THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

Archive for Tip Of The Day

FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Flaming Egg Nog

We ring in the New Year with Champagne. But before the clock strikes midnight, we dazzle guests with flaming egg nog.

The key to flaming is 150-proof rum—different from the 80-proof rum most people have in the house for cocktails.

  • MAKE or buy the nog (if you purchase it, spice it up with 1-1/2 ounces of spiced rum per 4 ounces of nog).
  • CHILL and pour into a Martini glass if you don’t have glass cups (but if you decide to invest in glass cups, they’re great for coffee and tea all year-round).
  • FLOAT the rum. Float half an ounce of 150-proof rum on top of the nog.
  • GRIND fresh nutmeg to garnish.
  • IGNITE the drink in front of the guest, using a long wooden fireplace match. It’s holiday magic!
  •  
    Find egg nog recipes in the Cocktails & Spirits Section of THE NIBBLE webzine.

     

    Get ready to light the match and ignite the New Year’s Eve festivities.

     

    *The Mount Gay rum shown in the photo is 80-proof, not 150-proof: 80-proof is for drinking, 150-proof is for igniting.

      

    Comments off

    FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Gourmet Hot Chocolate

    We love those luxury, super-rich hot chocolates that can cost up to $25 a box. Some are simply chopped up bits of fine chocolate, so you can make your own for far less money by chopping up a good chocolate bar. Combine 1 ounce (3 tablespoons) of chopped chocolate with 1 ounce of whole milk in mug. Microwave for 30 seconds and whisk thoroughly to blend. Add another 6 ounces of milk, stir, and heat for 60 seconds. You can use any chocolate: dark, milk, or white, including flavored bars (or add a dash of cinnamon, anise, nutmeg, and chili powder for “Aztec” hot chocolate). You can use chocolate morsels, but the key is, the finer the chocolate, the more delicious the drink. For a richer beverage, don’t use cream: The secret is to add a tablespoon of sweet butter to the milk before you heat it. Don’t try to make luxury hot chocolate with 2% or fat-free milk: The purpose is to enjoy a sumptuous beverage. If you’re cutting back, sugar-free “diet” cocoas are the best route, topped off with some whole milk. Read our reviews of the best diet cocoas, and our reviews of more than 65 gourmet cocoas and hot chocolates, in THE NIBBLE online magazine.   Hot ChocolateBefore you chop up the chocolate bar to make hot chocolate, shave some chocolate curls for garnish.
    WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COCOA AND HOT CHOCOLATE? Cocoa is made from cocoa powder, hot chocolate is made from shaved or ground chocolate bars, or from pistoles, tiny drops of whole chocolate. Hot chocolate is naturally richer, because it contains the cocoa butter that has been removed from cocoa powder.

    Comments off

    FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Panettone

    PanettonePanettone makes great French toast! Photo by Gabriel T | Sxc. Did you get a panettone for Christmas? Panettone is the Italian version of fruitcake, a fluffy, sweet yeast bread dotted with raisins, candied lemon and orange peel (called pan dulce in Latin America). In Italy, this tall, dome-shaped, airy Christmas yeast bread, which dates to Medieval times, is very popular for the holidays. The classic accompaniment is a sweet hot beverage or a sweet wine such as spumante or moscato (but any dessert wine will do). Some Italians add a side of crema di mascarpone, a cream made from mascarpone cheese, eggs and Amaretto (or substitute zabaglione). If you have more panettone than you can enjoy, cut it into slices and freeze it: After seconds in the microwave, it’s deliciously warm and fluffy again. We enjoy it toasted—buttered for breakfast or made into a luxurious piece of French toast, and for dessert with a scoop of vanilla or rum raisin ice cream. And it makes one heck of a bread pudding (there’s a recipe in Giada’s Family Dinners, by Giada de Laurentiis).Merry Christmas from all of us at THE NIBBLE.

    Comments off

    FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Holiday Shortcake

    Use your cookie cutters to make a special holiday “ice cream cake.” Slice regular or chocolate pound cake into 1/2″to 3/4″-thick slices and use cookie cutters to cut shapes into the cake—trees and stars are especially nice. Top with vanilla, mint or candy cane ice cream, fresh strawberries and mint leaves, and drizzle with chocolate sauce if you like. Use heart-shaped cookie cutters and other theme shapes to make this special (and easy) dessert for every holiday. If the poundcake isn’t dense, you may have to toast it lightly in order to cut out the shapes—but toasted cake is just as delicious. Click here for a pumpkin mousse recipe—another lovely, seasonal dessert in the Desserts & Ice Cream Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.   Snowflake Cookie Cutter
    Buy a poundcake, cut shapes with your cookie cutters, and turn them into “holiday shortcake”
    with whipped cream and berries.
     

    Comments off

    FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Peppermint Patties

    Chocolate Peppermint Patties
    These are from the Wisconsin Cheeseman, but your own homemade peppermint patties will be a much bigger hit.
      If you love peppermint patties, making them at home is easy. Combine 1 pound confectioner’s sugar, 3 tablespoons softened butter, 3 teaspoons peppermint extract and 1/2 teaspoon real vanilla extract. Mix in 1/4 cup evaporated milk. Roll into 1-inch balls, place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet and chill for 20 minutes. Next, flatten the balls with the bottom of a glass to 1/4″ thick, so they look like peppermint patties. Now prepare the chocolate coating in a double boiler: 12 ounces of good-quality semisweet chocolate (you can use chocolate morsels, but the key is to get the best-tasting chocolate you can find, like Guittard or Valrhona) with 2 tablespoons shortening (not butter, or it won’t cling to the center). Dip the patties and place them back onto the waxed paper to harden.
    If you want to go all-out, you can decorate the tops of the patties with candied mint leaves: Dip tiny leaves or cut pieces of leaf and crystallize in sugar syrup. The recipe makes about 5 dozen peppermint patties. Be sure to make extra for friends and family—these are so good, you’ll want to eat the whole batch. If you want to let others make the candy, take a look at the Candy Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments off



    © Copyright 2005-2017 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.