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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Spreads & Dips

RECIPE: Warm Spinach Mascarpone Dip

Among our Eatin’ O’ The Green recipes for St. Patrick’s Day, this warm spinach dish is very popular. Who doesn’t love a spinach dip, with its glimmer of healthful green spinach blended into a creamy (and not so healthful) base?

This recipe, from Vermont Creamery,is made even richer with mascarpone.

It’s delicious as a kick-back snack with Irish beer; or with wine and savory cocktails like the Martini.

RECIPE: WARM SPINACH MASCARPONE DIP

Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 16 ounces frozen chopped spinach
  • 8 ounces mascarpone
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Dippers: baguette slices, crackers, pita chips, toasts
  •  

    spinach-mascarpone-dip-vermontcreamery-230

    Warm and creamy, it’s Popeye’s favorite dip. Photo courtesy Vermont Creamery.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F.

    2. COOK the onion with olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat, until translucent.

    3. ADD frozen spinach and heat until spinach is hot but still green. Add mascarpone, salt, pepper, cayenne, Parmesan cheese and stir. Pour the mixture into a small casserole or baking dish.

    4. BAKE for 30 minutes until bubbling around the edges. Serve warm with pita chips or a sliced baguette. Or add a note of healthfulness with raw veggies (crudités).

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Guacamole Canapés & Mini Iceberg Wedges

    Deconstructed guacamole. Photo courtesy
    Wholly Guacamole.

     

    First of all: What’s a canapé (can-uh-PAY)?

    It’s a type of hors d’oeuvre: a small, savory bite on a base of bread, toast or pastry. It is a finger food, eaten in one or two bites.

    Canapés are often served at cocktail parties, and in the hands of a caterer or chef they can be beautifully decorated works of edible art. Canapé is the French word for sofa. The idea is that the toppings sit on a “sofa” of bread or pastry.

    These Super Bowl snacks are much more down to earth, as befits the occasion. They’re guacamole canapés, a change of pace from the same old, same old guacamole and chips.

    Since the tomatoes and onions are separate from the mashed avocado, this is effectively “deconstructed guacamole.”

    The recipes below are courtesy Wholly Guacamole.

     
    RECIPE: GUACAMOLE CANAPÉS

    Ingredients

  • 1 baguette (French bread loaf)
  • Guacamole (use prepared chunky guacamole or make your own)
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 lime, sliced into small, thin wedges
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SLICE baguette into 1/2 inch slices and toast lightly. Spread approximately 2 tablespoon of guacamole on each slice.

    2. TOSS diced tomatoes with onions an cilantro. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    3. DISTRIBUTE tomato/onion mix to canapés. Top with lime slices and serve on a platter.

     

    RECIPE: MINI WEDGE SALAD

    Most people enjoy a classic wedge salad: iceberg lettuce with blue cheese dressing. Here, we turn it into finger food.

    Ingredients

  • 1 head iceberg lettuce
  • Crumbled bacon
  • Cherry tomatoes, sliced
  • Crumbled blue cheese
  • Blue cheese dressing (here’s our recipe)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CUT lettuce into mini wedges, about 3 inches each. The objective is to pick them up by hand.

    2. TOP with bacon and tomato slices.

    3. DRIZZLE with blue cheese dressing and top with optional crumbled blue cheese. Serve on a platter.

     

    Mini iceberg wedge salad, for when you just want a taste. Photo courtesy Wholly Guacamole.

     

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Crocamole, An Avocado Crocodile

    You looking at me? Photo courtesy Shannon
    Seip | Bean Sprouts Café & Cooking School.

     

    This fun idea comes from Shannon Payette Seip, author of Bean Appetit: Hip And Healthy Ways To Have Fun With Food. She is co-founder of Bean Sprouts Café and Cooking School in Seattle, where families learn to make dishes that are both great tasting and good for you.

    There’s also a pun: avocado is also known as alligator pear.

