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RECIPES: Frozen Chocolate Cheesecake & Stout Pops, Chocolate Stout Float & The History Of Stout

Here are two fun, warm-day dessert recipes for the beer crowd, using stout. The history of stout is below, but let’s hop right to the recipes.

Any stout pairs deliciously with anything chocolate. And chocolate stout (photo #1) pairs even better.

RECIPE #1: FROZEN CHOCOLATE CHEESECAKE STOUT POPS

We are the Will Rogers of cheesecake: We never met a cheesecake we didn’t like. We’ve never met an ice cream we didn’t like, as well.

And we like alcohol (liqueur) in both our cheesecake and our ice cream.

So when we chanced upon this recipe from Nugget Markets—a frozen chocolate cheesecake fudge pop with stout, photo #3—we knew we had to make them. There’s even a graham cracker “crust.”

Prep time is 15 minutes plus overnight freezing.

Ingredients For 5 Pops

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • ¼ cup sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/3 cup Russian Imperial stout (we substituted chocolate stout)
  • ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate
  • 6 graham crackers (3/4 cup crumbs [3 ounces])
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MIX the sugar, softened cream cheese, and sour cream in a blender on low speed, until completely combined. Stir in the milk and stout.

    2. MELT the dark chocolate chips over a double boiler on the stove top (or in the microwave at 30-second intervals) until completely melted. Pour the melted chocolate into blender mixture and mix until well combined.

    3. SLOWLY POUR the mixture into the pop molds, tapping molds as you fill to remove any air bubbles. Leave a 1/2-inch empty space on the top for the “crust.”

    4. SMASH the graham crackers until completely crumbled (we put them in a plastic bag and use a rolling pin). ADD the melted butter and stir until combined. Add on top of the chocolate mixture, spreading evenly. Insert the ice pop sticks and freeze overnight.
     
     
    RECIPE #2: COFFEE-CHOCOLATE STOUT FLOAT

    We published recipes using chocolate stout a few years back: a chocolate stout float a few years back; along with chocolate stout ice cream.

    When we saw a recipe with coffee stout from the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (photo #3), we knew it was time to repeat the idea.

    In this recipe, the chocolate float is made with chocolate ice cream and coffee stout, but go for chocolate stout if you prefer.

    Or flip it: Have an all-coffee float with coffee stout and coffee ice cream.

    Here’s a chocolate stout cake recipe to go with it.

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 8 ounces coffee stout
  • 1/2 pint chocolate ice cream
  • Optional garnish: whipped cream
  •  
    Plus

  • A straw
  •  
    Preparation

       
    Rogue Chocolate Stout
    [1] Rogue Chocolate Stout is delicious in either of these recipes, plus this chocolate stout cream pie recipe from The Beeroness.

    Chocolate Cheesecake Pops
    [2] Have your cheesecake pops with a glass of stout on the side (photo and recipe from Nugget Markets).

    Coffee-Stout-Beer-Float-eatwischeese-230

    [3] The coffee stout float with chocolate ice cream. Here are step-by-step photos from Eat Wisconsin Cheese..

     
    1. PLACE two scoops of ice cream in a pint glass or other large glass.

    2. SLOWLY POUR the stout on top of ice cream to fill the glass. Serve with a straw

    Serve with a straw and a spoon.
     

     

    Glass Of Stout

    Guinness Pint Glass

    [4] and [5] Guinness, the world’s top-selling stout, is at the low end of ABV: just 5% (photos courtesy Guinness & Co.).

      THE HISTORY OF STOUT

    While man has been brewing beer since an client times, styles evolved over the millennia as different malts, yeasts, and hops became available. Stout is a relatively recent recipe.

    The first known use of the word “stout” for beer is in 1677. At that time, stout was a word for strong, and the document implied a strong beer, not a dark beer. Let’s skip ahead 50 years to porter, the basis of modern stout.

    Porter, which originated in London in the early 1720s. It was so-named because this strong beer—which was cheaper than other beers and increased in alcohol content with age—became popular with porters, among other Londoners.

    Within a few decades, porter breweries in London had multiplied many-fold. Large amounts were exported to Ireland, where by 1780 or so, ale brewer Arthur Guinness decided to brew his own porter (and ultimately created what would one day become the world’s most famous stout).

    The 19th century brought the development of black malt, the darkest of the common roasted malts. It gives beer a dark color and stronger flavor—a brew with a very different character than roasted barley-based beers. It became the standard malt for porter[source].

