THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

Archive for Recipes

TIP OF THE DAY: Drink Your Peaches (Peach Sangria, Peacharita, Etc.)

Peach Sangria Recipe
[1] This weekend, how about a big pitcher of peach cooler? (Photo courtesy Sparkling Ice.)

Peach Sangria Recipe
[2] You can use any glass you like. Collins glasses are sturdier, but wine glasses are elegant (photo courtesy Carrabbas Italian Grill).

Peacharita

[3] A Peacharita, with a birds-eye chile garnish (photo courtesy Peninsula Hotel | New York).

 

As you enjoy summer’s juicy fresh peaches—and peach cobbler, peach ice cream, peach pie, peach salsa and other peachy things to eat—don’t forget peachy things to drink.

You can make a Peacharita—peach schnapps replacing the Cointreau in a Margarita (photo #3). Here’s the recipe.

But don’t overlook peach sangria and peach coolers. Recipes follow.
 
RECIPE #1: PEACH SANGRIA WITH SCHNAPPS (Photo #2)

Ingredients For 6-8 Servings

  • 2 large fresh yellow peaches (about 1 pound), sliced
  • Other fruits of choice, e.g. orange slices, strawberries
  • 3/4 cup peach liqueur or peach schnapps (the difference)
  • 1 bottle white wine
  • 1 liter club soda, flavored club soda or ginger ale, chilled
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PLACE the peaches and other fruit in a pitcher, and add liqueur and wine. Stir. When ready to serve…

    2. POUR the sangria into glasses; make sure each glass has a nice amount of fruit. Top off with the carbonated beverage; stir gently as desired.
     
    RECIPE #2: PEACH SANGRIA WITH PEACH VODKA

    Prep time is 10 minutes, chilling time is 2+ hours. Adapted from All Recipes.

    Ingredients

  • 1 (750 ml) bottle dry white wine
  • 3/4 cup peach flavored vodka
  • 6 tablespoons frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 pound white peaches, pitted and sliced
  • 3/4 cup seedless red grapes, halved
  • 3/4 cup seedless green grapes, halved
  • Ice cubes
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the first four ingredients in a large pitcher. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Add the fruit.

    2. REFRIGERATE at least 2 hours or overnight, to allow the flavors to blend.

    3. SERVE over ice, and use a slotted spoon to include peaches and grapes with each serving.
     
     
    SANGRIA TIPS

    You are the master of your sangria.

  • If you want more pronounced flavor, add more of that ingredient.
  • If you want a less sweet drink, use unsweetened plain or flavored club soda next time.
  • Use prosecco for the wine. Prosecco, an Italian sparkling wine, is known for its peach flavors. You can substitute it for the still wine; or for the club soda, for a stronger drink.
  • Adjust the sweetness. If you add an ingredient with sugar, adjust the other sugar items so it won’t be too sweet. You can always add more sweetness, but you can’t take it away (without doubling the proportions, that is).
  •  

  • Ginger ale vs. club soda: Both will lose their carbonation in the pitcher, but ginger ale will leave the ginger flavor.
  • Substitute rosé for the white wine; use peach nectar instead of other ingredients like lemonade and soda, etc.
  • For a more sparkling sangria, fill each glass half full with sangria and top off with ginger ale or club soda.
  • Keep it peachy. This recipe from Bobby Flay has 1 bottle of wine, 3 ounces brandy, 2 ounces triple sec, 1 cup orange juice, 1 cup pineapple juice, 2 ounces simple syrup —but only 3 ounces of peach purée. It’s a delicious sangria, but not a particularly peachy one.
  • Use an optional herb garnish for color and the tiniest bit of flavor: basil, tarragon, thyme or rosemary.
  • The history of sangria.
  •  
     
    RECIPE #3: PEACH WINE COOLER (Photo #1)

    Thanks to Sparkling Ice—makers of zero-calorie sparkling water in 13 flavors—for this recipe.

    Ingredients

  • 1 peach, sliced
  • ½ orange, sliced
  • ¾ cup peach brandy
  • 1 bottle white wine, chilled
  • 4 cups Sparkling Ice Essence of Peach (calorie-free; substitute peach club soda or plain club soda with peach extract)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE the peaches, oranges and brandy in a pitcher, and lightly muddle. Add the wine and the Peach Sparkling Ice and stir.

    2. SERVE over ice and garnish with a peach slice.

     
      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Slab Pie Art

    Since the old-fashioned slab pie started trending a few years back, almost every fruit pie we’ve made has been a slab pie. Why? They’re sooooo easy!

