasonthe cooked vegetable.

    2. USE a silicon basting brush to paint a swath of purée across the plate.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: McConnell’s Ice Cream

    California-based McConnell’s Ice Cream has always been a small family company. Founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, the McConnells made everything from scratch, in small batches, with milk and cream from cows who graze on Central Coast pasture. It’s still made the same way—including pasteurizing the raw milk at The Old Dairy creamery (it dates to 1934).

    Happy cows give happy milk, and these California girls graze on green grass under blue skies. If you’re a cow, there’s nothing better. Add the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients—from the cage-free eggs to strawberries grown down the road. Avoid preservatives, stabilizers, or additives of any kind.

    The result: ice cream that tastes fresher, more vibrant and creamier (the ice cream now has more than 18% milk fat).

    The company is under new management (also a family), the ice cream is even better than we remember. Perhaps that’s because one of the owners is an executive chef-restaurateur, and the other is a veteran of winemaking (who grew up eating McConnell’s). They used their palates to fine-tune the classic recipes and create quite a few others.

    They also spent the better part of two years modernizing the equipment and production process.


    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/chocolate raspberry jam mcconnellsicecream 230

    Chocolate With Raspberry Jam.
    Photo courtesy McConnell’s.


    And they’re taking their updated line on the road: The brand is branching out nationwide. Look for it in specialty food stores and upscale supermarkets.

    The flavors change seasonally, but a representative sample includes:


    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/mcconnells 4 pints mcconnellsicecream 230

    While much is updated and improved at McConnell’s Ice Cream, the classic packaging remains. Photo courtesy McConnell’s.

  • Chocolate Almond Brittle
  • Chocolate Covered Strawberries
  • Churros Con Leche
  • Coconut & Cream
  • Double Peanut Butter Chip
  • Dutchman’s Chocolate
  • Eureka Lemon & Marionberries (in stores now and exquisite!)
  • Golden State Vanilla
  • Mint Chip
  • Peppermint Stick
  • Salted Caramel Chip
  • Sea Salt Cream & Cookies
  • Sweet Cream
  • Toasted Coconut Almond Chip
  • Turkish Coffee
  • Vanilla Bean
    One of this summer’s specials is Boysenberry Rose Milk Jam, an impressive combination (though we’re not one for all those boysenberry seeds). We recently tasted an upcoming fall flavor, Cardamom & Swedish Gingersnaps, that was so good, before we knew it the pint was empty (and we hadn’t gotten up from the table).

    If you can’t wait for the ice cream to show up in your local store, you can order it from the website. For the person who has everything, send it as a gift!

    For more information, visit



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Amorino Gelato


    The signature cone, served in petals in as
    many flavors as you like. Photo courtesy
    Amorino Gelato.


    Every year prior to July, National Ice Cream Month, we look for a great new brand of ice cream to review. This year, we were not disappointed: Amorino Gelato, the acclaimed European gelato and coffee chain, has come to the U.S.

    The gelato and sorbetto—celestial, awesome, fill in your favorite superlative here—is our new favorite ice cream and sorbet. Everything is as good as it can be (our thought: “to die for”), sometimes jaw-droppingly so (don’t overlook the Chocolate Sorbetto—no dairy—is like thick fudge, the Basil-Lime special of the month is a revelation, etc. etc. etc.).

    Launched in 2002 in Paris by two friends, the the company now has some 60 locations worldwide, and growing.

    There are two locations in Manhattan (Eighth Avenue and Eighteenth Street in Chelsea and University Place in Greenwich Village), one in Boston on Newbury Street, and others to come (keep checking the website or the Facebook page for new locations).


    Want an Amorino Gelato in your home town? Franchises are available. All of the food is made by artisans in Italy and shipped to the U.S.


    The brand’s signature is the gelato “flower” (photo above), with petal-like scoops. You can have as many different flavors as you want, from the monthly selection of 23 flavors (gelato, sorbetto, frozen yogurt) plus a special of the month.

    Not in the mood for an ice cream cone? There are:

  • Ice cream cups, crêpes and waffles
  • Coffee and tea drinks, hot and cold
  • Shakes made with ice cream or sorbet shakes
  • Pastries, macarons and confectionery

    If you are traveling to an “Amorino city,” make it a destination. You won’t be disappointed, even if you have to wait in line.

    Or better yet, make your city an Amorino city!



    Don’t want a petal cone? Have a cup! Photo courtesy Amorino Gelato.




