Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for The Nibble

TIP OF THE DAY: Eat Sunny Food

It’s no fun looking out the window on the first day of spring, waiting for the snowfall to begin. So to counter the gray skies and eat something bright and sunny.

Anticipating the weather, we acquired a ripe papaya and other fruits for this recipe from Hannah Kaminsky, who is wintering in Hawaii.

“At the Salted Lemon Smoothie & Juice Bar,” she writes, “they’ve perfected the art of building an unsinkable papaya boat. Local orange and pink-hued fruits, more brilliant than a sunrise in paradise, are hollowed out and stuffed to the brim with granola, yogurt, banana slices and blueberries, and finished with a light shower of chia seeds.

“The contrast between creamy yogurt and crunchy cereal, flavored with the ripe and juicy fresh fruits, is so simple yet so satisfying,” she concludes.

And on a day like today, in the gloomy Northeast, it provides something bright that says “Happy spring!”

RECIPE: PAPAYA BOAT

Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 1 medium or large papaya, peeled and seeded
  • 1 cup granola
  • 1 6-ounce yogurt, fruit, plain or vanilla
  • 1 medium banana, sliced
  • 1/2 cup fresh blueberries or raspberries
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  •    

    papaya-boat-hannahkaminsky-230

    Have papaya as part of a sunny breakfast or lunch. Photo © Hanna Kaminsky.

  • Optional: sweetener to taste* (agave, honey, maple syrup)
  •  

    *If the fruit isn’t sweet enough.

     

    papaya-cut-hannahkaminsky-230

    A halved papaya with a fanciful cut. Photo ©
    Hannah Kaminsky.

     

    Preparation

    1. DIVIDE a half cup of granola between two plates to set up a “foundation” for the papaya boat. This will help prevent it from capsizing when you eat it, and it also provides a layer of crunchy cereal to enjoy.

    2. PLACE the remaining granola inside the papaya halves (1/4 cup inside of each) and top that with the yogurt, spooning equal amounts into the two boats.

    3. ARRANGE the sliced banana and berries as desired. Top with a sprinkle of chia seeds.

    4. FINISH with a light drizzle of syrup as desired.
     
    HOW TO BUY PAPAYA

    1. When papaya ripens, the green skin will turn mostly yellow with patches of red. Smell the fruit at the stem end; a ripe papaya will be fragrant.

     
    2. Squeeze the papaya gently; it will give a little if it is ripe. Avoid papayas that are overly soft. You can ripen the papaya on the counter in a brown paper bag overnight, or place it in a sunny spot for a day or two.

    3. You can refrigerate a ripe papaya in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 3 days.
     
    CAN YOU EAT PAPAYA SEEDS?

    You can use papaya in any number of recipes, or simply eat it like a melon. Wash the outside, cut the fruit lengthwise and discard the seeds.

    But do the seeds have any other use?

    While there is no scientific evidence, in some circles the seeds have caught on as a potential health food. They are nontoxic, should you want to try them.

    You can eat papaya seeds whole, or can grind them up. Here’s how to do it from WikiHow, which claims that the taste is “fairly similar” to ground pepper.

    The skin should not be eaten.
     
    MORE SUNNY FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Yellow/Orange fruits: apples, apricots, cape gooseberries, cantaloupe, golden kiwi, grapefruit, lemons, mangoes, nectarines, oranges/mandarins, papapyas, peaches, pears, persimmons, pineapples, tangerines, yellow figs, yellow watermelon.
  • Yellow/Orange vegetables: acorn/butternut/pumpkin/other squash varieties, beets, bell peppers, carrots, corn, rutabagas, sweet potatoes, summer squash, Yukon gold/other yellow potatoes, yellow tomatoes, yellow winter squash varieties.
  • Red/pink fruits: apples, blood oranges, cherries, cranberries, grapes, grapefruit, pears, pomegranates, raspberries, red pears, strawberries, watermelon.
  • Red/pink vegetables: beets, bell peppers, radicchio, radishes, red onions, red potatoes, rhubarb, tomatoes.
  •   

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Angry Orchard Hard Cider (Hop’n Mad Apple)

    Some people are beer people, others are cider people. We’re both. Our beer style of preference is the IPA: Bring on the hops; the more, the better.