    A slab pie is a shallow pie that’s baked in a jelly roll pan or a rimmed baking sheet. It has a much higher crust-to-filling ratio than a standard pie, so it’s definitely for the crust-loving crowd, or the hand pie-loving crowd.

    When we want a lot of fruit, we make a cobbler or crisp (the difference).

    MORE SLAB PIE BONUSES

  • Since less filling is needed, a slab pie stretches pricey fresh fruit.
  • It feeds quite a few more people than a standard 9-inch pie: almost as much as two pies, in fact.
  • Only 1 crust is needed. Although some people make a lattice or two-crust slab—which affords picking up the square and eating it like a slab pie—we roll out just one crust and make a streusel.
  • It’s easy to cut and serve.
  • It gladly accepts all the standard pie garnishes: caramel sauce, chocolate shavings, crème anglaise/custard sauce, ice cream, whipped cream, a wedge of sharp cheddar, etc.
  •  
    READY, SET, BAKE!

    You can use any fruit filling in a slab pie with this slab pie recipe template. Head for the summer fruits:

  • Berries: single-berry or mixed berry. Here’s a recipe for a raspberry slab pie; just add your berry mix of choice.
  • Stone fruits (cherry, nectarine, peach, pear, etc.).
  • Black mission and other figs are also in season, and delicious in a pie topped with vanilla ice cream. Might we suggest a tablespoon of orange liqueur (e.g. Grand Marnier) in the filling?
  •  
    You’ve got the weekend ahead of you: Pick your slab pie.

     

    Mixed Berry Slab Pie

    [1] Take a tip from Pamela’s Products: Make a super-easy slab pie and unleash your inner artist with cookie cutters and a sharp paring knife.

    [2] The typical slab pie has a plain or lattice top crust (photo courtesy Taste Of Home).

     
    Then get out your cookie cutters and a sharp paring knife, and create a flower garden top crust (photo #1) or other design.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Create An International Version Of Your Favorite American Sandwich

    August is National Sandwich Month.

    We love sandwiches so much, we created a glossary with the different types of sandwiches.

    It is true that the Earl of Sandwich was inadvertently responsible for creating the modern English sandwich. But what we recognize as a sandwich—bread and filling—likely dates to around 9000 B.C.E., when permanent settlements were established in the Middle East.

    The hunter-gatherers began to plant and harvest grain, which was turned into the first breads: unleavened flatbreads that were baked over an open fire. They were also “edible plates,” holding roasted meat or fish on the journey from pot to mouth.

    People would eat “bread and cheese” or “bread and meat”; they just didn’t call it by a formal name. Check out the (sandwich history).

    Since the original sandwich was Middle Eastern, put a spin on your favorite sandwich today.

  • Plan A: Adapt an American sandwich. Pick any international cuisine you like, and add elements of it to an American sandwich.
     
    Examples: turkey with curried mayonnaise, curried egg salad or tuna salad, jambon de Paris and brie instead of American ham and cheese, tuna salad with feta and kalamata olives (photo #1, recipe below), etc.
  • Plan B: Have a sandwich that originated in another country. Examples: French croque monsieur or croque madame (photo #2), Greek gyros, Italian panini, Venezuelan arepa (photo #3), Vietnamese bánh mì (photo #4).
  •  
     
    GREEK-INSPIRED TUNA SALAD

    This recipe (photo #1) takes the chief ingredients of the popular Greek salad (horiatiki) and adds tuna, creating “Greek tuna salad.”

    We adapted the recipe from one featured by Put On Your Cake Pants.

    Since local tomatoes are at peak now*, enjoy hefty slices on each sandwich.

    Ingredients For 2 Single-Decker Sandwiches

  • 1 can tuna (5 ounces), drained
  • 1/4 cup chopped cucumber (about 1 Persian cucumber)
  • 1/4 cup red bell pepper, chopped (substitute other color)
  • 1/4 cup diced red onion (or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta†
  • 1 tablespoon kalamata olives, pitted and diced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill or 1/2 teaspoon dried dill
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 teaspoons oil-based salad dressing (red wine vinaigrette or bottled Italian dressing)
  • 2 leaves romaine lettuce
  • 1 medium tomato
  • Dried oregano to taste
  • Optional seasoning: lemon zest to taste
  • Optional toppings, mix-ins or garnishes: anchovies, capers, pepperoncini, sardines
  • Bread of choice: large pita pockets, crusty loaf, multigrain
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt†
  • 1 tablespoon milk†
  • Salt or garlic salt, pepper and dill to taste†
  •  
    _________________
    *When tomatoes are not in season, substitute 1-1/2 tablespoons chopped sun-dried tomatoes, mixed into the salad.