    At that point, “stout” still meant only “strong,” and the term could be related to any strong beer (stout pale ale, for example).

    But because of the huge popularity of porters, brewers made them in a variety of strengths. The beers with higher gravities were called stout porters.

    Stout became the generic term for the strongest or stoutest porters. There is still debate on whether stouts should be designated a separate style from porter (as they are now), or simply be designated as stout [strong] porter.

     
    Like porter, stout is a dark beer made from roasted malt or roasted barley, hops, water and yeast. Stouts were traditionally the generic term for the strongest or stoutest porters, typically 7% or 8% ABV.

  • Porter is typically 4% to 5% ABV. Baltic porter, brewed in the Baltic Sea countries of Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and Sweden, is brewed with a higher alcohol content.
  • Stout is typically 5% to 10% ABV. It’s important to note that some American craft brewers have been making even stronger stouts—up to 11.5% ABV.
  •  
    By comparison:

  • Lager is typically 4% to 5% ABV.
  • Pilsner, a popular style of lager, is typically 3% to 6% ABV.
  • Brown Ale is typically 4% to 6% ABV.
  • India Pale Ale is typically 6% to 7% ABV. [source]
  •  
    In addition to chocolate stout and coffee stout, check out the other types of stout, including cream stout, dry (Irish) stout (e.g., Guinness), milk stout and oatmeal stout.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Beer Crust Pizza

    Beer Crust Pizza

    Greek Salad Pizza

    You can make the pizza in any shape you like. [1] Oblong, flatbread-style from King Arthur Flour. [2] A traditional round pizza with Greek salad toppings, from Cooking Classy.

     

    Make Dad a pizza with beer or hard cider. It’s subtle flavor, and a fun idea.

    The type and quality of beer you use is very important. Mass-market beers will not give you the results that a good craft beer or imported German beer provide.

    Bonus: You can use leftover, flat beer.

    If you like a light crust, use an unfiltered wheat beer. The bottle contains yeast particles, which add to the rise and provide a yeasty taste to the crust. Before adding the bear, swirl the bottle to release the yeast from the bottom.

    Pilsners, IPAs and other hoppy beers can make the crust bitter. Porter and stout give a stronger flavor.

    Thanks to King Arthur Flour for the recipe.

    Prep time is 20 to 30 minutes; bake time is 18 to 48 minutes, depending on the rise.

    RECIPE: BEER CRUST PIZZA

    Ingredients For 2 Pizza Crusts

  • 2½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1½ cups semolina (substitute unbleached all-purpose flour)
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon King Arthur Pizza Dough Flavor* or 5 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1½ cups room-temperature beer
  •  
    Plus Toppings As Desired

  • Sauce
  • Mozzarella and other cheeses
  • Meats, vegetables, herbs
  •  
    ________________

    *King Arthur Flour’s Pizza Dough Flavor is a blend of cheese powder, garlic and natural flavors. You can blend your own to taste. Use approximately 1-1/3 teaspoons per cup of flour, in any pizza crust recipe.

     
    Preparation

    1. MIX and knead together all of the dough ingredients until you’ve made a smooth, soft dough. You can use your hands, a mixer or a bread machine. Cover the dough and allow it to rise for 30 minutes, or for up to 2 hours.

    2. PREHEAT the oven to 450°F with the pizza stone on the lower rack. Divide the dough in half, and shape each half into a 10″ to 12″ round.

    3. PLACE the rounds on parchment paper, if you’re using a pizza stone. Otherwise, place the dough on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. For a thin to medium crust, bake the pizzas immediately. For thicker crust, let them rise 30 to 60 minutes.

    4. TRANSFER the pizzas, parchment and all, to the baking stone; or place the pans in the oven. Bake for 5 minutes. Remove from the oven, top as desired, and bake for an additional 15 minutes, until the bottom crust is crisp and the cheese is bubbly, browned and ready to eat

    TIPS

    To end up with mozzarella that’s gently melted (not browned and hardened):

  • Add the meat or vegetables after 5 minutes of baking time.
  • Add half the cheese after 15 minutes baking time (i.e., 10 minutes after the meat and veggies).
  • Bake for 3 minutes, add the remainder of the cheese, then bake for an additional 2 minutes, until the second addition of cheese is barely melted.
  •  
     
    THE HISTORY OF BEER
     
    THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BEER

     
      

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    RECIPES: Chocolate Bacon Potato Chips, Wasabi Potato Chips

    For Father’s Day, for celebrations year-round or for general gifting, here’s something few others will be making: Chocolate Bacon Potato Chips. The bacon is optional: chocolate-only is just as delicious.

