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Archive for Rice-Beans-Grains-Seeds

RECIPE: Chickpea Salad

You can round out the Moroccan Chicken recipe we just published with a green salad, and you can also add another cold salad.

We’re not sure how this Chickpea Salad recipe came to us. Easy and tasty, it’s from Meaghann McGoun of Love With Food. Thanks, Meghann.

We especially like this as a spring and summer side with anything Mediterranean-inspired, including simple grilled proteins. Chickpeas themselves, which are seeds of the plant, are also high in protein.
 
RECIPE: EASY CHICKPEA SALAD

The recipe can be made a day in advance. Prep time is 30 minutes.

You can add more veggies to the salad: carrot and, celery, for starters.
 
Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 2 cans chickpeas (15 ounces each)
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1/2 red onion (better for the color) or 1 bunch green onions (scallions)
  • 1 bell pepper (color of choice)
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro
  • Optional: fresh jalapeño chile
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon sugar (we omit it)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. DRAIN and rinse the chickpeas.

    2. CHOP the tomatoes, cucumber, onion and pepper to bite-sized pieces. Finely chop the jalapeño and cilantro. Combine the chickpeas and vegetables in a large bowl.

    3. WHISK together the oil, vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper and and cilantro. Add to the bowl and mix until the salad is coated. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour for the flavors to blend.
     
    HISTORY OF CHICKPEAS

    The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 print reference to chickpeas (“Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tongue.” But the bean has been eaten since long before recorded history.

     

    Chickpea Salad Recipe

    Dried Chickpeas

    Fresh Chickpeas

    Top: A nutritious and toothsome Chickpea Salad (photo courtesy Meaghann McGoun | LoveWithFood.com. Center: Dried chickpeas from Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans. Bottom: Fresh chickpeas from Melissas.com.

     
    Chickpeas were among the first crops cultivated by man, known as the eight founder crops of the Fertile Crescent. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

    (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae family, known variously as the legume, pea, or bean family. You may have seen some of its other names: ceci or cece (Italian), chana or Kabuli chana (Northern India), Egyptian pea, garbanzo or garbanzo bean (Spanish), gram or Bengal gram (British India).
     
    The Evolution Of The Name

    The word chickpea in English came from the French chich, found in print in English in 1388. “Chick-pea” is found in print in the mid-18th century.

    The name evolved from traces through the French chiche to cicer, Latin for chickpea. Fun fact: The Roman cognomen Cicero came from cicer. Yes, the great orator Roman Marcus Tullius Cicero—also a consul, constitutionalist, lawyer, philosopher, political theorist and politician—was a member of the Chickpea family.

    More seriously, a cognomen was the third name of a citizen of ancient Rome—the hereditary name that we call a surname, which passed from father to children. The second name—the family name or clan name—identified a particular branch within a family, or family within a clan.
     
    IS THE CHICKPEA A BEAN OR A PEA?

    Peas and beans are both legumes and seeds, both members of the Fabaceae botanical family. Chickpea, also called garbanzo bean, is actually a bean. Some key differences:

  • Pea plants (genus/species Pisum sativum) have hollow stems. Beans (genus/species Cicer arietinum) have solid stems.
  • Peas have leaf tendrils which they use to twine. In general, beans lack tendrils.
  • The taller varieties both peas and beans need trellises to support them as they grow. Most beans just twine themselves over their supports while peas use their tendrils to climb. At each node along their stems, they generate two or three one-inch-long tendrils, which grab and then wind themselves around something a narrow trellis.
  •  
    Read the full article on DifferenceBetween.net.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Farro, The Original Wheat & A Moroccan Chicken Recipe

    With all the focus on quinoa as the “it” grain, don’t hold yourself back from trying other ancient grains.

    Farro, an early, very tasty wheat subspecies, is also known as emmer wheat. Some people also confuse it with spelt (more about that below).

    But it shouldn’t keep you from seeking it out at better supermarkets, specialty food stores, natural foods stores or online. If you don’t like the flavor of quinoa but want more nutrition, this is a must-try.
     
    WHAT IS FARRO?

    An unhybridized ancestor of modern wheat, farro was one of the first grains cultivated by man in the Fertile Crescent, also known as The Cradle Of Civilization.

    Here’s more on the earliest cultivated crops.

    Farro was a mainstay of the daily diet in ancient Rome, and it sustained the Roman legions as they conquered Europe. It was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times.