    So we were one of the happiest cider drinkers when Angry Orchard released its new Hop’n Mad Apple hard cider.

    The cider makers drew inspiration from the hops used to make beer. It wasn’t a stretch: Angry Orchard is owned by Boston Beer Company, makers of Samuel Adams. (It also suggests why, first launched in 2012, Angry Orchard is the number one selling hard cider in the U.S.)

    It’s an international affair, adding two type of imported hops to American cider apples. Strisselspalt hops from France contribute subtle citrus, herbal and floral notes to the cider; Galaxy hops from Australia impart bright, juicy tropical notes like pineapple and mango.

    The hops are added to the cider post-fermentation—a process known in the brewing world as dry hopping—to create a fresh hop aroma and a pleasant dry finish without any bitterness. The result is apply, hoppy and delicious, and is now our favorite* of the Angry Orchard cider.

    Find the retailer nearest you at AngryOrchard.com.

       

    angry-orchard-hop-n-mad-france44-230

    We’re hop’n glad for Hop’n Mad hard apple cider. Photo courtesy Angry Orchard.

     

    *The Angry Orchard line currently includes Apple Ginger, Cider House, Cinnful Apple, Crisp Apple, Green Apple, Hop’n Mad Apple, Summer Honey and Traditional Dry.
     
    A BRIEF HISTORY OF CIDER

    Here’s the history of hard cider from Angry Orchard. The history starts with the apples needed to make cider. Here’s the full history, with excerpts below.

  • 1500 B.C.E. A tablet found in Mesopotamia dating to this time documents the first recorded sale of an apple orchard. The price: three prized breeder sheep.
  • 1300 B.C.E. Egyptian pharaoh Ramses The Great orders apples to be grown in the Nile Delta.
  • 55 B.C.E. Cider was a popular drink in Roman times. Julius Caesar himself enjoyed the occasional glass (his drink of choice was wine). Caesar’s legions carry apple seeds with them. As they conquered Continental Europe, they planted apple orchards to replace the native crabapples.
  • 400 C.E. The Dark Ages were bright times for cider. Grapes didn’t grow as well in the northern regions of Europe, so gardens and orchards grew apples. Cider becomes a popular alternative to wine in the regions of Brittany and Normandy at the north of France, and throughout Britannia (Roman Britain).
  •  

    cider-apples-foxwhelp-cider.org.uk-230

    Cider apples may look like eating apples, but they have far less sugar and are not enjoyable to humans. The reverse is true with eating apples: They don’t make good cider. Photo courtesy Cider.org.uk.

     
  • 1066 C.E. The Norman Conquest of England brings many new apple varieties from France. Cider quickly becames a most popular drink in England, second only to ale.
  • 1620 C.E. Pilgrims headed to America bring apple seeds and cider-making equipment. Three days into the voyage from Plymouth, the Mayflower hist a storm and cracks a beam. They almost turned back, but are able to find a “great screw,” believed to be part of a cider press, to hold up the beam.
  • 1650 C.E. Early American orchards produce few apples because there are no honey bees to efficiently pollinate the trees. Bees are shipped from England to Virginia and Massachusetts to help apple production take off.
  • 1789 C.E. Cider is all the rage with the founding fathers. Washington and Jefferson own apple orchards and produce their own cider. It is rumored that John Adams drinks a tankard of cider with breakfast every morning.
  • 1800 C.E. John Chapman, a.k.a. Johnny Appleseed, establishes apple orchards throughout the Midwest. While his goal is to plant enough trees so that no one would ever go hungry, because he collects the seeds from cider mills, his plantings actually produce cider apples.
  •  

  • 1900 C.E. Waves of German and Eastern European immigrants arrive in the U.S. With their love for beer, cider’s popularity begins to wane.
  • 1910 C.E. The Temperance movement encourages many farmers to give up growing cider apples.
  • 1919 C.E. All alcohol production and consumption is declared illegal by the Volstead Act.
  • 1933 C.E. Prohibition ends. Breweries and distillers get back into production with imported ingredients, but orchards cannot easily switch back to cider apples.
  • 2010 C.E. American cider undergoes a renaissance. In five years, sales increase some 400%, with craft producers leading the way.
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: The Joy Of Cheddar

    We love cheese, but cheese doesn’t love us. After a lifetime of eating it three times a day, we developed lactose intolerance—no cause and effect, just one of those things that can happen when the bloom of youth fades away.