    These sweet-and-salty chips are a favorite at parties, and disappear quickly. We recommend dipping the chips most of the way, instead of completely enrobing them, to keep chocolate off of the fingers.

    It’s also faster; and no dipping tools are required.

    Don’t want chocolate? Make the wasabi-dusted potato chips recipe below.

    TIPS

  • Ridged chips are better because they are flatter, making them easier to dip.
  • The quick version is to purchase quality potato chips instead of making your own. But we make our own easily with this Mastrad microwave chip maker.
  • The better the chocolate, the tastier the chips.
  • If you want glossy chocolate, you need to temper it (here’s how to temper chocolate). But no one will notice if the chocolate is dull rather than shiny.
  • If you care about the taste of chocolate, never use candy coating. It doesn’t melt in the heat, it doesn’t require tempering, but it doesn’t taste good.
  • If you want to make the chips part of a dessert, we suggest a slightly tart-sweet counterpoint, like vanilla frozen yogurt.
  • Chocolate-dipped chips are best eaten the day they are made, when they are the crunchiest.
  •  
     
    RECIPE: CHOCOLATE OR CHOCOLATE-BACON POTATO CHIPS

    Ingredients

  • 24 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips or chopped chocolate
  • One 16-ounce bag ridged potato chips
  •  
    For The Optional Bacon

  • 3 strips bacon
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • Optional: ¼-½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  •    

    Chocolate Dipped Potato Chips

    Crisp Bacon Slice

    [1] Ridges work better (photo courtesy The Spruce). [2] Variation: Top the chocolate with crumbled bacon (photo courtesy iGourmet).

     
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Set the bacon slices on the parchment and sprinkle each slice with brown sugar, then with the red pepper flakes. Bake for 10-12 minutes until they are cooked completely. Set aside to cool. Once cool, dice the bacon into ¼” pieces.

    2. REPLACE the pan lining with parchment or waxed paper or and set aside for the dipped chips.

    3. Place the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave it at 45-second intervals until melted. Stir well between intervals to prevent scorching. To dip…

    4. HOLD a chip at one end and dip it into the chocolate about 80% of the wa, leaving an un-dipped edge at the end for neat pick-up. Hold vertically and let the excess chocolate drip into the bowl, and tap the chip against the edge a few times to remove the excess.

    5. PLACE the dipped chip onto the parchment and sprinkle with a few bits of bacon. Repeat for the rest of the chips.

    6. REFRIGERATE the chips for 10-15 minutes to set the chocolate (no longer; they’ll get soggy). Alternatively, cool for 1 hour at room temperature, or place in the refrigerator for one minute.
     

     

    Wasabi Potato Chips

    Wasabi Powder

    [3] Wasabi potato chips (photo courtesy Idaho Potato Commission). [4] Wasabi powder (photo courtesy Silk Road Spices).

     

    RECIPE: WASABI POTATO CHIPS

    This recipe was developed by the Idaho Potato Commission.

    You need to make your own chips, so the spice mix can stick to the hot chips.

    Ingredients

  • 2 large Idaho potatoes (12 ounces to 14 ounces each)
  • Canola or other non-hydrogenated oil
  • 1 tablespoon wasabi powder
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon sugar (we leave it out)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PEEL the potatoes and slice into desired shape: 1/2-inch sticks, wedges or 1/8-inch thick chips. Rinse and pat dry.

    2. HEAT the oil in a deep fryer or deep-sided saucepan, to 275°F. Blanch potatoes for 5 minutes, cooking in batches as necessary. Drain and set aside on paper towels until ready to serve.

    3. BLEND dry seasonings and set aside.

    4. INCREASE the oil temperature to 350°F. Cook the fries until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes for sticks and wedges and 1 to 2 minutes for chips.

    5. SPRINKLE the hot fries with the seasoning mix. (We tossed them in a large pan using protective gloves.
     
    POTATO CHIPS HISTORY

    It was a happy accident!

    TYPES OF POTATOES

    So many types, so little time!