    She also shared that Cornell study found kids to be 30% more likely to try a food if it has a cool name. For example, baked squash casserole can be “Squashy Shazam!”

    Kids also like to get creative when it comes to “styling” their food—turning grapes, olives and strips of red pepper into eyes, nose and mouth of their mashed potatoes.

     
    RECIPE: CROCAMOLE

    Ingredients Per Serving

  • 1 half avocado
  • Baby carrots or carrot sticks
  • 2 cucumber slices
  • 2 black olive slices
  • Crudités for dipping
  •  
    Preparation

    1. REMOVE avocado flesh, carefully preserving the shell. Make guacamole.

    2. RETURN guacamole to shell; create crocodile face with carrots (pointy side up), cucumber and olive slices, as shown in photo.

    3. SERVE with extra vegetables for dipping.

    EASY GUACAMOLE RECIPE

    1. MASH avocado. Mix with finely diced onion and chopped tomato to taste.

    2. SEASON with garlic, lime juice, salt and cayenne or chili flakes to taste.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Beet & Bean Dip

    Instead of hummus, consider this equally nutritious, healthful and tasty beet and bean dip.

  • Beets are one of the world’s healthiest foods, with a mix of powerful antioxidants that help to protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers.
  • Beans are rich in protein, fiber, iron and B vitamins and are beneficial to digestive tract health. Beans are healthy carbs—a low-energy-dense food, which means they have a low calorie ratio to the serving size.
  •  
    Serve the dip as a snack or hors d’oeuvre with crudités, pita chips or other crackers; or as part of a light lunch. The recipe is courtesy LoveBeets.com, whose ready-to-eat beets make this recipe a snap. Prep time is just 10 minutes.

     

    Colorful beet hummus. Photo courtesy
    LoveBeets.com.

     

    RECIPE: BEET AND BEAN DIP

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

  • 8.8 ounces cooked beets dipped in vinegar* (we used 1 container Mild Vinegar Love Beets)
  • 1 can (about 14.5 ounces) butter beans (baby lima beans) or white beans†, drained & rinsed
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • Small bunch fresh chives, finely chopped (reserve some for garnish)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  •  
    *You can toss conventional cooked beets in wine vinegar.
    †You can substitute white beans: cannellini, great northern or navy beans. See the different types of beans.

     

    If you like a saltines and similar crackers,
    try these pita chips from New York Style.
    We’ve become addicted to them. Photo
    courtesy New York Style.

     

    Preparation

    1. CHOP the beets into small dice; set aside in a medium bowl.

    2. PURÉE the beans in a food processor with the garlic, chives and olive oil. Season to taste with sea salt & freshly ground black pepper.

    3. TRANSFER to the bowl with the beets and gently fold through to mix. Scoop into a serving bowl and garnish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and some snipped chives.
     
    COOKED VS. DRY BEANS

    Despite the convenience of cooked beans, if you want the most nutritive value, you need to use dry beans. It’s easy to do.

    Health Reasons

  • Lower sodium. Canned beans are high in sodium; dry beans have none. There is far too much salt in prepared foods. Do what you can to cut back on it.
  •  

  • Preservative-free. Canned beans have enough added preservatives to last five years on the shelf. Dry beans have none (yet they last twice as long—up to 10 years in a cool, dry place!).
  • BPA-free. Studies suggest that the controversial chemical Bisphenol A, found in the plastic white lining of most cans of food and in some plastic beverage bottles, may contribute to certain cancers, insulin resistance and birth defects.
  •  
    More Reasons

  • Environment. Dry beans use less packaging than cooked beans, lowering the waste sent to landfills.
  • Cost. Dry beans are much cheaper per serving than canned beans; and if you buy them in bulk from the bin, even more so.
  • Texture and flavor. Canned beans are mushier and more bland. If you cook dry beans, you can make them as firm as you like.
  •  
    HOW TO COOK DRY BEANS

    It’s easy to get in the dry bean groove. All you need to do is:

  • Plan ahead. Soak beans overnight or for at least eight hours (e.g., before you leave for work).
  • Use a pressure cooker. No soaking is required and they’ll cook in 20 minutes instead of an hour or more on the stove top.
  •  
    Here’s the drill.