    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Kenny’s Krumbs

    If only Cosmo Kramer had focused on selling the tops of crumb cake crumbs instead of muffin tops, he’d have had a hit.

    Now, everyone who has delighted in the crumbs on top of a crumbcake can revel in jumbo crumbcake crumbs from Kenny’s Krumbs.

    Kenny has transformed the streusel (the crumb topping—see section below) into crunchy, cookie-like nuggets of cinnamon goodness. They’re crumb cookies—there’s no cake involved, although you can use Kenny’s Krumbs on any cake you like.


  • Snacking straight from the bag.
  • For your coffee break (or with other favorite beverage—tea, milk, hot chocolate).
  • As a garnish with whipped cream on pound cake or other uniced cake.
  • To garnish an iced cake.
  • Krumb-topped cheesecake.
  • On ice cream, along or with your favorite dessert sauce.
  • As mega-crumbs on a fruit crisp, a deep-dish baked fruit dessert made with a crumb topping.
  • On a cobbler, replacing the biscuit topping (the difference between crisp, crumb, cobbler, etc.)
  • To top chocolate or custard tarts.
  • As a pie topping (see our article on crumb tops for pies).


    Who needs cake. Here, crumb cake topping baked up as cookie-like “crumbs.” Photo courtesy Kenny’s Krumbs.


    Instead of butter, Kenny’s Krumbs uses margarine to create the crumbs. The other ingredients include enriched bleached flour, malted barley flour, sugar and spices.

    Kenny’s Krumbs sells them packaged in 12-ounce resealable bags. Four bags of Krumbs are $28.00, 12 bags are $72.00, plus shipping.

    You can also buy Krumbs in large metal gift buckets and smaller tins from Hahn’s Old Fashioned Cakes ($27.50 to $30.00).

    Kenny’s Krumbs and Hahn’s deliver anywhere in the continental U.S. Plan ahead: These crumb cookies are a great teacher gift or stocking stuffer.


    Picture 656

    Bring them to friends and teachers, stuff stockings, snack on. Photo courtesy Kenny’s Krumbs.



    Long popular as the topping on Streuselkuchen, Germany’s crumb-topped yeast cake, streusel (pronounced SHTROY-zul) is a topping made from butter, flour and sugar. It can also contain chopped nuts or rolled oats.

    The word derives from the German “streuen,” meaning to sprinkle or scatter. The original Streuselkuchen was very flat, with crumbs equal to the height of the cake (think one inch of cake topped with one inch of crumbs).

    Note that all crumbcakes are coffee cakes, but not all coffee cakes are crumbcake. Another popular coffee cake, also a yeast cake, can be strewn with raisins and nuts and drizzled with a variation royal icing* (and we wish we had a piece right now).

    The crumb cake is believed to have originated in Silesia, which today is in western Poland (if you’ve read James Michener’s Poland, you know the borders changed regularly).

    The original recipe engendered variants with tart fruits (apples, gooseberries, sour cherries, rhubarb), poppy seeds and pastry cream.


    Today, Americans can enjoy their crumbcakes with with a layer of fruit (apple, apricot, raspberry), chocolate and other flavors.

    Or, those who have discovered Kenny’s can simply enjoy the crumbs!

    *To make coffee cake icing, mix until smooth 1 cup confectioner’s sugar, 2 tablespoons warm milk and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Artisan Bistro Beyond Breakfast

    Artisan Bistro wants to make it easy for everyone to eat delicious, nutrition-rich meals. The company makes lunch/dinner entrees, burritos and breakfasts—single-serving frozen meals made with the best lean proteins, whole grains, vegetables and healthy fats.

    We received samples of their Beyond Breakfast line, and it was eye-opening: delicious and only 170 to 200 calories per satisfying serving. And, the entrees are microwave-cooked in just four minutes. It will cook while you’re making a cup of coffee with a single-serve machine.

    The vegetarian breakfasts use egg whites only, but you’ll never notice the absence of the yolk because each preparation is so well seasoned and the egg whites are patties shaped like a poached egg.

    In five varieties, the Beyond Breakfast options include:

  • Country-Style Potatoes & Egg, a modern twist on a classic favorite made with an egg white patty, all-natural turkey, organic kale and red potatoes finished with spicy white pepper.


    Breakfast in a box: satisfying, nutritious, calorie-friendly. Photo courtesy Artisan Bistro.

