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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Pasta/Pizza

TIP OF THE DAY: 50+ Ways To Eat Pierogi

October 8th is National Pierogi Day.

Pierogi* are dumplings of Central and Eastern European origin, traditionally stuffed with cheese, fruit, ground meat, mashed potato or sauerkraut. They can be served boiled baked or fried/sautéed, usually in butter with sautéed onions.

Pierogi is the Polish word. In Russian the term is pelmeni (don’t confuse pierogi with pirog, the Russian word for pie); in Ukrainian it is varenyky.

The Polish word pierogi is plural. The singular form, pieróg, is rarely used since a typical serving consists of multiple pierogi.

The dumplings are usually semicircular, but in some areas are rectangular or triangular.

Here’s how to celebrate: 50 ways to eat pierogi, culled from a list of 100 ways at
*Also spelled perogi, pierogy, perogy, pierógi, pyrohy, pirogi, pyrogie, or pyrogy.

  • Dipped in honey mustard or Dijon mustard
  • Dipped in Greek yogurt
  • Dipped in ranch dressing
  • Dipped in sour cream and hot sauce (spicy dip)
  • Dipped in sour cream and chopped green onions (onion dip)

    LN Fast Snack Cheese Pierogy Bites-230

    Pierogi topped with melted Cheddar. Photo courtesy Lewis & Neals.



    Boil, fry or saute the pierogi and serve:

  • Topped with Alfredo Sauce
  • Topped with apple sauce (cheese pierogi)
  • Topped with Bearnaise Sauce
  • Topped with butter and chives
  • Topped with caramelized onions in butter & paprika sour cream
  • Topped with caramelized onions, sage and jalapeño
  • Topped with caramelized onions and Polish sausage
  • Topped with caramelized onions, finely chopped bacon and garlic
  • Topped with caramelized onions and sour cream
  • Topped with chili con carne
  • Topped with Greek yogurt, dill, diced cucumber and red onion
  • Topped with green curry sauce
  • Topped with jelly or jam and optional sour cream (cheese pierogi)
  • Topped with mango peach salsa (cheese pierogi)
  • Topped with marinara sauce and cooked ground meat
  • Topped with melted butter
  • Topped with melted Cheddar cheese


    Pierogi with sautéed apples. Photo courtesy
    Mrs. T’s.

  • Topped with mushroom sauce
  • Topped with pesto sauce
  • Topped with roasted eggplant and tomatoes
  • Topped with roasted tomatoes and garlic
  • Topped with salmon or whitefish caviar (cheese or potato pierogi)
  • Topped with sautéed apples
  • Topped with smoked salmon, thinly sliced onions and capers (cheese pierogi)
  • Topped with sour cream, fresh basil and green onion
  • Topped with sour cream and fresh salsa: chopped onion, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, lime
  • Topped with sour cream, garlic and chives
  • Topped with spicy salsa
  • Topped with whitefish, sable, smoked salmon, lettuce, tomato, red onion, cucumbers, and capers (cheese pierogi)
  • Topped with yogurt, garlic and herb sauce

  • Bacon wrapped pierogi appetizers
  • Baked pierogi casserole with bacon, tomato and cheese
  • Pierogi casserole dish with your favorite casserole ingredients
  • Pierogi crostini topped with mushrooms, scallions and spicy fresh salsa
  • Pierogi tossed with garlicky string beans, onion, bell pepper and bacon
  • Pierogi “salad”: cold or hot pierogi on a bed of lettuce with honey Dijon mustard sauce or vinaigrette
  • Pierogi “salad” with other favorite ingredients (vegetables, ham, turkey, spinach, etc.)
  • Pierogi tossed with fried mushrooms, bacon and onions
  • Pierogi tossed with onions, peppers, and chicken sausage
  • Pierogi with melted mozzarella, caramelized onions and sautéed mushrooms
  • Pizza Pierogi: potato or cheese pierogi with pizza sauce, melted mozzarella cheese and pepperoni
  • Salmon skillet with pierogi, onions, capers, lemon, dill, and garlic
  • Sautéed pierogi in butter, topped with chili, cheese, sour cream and habanero sauce
  • Sautéed pierogi in butter, topped with steamed broccoli and melted cheese
  • Sautéd pierogi in olive oil with onion, kale, fresh garlic, lemon and oregano
  • Sautéd pierogi in sesame oil with kale, fresh garlic, red bell pepper and sesame seeds
  • Vegetable pierogi frittata with asparagus and garlic
    This should keep you busy through the next National Pierogi Day!