  • Farro has a mild, nutty flavor, is high in fiber content and nutrients.
  • It can be tolerated by lightly wheat-sensitive people because it has less gluten and the glutenis more easily digested (check with your healthcare provider).
  • It has slightly more protein than modern wheat: 7 grams per 1/4 cup uncooked farrow.
  • Farro cooks like rice and other grains: Rinse, add to a pot with water or stock, bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes.
  •  
    So Why Did Farrow “Go Away?”

    Because the yields aren’t as high as with other wheat species.

    Over the millennia, the tastier and more nutritious strains of many crops were abandoned in favor of strains and hybrids that produced greater yields and were less resistant to weather fluctuations, diseases and pests. Farro ceased to be cultivated, except in a few remote areas.

    (This selective breeding process was also conducted with animal species, both food animals, work animals and companion animals.)

    The growing interest in better-for-you foods has brought farro back.

       

    Farro

    Farro

    Top: A field of farrow (photo courtesy Institute For Plant Sciences | Zurich. Bottom: Farro from Anson Mills.

     
    FOOD 101: THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SPELT & FARRO

    It’s easy to confuse farrow and spelt. Farro looks rather like spelt, another early species of wheat; but they are not the same. Farro is emmer wheat, the original wheat. The botanical name for farro and emmer wheat is Triticum dicoccum; spelt is Triticum spelta; the most common modern wheat is Triticum aestivum.

  • Farro must be soaked (except for quick-cook brands), whereas spelt can be cooked directly from the package.
  • Cooked farro is firm and chewy; spelt is soft and becomes mushy when overcooked.
  •  
    But note: To be sure you’re getting whole grain farro, look for “whole” or “whole grain” on the label. “Pearled” or semi-pearled farrow, which is quicker cooking, is not whole grain and lacks the fiber and nutrition from the germ and bran of whole grains.

    Pearling removes the inedible hull that surrounds the grain, but the process also scours off part (semi-pearled) or all (pearled) of the nutritious germ and bran. Whole-grain farro is hulled using a gentler process that leaves the germ and bran intact.

     
    WAYS TO SERVE FARRO

    Today’s demands for better foods are bringing back some of the oldies. You can find:

  • Bob’s Red Mill Organic Farro at Whole Foods.
  • 10 Minute Farro at Trader Joe’s (see note below re pearled farro).
  • Fargo adds heft and, mouth feel and “chew” to recipes, or as a standalone side. You can serve it hot or cold, as a substitute for rice, quinoa, pasta, or other grain or starch.

  • Farro has a nutty flavor and chewy texture, similar to barley.
  • It can be added to any soup or stew.
  • It can be substituted for rice salad or pasta salad.
  • It is more flavorful than pasta.
  • Whole grain farro is high in fiber plus magnesium and vitamins A, B, C and E. It has less gluten than other varieties of wheat, making it easier to digest. As with other grains, it can be ground into flour to make bread and pasta.
  •  
    Farro For Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

  • Breakfast: Use farro in place of your morning oatmeal. Top it with apples, maple syrup and cinnamon.
  • Leftovers: Add any type of leftovers to farro to create a new side or salad, as we did in the photo above.
  • Lunch Salad or Side: Combine cooked farro with olive oil, tomatoes, feta and olives for a Mediterranean-inspired salad. Or try this delicious farro and beet salad recipe.
  • Rice Substitute: Cook and serve as you would serve rice.
  • Soups & Stews: Use farro in soups and stews for a heartier, earthier flavor.
  • Soup Meal: Cook farro with vegetable or chicken stock and your favorite vegetables for a warming and delicious light meal.
  •  

    Moroccan Chicken Recipe

    Farro Salad

    Top: Fragrant and flavorful: Moroccan Chicken recipe from Good Eggs. Bottom: A farrow salad can be served hot or cold. Photo © Dreamtime.

     

    RECIPE: BRAISED MOROCCAN CHICKEN WITH FARRO-CARROT SALAD

    This fork-tender braised chicken recipe from Good Eggs is packed with flavor and ready in an hour.

    Don’t be fooled by the number of ingredients: This dish is deceptively simple and easy to put together. Prep time is 15 minutes, cook time is 30 minutes.
     
