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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
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Archive for Recipes

RECIPE: Beer Cocktails

mimosa-pomwonderful

A Beer Mimosa. Photo courtesy Pom
Wonderful.

 

Can’t decide between beer or cocktails? Make beer cocktails, sometimes called beertails.

We published our first beer cocktail recipe, Almond Ale Spritzer, five years ago. It’s time to revisit the options.

These cocktails were developed by Bohemia Beer, made in a Pilsner style beer. But you can try other styles: Check out our Beer Glossary for the different types of beer.

RECIPE: BEER MIMOSA

Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • ¾ cup (1/2 bottle) beer, very cold
  • ½ cup fresh-squeezed orange juice, very cold
  • Orange slice—wedge, wheel, peel curl—for garnish
  •  
    Preparation

    1. POUR the beer into a wine glass. Top with orange juice and stir gently.

    2. GARNISH with the orange slice—or, be creative and make a curl from the peel, as shown in the photo above.

     
    RECIPE: MICHELADA

    Michelada is a Mexican drink: beer mixed with ingredients similar to Bloody Mary mix. “Chela” is Mexican slang for a cold beer, and michelada is a portmanteau of “mi chela helada,” or my cold beer. Here’s more about the Michelada.

     

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 1 cut lime
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt or coarse sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon cracked black pepper
  • 4-½ cups Bloody Maria Mix (recipe below)
  • 3 bottles beer
  • ¾ cup (6 ounces) tequila
  • Garnish: lime wedges, cherry tomatoes, pickled jalapeño slices
    and cubed cheese for garnish
  •  
    FOR THE MICHELADA MIX

    Ingredients For 4½ Cups

  • 1 quart tomato juice
  • 2 green onions (scallions), roughly chopped
  • 1 serrano chile, de-stemmed, roughly chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (about 1 whole lime)
  • Worcestershire sauce to taste
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  •  

    celery-salt-rim-bloodymary-pompeianFB-230

    Beer Bloody Maria. Photo courtesy Pompeian.com | Facebook.

     

    Preparation

    1. MAKE the Bloody Maria mix: Combine all ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth.

    2. COMBINE the salt and pepper and spread out on a flat plate. Rub the rims of 6 tall glasses with the cut lime, then twist in the salt and pepper to coat the entire rim.

    3. POUR 2 tablespoons (1 ounce) of tequila into each glass. Add ¾ cup of beer and ¾ cup of the Bloody Maria mix and mix the drinks well with a spoon.

    4. GARNISH: Place a lime wedge on the edge of each glass. Skewer a cherry tomato, cube of cheese and pickled jalapeño slice and place in glass.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Melon & Prosciutto

    melon-balls-speck-rolls-bar-eolo-230sq

    Who’d guess that this is the classic Italian first course, Melon and Prosciutto? Photo courtesy Bar Elo | NYC.

     

    This fun approach to Melon and Prosciutto was created by Chef Mario at Bar Eolo in New York City.

  • Instead of slicing the melon into wedges, use a melon baller.
  • Instead of flat slices of prosciutto (Parma ham), roll them into “roses” (or plain cylinders).
  • Instead of a lemon wedge, serve a strawberry coulis (or any fruit you prefer)—the recipe is below.
  • Add a modern garnish: microgreens.
  •  
    OTHER TYPES OF HAM

    You don’t have to use prosciutto, an Italian dry-cured (uncooked) ham served in very thin slices. You can try serrano, speck or any ham you prefer. While this recipe

    Check out the different types of ham in our Ham Glossary.

     
    RECIPE: STRAWBERRY COULIS

    A coulis (French, prounounced coo-LEE) is a fruit or vegetable sauce that is puréed, then strained to remove any seeds. Although straining creates a more elegant-looking sauce, you can save a few minutes and serve the purée unstrained.

    You can use fresh or frozen strawberries—or any berry you prefer. Or, try kiwi, mango or other fruit. You can make the coulis up to a week in advance and store it in a sealed container in the fridge.

     
    Ingredients For 1 Cup Of Sauce

  • 1 cup frozen unsweetened strawberries
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

    2. COOL and transfer to a blender or food processor. Purée until smooth; strain, and refrigerate.

     
      

    Comments (1)

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make A Semifreddo

    It’s National Ice Cream Month, which we interpret to include all frozen desserts. There is no National Frozen Yogurt Month, No Sherbet/Sorbet Month.