  • Huevos Rancheros Verde, a south-of-the-border-inspired mix of an egg white patty, organic black beans, bell peppers and creamy jack cheese.
  • Italian-Style Hash & Egg, a savory blend of an egg white patty, all-natural turkey, organic asparagus, white beans and bell peppers.
  • Mediterranean Breakfast Stack, a zesty offering with an egg white patty, organic polenta, eggplant and sharp romano cheese.
  • Veggie Chorizo Huevos Rancheros, all the flavor of traditional meat chorizo in a vegetarian version, with an egg whites patty, bell peppers and jack cheese.
    All varieties are contain 70% or more organic ingredients, no GMOs and are gluten free.

    After a week of Artisan Bistro breakfasts, We’re hooked on the flavor, ease, better nutrition and lower calories than what we usually make.

    Learn more at, including a store locator.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Carla Hall Petite Cookies

    Most fans of “Top Chef” Chef love Carla Hall, a finalist on her season and a subsequent Top Chef All Star, winning the “Fan Favorite” award.

    She went on to become a cohost on “The Chew” and to start Carla Hall Petite Cookies, an artisan cookie company that specializes in teeny cookies.

    A brilliant idea for people who need just a bite, the cookies are either half-inch cubes or one-inch drop cookies, depending on the nature of the dough.

    They’re meant to pair “boldly and beautifully,” according to Carla, with beer, wine, tea and coffee.

    For home, entertaining and gifting, we’ve been charmed by these little cookies. Made in small batches, every step from mixing the dough to packaging is done by hand.

    Of course, only the finest ingredients are used: European-style butter, unbleached sugar and flour, couverture chocolate, artisan cheeses, fresh nuts, premium spices and, says Carla of her most important ingredient: love.

    Focusing on familiar flavors with a twist, choices include:


    Harissa Spiced Nuts and Cookies

    Mexican Chocolate Chip Cookies, teeny bites of heaven. Carla Hall Petite Cookies.

    Petite Cookies

  • Almond Ginger Cherry Shortbread
  • Black Forest Crinkle (our favorite, a cherry-chocolate delight)
  • Chocolate Hazelnut Praline
  • Mexican Chocolate Chip
  • Lemon Black Pepper Shortbread
  • Oatmeal Cranberry White Chocolate
  • Pecan Shortbread with Vanilla Salt
    There’s one savory option:

  • Cheddar Pecan
    There are also cakes and regular-size cookies (including the best Magic bar we’ve ever had):

  • Cakes: Apple Walnut Bread, Carrot Cake, Chocolate Cinnamon Tea Cake, Lemon-Glazed Five Flavor Pound Cake, Salted Caramel Banana Bread
  • Cookies: Magic Bar, Oatmeal Cookie Sandwich, Triple Layer Cookie Bar


    A gift box for any cookie lover. Photo courtesy Carla Hall Petite Cookies.



    Most definitely, the Sweet Collection Gift Box, which includes six of the seven varieties of sweet petites. It’s $25.00; there’s a smaller box with three varieties for $12.50.

    If you want to include a signed copy of Carla’s cookbook, Carla’s Comfort Foods: Favorite Dishes from Around the World—you can add it to the Sweet Collection gift box for a total of $45.00.

    There are other gift options, other goodies, and of course, you can buy individual packages of whatever you like.

    Head to to get yours.

    Or, find a retailer near you.



    Fans of Top Chef may remember that Carla spent several years working as a model on the runways of Paris, Milan and London. It was in Paris that she fell in love with the art of food.

    But what most people don’t know is that before heading to Europe, Carla spent two years as a CPA at Price Waterhouse.

    When she returned from Europe, she attended L’Academie de Cuisine in Maryland where she completed her culinary training and began her career as a professional chef.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Siggi’s Skyr, Icelandic Yogurt

    We remember when Siggi Hilmarsson’s skyr (pronounced SKEER), Icelandic-style strained yogurt, first appeared on the shelves of Murray’s Cheese in Greenwich Village.

    Hailing from Iceland, the transplanted New Yorker found the yogurts in the U.S. too sweet and not thick enough—even the Greek-style yogurts. So in 2004 he started to make his own, in his kitchen. Today, Siggi’s skyr is available nationally, to the delight of many.

    This is not bargain yogurt. It’s even pricier than Greek brands—and it’s thicker than Greek yogurt as well. The reason is, more milk is required to produce the same quantity. You get what you pay for.

