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Archive for Gourmet Foods

RECIPE: Spiked Chai Tea

Just got in for the cold and the rain. Time for a cup of hot tea.

Make that hot spiced tea, chai.

Make that spiked spiced tea: chai with a hit of bourbon or rum. If you want to add more, go ahead: You can make this the tea version of Irish Coffee.

If you don’t have any chai bags or loose leaves, make your own from Recipe #2 below.

RECIPE #1: CHAI WITH SPIRIT (BOURBON, RUM, ETC.)

Ingredients For 3 Tea Cups Or 2 Mugs

  • 3 cups milk
  • 3 teaspoons loose chai tea (or cut open chai tea bags)
  • 2 tablespoons honey or sugar (substitute 1 tablespoon agave)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cinnamon stick or 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Optional: 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • Splash of bourbon or rum (silver, dark, spiced)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. HEAT the milk in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer, then add the tea, sweetener, vanilla, cinnamon and optional cayenne. Stir and reduce the heat to low, heating for another 2 minutes (keep your eye on the pot). Remove from the heat and allow to steep for 5 minutes.

    2. STRAIN into a liquid measuring cup or small pitcher with a lip. Add the bourbon. If the mixture has cooled a bit, stick it in the microwave for 30 seconds.

    3. POUR into cups and serve.

     
    RECIPE #2: CHAI TEA BLEND

    If you don’t have some of the ingredients, you can make do with what you have.

     

    Hot Chai

    Chai Tea Blend

    [1] On a chilly day, pour some spirits into the chai (photo courtesy Charles Chocolates). [2] No chai at home? Mix it up from your spice shelf (photo courtesy Foodie Underground).

     
    Ingredients For 2 Cups

  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 2-3 cardamom pods
  • 1 star anise
  • 3 black peppercorns
  • 3 teaspoons loose tea
  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • Optional: slice fresh ginger root
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    TIP OF THE DAY: Back To Butter, Now OK To Eat

    Butter - Lard

    Butter A Rich History

    Bowl Of Butter

    Bread and Butter

    [1] Butter and lard: out of the shadows and back onto the table (photo courtesy A Canadian Foodie). [2] Butter lovers will enjoy Butter, A Rich History. Also check out Nourishing Fats: Why We Need Animal Fats for Health and Happiness.

     

    If your new year’s resolution includes cutting back on butter, you might re-think it. After years of being shunned as a contributor to heart disease, butter is in again.

    Recorded use of butter dates to 2,000 years B.C. (the history of butter).

    At butter’s peak in the 1920s, annual per capita consumption in the U.S. was 18 pounds about 72 sticks. At its nadir, in 1992, with research reports giving it the thumbs-down, per capita consumption dropped to 4 pounds.

    As recently as 2006, margarine sales outpaced butter’s. For those on a budget, margarine was/is $1 to $2 per pound less expensive.
     
    THE HISTORY OF MARGARINE

    In 1913, French chemist Michel Eugène Chevreul discovered margaric acid; but it was not turned into a foodstuff until much later.

    Commercial margarine was invented in France in the 1860s, when Emperor Napoleon III offered prize money to whomever could find a cheaper substitute for butter, to feed the army and the poor.

    A French chemist, Hippolyte Mège-Mouriés, took the prize by inventing oleomargarine, an imitation butter made from refined vegetable oil and water. He patented it in 1869.

    Yet, while margarine was served to the army, it never took off in France: The French knew which side their bread was buttered on (the history of margarine).

    The good news: He sold the patent to the U.S. Dairy Company in 1871. Butter became very expensive during the Great Depression, and World War II rationed the supply, as dairy farmers went off to war. Margarine came into its own.
     
    LEAVING BUTTER BEHIND: THE 1980s

    Margarine never passed through the doors of our mother’s house. Her palate would only accept the best creamery butter, plus lard for her lauded pie crusts.

    When we first tasted margarine on bread in the college cafeteria, we agreed: Better no bread spread than one of vegetable oil.

    To those who can taste the difference, there is no substitute for butter in baking. We could tell at first bite if a cookie or cake was not made with butter…and tossed it.

    But it was the attribution of heart disease to animal fats that caused many people to back off of butter. Beginning in the 1980s, Americans were programmed by mass media reports to equate butter and fat with heart disease and poor health, and to head to low fat diets.

    Fortunately, research pointed to heart-healthy olive oil as an alternative, and many of us decamped to EVOO.