    The history of frozen desserts dates back to 2000 B.C.E., when the Chinese used syrups to flavor snow. Fruit juices made fruit ices. Honey and aromatic spices expanded the menu of flavors. So, the first frozen dessert was more sorbet than ice cream. Here’s the history of ice cream.

    Since ice cream is one of our favorite foods, we created a glossary of the different types of ice cream 10 years ago. Today’s tip, straight from the glossary, is to make a semifreddo.

    You don’t need an ice cream machine to make semifreddo. As with granita, it is often made in a loaf pan, or even an ice cube tray.

  • You can use cake pans or a springform pan make a semifreddo “cake,” with a center filling of caramel or fudge sauce, curd or fruit preserves, fresh berries or other fruit, Nutella, nuts, whatever.
  • If you use a springform pan, you can rim the semifreddo with lady fingers; or cover the sides of the cake with cookie crumbs.
  • You can make two or three layers of different flavors.
  • You can make individual semifreddos in custard cups or other molds.
     
    In fact, anything you can do to create ice cream cake can be applied to a semifreddo.

  •    

    strawberry-pistachio-semifreddo-safeeggs-230

    Make semifreddo in a loaf pan. Then slice it instead of scooping it. Photo courtesy SafeEggs.com.

    Semifreddo is the word for “half cold” in Italian; frozen soufflé is the English term. Semifreddo may look like ice cream but it is more of a frozen mousse, created by combining equal parts of ice cream and whipped cream. It is frozen in a pan or other container, then sliced and served.

    Semifreddo is a special occasion or party dessert that you can prepare ahead of time. The elegant Strawberry-Pistachio Semifreddo recipe below is from Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs.

    Since the recipe uses raw eggs, pasteurized eggs are a worry-free solution (here’s more about pasteurized eggs and the 12 popular foods where you should consider them to eliminate the Salmonella risk).

     

    strawberry-semifreddo-myrecipes-230

    Strawberries and Cream Semifreddo. Here’s the recipe from MyRecipes.com.

     

    RECIPE: FROZEN STRAWBERRY-PISTACHIO SEMIFREDDO

    Prep time is 25 minutes; allow another 12 hours for freezing. You can make and freeze the semifreddo up to three days in advance.

    You can use a different fruit, replace the nuts, etc. (we just made a raspberry-chocolate chip semifreddo adapting this recipe, and replaced the vanilla extract with Chambord raspberry liqueur). You can also be trendy, as in this recipe for Chocolate Semifreddo with Chile-Chocolate Sauce.

    You can also garnish with nuts, sliced fruit, chocolate savings, crushed cookies or candies, and sauces: chocolate sauce, custard sauce, fruit sauce, whipped cream, etc. You can also top it with meringue, Baked Alaska-style.

    Check out the different types of dessert sauces in our Dessert Sauce Glossary.

     
    Ingredients For 18 Servings

  • 2 cups fresh strawberries
  • 1 cup sugar, divided
  • 2-1/4 cups whipping cream (heavy cream)
  • 5 pasteurized egg yolk(s)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup chopped, toasted pistachios
  • Garnishes as desired
  •  
    Preparation

    1. LINE a 9×5-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap, leaving a 2-inch overhang on all sides.

    2. PLACE the strawberries in a food processor or blender. Add 1/3 cup of the sugar; process until the berries are puréed and set aside.

    3. BEAT the cream and 1/3 cup of the sugar in large bowl with an electric mixer on high speed, just until stiff peaks form. Set aside.

    4. BEAT the egg yolks with the remaining 1/3 cup sugar in a separate large bowl, until pale yellow and tripled in volume. Add the vanilla. Fold the whipped cream into yolks. Stir in the pistachios.

    5. POUR half of the egg mixture into loaf pan. Top with half of the strawberry purée. Use a small spatula to swirl the purée into the egg mixture. Repeat with the remaining egg mixture and strawberry purée.

    6. SMOOTH the top with a spatula and cover with plastic wrap. Freeze until firm, about 12 hours. To serve, remove the plastic wrap and invert the semifreddo onto a clean cutting board. Cut into 1/2-inch thick slices. Garnish as desired and serve.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Cherry Tomato Bruschetta

    cherry-tomato-bruschetta-recipe-ws-230

    We serve bruschetta as an appetizer course
    as well as an hors d’oeuvre with wine. Photo
    courtesy Williams-Sonoma.

     

    While cherry tomatoes are grown in greenhouses year-round, like all tomatoes, they taste so much better in the summer.

