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RECIPES: Potato Salad Reveries

The summers of our youth meant that on the three holiday weekends—Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor Day—Mom was going to put out a major spread. You could have held a wedding reception with the diversity and quantity of food she set out.

Aside from the fruit pies and trays of brownies, what we most looked forward to was her potato salad.

It was so much better than anybody else’s mother’s, which was more like deli potato salad: potatoes and mayo.

Not our mom. Gifted with a super-palate and member of a family of competitive (with each other) cooks, her potato salad consisted of:

  • Red jacket potatoes (the most posh of that era)
  • Red onion
  • Small dice of red and green bell peppers (the only colors available then)
  • Fresh parsley and dill
  • A dressing of Hellmann’s mayonnaise mixed with Grey Poupon Dijon mustard and some red wine vinegar
  • We could care less about the steak, chicken, burger or whatever: We just wanted a big plate of potato salad, a big plate of fruit salad (berries, melon balls and stone fruits, presented in a carved out watermelon), glasses of her fruit punch and all those desserts.

    (Alas, these remain our preferences. Keep the steak: Got sugar?)

    Over the years we’ve tried to improve on Mom’s recipe:

  • By adding something new [not all at once]: anchovies (for the right crowd), bacon or ham, capers, chiles, crumbled feta or blue cheese, fancy basil from the farmers market (cinnamon, lemon, licorice, opal, Thai), other herbs (minced chives, fresh thyme), peas (English peas, snow peas, sugar snap peas), sliced olives.
  • By adding newer versions of standard ingredients: homemade or artisan mayonnaise, purple potatoes, orange and purple bell peppers, scallions instead of red onions, vinaigrette with flavored olive oil.
  •  
    And we look for inspiring recipes from other cooks, such as today’s two recipes.

    The first is a rustic Italian potato salad side dish; the second is an elegant first course.

    RECIPE #1: HEALTHIER POTATO SALAD

    This recipe from Ciao Florentina uses a healthier olive oil dressing, veggies, and some additional ingredients that add not just flavor, but charm.

    Fiorentina says this is an Italian-style potato salad recipe, “made with colorful red and purple heirloom potatoes, fresh herbs and spring green peas, then tossed in a lovely light and zesty vinaigrette.”

    “To make a meal of things,” says Fiorentina, “feel free to add some toasted pine nuts or fresh radishes sliced paper thin, like I did. I also sprinkled the entire salad with a handful of green pea shoots in season; [at other times] I’ll go for pretty microgreens.”

    Florentina is an artist as well as a cook: Everything she makes is beautiful to look at. Her recipes are simple, wholesome, and most important, delicious!

       

    Pretty Potato Salad
    [1] Healthy and beautiful potato salad from Ciao Fiorentina.

    Pea Shoots

    [2] Chopped pea shoots (photo Hannah Kaminsky | Bittersweet Blog).

    Mixed New Potatoes

    [3] Mixed-color new potatoes (also called creamer potatoes; photo courtesy Poplar Bluff Organics).

     
    Download her free e-cookbooks and subscribe to her “recipe and inspiration” list here.
     
    Ingredients For 4 Side Servings

  • 2 pound colored new potatoes
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1-1/2 cup fresh green peas steamed*
  • 1/4 cup green pea shoots*, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup mixed fresh herbs parsley, dill, chives, thyme
  • 1 scallion thinly sliced
  • 5-6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt + more to taste
  • 1 cup yellow grape tomatoes halved, optional
  • Optional: 1 radish
  •  
    ________________

    *If fresh peas aren’t in season, substitute frozen peas; substitute microgreens for the pea shoots.

    Preparation

    1. RINSE and cut the potatoes into rustic (thick) slices or wedges. Cover them with cold water and bring to a boil. Season with a good pinch of sea salt and simmer until tender but still al dente, about 10 minutes. Drain and set aside to dry in their own steam for a few minutes. While the potatoes are cooking…

    2. STEAM the green peas for 3 to 4 minutes until al dente. Meanwhile…

    3. WHISK together the olive oil, lemon juice and most of the herbs in a large bowl. Season to taste with sea salt. Add the potatoes and peas to the bowl with the dressing, and gently toss to coat. Allow the potatoes to sit in the dressing for about 10 minutes to absorb all the flavors.