    Ingredients

  • 3 pounds whole chicken legs
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground fennel seed
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon Marash* chile flakes
  • 1 bunch cilantro, stems sliced into thin rounds and and kept apart from the leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 medium white onion, diced
  • 1 bunch carrots, one diced and the rest cut into matchsticks
  • 1 dried espelette chili pepper
  • 2-3 bay leaves
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • ½ can crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cups farro
  • Handful of almonds, lightly toasted & roughly chopped
  • 1 lemon
  • 12 Castelvetrano olives, pitted
  • 3 cups of chicken broth
  •  
    ____________________
    *Marash chile flakes are red pepper flakes from Turkey. They have a complex flavor—fruit and smoke—with moderate heat. Marash is both smokier and a bit hotter than Aleppo pepper, but you can use them interchangeably. The flakes can be blended with lemon juice and salt for a meat rub, or added to olive oil to make a vinaigrette, pasta or rice sauce. Blend the flakes with olive oil for a bread dipper, add to soups and stews, chili or any meat dish. See the different types of chiles and the different types of peppercorns.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Combine the spices—cumin, coriander, fennel, turmeric, cinnamon and Marash chile—in a small bowl and set aside. Pat the chicken legs dry and season with salt, pepper and about half of the spice mix.

    2. ADD 2 tablespoons of olive oil (more if needed) to an oven-safe pan large enough to fit the chicken legs and all of the vegetables. Turn the heat to medium, and when the oil is hot add the diced onion, carrot, celery and cilantro stems (not the leaves). Add a pinch of salt, the remaining spice mix, the dried espelette chile and the bay leaves. Cook until the vegetables are completely soft and the onion is a bit translucent.

    3. ADD half a can of crushed tomatoes and olives to the pan, then the chicken legs, skin-side up. Pour the chicken broth into the pan until the liquid is halfway up the chicken—you’ll want to leave some skin above the liquid so that it can crisp up in the oven.

    4. BRING the ingredients to a boil on the stovetop, then place the entire pan uncovered on the middle or bottom rack of the oven (to prevent burning) for about 30 minutes. Check every 10 minutes to ensure that the skin is getting crispy but not burnt: The pan can be covered with aluminum foil or a lid if it is browning too quickly. If the chicken doesn’t seem to be browning at all, move it up a rack in the oven, but watch it closely.

    5. REMOVE the pan from the oven after 30 minutes and check for doneness using a meat thermometer. The internal temperature should be 165°F. If not, place the pan it back in the oven for another 5-10 minutes. When it’s done, set it aside to cool for 10 minutes. While the chicken is braising in the oven…

    6. BRING a large pot of water to a boil. Season the water with 2 tablespoons of salt and add 2 cups of farro. Cook according to the package instructions until al dente, then drain and let cool. Toss with a bit of olive oil to help prevent clumping.

    7. COMBINE the carrots, cilantro leaves, farro, almonds, a generous squeeze of lemon and 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil in a mixing bowl. Toss gently and add salt and pepper to taste. Serve the farro salad alongside a chicken leg, with some braising liquid spooned over it.
     
    HERE’S ANOTHER FARRO SALAD RECIPE

    Try this Farro & Beet Salad Recipe.
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Moros y Cristianos, Cuban Rice & Beans

    Disclaimer: This is a traditional recipe based on a historical event. It is not a commentary on any religion or ethnicity.

    Why the disclaimer? The recipe is Moros y Cristianos, a dish commemorating the Islamic Conquest of Spain by Moors in the early 8th century, the ongoing wars between the two sides and the subsequent Reconquista by Spanish Christians in the 15th century.
     
    WHAT IS “MOROS Y CRISTIANOS?”

    Moros y Cristianos means “Moors and Christians” and refers to the popular white rice and black beans dish of Cuba. It was inspired by historic events that are commemorated annually with battle re-enactments across the southern coast of Spain.

    Platillo Moros y Cristianos is a staple served at virtually every Cuban restaurant and home. It is the Cuban version of the rice and beans dishes that are consumed throughout the Caribbean, Brazil, Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America, and in the southern United States. It can be simply called arroz moro, moros, moro or congrí.

    The black beans, or Moros, represent the darker-skinned Moors; the rice, Cristianos, represents the lighter-skinned Spaniards. They are simmered together or separately with herbs and vegetables: a sofrito* of bay leaf, bell pepper, garlic, onions and oregano. Bacon can also be added.