    Greek-style yogurt is thicker than American-style yogurt because more water is strained out of the whey—it’s triple strained. But skyr is drained even more. Think of it as quadruple-strained yogurt. One cup of Siggi’s skyr requires four times more milk than a typical American brand.

    The result is so thick that a spoon stands up straight in the cup; yet it has 0% fat (some flavors are lowfat, 2%). The concentration of milk also delivers more calcium and protein.



    A bowl of Siggi’s skyr with pomegranate arils. Photo courtesy Siggi’s Dairy.


    In Iceland, skyr is typically fat-free because all the cream is been removed to make butter.

    If you look for information on skyr, you may find it referred to as a cheese. So is it yogurt or cheese? It depends on the recipe of the individual producer.

    The recipe arrived in Iceland from Norway in the Middle Ages. It most likely was originally made as a cheese, with rennet. These days, some ism some isn’t. Siggi’s is yogurt.

    The difference between a cultured dairy product, such as sour cream or yogurt, and a fresh cheese that looks just like it, such as fromage blanc or quark, is the addition of a coagulant, such as rennet.

    With cottage cheese and ricotta, you can see the curds. With fromage blanc and quark (and most other cheeses), you can’t, because of the particular recipe. You also can’t tell the difference by tasting it. The textures of sour cream, yogurt, fromage blanc and quark are very similar.

    Don’t confuse these fresh cheeses with yogurt cheese like labneh.

  • Regular yogurt is made by combining milk with live cultures. It is available plain and flavored, made from whole milk (5% fat), lowfat (1%) and fat-free (0%).
  • Greek yogurt follows the same recipe, but is triple strained, removing a portion of by the whey. This creates a thicker yogurt that is higher in protein. It may or may not be tangier than regular yogurt, depending on the processes of the particular brand.
  • Skyr, Icelandic yogurt, is even thicker than Greek yogurt. Think of it as quadruple-strained. It is made from skim milk (0%)—the cream is skimmed off to make butter. In Iceland it is often made from raw milk, which is not legal in the U.S. for fresh dairy products.
  • The more concentrated (strained) a style of yogurt is, the costlier it will be because it contains more milk and less water.

    Check out our Yogurt Glossary for much more on the different types of yogurt.



    Siggi’s coconut yogurt topped with toasted coconut and pumpkin seeds from the pantry. Photo courtesy Siggi’s Dairy.



    In addition to its much thicker body, Siggi’s flavors have far less sugar. Mainstream flavored yogurts can have up to 25 grams of sugar per serving. Siggi’s varieties have 9-11 grams, resulting in 10-20 calories less than brands like Chobani and FAGE. While that doesn’t mean a lot for one portion, for frequent yogurt eaters it adds up.

    The products are made with rBST-free milk that comes from family farms in New York State and Wisconsin, and are sweetened with fruit and a touch of agave nectar or cane sugar, instead of fruit preserves. The result is a more elegant flavor

  • Blueberry
  • Mixed Berries & Açai
  • Orange & Ginger
  • Peach
  • Plain
  • Pomegranate & Passion Fruit
  • Raspberry
  • Strawberry
  • Vanilla

  • Coconut
  • Mango & Jalapeño
  • Plain
  • Pumpkin & Spice
  • Vanilla
    The company also makes squeezable yogurt tubes in Raspberry and Strawberry, and filmjölk—Swedish-style drinkable yogurt—in Plain, Raspberry, Strawberry and Vanilla.

    The brand is all natural, certified gluten-free and certified kosher by OU.

    Siggi’s is eco-friendly. The front of the label tells you the grams of sugar, protein and calories. The label itself is paper, and can be easily detached ffrom the plastic carton for separate recycling.

    For a store locator visit


    For a yogurt lover, pick up one or two containers of each flavor and tuck them into an Easter basket or a nice serving bowl.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Scrub Daddy Sponge



    Scrub Daddy, our new kitchen essential. Photos by Faith Tomases | THE NIBBLE.


    In the beginning, there was the sea sponge, one of the simplest animal organisms, believed to have evolved at least 700 million years ago. With no specialized organs and no locomotion, they attached to rocks on the sea bed, where they eat microscopic plants in the sea water.

    Under the skin is a simple skeleton made of a soft, porous material called spongin. Sponges have been harvested since ancient times and used for cleaning.

    In the 1940s, artificial sponges were developed by DuPont company, made from cellulose. Soon, cellulose sponges replaced natural sponges in America’s household. Today’s synthetic sponges can also be made from foamed plastic polymers.