    Depending on how lactose intolerant you are, you can eat aged cheeses. The older the cheese, the more the lactose has dissipated, to just 2%, depending on the cheese. But for the truly afflicted (including us), that’s 2% too much*.

    The only cheese that is naturally lactose-free is Cheddar. Through the process of cheddaring†, the last bit of lactose is consumed in production. We can eat it to our heart’s delight.

    We always liked Cheddar, but our cheese passions lay elsewhere: blues, chèvres, double- and triple-crèmes. So we went on a Cheddar safari, first trying the dozen different Cheddars in the cheese case at Trader Joe’s.

    These included plain Cheddars—mild, sharp and extra-sharp—and flavored Cheddars, variously blended with bacon, chive, horseradish, jalapeño, onion, scallion, wasabi, wine/spirits and other inclusions. There’s also goat Cheddar.

    The king of flavored Cheddars, which we discovered elsewhere, seems to be Yancy’s Fancy of New York State, which makes some 24 flavored Cheddars, including Buffalo Wing, Grilled Bacon Cheeseburger, Pepperoni and Strawberry. One day, we’ll gather them all and have a heck of a tasting party.

       

    amber-onion-cheddar-ig-230b

    iGourmet sells this delicious Cheddar with caramelized onions, also known as Abbot’s Gold. It’s made by Wensleydale Creamery in the U.K. Photo courtesy iGourmet.

     

    *Thanks to Erin Berardinelli, who wrote to tell us of mold allergy, a condition that can generate a bad reaction to the aged cheeses—as “young” as three months. If you’re reacting badly to aged cheeses but not to other dairy, have it checked out.

    †Cheddaring is an additional step unique to the production of Cheddar cheese. After heating, the curd is kneaded with salt, cut into cubes to drain the whey and then stacked and turned.

     
    OUR “CHEDDAR SAFARI” WINNER

    After weeks of tasting the world of Cheddar—from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.S. and the U.K.—favorites emerged.

    But our passion of the moment is the flavored English Cheddar With Caramelized Onions, imported by Trader Joe’s. Rich and creamy, full-bodied and redolent of the most delightful caramelized onion sweetness, it is addictive—one of those foods we call “love at first bite.”

    Trader Joe doesn’t disclose which Dorset producer makes this full-bodied farmhouse Cheddar, but it’s a “famed farm” with “more than 40 years of traditional cheese making experience.”

    The addition of caramelized onions was inspired by a classical British ploughman’s lunch pairing—cheese and chutney. The cheesemakers mixed caramelized onion marmalade into the Cheddar. The marmalade itself is made with cane sugar, cider vinegar, red currant juice, lemon juice, clove, cinnamon, sugar, ginger and olive oil.

    The result is a balanced sweet-savory flavor with honeyed notes and a pleasing onion aroma. The marmalade makes it a bit crumbly, like a mature Cheddar.

     

    cheddar-caramelized-onions-TraderJoe-230ps2

    Our new passion: Cheddar with caramelized onions. Photo courtesy Trader Joe’s.

     

    HOW WE USED THE CHEDDARS

    Every Cheddar fan has a favorite use, often on on burgers and sandwiches, including grilled cheese.

    Ours is as a snack or a light meal with with a Honeycrisp apple or other fruit, or a slice or two of Dave’s Killer Bread.

    Given the amount of Cheddar we had on hand, we also shredded it atop casseroles, chilis and soups; made fondue and cheese sauce; served lots of cheese plates to visitors; and had it for dessert with a piece of apple pie.

    We also made Cheddar pizzas, variously with apple, meatball and vegetable toppings. We made Cheddar soup and cauliflower Cheddar soup. And we stuffed shredded Cheddar into grilled portabello mushroom caps, then returned them to the broiler to melt.