    This nicely seasoned side is often served with grilled or roasted meat, poultry and seafood. It’s a good party dish, too: It can be made well in advance and be served at room temperature.
     
    MOROS VS. CONGRÍ: THE DIFFERENCE

    In the traditionally preparation, the Moros and Cristianos are prepared separately; they don’t meet up until they’re placed side by side on the plate. In the variation called Congrí, the rice and beans are cooked together†.

    These days, many cooks make the rice and beans together Congrí-style, but call it Moros y Cristianos.

    There’s no need to split hairs. Both methods work fine, although Steve Sando, the proprietor of Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans who has cooked bean dishes in every way possible, prefers “the sharper, more distinct flavors the old-fashioned technique delivers.”

    We’ll start with his recipe, and follow with a very quick version from Kraft.
     
    __________________________

    *Sofrito is the Spanish version of mirepoix, a chopped vegetable mix that is cooked in oil or butter to add flavor to sauces, soups, stews and stocks. Similar flavor bases include the Italian soffritto and the Portuguese refogado. Depending on the country, ingredients can include bell peppers, carrots, celeriac, celery, onions, and seasonings; refogado includes tomatoes. Cajun and Creole cuisines use what is called the “holy trinity”: onions, celery and bell peppers.

    †The beans are first boiled in water; the rice is cooked in another pot with some of the water from the beans. The cooked ingredients are combined with a flavorful sofrito (see footnote above).

       

    Moros y Cristianos

    Moros y Cristianos

    Moros y Cristianos

    Top photo of Moros y Cristianos courtesy Savoir Faire Los Placeres Del Paladar. Center: Side-by-side Moros y Cristianos from HeartOfWisdom.com. Bottom: A creative side-by-side from Fictionique.com.

     
    RECIPE: MOROS Y CRISTIANOS (MOORS & CHRISTIANS RICE & BEANS)

    This traditional recipe from Rancho Gordo adds another layer of flavor from bacon. Visit RanchoGordo.com for an exquisite selection of heirloom beans, spices and dazzling bean recipes.

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

  • 4 slices lean bacon, chopped
  • Olive oil, if needed
  • 1 white onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 1 green bell pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 teaspoon red chile powder (see note‡)
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 cups cooked black beans in their broth
  • Salt
  • 1½ cups hot cooked white rice
  •  
    _______________________________________
    ‡You can buy New Mexican Red Chile Powder from Rancho Gordo as well as from McCormick. New Mexican Red Chile Powder, also simply called red chile powder, is made from hot red chiles that have been dried and ground. It should not be confused with chili powder, a mixed spice for making chili. If you don’t have red chile powder, substitute cayenne pepper or the milder paprika.

     

    Moros y Cristianos Recipe

    Easy Moros y Cristianos from Kraft. It saves time by using canned beans. The recipe is below.

     

    Preparation

    1. GENTLY COOK the bacon in a large saucepan over medium-low heat until the fat is rendered and the bacon is cooked through, about 10 minutes. You should have about 2 tablespoons of bacon fat. If there is less, add olive oil as needed until you have 2 tablespoons of fat.

    2. ADD the onion, garlic and bell pepper and cook gently, stirring occasionally until the bell pepper is soft, about 8 minutes. Add the red chile powder and oregano and stir until incorporated. Add the beans and their broth and stir gently until mixed.

    3. COOK over low heat, stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes to blend the flavors. Taste and adjust the salt if needed.

    4. TO SERVE: Spoon some of the rice and the beans alongside each other on each individual plate. Serve immediately.
     

     

    RECIPE: QUICK MOROS Y CRISTIANOS

    This quick recipe, from Kraft, uses canned black beans. You can save even more time by using precooked frozen rice.

    Prep time is 5 minutes, total time 20 minutes.

    Ingredients For 6 Half-Cup Servings

  • 2 slices bacon, chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped onions
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1-1/2 cups cooked rice
  • 1 can (15.5 ounces) black beans, undrained
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon each: salt and black pepper
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK the bacon, onions and garlic in large skillet on medium-high heat until the bacon is crisp.

    2. STIR in the rice, the beans with their liquid, and the oregano, salt and pepper. Bring to boil.

    3. REDUCE the heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Fritos Chili Pie For National Chili Day & The Oscars

    Frito Chili Pie Recipe

    Chili In Mason Jar

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/frito pie realmomkitchen 230

    Top: Frito Chili Pie from Frito-Lay. Center: Country Living Magazine suggests making individual servings in Mason jars. Bottom: RealMomKitchen.com made the prettiest version.