    Comments (2)

    PRODUCT: A Better Pasta Sauce From Vino De Milo


    You won’t find more nutritious pasta sauce
    than this! Photo courtesy Vino de Milo.


    We first discovered Vino de Milo in 2005. It was a new line of gourmet tomato sauces for pasta and other dishes. Each flavor had a different wine in the recipe. It was a delight atop our pasta, chicken, eggs and tofu, and wonderful for gift-giving to cooks and non-cooks alike.

    But not every new product line survives and thrives. Some of our favorites have gone with the wind.

    That’s why we’re so pleased that Vino de Milo has grown and expanded, with bruschetta toppings, salad dressings and salsas.

    We love that the pasta sauces and the bruschetta toppings, both made from top-quality tomatoes that are so naturally sweet, have no sugar added. Americans consume a ghastly 22 teaspoons of sugar a day (the government recommends only nine teaspoons), much of it from “hidden” sugar added to prepared foods. Read the full review.

    Now, the company has added nutrition to its pasta sauce. Hilo by Milo is a high fiber, low sodium pasta sauce with a great nutritional profile. Per 3/4 cup serving, it has:

  • 5 g fiber
  • 4 g protein
  • 150 mg sodium
  • 110 calories

    The sauce uses crushed tomatoes, of course. But added to them are other fresh ingredients: fresh carrots, adzuki beans, currant purée, fresh onions, onion powder, red wine, fresh fennel, garlic powder, fresh basil, fresh thyme, cumin, black pepper, rosemary and crushed red pepper.

    Yes, you can taste the freshness!

    Like the other Vino de Milo pasta sauces, it is made in small batches with no added sugars added and is gluten-free.

    The products can be ordered from


    TIP OF THE DAY: Turn Leftover Pasta Into Antipasto Salad


    For lunch or a light dinner: antipasto salad.
    Photo courtesy Melissas.


    Turn your leftover pasta into an antipasto salad.

    You can boil the pasta from scratch, but whenever we make short cut pasta for a hot dish, we make extra for a cold pasta salad later in the week.

    You can customize the recipe with your favorite ingredients, and use up leftover peas and other veggies. With this recipe from Melissa’s The Great Pepper Cookbook, prep time is 30 minutes, total time 50 minutes.


    Ingredients For 12 Servings (1-1/4 Cups)

    For The Salad

  • 1 pound fusilli, rotini or other corkscrew pasta
  • 1/2 pound (about 2 cups) cooked ham, cubed
  • 5 ounces smoked mozzarella cheese, cubed
  • 4 ounces (3/4 cup) hard salami, cubed
  • 3 ounces pepperoni (3/4 cup), cut into strips
  • 1/2 cup pitted or stuffed green olives
  • 1/2 cup pitted black olives (Kalamata or Picholine)
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small red onion or sweet onion, very thinly sliced
  • Salt and pepper
  • Optional Garnishes

  • Pickled garlic
  • Pepperoncini pickled peppers
  • Sundried tomatoes, julienned, or fresh tomatoes (wedges or halved cherry tomatoes


    For The Vinaigrette

  • 1/4 seasoned rice vinegar or wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons dried Italian seasoning, crushed
  • 1 sundried tomato, finely diced (about 1
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 cup olive oil or canola oil


    1. COOK pasta per package directions; drain, rinse with cold water and cool to room temperature.

    2. MAKE the vinaigrette. Combine all ingredients, except for the oil. Drizzle in the oil while whisking, and continue to mix until well combined. Set aside.

    3. COMBINE the pasta with the remaining salad ingredients except optional garnishes; season with salt and pepper to taste. When ready to serve, toss with dressing and top with the garnishes.

    Here’s another antipasto salad recipe with a different set of ingredients.



    Be adventurous: Try different shapes like gemelli (juh-MELL-lee, meaning “twins”) instead of the more common fusilli in the photo above. Photo courtesy Barilla.