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Use “Everything” Bagel Topping On Everything Else

    Everything Fish Fillet

    Everything Burger Bun

    Everything Bagel Spice Blend

    Everything Topping

    [1] At OB Surf Lodge in San Diego, the “Everything” salmon entrée, has the spice topping with a variety of sides (*below). [2] and [3] Homemade burger buns from King Arthur Flour, which sells the topping. [4] What should you top first (photo courtesy Take Two Tapas).

     

    First there was the “everything” bagel (history and recipe below), for people who wanted it all: onion, garlic, poppy seed, salt and sesame seed.

    Then it ported to everything crackers, lavash, hamburger buns, bagel chips, dips, pretzels, popcorn…and now, to protein.

    You can purchase it ready-blended (see photo #3 and check Trader Joe’s and other stores) or customize your own topping, e.g., leave out the salt and add red pepper flakes. If you mix up a lot, you can give it as gifts.

    Then, here’s what you can do with it. Notes:

  • A little goes a long way, so start small.
  • When baking, the garlic can burn after a while. Keep an eye on it and cover with foil when it turns light brown.
  • For baking bread, use an egg wash before sprinkling on the topping.
  •  
    EVERYTHING BREAKFAST

  • Avocado toast.
  • Cream cheese: Top the brick with the seasoning.
  • Eggs: For fried, first toast the seasoning mix in a non-stick pan with a bit of oil. Then add the eggs and sprinkle more seasoning on top. When ready, flip. For scrambled eggs, add more at the beginning; then no need to sprinkle on top.
  • Plain yogurt and cottage cheese.
  • Buttered toast.
  • Regular bagels (sprinkle it on the cream cheese, or brush the bagel with water and adhere to the top).
  •  
    EVERYTHING LUNCH

  • Burgers: Bake “everything” buns, or brush plain buns with water and sprinkle on the topping.
  • Cole slaw and potato salad.
  • Green salads.
  • Pasta: Sprinkle on mac and cheese.
  • Pizza: Mix into the dough, or sprinkle on the top.
  • Salad dressing.
  • Sandwich filling garnish.
  •  
    EVERYTHING DINNER

  • Grilled chicken or fish.
  • Pan-fried fish: Rub an inch-thick tuna or other steak with olive oil and everything mix. Sear in a very hot cast iron skillet with about a tablespoon of olive oil, two minutes per side.
  • Pasta: Use with butter, olive oil, red or white sauce
  • Soup: Spread some Dijon mustard on the top, add the seasoning, drizzle with olive oil and roast in a 400°F oven for 5-8 minutes.
  •  
    EVERYTHING SIDES & SNACKS

  • Corn on the cob.
  • Dips.
  • Hard boiled eggs.
  • Focaccia.
  • Hummus.
  • Popcorn.
  • Potatoes and grains.
  • Soft cheeses: goat cheese log, ricotta.
  •  

     
    RECIPE: EVERYTHING BAGEL TOPPING

    Ingredients For About 1/3 Cup

  • 2 tablespoons black or white sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons poppy seeds
  • 2 teaspoons minced dried garlic
  • 1 tablespoon minced dried onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon† coarse salt (kosher, sea salt)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. TOAST the sesame seeds in a medium skillet over medium heat, until lightly browned, stirring occasionally (3 to 5 minutes). Transfer to the storage container and let cool.

    2. ADD the poppy seeds, onion, garlic and salt to the bowl and stir or shake to combine.

    3. STORE in an airtight container. As with all spices and dried herbs, store in a cool, dry place away from sunlight.

     
     
    THE HISTORY OF THE “EVERYTHING” BAGEL

    When a high school student, David Gussin had a part-time job in a bagel shop in Howard Beach, Queens. He says he invented the “everything” bagel sometime around 1980.

    One of his jobs was to sweep out the the seeds that had fallen off bagels. Instead of throwing them out, he swept them into a bin and snacked on them, enjoying the toasty mixed flavors.

    One day, in a stroke of inspiration, Gussin envisioned a new bagel topping: poppy and sesame seeds mixed with other toppings. He proposed the “everything” bagel to the owner, and it was an instant hit with customers.

    Following a 2008 New Yorker article with his story, the digital marketing pioneer Seth Godin wrote on his blog, “Unfortunately, I worked in a bagel factory in 1977…baking bagels…including the “everything” bagel.

    Gussin’s response: “The last thing I want is a brouhaha over the ‘everything’ bagel. It brings smiles to people’s faces. It doesn’t deserve controversy. It’s a nice thing’.”