    4. TASTE and adjust the seasonings to taste with more sea salt. Sprinkle with the remaining herbs, pea shoots and scallions. Optional to sprinkle with some grape tomatoes and radish slices.

     

    Purple Potato & Cucumber Salad
    [4] Potato salad as an elegant first course, from Idaho Potato Commission.

    Blue Peruvian Potatoes

    [5] Blue Peruvian potatoes. Depending on the strain and the soil where grown, they will be purple instead. Note, however, that blue potatoes often cook up the same purple color as purple potatoes (photo courtesy Burpee).

     

    RECIPE #2: LEBANESE BLUE POTATO TABOULI

    This recipe, developed by Chef Giuseppe Tentori of GT Prime and GT Fish & Oyster in Chicago, came to us via the Idaho Potato Commission, is called tabouli.

    Here’s some history for those of us who think of tabouli (tabbouleh) as a salad of cracked wheat, tomatoes, parsley, mint, onions, lemon juice, and olive oil:

    The tabouli cracked wheat salad originated in the Levant, a historical area in the Middle East that included parts of the modern countries of Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and Turkey. The term was first used in the 15th century.

    The Levantine Arabic word tabbule is derived from the Arabic word tabil, meaning “seasoning”; or more literally, “dip.” While the word came to define tabbouleh, the cracked wheat salad, Chef Tentori used it to define the small dice of ingredients that comprise his dish.

    At a fine restaurant, it sounds better than “potato salad.” (And technically, potatoes are indigenous to Peru, discovered by Spanish explorers. There were no blue potatoes—or likely other potatoes—in the Levant.)

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
  • 2 pounds Idaho All Blue Potatoes, peeled, small dice
  • 4 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 ounce extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 English (seedless) cucumbers, chopped fine†
  • Optional: 6 baby cucumbers‡ with blossoms (see photo)
  • 6 ounces crumbled feta cheese
  • Asian mesclun mix, as needed
  • ________________

    †We found that we wanted some seasoning in the cucumbers. We mixed them with fresh dill. You could also toss them with dill seed, garlic powder or the zest of the lemons.

    ‡This is a specialty item available from produce suppliers to chefs. If you can’t find them, use your spiralizer to create a mound of cucumber on top. Alternatively, thinly slice and marinate cucumbers in vinaigrette for an hour or more; then drain to use as a garnish.
     
    Preparation

    1. BRING salted water to a boil in a medium pan. Add the red-wine vinegar and then the diced potatoes. Cook until just al dente. Shock the potatoes in an ice bath. Drain well and pat dry.

    2. COMBINE the potatoes, parsley, olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper in large bowl. Toss gently to combine.

    3. PLACE a 4-inch ring mold in the center of each plate. Pack the potato mixture firmly into each ring mold; reserve the extra vinaigrette in bowl. Spread the chopped cucumber on top. Carefully remove the ring molds. Top the tabouli with a mini cucumber or two.

    4. GARNISH the plate with the feta cheese and Asian greens. Drizzle the greens with the remaining vinaigrette.
     
     
    POTATO LOVERS: Idaho Potato Commission has more potato recipes than the most avid potato lover could make in a year.

      

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    GLUTEN FREE: Three Bakers Snackers Crackers

    A gluten-free recommendation from Georgi Page-Smith, who reports on GF products for THE NIBBLE.

    One of the perks of my gluten-free lifestyle is the license I give myself to eat limitless quantities of cheese.

    Years ago I indulged my cheese cravings with perhaps the best cheese crackers ever to exist (including Cheez-Its): Gluten Free Cheddar Snackers, by The Grainless Baker.

    These crackers were unabashedly rich and cheesy, with just the right melt-in-your-mouth crumb. I purchased them in bulk from a local store until they were discontinued by the store; then I stalked them online.