     
    A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF CHEDDAR

    Cheddar has been called the “cheese of kings.” Records show that in 1170, King Henry II declared Cheddar the best cheese in England, and purchased more than five tons of it. His son, Prince John, who became king in 1199, purchased a similar quantity in 1184. U.S. President Andrew Jackson (in office In 1829-1837) once held an open house party at the White House at which he served a 1,400-pound block of Cheddar.

    Cheddar is a hard, sharp cheese, with a paste that ranges from off-white to pale yellow to deep orange, depending on the amount of annatto added (more about that in a minute). Originating in the Somerset County village of Cheddar in southwest England, it is the most popular type of cheese in the U.K. and accounts for more than half of English cheese production.

    The cheese is now made worldwide, and only one producer remains in the village of Cheddar itself. The name is not protected‡ under the EU Protected Food Names program; so cheese made anywhere can be called Cheddar. However:

  • West Country Farmhouse Cheddar has a PDO (Protected domain of Origin) that covers Cheddars made in the traditional manner (raw milk, calf rennet and a cloth wrapping) in the southwest England counties of Somerset, Devon, Dorset, Cornwall and Somerset.
  • Orkney Scottish Island Cheddar gained PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) status.
  •  
    The rich, nutty flavor notes become increasingly sharp with age. The smooth, firm texture of young Cheddar becomes more granular and crumbly with age.
     
    AMERICA’S FIRST CHEESE

    According to Widmer Cheese, a major U.S. producer of fine Cheddar, prior to 1850 nearly all the cheese produced in the U.S. was Cheddar. Cheddar production in Wisconsin, the leader in U.S. Cheddar production, began in the mid 1800s.

    A yellow food coloring (annatto) was originally added to distinguish where the Cheddar was made. In the U.S., Cheddars made in the New England states traditionally retaining the natural white color. There is no difference in flavor as a result of added coloring.

    Aging is the only difference between mild and sharp Cheddar. The longer cheese is aged naturally, the sharper and more pronounced the Cheddar flavor becomes.

  • Mild Cheddar is generally aged for 2 to 3 months.
  • Extra sharp Cheddar can be aged for as long as a year.
  • Cheddars in the U.S. with names such as “private stock” or “reserved” are aged for 15 months or longer.
  • In the U.K., “vintage” refers to a strong, extra-mature Cheddar aged for 16 months. In the U.S., Cabot’s Vintage Choice is aged for at least 2 years.
  • You can find Cheddars aged up to 10 years. We’ve never had one, but they’re supposed to be magnificent. The price is about double, to pay for the extra years of storage and tied-up cash.
  •  
    Here’s a more substantial history of Cheddar.

     
    ‡Protected Designation Of Origin, or PDO, is a trademark issued by the European Union that guarantees that a product is produced, prepared and processed in a designated geographical area, according to specified practices. There is also Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), which guarantees geographical area only. Both designations provide legal protection against imitators, and both can use an EU logo of authenticity on their packaging. Purchasing a PDO product guarantees a consistent product experience and an established standard of excellence; the PGI designation guarantees it comes from the its area of origin (Scotch Whisky, for example, is a PGI). But it seems that there is no guild of Cheddar producers to do the same for all U.K. Cheddars.

      

    Comments

    TIP: The New Linguine & Clam “Sauce”

    If you make linguine and clam sauce the way most Americans do—with canned clams—try it the way they serve it at Olio e Piú in New York City.

    Eight whole steamed clams surround a plate of linguine.

    The linguine is cooked and tossed in olive oil with fresh parsley and placed in the center of the plate.

    The clams, lightly cooked in a garlic broth, surround the linguine. EVOO is poured into the other half of each clam shell.

    In our interpretation of this dish, we made clams in garlic broth (vongole in brodetto). We also grilled up a side of crostini; the crunch of the bread is a nice counterpoint to the soft pasta and clams, and the arugula adds some color to the plate. You can substitute your favorite garlic bread recipe.