    Think of Italian pasta in these general categories:

  • Long Form Or Strand Pasta. This refers to any spaghetti-like that you can twist around your fork. These pastas are made in varying widths, from the thinnest angel hair to the plumpest bucatini. They can be round or flat (see ribbon pasta, next), solid or hollow, like bucatini.
  • Ribbon Pasta. A sub-category of long form pasta. These are the flat cuts: fettuccine, lasagne, linguine and tagliatelle, for example.
  • Short form pasta takes several forms:

  • Tubular Pasta. From tiny to jumbo, smooth or ridged (“rigati”), straight-cut or diagonally cut, this category includes elbows, manicotti, penne and rigatoni are well-known cuts. In this category, the seemingly same size pasta will have a different name if the ends are straight-cut versus diagonally cut—for example, penne, straight tubes cut on the diagonal, versus rigatoni, with square-cut ends.
  • Shaped Pasta. Farfalle (bow ties), fusilli (corkscrews), ruote (wagon wheels) are prominent examples. There are endless ways to twist and curl and shape pasta; hence, the hundreds of regional varieties.
  • Stuffed Pasta. This group includes agnolotti, mezzelune, ravioli, tortellini and “dumpling” pasta like gnocchi.
    See the different types of pasta in our Pasta Glossary.



    RECIPE: BLT Pasta Salad


    Like BLTs? Here’s a BLT Pasta Salad. Photo
    courtesy QVC.


    “Everyone needs a good pasta salad recipe for the summer,” says QVC chef David Venable. Here’s a fun pasta salad: a BLT Pasta Salad with Arugula, Bacon & Feta Cheese.

    It deconstructs a BLT sandwich, using baby arugula for the lettuce and adding cheese and chicken so it has the protein to serve as a luncheon or dinner salad.

    But, you can leave out the cheese and chicken and serve it as a side salad.

    David advises, “If you want to serve it as a side salad, this recipe is a flavor-packed side dish that would pair perfectly with anything from ribs to grilled salmon.”

    Add optional croutons for a fully deconstructed BLT sandwich.


    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 16-ounce box farfalle (bow tie) pasta
  • 1/2 pound bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 1/4 cup green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/2-3/4 pound baby arugula
  • 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (substitute goat or blue cheese)
  • 1 cup cooked or grilled chicken pieces (optional)
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon rind, grated
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Optional: homemade garlic croutons

    1. COOK the pasta according to the package directions. Drain well.

    2. TRANSFER the pasta to a large serving bowl. Add the bacon, green onions, cherry tomatoes, and arugula to the warm pasta. Add feta cheese and optional chicken and toss.

    3. WHISK together the balsamic vinegar, lemon rind and mustard in a small bowl. Gradually add the olive oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking until blended. Whisk in the salt and pepper, to taste.

    4. POUR the vinaigrette into the pasta salad and toss until well coated. Serve warm.

    Find more of David Venable’s recipes at


    RECIPE: Firecracker Macaroni & Cheese

    It’s not red, white and blue, but it has extra
    heat for a “firecracker” punch. Photo
    courtesy Dietz & Watson.

      Heat things up on July 4th with this special mac and cheese from Dietz & Watson, which used its peppadew and Cheddar with Jalapeño & Habañero products.


    Ingredients For 4 to 6 Servings

  • 2 pounds 100% semolina ziti
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 cups milk
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground white or black pepper*
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 3/4 pound peppadew*, grated or finely chopped
  • 1/4 pound Cheddar with Jalapeño & Habañero, grated or finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Hungarian paprika, for garnish
    *You can subsitute pimiento (roasted red peppers) for the peppadew, but the latter is tangier. You can use black pepper instead of white pepper; the difference is that black flecks will show in the recipe. White pepper was created (by removing the spicy black skin of peppercorns) for aesthetic reasons, that are no longer so important in current times. Black pepper delivers more heat.



    1. PREHEAT the oven to 375°F, and butter a 2-quart ovenproof casserole dish.

    2. BRING a large saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil and toss in the ziti. Boil until just slightly firm (al dente), drain in a colander (do not rinse) and set aside momentarily.

    3. MELT the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, stir in the flour to form a smooth paste (roux), and cook for about 1 minute. Pour in the milk, whisking constantly, and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, season with salt and white pepper, and add the nutmeg and thyme. Stir in the cheeses a bit at a time until incorporated and smooth.

    4. ADD the ziti to the cheese sauce, stirring gently to coat, and pour into the prepared casserole dish. Sprinkle the top evenly with Parmesan cheese and bake for 10 minutes.

    5. REMOVE the casserole from the oven and place under the broiler until bubbly and golden brown. Watch carefully to prevent the top from burning. Sprinkle with paprika, and serve hot.