    One day in 2011 the crackers disappeared completely. I searched, I Googled…and I found the Grainless Baker website. It said that the company had recently joined forces with The Gluten Free Food Group and would be replacing their old products with a new gluten-free product line under a new brand name, Three Bakers.

    I joined their Facebook community and waited to hear about the rollout. I think I even wrote a sad note “beg-couraging” them to not change their Cheddar Snackers formula. And then I cold-stored the information in a mental box with other sad things and doubled-down on my brie consumption.

    Recently, however, these crackers drifted into my mind again and I went to check their Facebook page for an update. The page was defunct and a cheerful selection of Snackers were now available from the Three Bakers website!

    I swung into action and within days, four bags of Snackers—Cheddar, Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Chocolate Chip and Honey Graham flavors—arrived at my doorstep. That was Friday. As of this Sunday’s writing there is about one-quarter of one of the bags left. They were that good.

    Four Flavors, Cheesy Or Sweet

    The Cheddar Snackers, though not as intense and decadent an experience as the originals, are incredibly good. The flavor is authentic tangy-and-toasty cheese, and they are quite light, delivering more flavor than you would expect in such a small package. The only downside on these was the texture, which was slightly more brittle than the other Snackers.

    Use them as dippers, as croutons on salad or chili (photo #1), in a crust for apple pie or pot pie, as a garnish on mac and cheese, or as a snack with apple wedges.

    The Chocolate Chip Snackers, with only 4 grams of sugar and 90 calories per 1 ounce serving, were simply scrumptious, with a gently dissolving crumb that quickly delivers the flavor to every part of your mouth. Best of all they are not too sweet, with no cloying aftertaste!

     

    Three Bakers Cheddar Snackers
    [1] Cheddar snackers add some crunch to chili (photo courtesy Three Bakers).

    Three Bakers Snackers Chocolate Chip
    [2] Time for dessert: chocolate chip snackers with ice cream (photo courtesy Gluten Free Palate.

    Three Bakers Snackers Crackers

    [3] Just plain snacking (photo courtesy Gluten Free Palate).

     
    The chocolate is of a high enough quality to carry the cookie, without additional sweeteners. The Chocolate Chocolate Chip Snackers increase the chocolate ratio, for aficionados.

    The Honey Graham Snackers deliver a very tasty, roasty flavor— again, with a gorgeous texture. These would also be fantastic on an ice cream sundae (photo #2), or crushed up to use in a crust. I was also impressed with the low sugar level, at 1 gram per 1 ounce serving, it made it that much easier to eat the whole bag.

    All Three Bakers’ Snackers are Ccrtified gluten-free by the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) and are made with non-GMO ingredients. The whole grains provide a source of fiber and the low sugar and salt mean that you can feel good about serving them to kids.

    Three Bakers also produces gluten-free breads, buns, pizzas and more. The products are available across the country; here’s a store locator.

    For more information head to ThreeBakers.com.

    —Georgi Page-Smith

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Faloodeh or Faludeh, It’s Delicious Rose Water Sorbet

    Faloodeh Sundae
    [1] Faludeh with a sour cherry topping (ba albaloo) at The Persian Fusion.

    Faloodeh With Sour Cherries
    [2] A squeeze of fresh lime juice blances the sweetness of the sobet (photo courtesy Tishineh, a site for Irani tourism).

    Persian Ice Cream
    [3] A “sundae” of faludeh combined with saffron ice cream (bastani in Arabic; photo courtesy Fun Love And Cooking). The combination of flavors is called makhloot.

    Elegant Faloodeh

    [4] An elegant update. Here’s the recipe from Tasting Table.

     

    We first encountered faludeh, Persian rose water sorbet, years ago. It was an eye-opening frozen dessert among the many jewels at the ice cream emporium of Mashti Malone, in Los Angeles—to us, the most magical ice cream emporium in America.

    We couldn’t believe how good it was—as is everything at Mashti Malone. Transliterated from the Arabic, you may also see it spelled faludeh or faloodeh, and also falude or palude.

    A sidebar: The Mashti Malone ice cream shop is owned by Mashti and Mehdi Shirvani, two brothers from the northeastern Iranian city of Mashhad. In 1980, Mashti bought an ice cream shop called Mugsy Malone on the corner of La Brea and Sunset in Hollywood. Because he had little money left over for a new sign, he simply replaced “Mugsy” with “Mashti,” and a legend was born.

    WHAT IS FALUDEH

    Faludeh is one of the earliest known frozen desserts; it has been dated to ca. 400 B.C.E. in Persia. Flavored with rose syrup, which also delivers a flowery scent, it’s a cross between shaved ice or granita, and sorbet.

    Raw angel hair or vermicelli noodles, made from rice starch or corn flour and water, are mixed in. The result: a unique frozen dessert and sensory eating experience.

    We’ve had Asian and Middle Eastern ice cream flavors before, but the rose water sorbet is a truly refreshing experience. The sorbet melts on the tongue, leaving the al dente rice starch noodles to crunch.

    Unusual as it may sound, the noodles provides are so delightful that you may try adding them to other granita and sorbet flavors.

    In its region of origin, it is a favorite dessert and party food.

  • Faludeh is served in one of two ways: ba limoo, with a splash of fresh lime juice or lime wedges; or ba albaloo, with a drizzle or sour cherry syrup. Or both!
  • We tried it with lemon juice and yuzu juice, too. Our favorite was yuzu juice and a lime wedge. The acidic citrus balances the floral, sweet flavors of the sweet rose flavors.
  • Pistachios and mint are popular garnishes.
  • Variations in texture, syrups and other ingredients exist across the Middle East, India and Pakistan.
  • In Iran, a scoop of faludeh is often served with a scoop of saffron-pistachio ice cream, a combination known as makhloot. It can be turned into a sundae with a splash of sour cherry syrup, and maybe a few sour cherries.
  •  
    Mashti Malone also makes saffron ice cream, and it is divine. Field trip, anyone?
     
     
    MAKING FALUDEH

    We tried a few different recipes in preparation for this article. The recipe below is a hybrid, taking what has worked for us to attain the best flavor with the simplest technique.

    Serve it in a bowl, on a plate, in a coupe or Martini glass.

    These days, faludeh can easily be made into granita; but we think that churning it into a smooth sorbet makes it even more magnificent.

    The rose water and rose syrup purchased for the occasion also are a delicious enhancement to vanilla ice cream.

  • Add rose water if you make your own vanilla ice cream.
  • You can also soften a pint of store-bought vanilla and vigorously whisk in the rose water, returning it to th4 freezer to harden.
  • In addition to refreshing yourself in the heat of the summer, also make faludeh on Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day. It is, in essence, edible roses.

     
    RECIPE: FALUDEH

    This recipe is granita-style, for those who don’t have an ice cream maker.

    If for some reason you don’t want to use noodles, you can substitute pistachio nuts or just enjoy the rose granita plain.

    If you’re a kitchen over-achiever, here are recipes to make your own rice starch noodles and cherry syrup.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon rose water
  • 1 ounce dried rice sticks or rice vermicelli noodles
  • Fresh lime juice or lime wedges
  • Traditional garnishes: lime wedge, sour cherries and/or sour cherry syrup (but you can substitute raspberries and/or raspberry syrup), pistachios (whole or chopped), mint leaves
  • Western-style garnishes: fresh berries, mint leaves
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the sugar and water in a small saucepan. Simmer over medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat and stir in the rose water. Set aside and let the syrup cool completely.

    2. PLACE the noodles in a heatproof bowl. Cover with boiling water and let stand until soft, about five minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Cut or tear noodles into two-inch pieces. Next time, if wish, you can try longer longer noodles. When softened, drain.

    3. PLACE the noodles and syrup in a shallow pan or metal ice cube tray (anything that works for granita) and place it in the freezer for an hour. Then remove it, stir it with a fork and return to the freezer for another hour.

    4. RAKE the granita with a fork, and return to the freezer until the desired consistency is reached, about one to three hours. To serve…

    5. RAKE with a fork (like granita), and scoop the faludeh into bowls. Garnish as desired and serve with fresh lime juice or lime wedges.