    But as everyone who uses these sponges knows, they fall apart and worse, collect odors and bacteria—including salmonella and E.coli wiped from cutting boards and kitchen counters. The moist environment of a conventional sponge—wild or artificial—is conducive to bacterial growth.

    We are advised to regularly clean our sponges: in the dishwasher, microwave or washing machine; or by soaking in a solution of ammonia, bleach or vinegar.


    Every so often, someone does create a better mousetrap. In this case, it was Aaron Krause, who created Scrub Daddy: a heavy-duty, scratch-free sponge. It is a champ at scrubbing off just about anything you want scrubbed.

    And it welcomes you with a smiling face, the mouth of which can be used to scrub utensils.

    Krause was washing and waxing cars for a living when he scratched a car. In response, he went home and invented a line of buffing and polishing pads, including the Scrub Daddy sponge.

    His business was bought out by 3M, which didn’t want Scrub Daddy because they had Scotch-Brite (not nearly as effective).

    He tried marketing Scrub Daddy himself, with minimal success ($100,000 in sales in 18 months). Then, he got an investment and assistance via Shark Tank that has generated $18 million in sales in 18 months.

    Scrub Daddy is made of a high-tech polymer texture that changes texture with the water temperature: It’s hard in cold water, for cleaning pots and grills; and soft in hot water for dishes.

    It’s safe to use (non-scratch) on just about every household surface. Like other sponges, it’s flexible to get to the bottom of coffee pots, mugs, vases, etc.

    We are thrilled—THRILLED!—with the cute little guy, who is made in happy colors: blue, green orange and yellow. There’s also a lemon-scented yellow version and a larger rectangle (no face). The company has also released Sponge Daddy, in the size of a conventional kitchen sponge (we haven’t tried it).

    We’ve used ours for a few months and it makes for happy scrubbing. Independent lab test showed it remains odor-free for up to two months. Beyond the kitchen, use it for:

  • Other household cleaning. Scrub Daddy adds fun to any chore.
  • Outdoor cleaning, from grills and swings to pool surfaces and decks.
  • Personal care, from handwashing (kids may like the face enough to use it more often) to exfoliating.
  • Auto care, the use that inspired it in the first place. Use it on your car or boat to clean dashboards, upholstery, wheels, windows, whatever.
    Scrub Daddy is sold in Bed Bath & Beyond, Home Depot, SuperValu and Wal-Mart, with other retailers coming on board. There’s also a website,, but we hate to send you there because it needs work!

    You can also buy it on



    According to the manufacturers of Peachy Clean, the bacteria on a conventional sponge double every 20 minutes A scrubbing sponge is the #1 cross contaminator of food borne illnesses in the kitchen.

    So they created Peachy Clean Silicone Scrubbers, incorporating a new technology that is anti-microbial and anti-odor, resisting most odors caused by bacteria, mold and mildew.

    These scrubbers are specially designed to be fast drying to help reduce the bacteria, mold, and mildew growth facilitated by a moist environment.

    Also non-scratch, they last on average 3-6 months (they are the only scrubbers on the market that come with a 3 month warranty). Instead of a smiling face, the sponges smell like peaches.

    You can buy them on, and visit the company website,



    Peachy clean has a subtle peach aroma. Photo by Julia Tomases | THE NIBBLE.


    NOTE: Both of these sponges are scrubbers, as opposed to liquid picker-uppers. While they will wipe a counter, for major spills you’ll need a conventional sponge or paper towel.



    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Kurobuta Ham


    Ham doesn’t get any better than this Kurobuta. Photo courtesy Snake River Farms.


    If you’ve been thinking about a juicy Easter ham gracing your table next week, there’s still time to order the best.

    In our opinion, that’s a Kurobuta (koo-row-BOO-tuh) ham from Snake River Farms. We’ve order at least one each year, and we never cease to be very, very happy.

    Kurobuta ham has been called the world’s best ham. Made from pure-bred Berkshire pork, it’s also known as the Kobe beef of ham, because of the fine intramuscular marbling that makes the meat melt-in-your-mouth tender.

    How good is this ham? Succulent beyond expectation with a perfect smoke and impeccable seasoning, subtle notes of clove and other spices caressing one’s tongue.

    And the most celestial aroma! We were truly sad when the last bite was gone.

    Our butcher, one of New York’s finest, already carried the Wagyu beef (an American-bred Kobe style) from Snake River Farms, but not the Kurobuta ham. After we shared some of our Kurobuta with him, he became an instant fan and a wholesale client.