    But over the past few years, new research has deflated the biggest myths about cholesterol. It’s OK to eat an egg every day, and to butter your bread. And you need at least a tablespoon a day of butter or oil for skin and hair health. Add a second tablespoon of EVOO for heart health.

    These studies have shown that consuming butter (within reason, as with any food) is not bad for you, but is actually beneficial (source).

    Butter is full of vitamins and healthy fatty acids that help prevent tooth decay, cancer and even obesity (!). [NOTE: THE NIBBLE is not a medical expert. Consult with yours if you have questions or issues.]

    Animal fats are no longer demonized, at roughly the same time as plant-based trans fats were removed from the marketplace. The result: an animal fat renaissance.

    Americans have responded to the news. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, per capita consumption rose to 23 sticks of butter, the highest quantity since World War II.

    And many restaurants never left it behind. Today, animal fats are more popular than ever. Chefs are cooking with not just butter, but with beef tallow, duck fat, even schmaltz—rendered chicken fat that was a mainstay of European Jewish cooking.

    Yes, chefs know that the secret to great flavor often lies in animal fat. So consult with your healthcare provider, and safely enjoy your share in the new year.
     
    OUR FAVORITE BUTTERS

    Do your own taste test; but in ours, the winners were, in alphabetical order:

  • Cabot Creamery (Vermont)
  • Kerrygold Pure Irish Butter (imported)
  • Plugrá (European-style butter made in the U.S. with 82% butterfat vs. the standard 80%)
  • Organic Valley (U.S.)
  • Vermont Creamery Cultured* Butter (our personal favorite)
  •  
    Depending on your preference for unsalted or salted butter, your favorites may vary.

    There are other great butters made in the U.S., including regional and artisan butters such as Kate’s Homemade Butter from Maine. But they are made in small quantities and hard to get ahold of.

     
    MORE “BUTTER IS BETTER”

  • Check out the different types of butter in our Butter Glossary.
  • European-Style Butter, an even richer version.
  • Butter Conversion: How to substitute salted butter for a recipe that calls for unsalted.
  •  
    ________________
    *After each milking, the cream is set aside and natural, lactic bacteria ripens it into cultured cream, a.k.a. crème fraîche.

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Try These 2017 Food Trends

    What’s trending in 2017? Every expert has an opinion, but here are some from the James Beard House.

    CAULIFLOWER IS THE NEW KALE

    Hmmm…we thought kale was the new cauliflower, back in 2013.

    But we’re so over kale and still in love with cauliflower, that we won’t fight this one! Cauliflower is so much more versatile. It can be mashed, instead of potatoes; it can be riced; it can be grilled like a steak. Each of these recipes is a treat:

  • Cauliflower Mac & Cheese
  • Cauliflower “Mashed Potatoes”
  • Cauliflower Risotto
  • Cauliflower “Steak”
  • Crispy Fried Cauliflower, Indian-style
  • Masala Cauliflower: Spiced Cauliflower & Cauliflower Salad
  • Riced Cauliflower/Cauliflower Rice
  • Whole Roasted Cauliflower
  •  
    SO ARE KALETTES!

    What do you get when you cross kale with Brussels sprouts?

    Kalettes, a dual cruciferous powerhouse. Combining the best flavors of both “parents” results in a fusion of sweet and nutty, which can be prepared in endless ways.

    It’s the first new vegetable to hit the market since broccolini.

    They grow on tall stalks like Brussels sprout, but have leafy heads—as if that solid Brussels sprout turned into feathery kale.

    And they’re much more tender than kale, which is so much more appealing in salads. Here’s more about kalettes.

    Recipes:

  • 16 Kale Recipes, from breakfast through dinner
  • Colorful Kalette Skewers
  • Crispy Roasted Kalettes With Parmesan Dip
  • Kalette, Tomato & Onion Frittata
  • Prosciutto-Wrapped Kalettes
  • Sesame Chili Sautéed Kalettes with Berkshire Pork and Jasmine Rice
  • Thai-Spiced Kalettes
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    WHEY TO GO

    Whey is a by-product of cheese-making. In fact, after centuries of feeding it to the farm animals, a clever cheesemaker figured out how to re-cook it into ricotta (which means “recooked”).

    Why is a byproduct of yogurt-making, too. In Greece, the acidic and delicious whey is used to marinate lamb; in the U.S., it is sold as whey powder in health food stores. But much domestic whey is discarded.

    At last: Bottles of whey for drinking and cooking have been spotted at health food stores and natural foods chains like Whole Foods. In 2017, look to say “Way!” to whey.
     