    In addition to broiling/grilling/roasting/sautéeing cherry tomatoes and adding them to pasta and salads, you can make a simple appetizer, hors d’oeuvre or snack: Cherry Tomato Bruschetta (broo-SKET-uh). Why buy “bruschetta topping” when it’s so easy to make this classic?

    Bruschetta, which originated in Italy, is at its simplest grilled bread rubbed with garlic and drizzled with olive oil. You can also add a variety of toppings (here’s the difference between bruschetta and crostini).

    However you prepare it, use the best-quality ingredients: crusty coarse bread; ripe tomatoes harvested at the height of the season; fresh basil; and the best extra-virgin olive oil your budget will allow.
     
    RECIPE: TOMATO BRUSCHETTA

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 pound cherry tomatoes or 3-4 large tomatoes
  • 16 fresh basil leaves, torn into small pieces
  • Optional cheese: mozzarella, gorgonzola or other favorite, small dice
  • Salt
  • 8 slices coarse country bread, each about 1/2 inch thick
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the broiler.

    2. CUT the cherry tomatoes. If using large tomatoes, core and seed them and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Combine the tomatoes in a bowl with the basil and a pinch of salt.

    3. PLACE the bread slices on a baking sheet and broil, turning once, until crisp and golden on both sides (about 3 minutes). Immediately rub one side of each slice vigorously with a garlic clove, using 1 clove per 4 slices.

    4. ARRANGE the bread slices, garlic side up, on a platter. Spoon the tomato mixture on the slices. Drizzle with the oil and serve.
     
    OTHER BRUSCHETTA TOPPINGS

    Here are some toppings to consider, all classic Italian:

  • Canned tuna with capers and lemon, tuna tapenade
  • Canellini beans with fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme)
  •  

    vegetable-of-the-day-ws-230

    This book is full of seasonal, vegetable-focused family. Photo courtesy Williams-Sonoma.

  • Cheese: Asiago, Gorgonzola, Mozzarella, Parmigiano, Smoked Mozzarella, other Italian cheese
  • Ham: prosciutto, serrano, speck
  • Grilled vegetables: bell pepper, broccoli rabe, radicchio, yellow squash, zucchini
  • Other veggies: arugula, sautéed mushrooms
  • Olive tapenade or sliced olives with herbs
  • Dessert versions: Nutella; or ricotta, orange and chocolate on raisin bread
  •  
    Here are recipes.
     
    Be as creative as you like, with ingredients from other cuisines. We start by thinking by country: French-style, Greek-Style, spanish-style, Russian-style, etc.

    Beets, pickled onions and sour cream (or goat cheese) topped with dill on crunchy toasted bread? Why not!

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: How To Smoke Fish On A Gas Grill

    grilled_salmon_tonyromas-230

    Smoky flavor from a gas grillPhoto courtesy Tony Roma’s.

     

    Mild hardwood chips add a delicious smoky flavor to grilled fish. Altough most commonly added to charcoal grills and grill-smokers, gas grills can easily be employed to produce tasty smoked (and grilled) fish.

    We’ve previously reviewed Savu Smoker Bags, an excellent way to add smoke Smoking Salmon on a Gas Grill

    Who says you need a gigantic smoker to get that great smoked flavor? Chef Bob of Tony Roma’s tells us how to use wood chips to smoke fish on a gas grill.

    Any fish can be smoked, but those that are high in fat are best because they absorb smoke faster and have better texture (note that the fat is heart-healthy, with omega-3 fatty acids).

    Lean fish tend to be dry and tough after smoking, although you can brine them to retain some moisture. Here’s how to brine fish.

     
    High-Fat Fish For Smoking On A Grill

  • Bluefish
  • Salmon: chinook, coho, pink and red/sockeye
  • Rainbow trout
  • Lake whitefish, sablefish, striped mullet
  • Tuna: albacore and bluefin
  •  
    What wood should you select? It depends on the delicacy of the fish and your preference for light versus heavy smoke flavor. Here’s a chart of the flavors imparted by different types of wood.

    In the recipe below, Chef Bob pairs salmon with hickory chips. Alder, apple, cherry and oak all work well for smoking fish.