    †For a dairy-free sandwich, eliminate the feta and use a red wine vinaigrette dressing.
     
     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the tuna, cucumber, feta, and dried dill in a bowl.

    2. MIX the dressing in a separate bowl: Greek yogurt, milk and salad dressing. Add to the tuna mixture and still until combined.

     

    Greek Tuna Salad Recipe
    [1] Greek tuna salad, a fusion of American tuna salad and Greek horiatiki (photo courtesy Put On Your Cake Pants).

    Croque Madame Sandwich
    [2] Croque madame from France: grilled jambon de Paris and gruyère cheese, dipped into beaten egg and sautéed in butter, with a fried egg on top (photo courtesy Eggs Fresh Simple).

    Pulled Pork Arepa
    [3] Pulled pork arepa (here’s the recipe from Serious Eats).

    Banh Mi Sandwich

    [4] Banh mi, a Vietnamese sandwich inspired by French baguettes (photo courtesy Good Eggs).

     

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Watermelon Iced Tea

    Watermelon Iced Tea
    [1] Basic watermelon iced tea, recipe below (photo courtesy Republic Of Tea).

    Watermelon Iced Tea
    [2] Watermelon-pomegranate green iced tea. Here’s the recipe from Watermelon.org.

    Watermelon Iced Tea

    [3] Fresh herbs and watermelon are a delightful pair. Here’s a recipe for Watermelon Basil Iced Tea from The Candid Appetite.

     

    It’s a magical August day here: lower-than-average temperature, low humidity. It’s the rare type of August day when we—a member of the We Hate The Heat Club—are happy to be outdoors. We’ve made some watermelon iced tea to bring with us

    To make your own batch, here are tips and a recipe.

  • Experiment with different teas: black, black flavored, green, rooibos (the different types of tea).
  • Consider leaving the sweetener out of the brewed tea, so it can be enjoyed without any, or customized by each person with a choice of sweeteners (agave, honey, noncaloric or table sugar, e.g.).
  • Consider making watermelon ice cubes, by puréeing seedless watermelon and freezing the purée in ice cube trays.
  • Alternatively, make tea ice cubes. Make extra tea and freeze it in ice cube trays. It prevents the tea from being diluted regular ice.
  • Consider muddling the watermelon for more watermelon flavor. We prefer the taste, although it produces a cloudy drink.
  •  
     
    ADDING HERBS TO ICED TEA

    If you have fresh herbs, by all means use them.

  • You can infuse them in the boiling water, or use them as a garnish.
  • Basil and mint are the most familiar pairings, but chervil, lemon thyme, marjoram, mint, sage, sweet cicely and tarragon are also delicious.
  • You can also experiment with spices, infused into the boiling water: black or pink peppercorns, cinnamon sticks, garam masala, etc.
  •  
     
    RECIPE #1: BASIC WATERMELON ICED TEA

    This recipe is from the Republic Of Tea, which originally created it as a decaf drink for kids, using a fruit-flavored decaf tea (they sell decaffeinated flavors such as Blackberry Sage, Ginger Peach, Hibiscus, Mango Ceylon, Mint and Vanilla Almond).

    Ingredients For 4 Six-Ounce Servings

  • 1 small watermelon, cut into 1″ cubes, or use a cookie cutter to slice watermelon into shapes
  • 3 cups water
  • 5 tea bags of choice
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon agave nectar or sweetener(s) of choice
  • Optional spirits: cherry schnapps or liqueur (the difference), white spirits (gin, tequila, vodka)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE the watermelon cubes on a piece of wax paper and freeze.

    2. BOIL 3 cups of water and pour over tea bags into an infuser in a heat-resistant pitcher. Allow to infuse for 5 minutes. Remove the tea bags and stir in agave nectar. Let the tea cool to room temperature and chill.

    3. SERVE the tea with frozen watermelon cubes or frozen tea ice cues, and serve
     
     
    MORE ICED TEA

    Have An Iced Tea Party

    The History Of Iced Tea

    How To Brew Perfect Iced Tea

    How To Dissolve Sugar In Cold Drinks

     
    IS IT ICED TEA OR ICE TEA?

    Properly, the drink is iced tea: tea that has been chilled with ice. It is spelled this way in primers on editing and by the line editors* of quality publications.

    But, as more and more Americans care less and less about the rules of English, ice tea—tea with added ice—has been making inroads, even among some editors.

    There is precedent: Ice water was originally, properly, “iced water.” We presume that editors in that era of transition were equally chagrinned.