    JULY 4th: Bacon Flag Pizza

    Blogger Bev Cooks of Kansas City designed this celebratory snack for Independence Day. It’s so nifty, there’s temptation to find more occasions to eat this flag!



  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 cup jarred Alfredo sauce (or make your own with this recipe)
  • 1 tube (11 ounces) Pillsbury thin crust pizza dough
  • 1 pinch coarse salt
  • 4 small purple potatoes, sliced thinly with a mandoline
  • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 7 slices bacon

    You’re a grand old pizza! Photo courtesy



    Purple potatoes

    Also use purple potatoes in a red, white and blue potato salad. Photo courtesy



    1. ARRANGE the raw bacon slices on a cooling rack. Place the rack on a rimmed baking sheet and then into a cold oven.

    2. PREHEAT the oven to 400°F. Set the timer for 20 minutes. When the timer rings, remove the bacon from the oven. Leave the oven on. In the meantime…

    3. HEAT the oil in a medium skillet. Add the sliced potatoes and sauté until they brown and become slightly crispy, about 7 minutes. Add a pinch of salt.

    4. DRAIN the bacon fat from the baking sheet and flip it over. Lightly grease the underside. Roll the dough onto the sheet. Prebake for 6 minutes.

    5. SPOON the Alfredo sauce over the crust. Arrange the potatoes in the upper left hand corner of the pizza. You can overlap them or lay them side by side. Arrange the bacon to the right and under the potatoes, creating stripes.

    6. SPRINKLE the cheese between the bacon stripes. If you want, you can create little cheese stars on the potatoes. Bake pizza an additional 6 to 10 minutes, or until the cheese is melted, browned and bubbly.

    Check out this crudités American flag.


    See the step-by step photos on

    Check out more of Bev’s wonderful recipes at



    PRODUCT: Vegan Pesto From Sauces ‘n Love


    Vegan, lactose free and cholesterol free
    pesto. Photo courtesy Sauces ‘n Love.


    Keeping a good jar of pre-made pesto at hand can make any dish extraordinary in only a matter of minutes.

    Pesto sauce, traditionally consists of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, Parmesan and Pecorino cheeses and salt for seasoning. Add a dollop to dinner and suddenly you’re a fancy cook who understands how to dazzle with delicate herbs. Pesto is vegetarian, low in carbs and packed with fresh ingredients: a bright, healthy addition to your meals.

    Pesto originated in the Italian province of Liguria, 220 miles of crescent-shaped Mediterranean coastline that is sometimes called the Italian Riviera. Liguria, the capital of which is Genoa, is home to superb produce, most notably the sweetest, mildest basil. Its people enjoy one of the freshest, healthiest cuisines in all of Italy.

    Just as pesto can be made with different nuts (hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts) and greens (arugula, spinach)—or even non-greens, like red pepper pesto—it can be made vegan instead of vegetarian. One way to do this is to substitute vegan Parmesan.


    But Sauces ‘n Love has creating a pesto condiment, dip and sauce that eliminates the cheese or cheese substitute. Using only extra virgin olive oil, sunflower oil, basil, pine nuts, garlic, salt and black pepper still creates a delicious pesto.


    Why vegan pesto? Aside from accommodating the growing number of vegans, it’s a boon for non-vegans who are lactose intolerant, those cutting back on cholesterol, and kosher consumers who want to serve pesto with meat-based meals.

    Sauces ‘n Love, a NIBBLE Top Pick of The Week is one of our favorite lines of Italian-style sauces, sold fresh in the refrigerator case. A sister line, Scarpetta, is shelf-stable and will stay fresh without refrigeration for nine months. Learn more at

  • Pesto Overview
  • The History Of Pesto
  • Pesto Serving Suggestions
  • Homemade Pesto Recipe and Pesto Prep Tips
  • More Favorite Pestos


    Beyond pasta: Pesto can be used to enhance most savory dishes. Photo by Guyer Wood | IST.




    TIP OF THE DAY: Tortellini En Brodo

    Tortellini en brodo (often misspelled in the U.S. as tortellini in brodo) is a classic Italian dish. Some Americans call it tortellini soup.

    It is served as a first course—chicken broth with a few tortellini—or as a main dish packed with tortellini. It’s a cousin of dumpling and chicken soups from Jewish chicken soup with kreplach to Chinese wonton soup, not to mention American chicken-noodle soup.