  • Sort the beans. Place them on a kitchen towel or in a shallow pan; pick out and discard any broken or shriveled beans, pebbles, etc.
  • Rinse the beans. Rinse them thoroughly under cold, running water.
  • Soak the beans. Soaking helps to remove some of the indigestible sugars that cause flatulence. Place the beans in a large bowl and cover with 2 to 3 inches of cool, clean water. Leave at room temperature for eight hours or overnight; drain well. NOTE: If you have a hot kitchen, soak the beans in the fridge to avoid possible fermentation.
  • Quick soak alternative. Place the beans in a large pot and cover with 2 to 3 inches of cool, clean water. Bring to a boil and boil briskly for 2 to 3 minutes. Cover and set aside off of the heat for 1 hour; drain well.
  • Cook the beans. Place beans in a large pot and cover with 2 inches of water or stock; don’t add salt at this point since it will slow the softening. Slowly bring to a boil, skimming off any surface foam. Reduce heat, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally. Add more liquid as necessary, until beans are tender when mashed or pierced with a fork. Add salt in the final stages of cooking. Cooking times vary with the variety, age and size of beans. Plan for 1 to 2 hours.
  •  
    Enjoy those tasty, healthful, inexpensive beans.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Yummy Yammy Sweet Potato Salsa

    Yummy Yammy sweet potato salsa: healthful
    dip, spread, topping and stocking stuffer.
    Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    When you say “Norwich, Vermont,” sweet potatoes don’t come to mind.

    But they may when more people discover Yummy Yammy sweet potato-salsa—actually more of a smooth dip or spread than what most people think of as salsa.

    But like a Mexican-style salsa, Yummy Yammy is packed with nutrition and a guilt-free snack, when combined with crudités or a some rice crackers. The whole jar has just 250 calories.

    Yummy Yammy also works as a dip with any crunchy snack (chips, pretzels, bagel chips, pita chips); as spread for burgers, burritos, and sandwiches; as a condiment with eggs, rice or vegetables; even atop nachos.

    There’s no tomato here in this salsa; just 100% pure flame-roasted sweet potato and deft seasonings. There is no added sugar, it’s naturally fat-free and loaded with natural nutrition.

     
    Flavors include:

  • Mexican Sweet Potato Salsa with corn, black beans and chipotle
  • Moroccan Sweet Potato Salsa with curry, lentil and kale
  • Tuscan Sweet Potato Salsa with roasted red pepper, white bean and basil
  •  
    There’s a store locator on the website, and the products can be purchased on Amazon.com ($9.99 per 12-ounce jar).

    Try some: You, too, may become a “yambassador.”

    And by all means, “spread” the word. Give a jar as a stocking stuffer, Thanksgiving host/hostess gift or party favor.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Quick Curried Carrot Soup & Carrot Hummus

    We all know that carrots are good for us: 1 medium carrot, just 25 calories, provides 203% of our daily value of vitamin A, a powerful antioxidant.* Beyond nibbling on a carrot stick or baby carrot, though, we just don’t take enough time to think about what to do with them.

    Here are two easy recipes from Grimmway Farms, a California grower of carrots (and most of the baby carrots you come across). Find more carrot recipes at Grimmway.com.

    RECIPE: CURRIED CARROT SOUP

    This dairy-free recipe is low in calories: just 91 calories per serving.

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

     

    Curried carrot soup. Photo courtesy Grimmway Farms.