     

    RECIPE: SMOKY GRILLED SALMON

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 4 salmon fillets, 4-6 ounces each
  • 1 1/2 size aluminum foil pan
  • 1 bag hickory wood chips
  • 1 whole lemon
  • Kosher salt
  • Black pepper
  • Water
  • Aluminum foil
  •  

    trout_-morguefile-RoseVita-MF-230

    Trout, ready for grilling and smoking. Photo by Rose Vita | Morguefile.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the grill to 300°F (only preheat one side of the grill). Mix the seasonings in a medium bowl and season both sides of the salmon fillets.

    2. ADD 4-5 cups of wood chips to the pan, fill the pan with water and let the chips soak for 30 minutes. Drain and cover the pan with aluminum foil.

    3. CUT 6-9 holes in the top of the aluminum foil (while the foil covers the pan) to let the smoke escape. Place the pan on the preheated grill.

    4. WAIT 30 minutes; then check to see if the pan is smoking. If not, check your heat setting and wait until smoke appears before adding the fish. Don’t worry if the smoke isn’t billowing: Too much smoke can produce bitterness.

    5. PLACE the fish on the opposite side of the grill and close the lid. Cook the salmon until it is fully smoked and flaky, about 30-35 minutes. The smoke will envelop the fish and give it that delicious smoked flavor.

    Enjoy the flavor…and the aroma while the fish cooks.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: BLT Gazpacho

    BLT-gazpacho-munchery-230sq

    Bright red tomato gazpacho shows off the BLT topping. Photo courtesy Munchery.com.

     

    Like BLTs? Turn the concept into a soup, as Munchery.com did with this tomato gazpacho.

    There are as many recipes for gazpacho as there are people who make them. Each region of Spain has its own preferred style, dating back hundreds of years. And then, there are modern approaches, from mango gazpacho to gazpacho with beer (the recipe iinks are below).

    Here’s the history of gazpacho.

    The recipe below is a thin tomato purée. No chunky vegetables are used, in order that the BLT topping can stand out.

    But you certainly can place the garnish atop a chunky soup recipe (we have more of those at the bottom of this article).

    You can also use the BLT topping on hot tomato soup.

     
    RECIPE: SMOOTH TOMATO GAZPACHO

    Ingredients

  • 1 slice country-style bread, about 1″ thick, crusts removed
  • 2 small cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and chopped*
  • 2 pounds very ripe tomatoes, seeded and coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  •  
    For The BLT Garnish

  • Tomato gazpacho or tomato soup.
  • Crisp bacon, crumbled or chopped.
  • Baby arugula, representing the lettuce.
  •  
    If you want a BLTA, add some diced avocado. Munchery also added croutons, pickled onions and cubes of boiled potato.
     
    *If the tomatoes aren’t ripe enough or are too pricy, you can substitute 3 cups of tomato juice.

     

    Preparation

    1. SOAK the bread for a half hour in a small bowl, covered in water. Squeeze out the moisture with your hands.

    2. PURÉE the bread, cucumbers, tomatoes, garlic, vinegar, olive oil, and 1 cup of water in a food processor until very smooth.

    3. USE a coarse sieve to strain, pushing the purée through with the back of a wooden spoon. Season to taste with salt.

    4. CHILL the gazpacho in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours. Adjust the seasoning as needed. Serve in individual bowls or glasses, topped with the BLT garnish.
     
    MORE GAZPACHO RECIPES

  • Avocado Gazpacho, topped with shrimp
  • Gazpacho Verde (green gazpacho)
  • White Gazpacho with cucumber, leeks and sour cream
  • White Gazpacho with almonds, garlic and grapes
  • Mango Gazpacho with crème fraîche sorbet
  • Pineapple Gazpacho with chile heat
  • Yellow Bell Pepper Gazpacho
  • Tomato Gazpacho With Beer
  •  

    arugula-bowl-parkseed-230

    Baby arugula substitutes for the lettuce in this BLT garnish. You can also use it instead of iceberg or romaine lettuce on a BLT sandwich.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make The Best French Fries

    fries-calphalon-fryer-WS-230

    If you love to make French fries, you need a fry basket. Photo courtesy Calphalon.

     

    Today is National French Fry Day, the perfect day to explore how to make the best French fries.

    We contacted our friends at the Idaho Potato Commission, a website with tons of tips and recipes.

    They start by advising you to buy Idaho potatoes, which are branded russet potatoes. In actuality, depending on where potatoes are grown, they will have more or less moisture. Idaho russets have less moisture, which is desirable for crisper fries.