     

    Back in 2012, Fritos set the Guinness World Record for the largest-ever Frito Chili Pie: 1,300 pounds of Fritos, chili and cheese.

    For February 28th, National Chili Day, consider recreating the recipe, scaled down to human size.

    Prep time is 5 minutes. It’s comfort food you can make during the commercial breaks during tonight’s Oscars.

    If you want to make your own chili, great; but you’ll be spending more than 5 minutes.

    A bonus for corn chip lovers: There’s also a National Tortilla Chip Day on February 24th (that’s two celebrations in one week!).

    RECIPE: FRITO CHILI PIE

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 large bag Fritos Corn Chips (substitute tortilla chips—the difference)
  • 1 can chili with beef (15 ounces, with or without beans)
  • 1 bag (8 ounces) shredded Cheddar or other cheese
  • Garnishes: chopped scallions or red onion, chopped tomatoes, fresh cilantro, shredded lettuce, sliced jalapeños and/or sour cream
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F.

    2. SPREAD the corn chips evenly over the bottom of an oven-safe serving dish or pie plate (preferably glass). Heat the chili and pour it evenly over corn chips.

    3. SPRINKLE the cheese over the top and pop the pie into the oven to melt the cheese. Remove from the oven, add the garnishes and serve immediately with a serving spoon. Give soup spoons to the participants as well as forks.
     
    Want a vegetarian or vegan recipe? Use all-bean chili, or try this recipe, which substitutes tofu for the beef.

     
    FRITO CHILI PIE HISTORY

    The Fritos brand was born in 1932 when Elmer Doolin of San Antonio, Texas purchased a corn chips recipe from a local producer. He made the first Fritos brand chips in his mother’s kitchen.

    The popularity of the corn chips snack was catapulted in 1961, when Doolin joined forces with H.W. Lay & Company to create Frito-Lay.

    To help sell more product, Doolin’s mother, Daisy Dean Doolin, created recipes using Fritos as a recipe ingredient. She created the now-famous Fritos Chili Pie.

     
    FRITOS PIE VARIATIONS

    Fritos Chili Pie is so popular that it has its own website, FritosPieRemix.com.

    If it looks like you’ve landed on You Tube, that’s because you have: The site is a collection of videos demonstrating different recipes with, among other ingredients, ahi tuna, black beans, cole slaw, cranberries, cream cheese, curry, eggs, elbow macaroni, grits, horseradish, peanut butter, pineapple, potato chips, pork and beans, pumpkin, ramen noodles, spinach and tofu… and applesauce, caramel, chocolate and ice cream!
     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Red Rice, A Whole Grain

    Of all the international foods that have become mainstream in the U.S., some lovely rice varieties from Asia remain largely unknown.

    When we want to add something extra to a dish, we often replace the white or brown rice with red rice of black rice. As with brown rice, red and black are whole grain.

    Red rice is an unhulled or partially hulled rice variety that has a red husk (most rice has a brown husk). The rice grains are also red in color. As an unhulled rice, red rice has a nutty flavor from the bran (like brown rice) and high nutritional value from the germ.

    The nutrition and fiber roughly compare to brown rice, as are the cooking proportions: 2 cups of fluids per cup of rice.

    The red color comes from anthocyanins, powerful antioxidants that create red, blue and purple colors. They give color to radicchio, red onions, red/purple cabbage and purple potatoes, among other foods.
     
    TYPES OF RED RICE

    As with all agricultural products, there are numerous varieties of red rice: More than 2,000 rice varieties are grown throughout the world. Depending on the variety, red rice can be long or short grain.

    The grain grows well in both high elevations, such as Kingdom of Bhutan in the eastern Himalayas and the Palakkad District of the Indian state of Kerala, and low elevations including the wetlands of the Camargue region of southern France, and cargo red rice from Thailand.