    RECIPE: LINGUINE & CLAMS

    Ingredients

  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more for tossing with the pasta
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons red chili pepper flakes
  • 8-10 clams in shell per person
  • 1-1/4 cups white wine
  • 1-1/4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1/4 cup fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 package linguine (or fresh linguine)
  •    

    linguine-alla-vongole-clam-olionyc-230

    A modern interpretation of linguine and clam sauce. Photo courtesy Olio e Piú | NYC.

     

    For The Garlic Crostini

  • 1 baguette, sliced into 1-inch-thick pieces
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 large garlic clove, peeled
  • 1/2 to 1 cup ricotta
  • 1-2 cups baby arugula, cleaned and dried
  •  

    ricotta-truffle-oil-arugula-blackpepper-olionyc-230

    Garlic-ricotta-arugula crostini. Photo courtesy Olio e Piú | NYC.

     

    Preparation

    First, make the clams in garlic broth.

    1. WASH the clams to remove any dirt or sand.

    2. COOK the clams. In a heavy pot over moderate heat, heat the oil until hot but not smoking. Add the garlic and sauté until golden brown (about three minutes). Add the salt, pepper and chili flakes and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute.

    3. INCREASE the heat to moderately high and add the clams, white wine, water and thyme. Cover and bring to a boil. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the clams open (5 to 7 minutes). Discard clams that do not open. Drain the clams and toss with the chopped parsley.

    4. MAKE the pasta according to package directions. Drain and toss lightly with olive oil and a pinch of salt. While the pasta cooks, grill the bread:

     

    5. PREHEAT the broiler or grill to high. Brush the crostini slices on both sides with olive oil and sprinkle lightly with salt. Grill, flipping once, until golden brown and crisp. While the bread is grilling…

    6. SEASON the ricotta with salt and pepper to taste. Remove the crostini from the broiler/grill and rub each slice on the top side with the raw garlic. Spread with ricotta and top with arugula.

    6. PLATE the pasta in a mound in the center of the plate. Serve clams with the crostini.

      

    Comments

    RESTAURANT: Vermillion

    Last night, while others were enjoying corned beef and cabbage with green beer, we broke with tradition in a big way.

    We dined at Vermillion in midtown Manhattan. The soaring, bi-level space is the New York branch of the Chicago Vermillion established by Rohini Dey, a former international banker and McKinsey consultant.

    Serving a unique Indian-Latin fusion menu, the flavors and presentation are as stylish as Ms. Dey herself. First, the cuisine:

    In a complete relaunch of the menu, Ms. Dey’s concept to fuse the two colorful cuisines has been interpreted by co-executive chefs Anup Patwal and Aseema Mamaji from India, and sous chef Javier Alvarez from Latin America. The gifted young team brings verve, energy and an elegant touch to the food.

    Beyond the flavorful, there’s a “wow” experience in the presentation. Thought has been given to turning each dish into culinary art; whether it’s a specially crafted chrome rack from which four different types of kabobs hang in alluring fashion, or a slice of tree trunk used as a charger.

     

    caldeirada-de-peixe-vermillion-230

    Caldeirada de peixe, a traditional Brazalian seafood stew accented with Indian spices and a side of coconut rice. Photo courtesy Vermillion Restaurant.

     

    Absolutely everything demands to be consumed. Even garnishes of pickled red onion or green chile are exciting. We didn’t leave a scrap on the plate!

    The seasonings are spectacular. There’s just enough of the custom-blended spices and heat to blend perfectly, appropriately understated without providing a punch not wanted in fine dining. It’s not often that we encounter such finesse with spices. Kudos to the chefs!

    In addition to fusion dishes, there’s a menu of classic Indian entrées. There is nothing we don’t want to try, and we can’t wait to go back.

    While dinner can cost what you’d expect for such fine cuisine, lunch is quite affordable: two courses for $20 or three courses for $24.

    Wine tip: The Chateau Ste Michelle Riesling, made with grapes from Washington’s Columbia Valley, is perfect with the cuisine. Off-dry, with notes of sweet lime, peach and subtle minerality, it is a charming complement to the spice and heat.