    ____________
    *A line editor is responsible for reviewing each sentence for consistency, grammar, punctuation, spelling and word usage prior to publication. Here’s more.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Cold Pasta For Hot Days

    If you love pasta but not the idea of a steaming plate of it on a hot summer day, the solution is simple: cold pasta.

    Cold noodles have been a standard in Asia since…the creation of pasta? That was around 1700 B.C.E. in China (here’s the the history of pasta).

    The recipes that follow were developed by the corporate chefs at Melissa’s, the largest distributor of specialty produce in the U.S. With more than 1000 items available at any given time, Melissa’s sells both domestic products and exotic fresh fruits and vegetables from around the world.

    These are Asian flair, but western tomato sauces and olive oil-based sauces work as well on any cold pasta preparation you want to put together. A plate of angel hair with chilled vodka sauce or linguine with fresh (uncooked) tomato sauce—fresh basil on both—are just right on a hot day.

    You can substitute conventional wheat pasta for the buckwheat (soba) and rice noodles, as well as gluten-free pasta made from legumes and other vegetables.

    The chefs at Melissa’s are always whipping up something new. Even if you aren’t purchasing produce, take a look at them for inspiration.

    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PASTA & NOODLES

    Pasta is Italian for “paste,” which refers to the paste of flour and water that is turned into ribbon noodles and short cuts (bowties, corkscrews, etc.).

    Noodles, from the German word “nudel,” refer to paste made with an egg.

  • In the U.S., the term refers to egg noodles as well as Asian forms of pasta. Noodles can be made from wheat, rice, bean, potato, or other flour, like oat; from sweet potato or arrowroot starch; from bean curd skin and tofu; and from mung bean threads.
  • Italian pasta is always made from durum wheat flour.
  • See the different types of pasta and noodles in our Pasta Glossary.
  •  
    First up is pancit, a Filipino dish. Pancit is the Filipino (Tagalog) word for noodles, derived from a Hokkien word for “convenient food.”

    Noodles were introduced by immigrants from China or East Asia, and readily adopted into local cuisine, with each region creating its own combination of noodles and other ingredients (just as in Italy).

    According to the food lore handed down by the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday for long life and good health. Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” on their menus. These are long noodles: it wouldn’t do to serve short cuts when you seek a long life [source].

    RECIPE #1: SHRIMP PANCIT

    This recipe, from Melissa’s corporate chef Miki Hackney, has been taken down a notch in fat. “Pancit is usually pretty high in saturated fats,” says Chef Miki. “I have made a ‘lighter’ version by omitting the traditional frying of noodles in rendered chicken fat, then including the fried skin in the dish.”
     
    Ingredients For 8 Servings

    For The Dressing

  • 1½ cup chicken stock
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 5 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • 2 tablespoons ginger, grated
  • 1 tablespoons fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  •  
    For The Pancit

  • 8 large shrimp, peeled and deveined (more as your budget permits)
  • ½ teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon peanut oil
  • 1 chicken breast, boneless, skinless, and cut in half
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Peanut oil, as needed
  • 2 cups red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups Chinese long bean, cut into 1” pieces
  • 2 cups carrot, julienne
  • 8 ounces sliced button mushrooms
  • 4 cups napa cabbage, ¼” sliced
  • 2 baby bok choy, ¼” sliced
  • 4 ounces snow peas, trimmed
  • Boiling water, as needed
  • 14 ounces yakisoba noodles
  • 8 ounces vermicelli rice noodles
  • Ice water bath
  • 3 scallions, ¼” cut on bias
  •  
    For The Garnish

  • 1 cup cilantro leaves
  • 3 calamondin or key limes cut into wedges
  •    

    Shrimp Pancit
    [1] Pancit, a Filipino specialty (photo courtesy Melissa’s).

    Raw Shrimp
    [2] Mmm, shrimp (photo courtesy I Love Blue Sea).

    Grilled Chicken & Soba Noodles Recipe
    [3] Grilled chicken with soba, buckwheat noodles (photo courtesy Melissa’s).

    Raw Chicken Breasts
    [4] Raw chicken breasts (photo courtesy Provisioner Online).

    Grated Ginger

    [5] Grated ginger photos courtesy (photo courtesy Luxury Thailand Travel).

     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the dressing ingredients in a small saucepan and heat to dissolve the sugar. Adjust the seasonings to taste. The dressing should have a slight tart taste. Set aside.

    2. PLACE the chicken breast in a saucepan and cover by 1 inch with water. Add salt and bring to a boil; reduce to a simmer and cover. Simmer until the chicken is cooked through, about 20 minutes.