    The varieties you are most likely to find in the U.S. include:

  • Camargue red rice, from the southern part of France, grows in marshlands where the Rhone River meets the Mediterranean. The Camargue region produces a short-grained, slightly sticky red rice.
  • Bhutanese or Himalayan red rice, grown at 8,000 feet, is similar to Camargue rice. It’s the chief rice in the Bhutanese diet, and has a distinctive mineral profile because it’s irrigated with glacier water.
  • Thai red rice or cargo rice is a long-grain variety similar to white jasmine rice in fluffiness.
  • Colusari rice, grown in the Sacramento Valley of California, has a burgundy hue that holds its color when cooking. A russet-red variety, Wehani, was developed from an Indian basmati-type seed.
  •  
    You can substitute red rice in any rice recipe—even rice pudding! Here’s an everyday grain bowl recipe from Good Eggs.
     
    RECIPE: RED RICE & SUNCHOKE GRAIN BOWL

    This savory grain bowl uses ingredients that may not be part of your regular grocery list: red rice, sunchokes (formerly called Jerusalem artichokes), beet greens and the Middle Eastern spice, sumac. The recipe is from Good Eggs, with the note:

    “This recipe is a great reminder to treat beet greens as a valuable vegetable in their own right. Once you see how much flavor they add to this bowl, you’ll never compost them again!”

    A NIBBLE tip: Beet greens are “free” when you buy fresh beets. Some people who buy beets at farmers markets ask the farmer to remove the tops (the beet greens) so they don’t have to do it at home. Seek out the nearest beet seller and ask him/her for the tops. If you don’t want to seem like you want something for nothing, say they’re for your rabbits.

       

    Himalayan Red Rice

    Red Rice Cooked

    Colusari Red Rice

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/red jasmine rice inharvest 230

    Top: Himalayan Red Rice from Olive Nation. Middle: Cooked red rice from Jugalbandi.info. Bottom Photos: There are different shades of red rice, as shown in this comparison between burgundy Colusari and the lighter red jasmine rices. Photos from InHarvest.com.

     
    Prep time for this recipe is 15 minutes, active time is 35 minutes total.

     

    Red Rice Grain Bowl

    Jerusalem Artichokes (Sunchokes)

    Top: A nutritious, delicious grain bowl from Good Eggs, focusing on red rice and beet greens. Bottom: Sunchokes, originally called Jerusalem artichokes, don’t look like the familiar green artichokes, but the taste of these tubers is similar to the choke. Photo courtesy Chatelaine.com.

     

    Ingredients For 2-3 Servings

  • 1 cup red rice
  • 1 bunch beet greens (substitute chard, with the bottom of the stalks removed)
  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt
  • 2 teaspoons of sumac (*substitute below) or more to taste
  • ½ bunch of spring onions, sliced thinly (substitute green onions—scroll down for the difference)
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • ½ pound sunchokes, wiped clean and cut into ¼ inch slices
  • 2 or more tablespoons rosemary leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about half a lime)
  •  
    ____________________
    *An easy substitute for sumac is lemon zest plus salt. In salads, use lemon juice or vinegar. Sumac is ground from a red berry-like drupe that grows in clusters on bushes in subtropical and temperate regions. The dried drupes of some species are ground to produce sumac, a tangy, crimson spice. The word “sumac” comes from the old Syriac Aramaic summaq, meaning red. In Middle Eastern cuisine, the spice is used to add a tangy, lemony taste to meats and salads; and to garnish hummus and rice. The spice is also a component of the popular spice blend, za’atar.
     
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 375°F. While the oven heats up…

    2. ADD a cup of red rice to a pot with two cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat. When the rice and water are at a rolling boil, cover the pot and turn down to a simmer for about 20 minutes. When all of the water has been absorbed…

    3. REMOVE the pot from the heat, add the cumin and allow it to sit and steam with the lid on for about 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, fluff the rice with a fork. While the rice cooks…

     
    4. TOSS the sunchoke slices with a a tablespoon of olive oil (more if needed) and the rosemary, and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes, until the sunchokes start to turn golden brown and their edges are crispy.

    5. HEAT 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil in a small pan. When the oil is hot, add the shallots and cook for about 3 minutes, until the shallots start to turn golden brown and translucent. Add the beet greens at this point and turn the heat to medium. Turn with tongs to distribute the shallots and olive oil. Cook the greens until they’re tender—7-10 minutes—and finish with a tablespoon of lime juice.

    6. ASSEMBLE the bowl. Start with a base of rice and add the greens and sunchokes. Add a dollop of Greek yogurt and sprinkle the sumac on the yogurt. Finish with a handful of scallions, a sprinkle of flake salt and freshly ground black pepper.
     
    BEYOND RED RICE: THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF RICE.

      

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