    There’s a comfortable cocktail lounge downstairs and a private dining room upstairs, on the main dining floor. The restaurant is at 480 Lexington Avenue at 46th Street. Visit the company website or call for reservations: 212-871-6600.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Bake Irish Soda Bread

    Having published a recipe for Irish soda muffins for St. Patrick’s Day, we hadn’t planned to feature Irish soda bread this year.

    Then, we received this recipe from The Baker Chick and realized how much we wanted to tear into a warm loaf of soda bread and slather it with Kerrygold butter from Ireland.

    So we bumped our previously scheduled Tip Of The Day for this suggestion: Bake a loaf of Irish soda bread. If you’re already at work, bake it when you get home. It’s delicious with dinner—or in our case, instead of dinner. (We can make a joyous meal of great bread and butter.)

    Traditional Irish soda bread, the recipe below, has just four ingredients: flour, baking soda, salt and buttermilk. Other recipes add butter, caraway seeds, chocolate, eggs, orange peel or zest, raisins and/or sugar.

    The style of soda bread we enjoy in the U.S. is American-style, developed by Irish immigrants with butter, sugar and raisins.

    We adapted the recipe to meet in the middle: no butter or egg, but a bit of raisins and caraway.

    RECIPE: TRADITIONAL IRISH SODA BREAD

    Ingredients For 1 Loaf

       

    irish-soda-bread-thebakerchick-230

    Traditional Irish soda bread has no raisins or caraway. Photo courtesy The Baker Chick.

  • 1 pound (3-1/2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more as needed
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 cups buttermilk
  •  
    We couldn’t help ourselves: We added these optional, non-traditional ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup raisins, sultanas or dried cherries, currants or cranberries
  • 1 tablespoon caraway seeds
  •  
    But in the name of tradition, we held back on the butter, egg and sugar.
     
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 450°F.

    2. STIR together the flour, salt and baking soda in a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle of the mixture and pour in 1 1/2 cups of the buttermilk. Use a wooden spoon or your hand to combine the ingredients. You want the dough to be soft, so don’t over-mix it. Add more buttermilk if needed to get the dough to come together.

    3. TURN the dough onto a floured surface and give it just a few kneads (more will result in a tougher crumb). Shape it into a 6-inch diameter disk, about 2 inches high. Use a sharp knife to score a shallow X on the top of the loaf. Transfer to a cookie sheet or pizza stone and bake for 15 minutes.

    4. REDUCE the heat to 400°F and bake for another 20-25 minutes, or until the crust is golden, and the bread sounds hollow when you tap it.

     

    kerrygold-brick-230

    For St. Patrick’s Day, spring for Kerrygold butter, made with milk from cows who graze
    on the green grass of the Emerald Isle. Photo
    courtesy Kerrygold.

     

    THE HISTORY OF IRISH SODA BREAD

    Baking soda, called bread soda in Ireland, was invented in the early 1800s. In those days most people didn’t have an oven—they cooked in a fireplace over coals or a peat fire (called turf fire in Ireland). They placed the dough in a lidded cast-iron pot which went right on top of the fire.

    In County Donegal and County Leitrim, there was a tradition of adding caraway seeds to bread. Immigrants brought that recipe to the U.S. In America, the recipe evolved to include butter, eggs, raisins and sugar—ingredients which frugal housewives in Ireland wouldn’t have thought to add to the dough.

    Today, the soda bread recipe options include:

  • White soda bread: all-purpose flour, baking soda, salt, buttermilk and optional caraway seeds.
  • Brown soda bread, also a traditional recipe that substitutes whole wheat flour for part or all or all of the white flour.
  • Irish soda bread with raisins and caraway, the classic Irish-American version also made with sugar, butter, and eggs.
  • Numerous modern recipes, from healthier variations of whole grains, flax and sunflower seeds to walnut soda bread to oat soda bread with browned butter, rosemary and black pepper.
  •  
    Check out these and other recipes here.

    FOOD TRIVIA: The cross cut into the top of the loaf before baking allows the heat to penetrate into the thickest part of the bread. As a bonus, in a Catholic country it adds the symbolic note of giving thanks.