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 pound carrots (about 6 extra large), diced
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • Optional garnish: yogurt squiggle; fresh basil, chives or parsley
  •  

    Preparation

    1. HEAT the olive oil in a sauce pan over medium heat. Add the diced onions, diced carrots, curry powder, cumin, salt and pepper. Toss to combine and cook for about 3 minutes.

    2. ADD the chicken broth and cover the pot. Continue to cook over medium heat for another 15 minutes.

    3. PURÉE: Carefully remove the cover and purée the soup in batches in a blender. Alternatively, purée the soup in the pot using an immersion blender wand.

    TIPS:

  • To make the yogurt squiggle, put yogurt in a plastic sandwich bag and cut off one of the corners. Squeeze as you would a pastry bag.
  • If you more body in the soup, stir in some Greek yogurt.
  •  

    Nutrition Per Serving: 91 calories; 4 g total fat; 0.6 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol and trans fat; 946 mg sodium; 11 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 5 g protein.

     

    Carrot hummus. Photo courtesy Grimmway
    Farms.

     

    RECIPE: CARROT HUMMUS

    Here’s a spin on conventional hummus, adding even more nutrition to this very healthful dip and spread. The orange color is also just right for Halloween and the harvest season.

    Prep time is 5 minutes, cook time is 5 minutes.

    Ingredients

  • 1 cup well-packed shredded carrots
  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas, drained
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice (about two lemons)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  •  Preparation

    1. PLACE all ingredients in a food processor and pulse several times to coarsely chop. Then let food processor run for about 2 minutes until smooth.

    2. REMOVE hummus from food processor bowl to serving bowl, using a spatula. Serve with carrot and other vegetable chips, baby carrots and other crudités, or pita chips.

    Nutrition Per Serving: 102 calories; 5g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 g trans fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 306 mg sodium; 11 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 4 g protein.

    CARROT TRIVIA

    Contrary to popular belief, baby carrots are not grown bite-sized. They are bred long and slender, and then cut into two-inch pieces and lathed to a uniform width.

     
    *Yes, is key to good vision, a healthy immune system, good skin, and general cell growth. It has been studied as a treatment for many other conditions, including cancers, cataracts and HIV. However, the results to date are inconclusive.

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: National Guacamole Day

    Dating back to Mayan times (pre-Aztec), guacamole sauce was made the avocado, onion, chiles, fresh tomato, and salt—a recipe that is still made today.

    The ingredients were mashed in a molcajete (mol-cah-HET-tay), a Mexican pestle carved from volcanic stone, although today granite is an easier-to-clean option.

    The name of the dish comes from the Aztec language, Nahuatl: ahuacamolli (ah-waka-MOLE-ee), which literally translates to “avocado sauce” (ahuacatl is avocado, molli is sauce. In Spanish, guacamole is prounounced huac-ah-MOE-lay.

    Over time, different regions of Mexico began mixing local ingredients, creating thousands of variations. In American cuisine, it is used as a dip and condiment.

    Progressive Mexican restaurants often offer a tasting appetizer of three or four different recipes.

     

    Try guacamole with different garnishes and mix-ins. Photo courtesy Avocados From Mexico.

     

    At Maya Modern Mexican Kitchen and Tequileria in New York City, Chef Richard Sandoval does exactly that, offering options that include:

     

    A regional guacamole recipe from the south
    of Mexico. Photo courtesy Maya | NYC.

     
  • Traditional, made with avocado, tomato, onion, cilantro and serrano chile
  • Baja, with flavors from Baja California—kiwi, jicama, strawberry, mango, mint, arbol chile, lime and sea salt
  • Norteno, with signature ingredients from the North—chicharrón (fried pork rinds), pickled onions, salsa fresca, Serrano ham, queso fresco, roasted corn, lime and sea salt
  • Pacifico, with grilled beet, roasted walnut, queso fresco, diced orange, citrus chipotle salt and lime juice
  • Sur, incorporating flavors from the South including grasshoppers (uh…fried grasshoppers are a popular snack in Mexico and you can buy them online), tomatillo, cotija cheese, onion, cascabel chile, cilantro, lime and sea salt (see photo at left)
  •  
    But perhaps the best way to enjoy National Guacamole Day is to create your own signature recipe. To the mashed avocado, lime juice and salt, add:

     

  • Tomato group: tomato, tomatillo, salsa, sundried tomatoes
  • Onion group: chives, onion, green onion/scallion, pickled onions, red onion, shallots
  • Heat: chili flakes, minced chiles, hot sauce
  • Cheese: blue cheese, cotija, queso fresco, grated cheddar (try jalapeño cheddar) or jack
  • Creamy: crème fraîche, sour cream, yogurt
  • Fruit: dried fruits, mango, melon, papaya, pomegranate arils, strawberry
  • Herbs: basil, bell pepper, cayenne, cilantro, garlic cloves, mint, parsley, sage, tarragon
  • Vegetables: asparagus, corn, jicama, radish/daikon
  • Wild card: bacon, crab meat, minced pork or ham, olives, toasted nuts
  •  
    Check out this fusion recipes from California Avocado Growers for Cajun Guacamole, French Guacamole, Greek Guacamole, Italian guacamole, Japanese guacamole.

    There are 21 pages of guacamole recipes on the website.

    Here’s a Cranberry Guacamole recipe for the holidays.

      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Eat Well Enjoy Life Hummus

    Hummus made from red lentils, not
    chickpeas. Photo courtesy Eat Well Enjoy
    Life.

     

    The impressive hummus line from Eat Well Enjoy Life is like a horse of a different color: made not from chickpeas, but from black beans, white beans, red lentils, yellow lentils and edamame.

    The result: a whole new way to enjoy hummus. The flavors are exceptional, and the products themselves inspire innovation at home.

    Beyond a dip or sandwich spread, think of edamame wasabi hummus blended with mashed potatoes or deviled egg stuffing, spicy red lentil hummus atop crostini and in baked potatoes, black bean hummus in stuffed peppers, white bean hummus on veggie pizzas.

    There’s also a line of traditional chickpea-based hummus mixed with Greek yogurt. The result: a milder taste, less fat and fewer calories. The verdict: equally delicious.

    The line is cholesterol free, gluten free and certified kosher, and has won Healthy Food Awards in both the Healthy Living and Diabetes Focus categories.

    Read the full review.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Broccoli Salsa & More Ways To Love Broccoli

    A broccoli veggie mix, ready to spoon into a
    baked potato. Photo courtesy Potatopia |
    New York City.

     

    We love broccoli, lightly steamed*, raw with dip, puréed as a side dish and as soup. Perhaps the most famous words ever said about broccoli were from our 41st president, George H.W. Bush, and they were not an endorsement:

    “I do not like broccoli,” said the president at a 1990 news conference. “And I haven’t liked it since I was a little kid and my mother made me eat it.* And I’m President of the United States and I’m not going to eat any more broccoli. Now look, this is the last statement I’m going to have on broccoli. There are truckloads of broccoli at this very minute descending on Washington. My family is divided. For the broccoli vote out there: Barbara loves broccoli. She has tried to make me eat it. She eats it all the time herself. So she can go out and meet the caravan of broccoli that’s coming in.”

    Whew! Broccoli farmers of America did more than wince!

     
    That same year, Johns Hopkins University published a cancer study showing that broccoli prevented the development of tumors by 60% and helped reduce the size of the tumor by 75%. But when you’re younger and less health-concerned, what you hear is: “If the president won’t eat broccoli, I don’t have to eat it.”

    If you’re not a fan, chop raw broccoli florets finely and add the broccoli to mixed diced vegetables, salsa, sour cream, Greek yogurt or other base—possibly with garlic, green onions, chives or other flavors you like that reduce the prominence of the broccoli. Then, enjoy it in baked potatoes, mashed potatoes, on fish, chicken, rice, etc. Save the stems to enjoy as crudités, steamed as a side veg or puréed into soup.