    3. REMOVE the chicken from the liquid and place it on a plate to cool. When cool enough to handle, use two forks and pull apart the breast into rough shreds. Set aside and lightly cook the shrimp.

    4. HEAT the yakisoba noodles by warming in a microwave or soaking in boiling water, loosening the bunches as they heat. Toss all the ingredients but the shrimp and plate. Garnish with the shrimp and cilantro, with the lime wedge on the side.
     
    RECIPE #2: GRILLED CHICKEN & SOBA NOODLE SALAD

    This and the remaining recipes are by Melissa’s corporate Chef Tom Fraker.

    Ingredients For 6-8 Servings

    For The Chicken

  • 6-8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Garlic salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • Crushed red pepper to taste
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 4 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 4 tablespoons seasoned rice Vinegar
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger paste
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  •  
    Plus

  • 3 bundles of buckwheat soba noodles
  • 8 radishes or watermelon radishes, ends trimmed; cut into rounds
  • 1/4 pound snow peas, strings removed; sliced on bias
  • 1/4 pound broccoli florets
  • 2 carrots, ends trimmed; cut into rounds
  • 1/4 red cabbage, shredded
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREPARE a hot grill. Season the chicken with the salt, pepper and red pepper. Spray the chicken with the cooking spray and place it on the grill.

    2. COOK both sides until you reach an internal temperature of 165°F. Let the chicken rest for 5-6 minutes, then cut into bite-size pieces.

    3. PREPARE the dressing: Place all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl and whisk to combine. Set aside.

    4. PREPARE the noodles according to the package instructions, then rinse them with cold water and drain.

    5. COMBINE all ingredients except the chicken in a bowl, add the dressing and toss. Place on a serving platter and top with the chicken.

     

    Chicken & Soba Salad Recipe
    [6] Grilled chicken and soba noodles.

    Thai Beef Salad Recipe
    [7] Thai beef noodle salad.

    Yakisoba Noodles

    [8] Yakisoba noodles (all photos courtesy Melissa’s).

     

    RECIPE #3: THAI BEEF SUMMER YAKISOBA NOODLE SALAD

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
  • ½ sweet onion, diced
  • 2 serrano chiles, cut into rounds
  • 6 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 pound beef flap Meat
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, minced
  • 1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar
  • 3 packages Melissa’s Yakisoba stir Fry Noodles Original Flavor (or substitute)
  • 3 mini cucumbers, ends trimmed; halved crosswise and julienned
  • 2 carrots, ends trimmed; shredded
  • 1 container baby heirloom tomatoes, halved
  • 1 red Onion, diced small
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE the marinade ingredients into a sealable plastic bag and add the meat. Massage the meat and place in the refrigerator. Marinate the meat for 2 hours or overnight, agitating it every so often.

    2. PREPARE a hot grill and grill the steak to your desired doneness. Let it rest for 5-6 minutes, then slice.

    3. COMBINE all of the dressing ingredients and set aside.

    4. PREPARE the noodles according to the package directions (without the flavor packet) and then rinse under cold water. Drain.

    5. ASSEMBLE: Combine the steak, noodles, cucumbers, carrots, tomato and onion in a bowl. Add the dressing and mix well to combine.

     
    RECIPE #4: GRILLED SHRIMP & SOBA NOODLE SALAD

    Ingredients

  • 12 large raw shrimp, peeled; deveined
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1 lime
  • 1 red bell pepper, stem and seeds removed; quartered
  • 1 green bell pepper, stem and seeds removed; quartered
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, stem and seeds removed; quartered
  • 1 sweet onion, peeled; sliced
  • Nonstick cooking spray, as needed
  • 3 bundles of buckwheat soba noodles
  • 1 Asian pear, cored; diced
  • 10 leaves fresh basil, minced
  • Your favorite sesame-ginger salad dressing
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREPARE a hot grill. Season the shrimp with the salt and pepper and place on the grill. Cook on both sides until the shrimp is opaque, about 2 minutes per side. Remove the shrimp and squeeze the juice from the lime over them. Set aside.

    2. SPRAY the bell peppers and onion with the cooking spray and place on the grill. Cook until you get nice grill marks on both sides and then remove from the grill. Once cooled, slice the bell peppers and dice the onion.

    3. PREPARE the soba noodles according to the package directions, then cool them under cold water. Drain.

    4. ASSEMBLE: Combine the noodles, bell peppers, onions, pear and basil in a bowl. Place the salad on a serving platter, top with the shrimp and serve with the dressing. Makes about 4-6 servings.

      

    Comments



    © Copyright 2005-2017 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.