      

    Comments

    COCKTAIL: Green Drink For St. Patrick’s Day

    From the Owl’s Brew, specialists in tea crafted for cocktails: artisanal, fresh-brewed and ready-to-pour tea.

    For St. Patrick’s Day, they sent us this appropriately green cocktail that uses one of their brews (here’s a store locator); or you can brew your own.

    They call the cocktail The Green Garden, but you can call it The Emerald Isle.

    RECIPE: THE GREEN GARDEN

    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • 2 parts The Classic brewed tea*
  • 2 parts cold pressed green juice (recommended: cucumber & mint or mixed greens with apple & lemon)
  • 1 part vodka
  • 1 part saké
  •  
    *The Classic is a blend of English Breakfast Tea and lemon peel, with a bit of tartness from lemon juice and lime juice. If you can’t find the product locally, you can brew your own.

     

    green-garden-owlsbrew-230

    As green as the Emerald Isle. Photo courtesy Owl’s Brew.

     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients and stir or shake.

    2. POUR over ice into a mason jar or strain into a martini glass.

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: National Artichoke Hearts Day

    artichoke-baked-potato-bonefishgrill-230

    Celebrate with an artichoke baked potato. Photo courtesy Bonefish Grill.

     

    Today is National Artichoke Heart Day, an occasion to mix up our favorite luxurious yet low-calorie dishes, “Luxury Salad.” It combines artichokes with hearts of palm, roasted red pepper, red onion and black olives in a white wine vinaigrette. Here’s the recipe.

    But we’re all about options, and we’re making a stuffed baked potato from some of the artichoke hearts.

    We were inspired by this photo from Bonefish Grill. The elaborate recipe topped with an artichoke heart seems an elegant way to celebrate National Artichoke Hearts Day.

    The potato is stuffed with some sautéed spinach, then crowned with a poached egg and the artichoke heart.

    RECIPE: ARTICHOKE STUFFED POTATO

    Ingredients For One Serving

  • 1 baked potato
  • 3 tablespoons sautéed spinach
  • 1 poached egg
  • 1 artichoke heart, drained
  • Optional: hollandaise sauce (recipe)
  • Garnish: tarragon chiffonade
  • Preparation

    1. BAKE the potato(es). When the potatoes are almost done…

    2. Sauté the spinach and poach the egg(s). Warm the artichoke heart(s) in the microwave.

    3. SLICE the top off the potato(s) to provide an even platform. Scoop out a bit of the potato to create a shallow well for the spinach.

    4. FILL the well with the spinach, top with the poached egg and hollandaise sauce. Crown with the artichoke heart, sliced in half as necessary. Garnish with the tarragon.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Pointed Cabbage, The New Brassica* In Town

    Even if you don’t eat cabbage regularly, you may be having some corned beef and cabbage tomorrow, St. Patrick’s Day.

    If you think there’s nothing new in cabbage, check out the new cabbage in town. Originally grown in Spain as Sweetheart or Sweet Heart cabbage, it is now grown in California branded as Kool cabbage.

    It is delicious pointed cabbage, another name by which it is known. Still other names include duchy cabbage, hearted cabbage and hispi.

    A conical-shaped member of the cabbage family, the leaves are more open (less tight) than those of a conventional green cabbage, with a softer texture and sweeter taste. It also requires less time to cook.

    Note that while a pointed cabbage is, in fact, cool, kool is the Dutch word for cabbage. It gave its name to koolsla, which in the U.S. became cole slaw (kool = cabbage, sla = salad).
     
    COOKING POINTED CABBAGE

    Kool/pointed cabbage is best enjoyed cooked, as opposed to raw in slaws and salads.

     

    sweet_heart_kool_cabbage_europeancuisines-230

    Sweetheart or Kool cabbage, known by a variety of other names. Photo courtesy EuropeanCuisines.com. Check out their recipe for Shredded Baby Cabbage in Cream Sauce.

  • Melissas.com, which sells the cabbage online, suggests removing the center core and using the leaves in stir fry, boiled or steamed as a stand-alone side dish or grilled as a topping for steak or lamb chops.
  • Cut the cabbage in half and then into quarters, removing the hard core from each quarter at an angle. Then slice and wash thoroughly.
  •  
    It’s easy to overcook cabbage and bring out those odoriferous sulfur compounds.

