THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

Archive for Recipes

TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Crabmeat Day

Jumbo Lump Crabmeat
The whitest, biggest chunks of crab—known as Jumbo Lump crabmeat—are also the priciest.
  How can you celebrate National Crabmeat Day and still have change to spare? Here’s the secret: Those pretty puffs of lump white crabmeat on the buffet are up to three times the price of the darker body crabmeat. But the darker meat is actually tastier. If you’re mixing the crab into a salad for sandwiches (think crab rolls, like lobster rolls, or serve it on brioche, as a crabmeat BLT) or to stuff eggs or omelet, save money—and enjoy crab more often—by using dark crabmeat.

Also celebrate National Crabmeat Day by:
– Learning about the different types of crab and crabmeat, and what you should look for when you purchase canned crab.
– Read our review of Miller’s Select, our favorite brand of crabmeat (it’s shelf-stable too, no refrigeration required).
– Make one of these crabmeat recipes.
– Buy this nifty little crab cookbook: Crab: Buying, Cooking, Cracking, by Andrea Froncillo and Jennifer Jeffrey.
 

Comments off

TIP OF THE DAY: Bake Shamrock Cookies For St. Patrick’s Day

Shamrock Cookies

Bite me, I’m Irish. Shamrock cookies from Elenis.com.

 

Make St. Pat’s cookies: You’ve got plenty of time to find a shamrock cookie cutter before the St. Patrick’s Day festivities begin.

Then, bake up a batch of delicious butter cookies. If you don’t have a shamrock cookie cutter, you can default to regular shapes with green décor.

Use your own favorite recipe, or try this butter cookie recipe from King Arthur Flour.

  • Unless you need to use margarine for dietary reasons, always use fresh butter—not a bar that’s been sitting in the refrigerator for a month, picking up flavors from other foods.
  • You can also use the shamrock cookie cutter to make shamrock toasts for hors d’oeuvres, shamrock pancakes and even vegetable cut-outs.
  •  
    If you don’t want to bake St. Pat’s cookies, your market will be more than happy to sell you some.

     
      

    Comments off

    RECIPE: “Dublin Delight” St. Patrick’s Day Cocktail

    St. Patrick’s Day Cocktail
    Skip the green beer, have a green Grey Goose cocktail, the “Dublin Delight.”
      Don’t color the beer green at your St. Patrick’s Day party. Let the beer drinkers enjoy fine craft beer in the golden color it should be. Those who want a vodka cocktail can go green with a Dublin Delight from Grey Goose Vodka. It was specially created to abet drinkin ‘o the green by master mixologist, Nick Mautone, author of Raising the Bar (“Better Drinks, Better Entertaining”). Starting with Grey Goose Vodka’s popular Le Citron lemon-flavored vodka, the ingredients include kiwi, simple syrup, a sprig of mint, a small piece of vanilla pod and a splash of club soda.

    It’s not as simple as pouring tonic water into the gin, but once you make up a pitcher, it’s smooth sailing—and you have something memorable for your guests.

    – Read the full Dublin Delight recipe.

    – Find more seasonal cocktails in the Cocktails Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

     

    Comments off

    TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Pound Cake Day

    Vanilla Pound Cake

    Lemon Pound  Cake

    Top: Vanilla pound cake with a lemon glaze from Spice Islands. Bottom: Cut view of a similar recipe from Baked NYC.

     

    A pound cake is a loaf cake, although some people make them in Bundt pans.

    The original pound cake, buttery and moist, recipe was made with one pound each of butter, flour, sugar and eggs (that’s about eight eggs), plus flavoring—hence the name.

    Vanilla or lemon are the classic pound cake flavors, but quite a few variations have evolved through the years—adding buttermilk, cream cheese or sour cream to the batter, as well as every flavoring under the sun (amaretto, Black Forest, blood orange, cappuccino, caramel turtle, chocolate/white chocolate, chocolate chip, coconut-macadamia, Grand Marnier, Key lime, peanut butter, pecan, and so on). Others add fruit or a fruit swirl.

    Some pound cake recipes on THE NIBBLE:

  • Grilled Pound Cake
  • Meyer Lemon & Ginger Pound Cake
  • Peanut Butter Pound Cake
  • Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake Bundt
  •  
    POUND CAKE HISTORY

    The original recipe, developed in England in the 1700s, made a very large and dense cake. By the mid-1800s, the ingredient proportions had been adjusted to make a smaller, lighter cake.

    The British pound cake is actually a fruit cake containing currants, raisins, sultanas (golden raisins) and glacé cherries. Pound cakes were the traditional wedding cakes.

    Since the ingredients are so simple, it’s hard to make a bad pound cake—just use the freshest eggs and butter you can find, real vanilla extract, and don’t over-bake.

     
    Pound cakes are so easy to make—why not whip one up to celebrate National Pound Cake Day?

    While a plain piece of pound cake is a joy, some added whipped cream, berries, vanilla ice cream or the full monte—a pound cake hot fudge sundae—makes the occasion even more joyous.

     
      

    Comments off

    TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Mulled Wine Day

    You’ve heard of mulled wine, you say, but you don’t really know what it is? You’re not alone. So we’ll take a moment on National Mulled Wine Day to give you some information to mull over, as well as recipes for mulled wine and its Scandinavian cousin, glögg (pronounced glugg—add Aquivit or vodka along with the brandy, plus almonds and raisins). For those who don’t drink alcohol (or for the kids), there’s also a recipe for mulled apple cider. The basics: Take a modest red wine and add water, brandy, spices and some sugar or honey. Simmer on the stove top (read the recipe) and serve in mugs. Glass mugs are preferable, since, as with any wine, one likes to enjoy the color of the beverage. But any mug will do. (If you’re going to buy glass mugs, we love the double-walled Bistro series from Bodum. They’re beautiful, keep the beverage hot longer and don’t require a coaster because the double wall keeps the heat and moisture raised above your tabletop.)   Mulled Wine
    A cinnamon stick for garnish is optional.
    The word “mull,” referring to sweetening, spicing and heating of wine or ale, has been traced back to 1610 or so. Wine and ale often went bad; by adding spices and honey (sugar was not widely available for another two centuries), it could be made drinkable again. Almost every European country has its version of mulled wine (even the French make vin chaud), and it is popular in South America as well—today as a comforting drink, not to cover up bad booze. The spicy-sweet aroma of the mulling wine will fill your home—it’s the beverage equivalent of baking cookies. You can buy premixed mulling spices in a specialty food store or spice shop (or even in some supermarkets); or you can measure out a little allspice, some dried orange rind (a.k.a. orange peel) and a few whole cloves into a muslin pouch or spice ball (add peppercorns if you’re into pepper, and star anise if you have it), and throw a few cinnamon sticks into the brew. Historical note: The holiday wassail bowl of yore was a mulled ale, flavored with cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, topped with slices of toast (think croutons). The wassail served at today’s Medieval holiday reenactments is likely to be mulled cider, to accommodate modern palates. Find more drink recipes for entertaining in the Cocktails Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments (2)



    © Copyright 2005-2017 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.