    Here’s how chefs do it—a twice-fried method:

    HOW TO FRY PERFECT FRENCH FRIES

    1. WASH and scrub the potato skins well, and allow to air-dry in a single layer on a sheet pan.

    2. USE a French fry cutter to cut the potatoes into the desired size and shape, leaving the skins on. RINSE thoroughly so the excess starches and sugars are removed.

     
    At this point, you can leave the sliced potatoes covered with water in the fridge up to 24 hours in advance of cooking.

    3. SPIN the potatoes dry with a salad spinner or drain on a drip screen (i.e., cooling rack) before frying.

    4. BLANCH or partially cook the fries to keep the potatoes from oxidizing/darkening, in a 250°F fryer for 2-3 minutes. Remove from the fryer and drain. Allow the fries to cool to room temperature before the final fry. Fries should be bendable. Then, chill in the fridge before the final fry.

    5. FINISH the fries in the fryer at 350°F for 3-4 minutes until golden brown and fully cooked. Remove and drain well. TIP: Fill the fry basket only half full. Better oil circulation results in crisper fries.

    6. After draining on a screen, season with salt. Do not season over the hot oil! Consider seasoning with dried herbs as well—rosemary or thyme, for example—or substituting garlic salt.

     

    THE HISTORY OF FRENCH FRIES

    Potatoes originated in Peru and spread to other parts of Latin America. Fried potatoes—cooking potatoes in fat over a fire—is a practice that’s thousands of years old.

    Potatoes were “discovered” and brought back to Europe by the Spanish conquistadors—where they were uses as hog feed! The French were convinced that potatoes caused leprosy, and French Parliament banned the cultivation of potatoes in 1748.

    A French army medical officer, Antoine-Augustine Parmentier, was forced to eat potatoes as a prisoner of war, and discovered their culinary potential. Through his efforts, in 1772, the Paris Faculty of Medicine finally proclaimed that potatoes were edible for humans—though it took a famine in 1785 for the French to start eating them in earnest.

    In 1802, Thomas Jefferson’s White House chef, Honoré Julien, a Frenchman, prepared “potatoes served in the French manner” for a state dinner. The potatoes were “deep-fried while raw, in small cuttings.” French fries had arrived! By the early 20th century, the term “French fried,” meaning “deep fried,” was being used for other foods as well (onion rings and zucchini sticks, anyone?).

     

    Julienne_Fries_alexia-230ps

    Season your fries with rosemary, thyme or other favorite herb. Photo courtesy Alexia.

     
    DIFFERENT TYPES OF FRENCH FRIES

    Our French Fries Glossary has 27 different types of French fries.

    You can make number 28, by creating your own signature French fry recipe. Here’s how.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Salmon Tostadas

    Norwegian-Salmon-Tostadas_salmonfromnorway-230

    Nutritionists advise that salmon and other fish make a healthier tostada or taco. Also substitute fat-free Greek yogurt for the sour cream! And substitute corn tortillas and shells for the white flour versions. Photo courtesy Salmon From Norway.

     

    According to Cabo Flats Cantina & Bar, there are 54,000 Mexican restaurants in the U.S., and $39 billion is spent each year on Mexican food.

    You can keep some of that restaurant money in your pocket by making these tasty salmon tostadas at home.

    Simple mesquite-seasoned salmon tostadas are a tasty Tex-Mex meal. You can grill the salmon or cook it on the stove top.

    RECIPE: FRESH SALMON TOSTADAS

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 4 each 5-6 ounce salmon fillets, skin removed
  • 1 small head iceberg lettuce
  • 4 teaspoons mesquite barbeque seasoning
  • 2 tablelspoons canola oil
  • 8 tostada shells
  • 1 can refried black beans
  • 1 cup Mexican cheese blend, shredded
  • 3/4 cup salsa
  • Optional garnish: sour cream (substitute plain Greek yogurt)
  • Optional garnish: fresh cilantro leaves
  • Preparation

    1. SHRED the lettuce.

    2. SPRINKLE mesquite seasoning on each fillet. Heat a sauté pan over medium-high heat, add the canola oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. Carefully place the salmon into the pan, and cook for 2-3 minutes until browned.

    3. TURN over carefully and cook for another 4-6 minutes or to desired temperature.

    4. HEAT the refried beans in a saucepan while the salmon finishes cooking.

    5. ASSEMBLE: Place 3-4 tablespoons of beans on each tostada shell, and place two shells overlapping on each plate. Mound lettuce on top of the beans and sprnkle with the cheese. Place a salmon fillet on top. Garnish with salsa and the optional sour cream and cilantro.
     