    While most Americans eat tortellini with a red or white sauce and grated Parmesan, en brodo is a lighter way to enjoy the little loops of pasta.

    The dish, which originated in the northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna (more about that below), is warming in cold weather, but light enough to be summer fare. You can make it from scratch or purchase the components. Both the tortellini and the broth can be made ahead and reheated.

    While a flavorful bowl of chicken broth and tasty tortellini are comfort food in any season, if you don’t add veggies and herb garnishes, you’re leaving a lot off the table.

  • Add lots of fresh herbs. Parsley will do; but you can pick your favorites, from cilantro to dill. They may not be authentic Italian herbs, but this is your show (and they taste great with the dish).

    Tortellini en brodo in its simplest form, with fresh herbs. Photo by Aas2009 | Dreamstime.

  • Root vegetables add fragrance and flavor the broth. Also consider spinach or kale.
    Customize your recipe:

  • Combine both white and green tortellini. Mixing up different fillings offer a pleasant surprise with each bite.
  • In spring, add fresh peas or other seasonal vegetables such as asparagus.
  • Make it a heartier dish with strips of poultry or pork, or tiny meatballs.
  • Spice it up with a garnish of sliced fresh jalapeño.
  • Go fusion with a garnish of tortilla or wonton strips.


    The next time you make tortellini, try it en
    instead of with traditional sauces.
    Photo of Randazzo’s tortellini and sauces by
    Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.



    Tortellini are made by filling long strips of pasta, rolling them into tubes and cutting individual pieces, which are pinched together with the thumb and forefinger. The famous “loop” shape is said to be based on the belly button of the Venus, the Roman goddess of love.

    One of the most famous versions of the legend, written in the 14th century, tells us that that Bacchus, Mars and Venus came down to earth to intervene in a 12th century war between Bologna and Modena (in Emilia-Romagna). They spent the night at an inn in Castelfranco, a small town located between the two cities.

    In the morning, Bacchus and Mars arose early to visit the battle site. When Venus awoke and could not find her companions, she called for the innkeeper, who arrived to find the goddess of love naked. Inspired by her navel, he created a new shape of pasta. (Seriously, Mr. Innkeeper—her navel inspired you?)

    Tortellini are made in a size that fits easily onto a soup spoon. There is a recipe for tortelli, larger tortellini, that dates back to the 12th century. The first recipe for tortellini alla Bolognese, tomato and meat sauce, appeared in Bologna in 1550 and became a signature dish in that city. (Note that Tuscans also claim tortellini as their regional pasta.)

    Tortellini en brodo was the traditional Christmas soup, made with capon broth, which was favored by the ruling classes. The broth was made rich by cooking all the meat in it. The meat was then turned into a stuffing with Parmigiano-Reggiano, prosciutto crudo and/or mortadella.

    Today you can find tortellini filled with everything from cheese blends to meat and cheese to pumpkin.

    If you love great Italian food, consider a trip to Emilia-Romagna. It’s the birthplace of, among other culinary pearls:

  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Parmigiano-Reggiano and Grana Padano cheeses
  • Prosciutto di Parma
  • Pasta cuts including cappelletti, garganelli, gramigna, lasagne, strozzapreti, tagliatelle, tortellini and tortelli alla lastra (ravioli)
  • Wines such as Lambrusco, Sangiovese and Trebbiano
  • Zuppa inglese, a trifle-like custard dessert


    FOOD FUN: Gnocchi For Breakfast


    Pasta for breakfast! Photo and recipe
    courtesy Giovanni Rana.


    Here’s a fun idea for breakfast or brunch: “Gnocchi Homefries,” made with potato gnocchi instead of sliced potatoes, in yummy sage brown butter.

    Sauté with pancetta, onions and rosemary; or add sausage, and freshly-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. Or add it all, topped with a poached or fried egg.

    This recipe is courtesy of Giovanni Rana, which used its delicious Gnocchi di Patate (potato gnocchi) Home Fries with Pancetta and Sage Brown Butter Fried Eggs for a romantic brunch. Find more recipes on the website.