  • To steam cabbage, place it in a steamer and cook for 5-10 minutes until tender but still crisp.
  • To boil cabbage, bring a pan of water to the boil, add the prepared cabbage and cook for 5 8 minutes until tender but still crisp.
  • To stir-fry cabbage, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a frying pan, add the cabbage and stir fry for 4-5 minutes or until tender but still crisp.
  • To grill cabbage, preheat the grill to medium. Cut the cabbage into wedges (8 for a conventional cabbage) and remove the core. Place on a piece of foil large enough to wrap all the wedges. Season to taste (garlic powder, salt, pepper), seal in the foil and grill for 30 to 40 minutes until tender.
     
    Don’t forget the corned beef!
     
    *Brassica is the plant genus that comprises the cruciferous vegetables, nutritional powerhouses packed with potent, cancer-fighting phytonutrients (antioxidants). They include arugula, bok choy, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, rapeseed/canola, rapini, rutabaga, turnips and others.

      

  • Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Chocolate Chip Mint Cupcakes

    chocolate-mint-cupcakes-zulkasugarFB-230

    St. Patrick’s Day cupcakes. Photo courtesy
    Zulka.

     

    Family-owned Zulka manufacturers premium-quality sugars/ They’re dedicated to producing more natural sugar through responsible, environmentally friendly cane production. The sugars are minimally processed, which helps to preserve the fresh flavor of the sugar cane and more of the nutrition that is stripped away when cane is processed. The result: better tasting sugar!

    The company provides lots of recipes for how to use the sugars. Here’s their suggestion for the perfect St. Patrick’s Day cupcakes. Get out your muffin tins!

    RECIPE: CHOCOLATE MINT CUPCAKES

    Ingredients For 18 Cupcakes

    For The Cupcakes

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup cane sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 4 oz dark or semi-sweet chocolate, melted and slightly cooled
  • 2 large eggs plus 2 egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup canola oil*
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon mint extract
  • 1/3 cup full fat sour cream or Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1-1/2 cups mini chocolate chips, divided
  • For the Frosting:

  • 6 ounces full fat cream cheese, room temperature
  • 10 tablespoons butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon mint extract (use more for a stronger flavor)
  • 6-10 drops green food coloring
  •  
    *Mild virgin olive oil, sunflower or grapeseed oil can be substituted.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Prepare the muffin tins with 18 cupcake liners.

    2. COMBINE the flour, baking soda, cocoa powder and salt in a small bowl, whisking well. Set aside.

    3. MIX the butter and sugars until in a large bowl with an electric or stand mixer until light and fluffy, about 2-3 minutes. Add the eggs and yolks one at a time, mixing well after each addition.

    4. ADD the melted and cooled cocoa mixture, mixing well until fully combined. Add the oil and extracts and mix again, stopping to scrape down the sides as needed.

    5. ADD the sour cream and then the flour mixture and mix slowly until just combined. Add the milk and mix for another 20 seconds. Fold in 1 cup of the mini chocolate chips.

    6. FILL the cupcake liners 2/3 of the way full. Bake for 16-18 minutes or until the tops of the cupcakes bounce back slightly when lightly pressed. Let them cool in the pan for 3 minutes, then carefully remove to a wire rack to cool completely before frosting.

     

    zulka-morena-cane-sugar-2-230

    Cane sugar, one of the three different types used in this recipe. Check out the different types of sugar in our sugar glossary. Photo courtesy Zulka Morena.

     

    7. MAKE the frosting. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to blend the cream cheese, butter and salt until lightened and fluffy. Add the powdered sugar 1/2 cup at a time, mixing well in between each addition.

    8. ADD the vanilla extract and food coloring, starting with small amounts until you reach the desired flavor and color. It will darken more as it sits.

    9. FROST the tops of each cupcake using either a spatula or a frosting bag fitted with an open star tip, and sprinkle the remaining mini chocolate chips on top. Serve at room temperature.

      

    Comments

    « Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact