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Archive for Special Sweets

RECIPE: Easy Valentine’s Day Dessert

If you still don’t have a special Valentine’s Day dessert, you can pick up these ingredients and have something special in 5 minutes.

Kozy Shack’s Chocolate Covered Strawberries all-natural pudding and pie filing is the first in a new line of Limited Edition products from the pudding company. This flavor, available through April 1st, drops large pieces of strawberries into a very satisfying chocolate pudding.

The recipe for the Chocolate-Strawberry Cream Pie is on the package, but we’ve included it below. The pudding is delicious right out of the container and as an ingredient in other desserts.

  • If you can’t get hold of this limited-edition flavor, buy the regular chocolate pudding and stir in some diced strawberries, fresh or frozen.
  • If you prefer real whipped cream to frozen whipped topping and have an extra 10 minutes to stabilized whipped cream that doesn’t collapse (deflate), see the recipe below.
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    RECIPE: EASY CHOCOLATE-STRAWBERRY PUDDING PIE

    Ingredients

  • 1 eight-inch pre-made pie shell (regular or chocolate crust)
  • 22-ounce container Kozy Shack Chocolate-Covered Strawberries Pudding
  • Whipped topping
  • Fresh strawberries and shaved chocolate to garnish
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    Preparation

    1. POUR the pudding the into pie shell and spread evenly.

    2. COVER the entire surface of the pie with whipped topping. Place in the freezer for an hour.

    4. REMOVE, slice and serve.

     

    Kozy Shack Pie

    Kozy  Shack Chocolate Pudding Recipe

    Make this pie in 5 minutes with Kozy Shack’s Chocolate Covered Strawberries pudding and pie filling. Photos courtesy Kozy Shack.

     
    RECIPE: STABILIZED WHIPPED CREAM WITH GELATIN

    Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
  • 4 teaspoons cold water
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar, sifted
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    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the gelatin and cold water in a small pan; let stand until the mixture is thick. Then place the pan over low heat, stirring constantly, until the gelatin dissolves. Remove from the heat. Let it cool, but do not allow it to set.

    2. WHIP the cream with the sugar until slightly thick. While slowly beating, add the gelatin to whipping cream. Whip at high speed until stiff.
     
    Visit KozyShack.com for more recipes, and check out the recipe collection in the Desserts & Ice Cream Section of THE NIBBLE webzine.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Pâtes de Fruit

    Coincidentally, since our prior post was about Michael Recchiuti’s new cassis gelée chocolate, our tip of the day focuses on pâte de fruits—a.k.a. fruit gelee or fruit jelly, although we hesitate to use the latter term because these have nothing to do with Chuckles or those jellied watermelon slices. Pâtes de fruits (pronounced pot duh froo-EE) are gourmet fruit jellies, made of fruit purée, sugar and pectin. Those other fruit jellies are made with “fruit flavoring.” A great pâte de fruit is like eating a wonderful piece of fruit in a different form (as is a great fruit sorbet). For people who like sweets but not chocolate, a perfect Valentine’s Day gift is a box of the best pâtes de fruit we know, from Paris’s Maison du Chocolat (which, conveniently, has two shops in New York City from which they do mail order). And keep a box in your own pantry. They’re so versatile: instead of (or in addition to) cookies and petit fours when friends drop by for tea or coffee; as an accent on a dessert plate; when guests can’t eat your regular dessert due to nut or chocolate allergies. In fact, if you’ve forgotten the dessert, or the soufflé flops, bring out a plate of these beautiful, jewel-colored sweets and no one will be the wiser.   Pates de Fruit
    Our favorite pâtes de fruit, from La Maison du Chocolat.
    By the way, the difference between pâtes de fruit, plural, and pâte de fruit, singular, is not how many pieces you get, but how many flavors. If there’s more than one flavor, use the plural, pâtes. This nuance of the French language is courtesy of our French cousin Philippe. Read more about our favorite sweets in the Gourmet Candy Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine. If you pursue the greatest chocolates, visit our Chocolate Section.

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    TIDBIT: Chocolatier Vs. Confectioner

    What’s the difference between “chocolates” and “confections?” Is a “chocolatier” or chocolate shop the same as a “confectionary?” A confectionery (also spelled confectionary) is a confectioner’s shop—more popularly called a candy store or sweet shop. A chocolatier (a French word, pronounced cho-co-la-tee-YAY) is both the chocolate shop and the person who makes the chocolate. While both of these words are commonly used in American chocolate circles, the French words for confectioner, confiseur, and candy shop, confiserie, are not.

    – The term “confection” refers to all candies and sweets, including candy bars, candied nuts, chocolate, fudge, hard candies, licorice, lollipops, marshmallows, marzipan, nougat, mints, toffee and other products, from cotton candy and candy canes to gum drops and gummi bears.

    – The term applies to snack items, so any baked goods and ice cream sold at a confectionery are included.
      Nougat - Burdick ChocolateNougat (from Burdick Chocolate) is a confection.
    So…if chocolate is a confection, what’s the difference between a chocolate shop and a confectioner’s shop?

    – A chocolatier is a chocolate specialist, and generally makes some or all of the chocolates sold on the premises.

    – While a chocolatier often makes marshmallows, marzipan, toffee and other confections, most of what is sold is chocolate-based or chocolate-coated.

    – In a confectionary, you’ll find a balance of sweets, of which only a portion are chocolates.

    Read more about chocolate in the Chocolate Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine. If you want to find the confectionery, you’ll have to look in the Candy Section and under Cookies, Cakes & Pastries.

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    TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Chocolate Fondue Day

    The best way to celebrate National Chocolate Fondue Day is not with a traditional chocolate fondue. Nope. It’s by thinking outside the box and making this Spicy Truffle Melt. Check out the concept plus a party plan. If you want the traditional chocolate fondue recipe, of course we’ll oblige.
    – Don’t dip rubbery supermarket marshmallows into a fine fondue. Gourmet marshmallows are the way to go.
      Hot Chocolate and Spices
    You can add the same spices to chocolate fondue and hot chocolate. Try allspice, cardamom, chili, cinnamon-nutmeg, coconut-curry, ginger, and paprika. Photo courtesy of Recchiuti Chocolate.
     

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    NEWS: Lindt Chocolate Owner/Chair Dies

    Last week, one of the titans of chocolate entered into eternity. Rudolph R. Sprüngli, owner and chair of the largest prestige chocolate company in the world, Chocoladefabriken Lindt & Sprüngli A.G., passed away in Geneva at the age of 88. If you have noticed the pervasiveness of Lindt chocolate throughout your town, it is thanks to the leadership of Mr. Sprüngli. He took the company from being another Swiss chocolate manufacturer to the world’s largest producer of prestige chocolate, with a work force of 4,000. (The most expensive category of chocolate. In the confection industry, chocolate is categorized by its price per pound at retail. The categories include Mass Market, less than $15 per pound; Mass Market Premium, from $15 to $25 per pound; Gourmet, from $25 to $40 per pound; and Prestige, at $40 per pound and higher.) Mr. Sprüngli kept the family firm, established in 1845, from being acquired by a mass-production multinational corporation. He listed Lindt & Sprüngli on the Swiss stock exchange in 1986.   Lindt Excellence
    The 85% cacao bar from the Lindt Excellence line is one of the finest 85% bars in the world. Read our full review of Lindt Excellence chocolate bars.
    Rodolphe Lindt revolutionized the chocolate industry in 1879 when he invented conching, the process that smooths chocolate into the velvety, aromatic product we know today. While Lindt was arguably the most famous chocolatier of his day, his business in Berne, Switzerland remained a small though high-quality one. In 1899 it was acquired by the larger Sprüngli chocolate company of Zurich, and Lindt & Sprüngli has been a major player in the quality chocolate business ever since. However, it took Rudolph R. Sprüngli, who was born in 1920 and spent his entire career with the firm, to build the brand overseas. Today, the U.S. eats so much Lindt chocolate, there’s now a production facility in Vermont! Rest in peace, in chocolate heaven, Mr. Sprüngli.

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