     

    HISTORY OF FALUDEH

    Faludeh is originally from Shiraz in southwestern Persia/Iran, known as the city of poets, literature, wine and flower. The dessert is is also known as Shirazi Paludeh.

    Faludeh is one of the earliest forms of frozen desserts, with references found as early as 400 B.C.E.. At that time, ice was brought down from the mountains and stored in tall refrigerated buildings called yakhchals, which were kept cool by windcatchers.

    The recipe for faludeh was brought to the Indian subcontinent during the Mughal period, the 16th to 18th centuries. Their cooks adapted it into a cold dessert beverage called falooda.

    A Brief History Of Frozen Desserts

    A brief history of ice cream and its predecessor, frozen fruit juice (sorbet), begins around 2000 B.C.E. Around 4,000 years ago, the Chinese elite enjoyed a frozen dessert. The earliest may have been a frozen syrup, mixed with overcooked rice and spices, and packed in snow to harden.

    Later, a mixture of snow and saltpeter was poured over the exteriors of containers filled with syrup. In the same way that salt raises the boiling-point of water, it lowers the freezing-point to below zero.

    Fruit ices were also developed, prepared with fruit juices, honey and aromatic spices. Through trade routes, frozen desserts were introduced to the Persians about 2,500 years ago.

    (The Persian Empire includes the countries now known as Iran, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Turkey and portions of western China and northern Iraq.)

    The Persians drank syrups cooled with snow called sharbat (“fruit ice” in Arabic, and the derivation of sherbet, sorbet and sorbetto). Alternatively, you can envision fruit syrups poured over a dish of snow

    The Macedonian king Alexander III (Alexander the Great) battled the Persians for 10 years before finally toppling the Persian Empire in 330 B.C.E.

    In Persia, he discovered fruit “ices” sweetened with honey and chilled with snow, and brought the concept back to Greece—although the early form of faludeh he knew probably had no noodles.

    Three centuries later, Roman Emperor Nero’s famous banquets always included fruit juices mixed with honey and snow. At that point, it was granita, roughly-shaved ice. As technology improved, smooth sorbet emerged in Renaissance Italy.

    And the rest is sweet, sweet history.

     

    Faluda

    [5] In India, faludeh was turned into a drink for Mughlai royalty, called falooda (photo courtesy Merwyn’s Fotomac).

    Rice Sticks

    [6] Rice sticks (rice vermicelli) can be found in the Asian products aisle or online. You can similarly find rose water and sour cherry syrup.

     
    Around the same time, during the Mughal Empire in 1526-1540, faludeh traveled to India with Muslim merchants who settled there. There, it was transformed by locals into a drink, falooda (photo #5), a “float” rose syrup, vermicelli, sweet basil seeds and pieces of jelly with milk.

    Modern falooda is often topped off with a scoop of ice cream.

    By the way, both sorbetto/sharbat and pasta arrived in Italy with the Arab invasions of Sicily, in the 8th century (the Marco Polo story is a myth—see the history of pasta).

    Italian granita was born, flavored with fresh citrus, a wide range of fruits and coffee. The Italian cooks left out the noodles.

    Here’s more on the history of ice cream and other frozen desserts.

      

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    RECIPE: Grilled Peaches Or Nectarines With Ricotta

    Grilled Peaches & Ricotta
    [1] Peaches and cream, reimagined: Grilled peaches and ricotta, for breakfast, lunch or dessert (photo and recipe courtesy Good Eggs).

    Organic Stone Fruits

    [2] Organic stone fruits—nectarines, peaches and plums—from Frog Hollow Farm. They ship!

     

    Part of our paean to summer’s stone fruits, our tip on easy fruit tarts and our recommendation of summer fruit salads with fresh cheese, is another seasonal special:

    Grilled stone fruits with ricotta cheese.

    Use any stone fruit large enough to grill, unless you have a grilling basket or pan. If you do have one, apricots and cherries are splendid in this recipe. You can use avocado as well, or mix the types of fruit.

    Peaches and nectarines are the right size to be grilled.