    For The Home Fries

  • ½ – 8.8-ounce package Giovanni Rana Gnocchi di Patate
  • 2 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 ounce pancetta or bacon, cut into ¼” strips (easier to cut when frozen)
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • ½ teaspoon finely chopped rosemary or sage
  • 2 teaspoon vegetable oil, such as canola
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated
    For The Eggs

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 6 leaves fresh sage
  • 2 eggs
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste


    1. SAUTÉ pancetta or bacon over medium/low heat with extra virgin olive oil in a nonstick pan. When crispy, remove to a paper towel to drain. Add onions and chopped rosemary and sauté over medium heat until tender and starting to brown; about 7-9 minutes. Remove to a bowl and wipe pan clean.

    2. HEAT 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in the nonstick pan over high heat until almost smoking. Add the gnocchi and sauté, constantly tossing to prevent burning, until they are golden brown. Turn off heat.

    3. RETURN onions and pancetta to the pan. Add 2 tablespoons unsalted butter and toss until butter is melted. Empty contents of pan into a bowl. Add Parmigiano-Reggiano and toss.

    4. MELT 2 tablespoons unsalted butter in a small nonstick pan over medium heat. Add fresh sage leaves and swirl pan until the butter begins to brown. Turn heat off and allow the pan to cool slightly; about 1 minute. Add the eggs and season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Fry the eggs on medium/low heat to desired doneness, spooning some of the brown butter over top of them a few times; about 2-1/2 minutes for sunny side up.



    Giovanni Rana’s potato gnocchi are just one of the company’s delicious fresh pastas and sauces. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.


    5. PLATE the home fries and top with fried eggs.



    TIP OF THE DAY: Breakfast Pizza

    Still pondering what to make for Mother’s Day breakfast? Perhaps this is the year to skip the bagels and lox, pancakes, quiche and waffles and opt instead for a glamorous breakfast pizza.

    Just plan ahead and make the dough one day in advance; it needs to be refrigerated overnight (it can be made up to 2 days ahead). Keep it chilled until ready to use.

    This recipe, sent to us by Savor California, is by cookbook writer Jill Silverman Hough.

    You can turn it into bacon-, ham- or sausage-and-eggs pizza by adding your favorite breakfast meat.


    Ingredients For 4 Servings
    For The Dough

  • 2 tablespoons warm water (115°F)
  • ½ teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1-1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup cool water (65° to 70°F)
  • 1 teaspoon coarse/kosher salt
  • Olive oil


    A special breakfast for a special day. Photo by Misha Gravenor Photography.


    For The Topping

  • Cornmeal for sprinkling
  • Olive oil
  • ¾ cup drained roasted red peppers, cut into 1/3-inch strips
  • 1/3 cup black olives, pitted and quartered*
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese shavings
  • 1½ teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 4 large red onion rings, each 3-1/2 to 4 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch thick
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 cups arugula, lightly packed
    *Jill used Olivos del Mar Organic Honey Balsamic Olives that have been flashed brined overnight in a mixture of organic lemongrass rice vinegar, organic balsamic vinegar, and a mixture of Italian herbs. You can similarly brine your olives overnight.



    Add some bacon or other breakfast meat to
    your pie. Photo courtesy



    1. MAKE the dough. Pour 2 tablespoons warm water into large bowl of stand mixer fitted with dough hook; sprinkle yeast over. Let stand until yeast dissolves, about 15 minutes (mixture will not be foamy).

    2. ADD both flours, 1/2 cup cool water and 1 teaspoon coarse salt; mix on medium-low speed 4 minutes. Let rest 5 minutes, then mix on medium speed until dough is smooth, elastic, and slightly sticky, about 3 minutes.

    3. LIGHTLY OIL a medium bowl. Gather dough into ball and transfer to prepared bowl; turn to coat with oil. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature 30 minutes. Chill dough overnight. When ready to bake…

    4. TRANSFER bowl to warm, draft-free area and let dough rise, covered, until very slightly puffy, at least 2 hours. Place a pizza stone or rimless baking sheet in oven; preheat to 500°F.


    5. SPRINKLE pizza paddle or another baking sheet generously with cornmeal. Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round; transfer to paddle.

    6. BRUSH dough with oil; scatter peppers, then olives, over the top. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and rosemary. Arrange onion rings atop pizza, spacing apart. Slide pizza onto stone or baking sheet in oven. Bake until lightly browned but not crisp, about 7 minutes.

    7. REMOVE pizza from oven and gently crack 1 egg into each onion ring. Return pizza to oven and continue to bake until eggs are softly set and crust is golden, about 6 minutes. Sprinkle pizza with salt and pepper. Scatter arugula over top and serve.



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