    _______________

    *In this dish, the chef has crusted the salmon with “everything,” and sauté it until the topping is toasted. The salmon is finished in the oven and served with crisp fried capers, lightly wilted arugula with red onion, polenta and buttermilk sauce.

    †We use much less salt than most recipes. We find “everything” bagels to have too much salt.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make Your Fantasy Ice Cream Pie

    One of the easiest yet impressive desserts you can make make is an ice cream pie.

    In its quickest form, you buy a cookie crumb pie crust, a quart of ice cream and a jar of dessert sauce. Press the softened ice cream into the crust, freeze, garnish and serve.

    Have a few extra minutes? Make your own cookie crumb crust and sauce, and create two different layers of ice cream, with a nifty filling in-between.

    It’s a make-ahead dessert that you can keep in the freezer, waiting for an impromptu occasion.

    (Truth to tell, that pie wouldn’t last a day in our freezer unless someone put a lock on the door. It’s iffy survival here for any ice cream, cake or cookies.)

    What’s your fantasy ice cream pie?

  • Crust: Chocolate wafers, chocolate chip cookies, peanut butter cookies, oatmeal cookies, Oreos, shortbread.
  • Ice cream: Pick your flavor(s). You can also combine an ice cream and a sorbet (e.g., Creamsicle pie). Mango or raspberry sorbet are exquisite, combined with vanilla ice cream.
  • Liqueur: Blend in 3 tablespoons per quart of ice cream, 1 tablespoon per 1.5 cups of sauce.
  • Sauce: Butterscotch*, caramel*, chocolate, fruit purée, liqueur†.
  • Mix-ins: M&Ms, toffee bits, flavored chips, mix whole or halved berries, diced fresh fruit, etc.
  • Fillings: If you don’t mix anything into the ice cream itself, you can use candies or fruits as a layer, either between two different flavors or in the middle of a single flavor.
  • Garnish: Chocolate shavings, fruit, candy pieces, etc.
  •  
    You can spend the summer working on recipes (one per weekend, perhaps?) and show off the “winners” over Labor Day Weekend.
    ________________

    *Butterscotch and caramel are similar, with a key difference: Butterscotch is made with brown sugar, caramel is made with white granulated sugar. To create a sauce, the sugar is melted over high heat and blended with butter and cream.

    †You can add liqueur to the sauce; or if there’s no sauce, sprinkle it over the top of the pie. We add it to the softened ice cream as well.
     
     
    RECIPE: SWEET & SALTY ICE CREAM PIE

    This pie uses store-bought ice cream, but you make the crust and topping from scratch. Prep time is 20 minutes, cook time is 20 minutes.

    Ingredients For 1 Pie

  • 2 cups pretzels, finely ground
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 1-1/2 quarts vanilla ice cream
  • 5 (1.4-ounce) chocolate covered toffee bars, crushed (substitute 7 ounces other toffee)
  • 1/2 cup salted peanuts, chopped Snickers bar
  •  
    For The Caramel Sauce

  • 1 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. In large bowl, combine pretzels, butter and sugar. Press mixture into bottom and up sides of 9-inch pie plate. Bake 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

     

    Peanut Butter Chocolate Ice Cream Pie

    Blueberry Ice Cream Pie

    Grasshopper Ice Cream Pie

    Snickers Pie

    [1] Peanut butter ice cream on a brownie base. Here’s the recipe from Go Bold With Butter. [2] Homemade blueberry ice cream pie. You can also blend puréed blueberries into store-bought anilla ice cream (photo courtesy Elegant Affairs Caterers). [3] Grasshopper pie: the mint ice cream tastes even better with a few tablespoons of creme de menthe liqueur. Here’s the recipe from Taste Of Home. [4] Sweet and salty ice cream pie from Go Bold With Butter. The recipe is at left.

     
    2. REMOVE the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften for 5 minutes. Place the ice cream in the bowl of an electric mixer and mix until smooth. Add the crushed toffee bars and peanuts, mixing to combine.

    3. POUR the mixture into the cooled crust. Cover and freeze until completely firm.

    4. MAKE the caramel sauce: Combine the brown sugar, butter, heavy cream and salt in medium saucepan. Bring to boil and boil 5 to 7 minutes, or until sauce begins to thicken. Remove from heat and add the vanilla. Let cool.

    5. SERVE the pie with the caramel sauce. Garnish with extra toffee pieces and peanuts.

      

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