    SORGHUM: THE ANCIENT NEW “IT” GRAIN

    Sorghum is an ancient grain and a nutritious whole grain; but for the last century or so in the U.S., which is the world’s largest grower, it has mostly been grown for animal feed.

    Made into a syrup, was the most popular sweetener in 19th century America. On-trend chefs have been using it to glaze and braise.

    But until recently, we had no idea that it was sold in grain form. Now, it’s poised to become the latest “new” gluten-free grain of the moment.

    Sorghum resembles Israeli couscous in shape, but is sweet, not earthy. We had our first bite recently, and it is delicious!

    Sorghum can cooked in any grain recipe; it can be popped like popcorn. You can bake with sorghum flour (it’s often part of GF flour mixes).

    Start with Bon Appétit’s delicious recipe for Roast Chicken with Sorghum and Squash.

    Here’s more about sorghum, plus two (of the soon to be numerous) dedicated sorghum cookbooks:

  • Sorghum’s Savor
  • Sorghum Treasures: A Compilation of Recipes Old and New
  •    

    Kalettes Hybrid

    Kalettes

    Spiced Kalettes

    Sorghum Grains

    Roast Chicken & Sorghum

    [1] The newest vegetable in years, kalettes (center) are a cross between kale (left) and brussels sprouts (right—photo courtesy Modern Farmer). [2] Look for packaged qualities (photo courtesy Ocean Mist). [3] Turn them into salads or delicious dishes like Thai Spiced Kalettes (here’s the recipe from One Tomato Two Tomato). [4] Make sorghum your new grain. You can buy it at Whole Foods and other natural foods markets, or online (photo courtesy Easy Me World | Blogspot). [5] Roast chicken with sorghum. Here’s the recipe from Bon Appetít.

     
    WHERE’S THE BEEF?

    According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the consumption of red meat peaked in the 1970s.

    But until recently, at restaurants around the country, it was rare to find a menu that didn’t offer a juicy steak or other red meat.

    With increased costs, more concern about sustainability (forests are cut down for grazing land, steers generate tons of methane, and both contribute to greenhouse gas), or a change in tastes due to international cuisines that don’t focus on red meat, restaurants and homes alike are using less beef.

    Except for the ubiquitous burger.

    Vying to take beef’s place: duck, lamb, venison, pork, and more vegetarian and grain mains.

    Do your part: Instead of beef, choose something else—preferably a nice veggie burger. Pick up a book on vegetarian entrées.

     

    Tuna Tataki

    Pickled Watermelon Rind

    Waste Free Kitchen Book

    [1] Make this beautiful tuna tataki recipe from Just One Cookbook. [2] Alton Brown’s watermelon pickles, a.k.a. pickled watermelon rinds. Here’s the recipe. [3] Start the year with a mission to stop wasting food, with this wonderful book (photo courtesy Chronicle Books).

     

    VEGETABLES TAKE CENTER STAGE

    For nutrition, weight control, sustainability, easy of clean-up and for flavor, vegetables are becoming the star of the show for non-vegetarians. Vegan restaurants are gaining popularity with mainstream eaters.

    Perhaps this is the year to re-think Meatless Monday, which sounds like abstinence, to Voluptuous Veggie Day.

    And have fun doing it!

    FERMENT YOUR WAY TO HEALH

    Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kombucha are very healthful.

    And fermentation has fascinated chefs for years, as they’ve tried to uncover new ways to create naturally complex flavors, nuanced textures, and other gastronomic excitement.

    The new magazine Cured focuses on aging and fermenting food, and cookbooks like Bar Tartine give explicit instructions about how to ferment your own condiments.

    Fermented foods have been made for millennia. So before you think new, think old: older, bubbling, cultured and fermented. And check out this book.

     
    TIME FOR TATAKI

    Move over crudo and carpaccio. From fish to beef, toro to kobe, tataki is an appetizer expected to sweep the nation.

    The protein is quickly seared, then thinly sliced, brushed with a bright vinegar, and presented with a host of east-meets-west accompaniments.

    Recipes are beautiful, healthful, and very tasty. Start with these:

  • Tuna Tataki
  • Beef Tataki
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    With beef, the benefit with tataki is that with thins trips of red meat, you eat less of it—and spend less on it.

    Never had tataki? Head to the nearest Japanese restaurant for a starter of tuna tataki. Then, pick up some tuna or salmon and make your own at home.
     
    Finally, but perhaps most important:

    WASTE NOT, WANT NOT

    With nearly half of all food produced in the U.S. going to waste, concerned restaurants, professional chefs and even home cooks are learning to create delicious dishes with parts of the animal, fruit, or vegetable that would normally end up in the trash.

    Top chefs are focusing on it; Mario Batali, Tom Colicchio and others are speaking out about how we can all reduce waste in our kitchens. Introductory recipes for waste-less cooking are popping up everywhere.

    It’s not hard: Instead of throwing out watermelon rinds, pickle them! Here’s a recipe.

    Start with this book.

    Seattle is the city pioneer in waste not, want not: In 2014, it began to impose fines on households and restaurants. Here’s the scoop.

    For the health of our planet and our legacy to our grandchildren, this is a trend we hope will have staying power.

     

      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Mochidoki, Ice Cream-Stuffed Mochi

    Like ice cream? Get ready for a [relatively] new variation: ice cream mochi (MO-chee).

    Mochidoki is a delightful ice cream treat—a sophisticated re-envisioning of a classic Japanese sweet made from rice dough: a dough of pounded, glutinous (but gluten-free) sweet rice flour that is steamed and kneaded until it becomes delightfully chewy and supple, with a velvet—like texture.

    The resulting rice paste was often eaten plain and uncooked, pounded into a soft, chewy rice paste. There are still sweet and savory, uncooked and cooked versions.

    Mochi is all about the texture. Centuries later, it was turned into dumpling-like sweets, exquisite little mouthfuls to accompany tea.

    We love daifuku mochi, filled with sweetened red bean paste or other pastes, such as peanut and sesame. They can be served with tea (any kind) or coffee for an easy yet elegant snack (the different types of daifuku).

    [SIDE BAR: Daifuku mochi are an ideal food for celebrations: Daifuku means good luck!]

    The rice paste can be made into other forms, but today we focus on the sweet treat.

    Like cookies and brownies, they are finger food; but like brownies and other bar cookies, they can be garnished simply—with sauces and/or fruit—to elaborate preparations like spun sugar.
     
    THE HISTORY OF MOCHI

    Ice cream mochi are a new, fusion food. The original mochi are Japanese sweet snacks, served as Americans might enjoy a cookie or two. Like a smaller, flatter jelly donut, the inside is filled with red bean (azuki) paste or other fruit-flavored bean paste, peanut or sesame paste. The rice outside is white or pastel-colored.

    The exact origin of mochi is unknown, though it is said to have come from China. By the ninth century, it had become a New Year’s treat in Japan, and by the tenth century mochi were used as imperial offerings and in religious ceremonies (more).

    It also became used as an energy food: from the battlefield, where it was easy for Samurai to carry and prepare; to the farm, consumed by Japanese farmers to increase stamina on cold days.

    Our first experience with mochi was the classic daifuki mochi, a tea cake of rice dough filled with red bean paste. We live in a city with readily available Japanese confections; if you’re ever in Manhattan, head to Minamoto Kitchoan with branches in midtown and the World Trade Center, and 11 locations worldwide. They also sell the delightful pastries known as wagashi.
     
    ICE CREAM MOCHI

    Mochi Ice Cream is the best treat to serve at parties or events because they are delicious and convenient. Not only do they come in a variety of flavors so that your guests can discover their favorites, but they are also the perfect serving size! With the solid outer layer of rice-flour Mochi dough, they are easy to grab and carry around.

    And centuries later, they were filled with ice cream.

    Mochi ice cream has begun to expand nationwide in the U.S.

    Mikawaya, a Japanese confectionary based in Los Angeles, started selling the product in Little Tokyo in the early 1990s. Building up a local following, it found its way to California-based Trader Joe’s, Albertsons, Ralphs and Safeway, and is now in their stores nationwide (you could buy pumpkin ice cream mochi for Thanksgiving).

    The invention in Los Angeles was the casual idea of the Jewish husband of the third-generation owner of Mikawaya, Frances Hashimoto. Joel Friedman created the fusion food for snacking, wrapping spoonfuls of ice cream in plain mochi cakes.

    Ms. Hashimoto developed her husband’s idea for retail. It took a decade of R&D to develop a rice dough that would remain chewy and tender after freezing. Commercial production began in 1993, with seven flavors: Chocolate, Green Tea, Kona Coffee, Mango, Red Bean, Strawberry and Vanilla.

    Mikawaya’s pioneering efforts engendered supermarket competition from Little Moons, Maeda-En and Mikawaya’s sister brand, My-Mo.

    But we prefer gourmet newcomer Mochidoki for its better-quality ice cream, broad variety of flavors and elegant, thinner mochi covering.
     
    MOCHIDOKI FLAVORS

    Flavors change seasonally. You can get a 10-pack of one flavor, or a four-piece gift box featuring four different flavors.

    The only problem is making a decision. We’re ready to place another order, and we don’t know where to start!

    All are so very delicious. The current best-seller is Salted Caramel; but we adored every flavor, with a “wow” to the hot-and-cold Spicy Chocolate.

    Fall-Winter flavors, available in 10-packs ($20), include:

  • Azuki Red Bean
  • Black Sesame
  • Frothy Chocolate
  • Ginger Zing
  • Lychee Colada
  • Mandarin Orange Cream
  • Matcha Green Tea Chocolate Chip
  • Matcha Green Tea Classic
  • Mochaccino Chip
  • Raspberry White Chocolate Crunch
  • Salted Caramel
  • Vanilla Chocolate Chip
  •    

    Mochi Presentations, From Simple To Fancy

    Matcha Mochi

    Chocolate Mochi

    Decorated Mochi

    Salted Caramel Mochi Doki

    Mochi Doki

    Mochi Doki Gift Boxes

    [1] Mochi are small balls of ice cream covered in a velvety, chewy rice paste. Two classic flavors: Matcha Green Tea and Vanilla Chocolate Chip. [2] Dress up the plate with dessert sauce (plus, with chocolate, some cacao nibs). [3] Garnish halves with whipped cream and fruit. [4] The best seller, Salted Caramel, garnished with spun sugar. [5] Four-flavor gift boxes let you try more flavors. [6] Three gift boxes, 12 great flavors (all photos courtesy Mochidoki).

     

    Daifuku Mochi

    Mochi Yogurt Pops

    [7] Before ice cream mochi, the popular sweet version was (and still is) daifu-mochi, a dumpling-like cookie stuffed with red bean paste, peanut or sesame paste (photo courtesy Morgaer | Deviantart). [8] Bits of mochi rice dough now appear in everything from brownies to ice pops (photo courtesy Kirbie’s Cravings).

     

    MORE GREAT FLAVORS

    Four-Piece Gift Boxes ($10)

  • Cinnamon Eggnog
  • Spicy Chocolate
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    Four-Piece Collections ($10)

  • Americana Collection: Frothy Chocolate, Raspberry White Chocolate Crunch, Salted Caramel, Vanilla Chocolate Chip
  • Signature Chip Collection: Matcha Green Tea Chocolate Chip, Mochaccino Chip, Raspberry White Chocolate Crunch, Vanilla Chocolate Chip
  • East Meets West Collection: Black Sesame, Matcha Green Tea, Salted Caramel, Vanilla Chocolate Chip
  • Exotic Collection: Lychee Colada, Mandarin Orange Cream, Matcha Green Tea Chocolate Chip, Mochaccino Chip
  • Taste Of Thailand Collection: Ginger Zing, Mango Thai Basil, Thai Iced Tea, Toasted Coconut
  • Tropical Collection: Lychee Colada, Mandarin Orange Cream, Passion Fruit, Toasted Coconut
  • The Classics Collection: Azuki Red Bean, Black Sesame, Ginger Zing, Matcha Green Tea
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    HEAD TO MOCHIDOKI.COM

    You can order as many boxes as you like for a flat rate of $15.00. They arrive frozen in dry ice and you can’t eat them immediately—they’re frozen solid.

    But 5-10 minutes at room temperature makes them just right.

    Order here.

    Hopefully, we’ll be seeing Mochidoki at retail soon. The brand was purchased by a private equity firm in 2015, with plans to bring mochi ice cream to a wider audience.

     
    WAYS TO SERVE MOCHI

    Mochi are neat to eat. You can snack on them as finger food, or add garnishes for an elegant dessert.

    You can eat them from the container or plate them, whole or halved, with garnish:

  • Berries or other fruit
  • Dessert sauces
  • Whipped cream
  • Anything from spun sugar to cookie crumbs
  •  
    Just let them sit for five minutes after you take them from the freezer.
     
    MAKE YOUR OWN MOCHI

    You can make daifuku mochi—the room temperature variety filled with bean paste. This recipe from The New York Times makes everything from scratch, including turning dry azuki beans into red bean paste.

    Note that the fresh dough will turn dry and stiff within a couple of days, so plan to eat your mochi in short order.

    If you want to make ice cream mochi, the shelf life is even shorter. Make them with this recipe, then freeze for two hours and eat. Otherwise, the homemade rice paste will freeze solid.