    We couldn’t be happier about that. Now, when we have a hankering for a great piece of ham, we just have to go downtown to Pino’s to pick it up.

    All you have to do is head to or phone 877.496.4220.

    And if you’re already set for Easter, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are coming up soon! For lovers of fine food, a Kurobuta is a memorable gift.

    A final comment: Kurobuta ham isn’t a luxury: It’s a necessity!


  • The cuts and types of ham.
  • The history of ham.
  • Ham and ham glaze recipes.
  • Ham trivia quiz #1.
  • Ham trivia quiz #2.


    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Dave’s Killer Bread

    Milwaukie, Oregon, founded in 1847 on the banks of the Willamette River and now a suburb of Portland, is also known as the the birthplace of the Bing cherry. But soon, it may be known as the birthplace of Dave’s Killer Bread.

    Dave’s Killer Bread is “the best bread in the universe,” according to the company website.

    While we might add other favorite breads in the tie for “best,” Dave’s Killer Bread is up there. It’s the #1, best-selling organic bread in the U.S.

    And it is, indeed, killer: all natural, whole grain breads packed with protein, fiber, omega 3 fatty acids and great flavor. Whole grain bread has never tasted better.

    The line of organic, Non-GMO Project Verified, vegan whole grain breads began 10 years ago with Blues Bread (with blue cornmeal). You can tell how much the locals love “DKB”: That original loaf has expanded to 14 different killer breads ranging in flavor and texture, plus dinner rolls and a whole grain cinnamon roll. The line now sold nationwide.

    We tried samples of two varieties and are converts. This is the best seeded, whole grain bread we can imagine. We wouldn’t use anything else for sandwiches and toast.



    Photo courtesy Yvonne |




    PowerSeed has 6g protein, 6g fiber and 500 mg omega 3 per slice. And it’s delicious! Photo courtesy Dave’s Killer Bread.


    A Cornucopia Of Delicious, Better-For-You Breads

  • Blues Bread, rolled in organic blue cornmeal, giving it a crunchy crust and sweet flavor. 5g protein, 4g fiber, 340mg omega 3, 130 calories per slice.
  • Good Seed, with the boldest texture and sweetest flavor of the breads. 6g protein, 4g fiber, 670mg omega 3, 130 calories per slice.
  • 100% Whole Wheat, with a smooth texture and a touch of sweetness (try it as French toast). 4g protein, 3g fiber, 90mg omega 3, 110 calories per slice.
  • Powerseed, sweetened with organic fruit juices instead of sugar, 6g protein, 6g fiber, 500 mg omega 3, 110 calories per slice.
  • Rockin’ Rye, with a seedless crust and soft texture. 6g protein, 4g fiber, 130mg omega 3, 120 calories per slice.
  • Seeded Honey Wheat, with nearly 4 tablespoons of pure organic honey packed into each loaf, the sweet taste and crunchy texture make Seeded Honey Wheat an instant favorite. 5g protein, 5g fiber, 100mg omega 3, 110 calories per slice.
  • Spelt, with a smooth texture and an earthy, nutty flavor. 5g protein, 4g fiber, 410mg omega 3, 130 calories per slice.
  • Sprouted Wheat, with bold flavor and crunchy texture. 6g protein, 4g fiber, 840mg omega 3, 110 calories per slice.
  • 21 Whole Grains and Seeds, with a hearty texture, subtle sweetness, and a seed-coated crust. 6 protein, 5g fiber, 220mg omega 3, 110 calories per slice.
  • It that’s not enough, there are:

  • Thin Slice Breads, five versions of the most popular loaves, with calories from 60-90 slice (compared to 110-130 for the regular breads).
  • Buns, dinner rolls and hamburger buns.
  • Cinnamon Roll, called Sin Dawg, a whole grain, baguette-shape treat.
    What’s in those breads? Depending on the loaf, you’ll get:

  • Whole grains: barley, blue cornmeal, brown rice, buckwheat, cracked rye, cracked whole wheat, Kamut khorasan wheat, millet, quinoa, rolled oats, rye, spelt, sorghum, triticale, whole wheat flour, yellow cornmeal
  • Seeds: amaranth, black sesame seeds, brown sesame seeds, flaxseeds, poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, unhulled sesame seeds
    Bread lovers: Get up, go out and get some! Here’s a store locator.

    Or, order online.

    Thanks, Dave, for each delicious bite.



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