  • Serve two halves for breakfast or lunch, on a bed of greens.
  • Serve one half for dessert, with optional berries and/or biscotti.
  •  
     
    RECIPE: GRILLED PEACHES OR NECTARINES WITH RICOTTA

    Ingredients For 6 Or 12 Servings

    Stone fruits and ricotta are a marriage made in heaven. This recipe takes just 15 minutes from grill to plate.

    Ricotta is a mild cheese that welcomes both sweet and savory garnishes: a drizzle of honey, a grind of fresh, pepper, and/or flaky salt for a bit of crunch. You can also add raisins, nuts and/or seeds.

    Ingredients

  • 12 peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
  • Olive oil
  • Pinch of coarse sea salt or flavored salt (balsamic, chile, ginger, lavender, lemon, lime, rosemary, truffle)
  • 4 ounces ricotta (the best you can find)
  • 3 tablespoons quality honey or infused honey (chile, lavender, truffle, and other flavored honey)
  • Optional garnish: microgreens
  • Optional: peppermill
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the grill to medium-high heat. Toss the peaches with enough olive oil to coat, and season with sea salt or flavored salt.

     
    2. GRILL the peach halves cut-side-down on the grill or pan and sear them until almost blackened. If using a stovetop, cook 2 minutes, flip, and cook for another minute. If using a grill, cook for 2 minutes with the lid down, without flipping.

    3. REMOVE the peaches from the pan, let cool, and serve with a generous dollop of fresh ricotta. Top with a drizzle of honey and pinch of flaky salt. Have a peppermill on the table for those who want an added layer of flavor.

    4. GARNISH as desired, with a pinch of microgreens atop each peach.

     
      

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    RECIPE: Peach Iced Tea

    A couple of days ago, we presented peach drinks with alcohol. Today, we have a favorite recipe for all, peach iced tea.

    You can make this recipe anytime with frozen peaches; but there is nothing better than puréeing ripe, luscious summer peaches.

    Keep an eye out for “specials” at the store: peaches have achieved peak ripeness and need to be moved out. Not only are they the best-priced; they’re the best tasting for this recipe.

    The ripest peaches are the sweetest, too, cutting down on the amount of added refined sugar needed.

    Regarding sweeteners: We personally prefer iced tea and coffee without sugar or other sweetener. Others people avoid added sugar entirely.

    Depending on your crowd, you may want to make a second, unsweetened, pitcher and provide noncaloric sweeteners.

    We adapted this recipe from Jen Pullman, a registered dietitian who creates healthful recipes at Nourished Simply.com. She used green tea in the recipe; substitute black tea if you prefer.

    Prep time is 15 minutes, plus chilling. And our ongoing tip: Make green tea ice cubes so you don’t dilute the drink. You can also use peach-flavored club soda instead of plain water ice cubes.
     
     
    RECIPE: PEACH ICED TEA

    Ingredients For 12 Glasses

  • 3 quarts water
  • 5 green tea bags
  • 4 ripe peaches
  • 1/2 cup simple syrup or 1/4 cup agave*, to taste
  • Garnish: mint sprig, unpeeled peach slice
  •  
    For Cocktails

    You can set out spirits next to the pitcher of iced tea, and let people add their own:

  • Peach schnaps or orange liqueur (e.g. Grand Marnier)
  • Gin, tequila or vodka
  • Garnishes: mint springs, orange slices, peach slices, raspberries
  •  

    Peach Iced Tea
    [1] Purée peaches for a pitcher of peach iced tea (photo courtesy Nourished Simply).

    California Peaches

    [2] Organic peaches from California’s Frog Hollow Farm.

    ________________

    *You can also use honey or stevia. Because agave is twice as sweet as sugar, use half as much.
     
    Preparation

    1. BRING 3 quarts of water to a boil. Add to a pitcher with the tea bags and steep for 5 minutes (not longer, or the tea will get bitter). Let the tea cool to room temperature, then place into the refrigerator to chill.

    2. PEEL and slice the peaches, and place peach in a food processor; purée. Pour the purée through a strainer. Add the strained peaches and simple syrup into the tea pitcher and stir to combine. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

    3. SERVE over ice and garnish as desired.

      

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