    Beyond the classic mochi, this article from Huffington Post shows how to use mochi (the dough) in conventional sweets: brownies, cakes, cookies, donuts, ice cream and ice pops.

    How trending is mochi? Check this website of baby names.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Homemade Biscuits For Breakfast

    We love to start the new year with homemade biscuits—a different type each year. This year, it’s ham and gruyère, with fresh chives.
     
    THE HISTORY OF BISCUITS

    The word biscuit dates to ancient Latin: bis cotus, meaning twice baked. These words form the origin of biscotti: initially a hard food with a long shelf life that could be taken on the road, in an era where roadside food was minimal at best. They were (and are) first baked, then dried out in a slow oven.

    It’s important to note that, like those hard Roman biscotti, the term biscuit in Europe still refers to what is called a cookie or cracker in the U.S.

    Scones an early quick bread, are first mentioned in the early 16th century. Spice buns appeared during the Tudor period (1485 to 1603).

    But it wasn’t until the 18th century that chemical leavenings (raising agents) enabled the the moist, fluffy biscuits we know today.

    The leavening creates gas bubbles that lighten and soften the dough. Pearl ash (potash) was an early example; others included beer and kefir (both of which have live yeast), sour milk, vinegar, lemon juice and or cream of tartar. Steam and air were used to raise popovers and Yorkshire pudding.

    Baking soda was used by the turn of the 19th century; baking powder was introduced in 1843 (the difference between baking powder and baking soda). And with them came light, fluffy breads and cakes galore.
     
    BISCUITS VS. ROLLS

    Biscuits and rolls are both made from flour, fat* (butter, shortening, olive oil), liquid (buttermilk, cream, milk, water) and salt.

    What’s the difference?

    Biscuits are raised with chemical leavening (baking powder); rolls are risen with yeast.

    RECIPE: HAM & SMOKED GOUDA BISCUITS WITH MAPLE BUTTER

    This recipe is from National Pork Board, “Pork: Be Inspired.” They can be served at any meal of the day; but we prefer their complex flavors with the simpler foods of breakfast, or with a light lunch of soup and salad.

    The recipe was originally made with smoked Gouda, but we prefer Gruyère. You can substitute any semihard cheese.

    You can also substitute other types of bacon for the standard American bacon strips; and substitute chives for the thyme.

    Don’t hesitate to make any recipe your own, by substituting favorite ingredients or experimenting with new ones.

    Prep time is 20 minutes; bake time is 20 minutes.

    Ingredients For 12 Biscuits

  • 1 cup diced ham steak (not sliced ham)
  • 2-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, plus more for the baking sheet
  • 1-1/2 cups smoked Gouda cheese, coarsely shredded (about 4-1/2 ounces)
  • 1/4 cup chives, chopped (substitute thyme)
  • 1-1/4 cups plain yogurt (lowfat is O.K.)
  •  
    For The Maple Butter

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (substitute honey)
  • Pinch of salt
  •  

    Ham & Cheese Biscuits

    Maple Butter Recipe

    Bacon & Sweet Potato Biscuits

    Buttermilk Biscuits

    [1] “Ham and cheese” biscuits. You can use your favorite types of ham and cheese (photo courtesy National Pork Board). [2] Maple butter is one of many compound butters you can easily make (photo courtesy Food Blogger Connect). [3] Chipotle Cheddar Biscuits (here’s the recipe from McCormick). [4] Classic, flaky buttermilk biscuits (here’s the recipe from Kindred Restaurant | Davidson, N.C.).

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 450°F. Butter a large baking sheet, or coat it with nonstick spray.

    2. WHISK together in a large bowl the flour, baking powder, sugar salt and baking soda. Use a pastry cutter or fingertips to add the butter, working the mixture until it resembles a coarse meal.

    3. STIR in the ham, cheese and chives. Add the yogurt, stirring until just combined. Drop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet in 12 equal mounds, about 1 inch apart. Bake until golden brown, 18 to 20 minutes. While the biscuits bake…

    4. MAKE the maple butter. In a medium bowl, combine the butter and maple syrup. Add salt to taste and transfer to a serving bowl.

    5. SERVE the biscuits warm. with the maple butter on the side.

     
    MORE BISCUIT RECIPES

  • Bacon & Sweet Potato Biscuits
  • Buttermilk Biscuits
  • Cheddar Chive Biscuits, atop a vegetable cobbler!
  • Dill Biscuits With Smoked Salmon
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    ________________
    *Some types of rolls do not contain fat.

      

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