    *Perhaps Dorothy Walker Bush overcooked the broccoli. There’s nothing worse than overcooked cruciferous veggies: the same cancer-inhibiting, sulfur-containing compounds (glucosinolates) are released by long heating in the most unpleasant, odoriferous way. We wouldn’t eat overcooked broccoli either.

     

    WHY IS BROCCOLI SO GOOD FOR YOU?

    The Brassicaceae family of vegetables (arugula, bok choy, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, cress, daikon, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, mizuna, mustard, radish, rapeseed, rutabaga and turnip) contain powerful antioxidants that prevent the build-up of destructive, disease-engendering free radicals.

    Studies show that broccoli and its cruciferous cousins aid with alkalinization (making the body less acidic), bone health, cancer prevention, cholesterol reduction, detoxification (neutralization and elimination of unwanted contaminants), digestion (high in fiber), heart health, lowering blood sugar, reducing allergy reactions and inflammation, and much more. Plus, all that fiber helps to curve overeating.

    Can you name a food that does more for you?

    Broccoli is one of the most “potent” members of the family. So if you like it, eat more. If you’re not a fan, try:

     

    Have fun with broccoli, shown here in both purple and conventional green. The green pointy veggie is Romanesco broccoli, also called Roman cauliflower. Check farmers markets and specialty produce stores for these beauties. Photo courtesy The Fat Radish | New York City.

     

    And never, ever overcook it (see the footnote above). But if you do, here are two remedies we found online:

  • Add other flavors. Toss the broccoli with olive oil, garlic and chopped olives, capers, or whatever you have on hand.
  • Make broccoli soup. Per head of cooked broccoli, cook some carrots, about 1/4 the volume of the broccoli. Sauté a medium onion with fresh thyme and 3 large garlic cloves; use butter, olive oil or a mix. In a separate pot, add 2 cups of chicken broth and 3/4 cup of any milk or half-and-half. Add some flour to thicken. Simmer, then add in the cooked broccoli and carrots. Season with salt and pepper to taste; simmer as needed and puréed with an immersion blender. Serve topped with shredded Cheddar or Gruyère (or, you can stir the cheese into the soup).
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Roasted Corn Guacamole

    Even if you think your guacamole recipe is the best, there are so many guac lovers tweaking the basic recipe that you need to keep tasting!

    Now that it’s corn season, Top Chef Master and America’s best-known master of Mexican cuisine, Chef Rick Bayless, has put a new spin on guacamole. His special ingredients: grilled corn, from the season’s bounty, and poblano chile.

    Chef Bayless created this tasty recipe for AvocadosFromMexico.com, which has as many recipes with avocado as your heart could desire.

    You can roast the corn in the oven instead of grilling it.

    GRILLED CORN AND POBLANO GUACAMOLE

    Ingredients

  • 2 small ears fresh corn, shucked
  • 1 small poblano chile
  • 8 ounces tomatillos, husked (about 4 large)
  •  

    Add roasted corn and poblano chile to your guacamole. Photo courtesy Avocados From Mexico.

  • 3 avocados from Mexico, halved, pitted, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped red onion, rinsed
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT gas grill to medium or prepare a charcoal grill. Grill corn, turning occasionally, until golden on all sides, about 5 minutes. When cool enough to handle, cut kernels from the cob; remove to a large bowl.

    2. GRILL the chile and tomatillos, turning until skins are nicely charred, about 10 minutes. When cool enough to handle, peel the charred skin from the poblanos with your fingers. Remove stem, core and seeds; chop chile and remove to the bowl.

    3. CHOP the tomatillos finely, capturing the juices, and add to the bowl. Add avocado, onion, cilantro and salt. Coarsely mash avocado and gently stir to combine all ingredients.
     
    LOVE AVOCADO?

    Check out the history of the avocado.

      

    Comments

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