    Find more salmon recipes at SalmonFromNorway.com.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: 12+ Uses For Flat Beer

    When leftover beer goes flat, there’s no need to toss it. With respect to all of the household and personal care uses, we prefer to consume it. When you add it to recipes, the flatness doesn’t matter at all; it becomes analogous to adding still wine.

    The beer is substituted for all or some of the water (or, in the case of a marinade, another liquid). Here are 12+ uses for flat, leftover beer:

  • Batter: Make beer batter shrimp, chicken, anything battered and fried.
  • Beans: Substitute for water, as in the Mexican recipe Frijoles Borrachos, “drunken beans”.
  • Beer Can Chicken: Set a whole chicken atop a beer can, atop a grill (recipe).
  • Braises: Add to pot roast and other slow-cooked meats like short ribs and pork butt. Check out this Belgian recipe for chicken with beer and prunes or carbonade flamande, a Belgian beef stew.
  • Brats and Franks: Steam them in beer.
  • Bread: Check out recipes for beer bread. There are a number of beer bread mixes, too: Just add the beer!
  •    

    waffled-pancake-pan-nordicware-WS-230

    Who knew: You can add flat beer to pancake and waffle recipes. The slight bitterness is a nice counterpoint to the sweet syrup. The Silver Dollar Waffle Griddle is from Nordicware.

  • Butter: Make “beer butter,” a compound butter used for cooking. There’s a recipe below to use as a bread spread.
  • Cheese Soup: This was a popular breakfast soup in medieval Europe, sometimes poured over yesterday’s bread (or toast). Try it for lunch or dinner (recipe).
  • Honey Beer Sauce: Cook chicken breasts in this tasty sauce.
  • Marinades and Brines: Beer helps to tenderize and adds flavor.
  • Pancakes and Waffles: Replace the water with beer.
  • Sauces: Use beer instead of wine.
  • Seafood: Combine with water to steam clams, mussels, shrimp, etc. Consider adding some Old Bay seasoning.
  •  

    beer-cheese-soup-melissas-230

    Use leftover beer in a hearty cheese soup—a breakfast staple in medieval Europe. Photo courtesy Melissas.com.

     

    RECIPE: HONEY MUSTARD BEER BUTTER

    Ingredients

  • 1 stick/8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened to room
    temperature
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 heaping teaspoon Dijon or honey mustard
  • 1 tablespoon beer
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BEAT the butter in a mixing bowl until very soft and silky, 2 to 3 minutes. Drizzle in the honey and continue mixing until well incorporated.

    2. ADD the mustard, beer and salt. Beat until all ingredients are thoroughly combined. Use immediately or tightly wrap and store in the refrigerator or freezer.

     

    Adapted from a recipe on SoupAddict.com, where it was used with Irish soda bread.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Blueberry Sorbet

    July is National Ice Cream Month as well as National Blueberry Month. Why not combine both concepts and make blueberry ice cream?

    Or, lower in calories and lactose free, blueberry sorbet?

    You don’t need an ice cream maker to prepare this two-ingredient blueberry sorbet; just blueberries and apple juice concentrate.

    The recipe, from U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council, couldn’t be easier to make. While you can do it with fresh blueberries in season, it’s just as good with frozen blueberries, which are picked at their peak and flash-frozen.

    The icy and refreshing treat can be enjoyed plain or served with cake, cookies, pies or fruit salad; or turned into a sorbet cocktail or mocktail.

    RECIPE: BLUEBERRY SORBET

    Ingredients For 4 Cups/6 Servings

  • 4 cups fresh or thawed, frozen blueberries
  • 1 can (6 ounces) frozen apple juice concentrate
  • Optional garnish: fresh blueberries
  • Optional garnish: crème fraîche
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    Blueberry-Sorbet-blueberrycouncilorg-230

    Two-ingredient blueberry sorbet. Photo courtesy Blueberry Council.

     

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the blueberries and apple juice concentrate in the bowl of a food processor or blender. Whirl until liquefied and our into a 11 X 7-inch baking pan. Cover and freeze until firm around the edges, about 2 hours.

    2. BREAK the frozen mixture into pieces with a heavy spoon. Place the pieces into the food processor or blender and whirl until smooth but not completely melted.

    3. SPOON into a 9 X 5-inch loaf pan; cover and freeze until firm. Serve within three days.

    Find more recipes at BlueberryCouncil.org.

      

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