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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Meat & Poultry

TIP OF THE DAY: How To Eat Less Red Meat

People who love red meat tend to like large amounts of it. A one-pound strip steak? Sure, that’s a “normal portion,” just like a pint of ice cream.

You can cut back on the ounces by enjoying your steak in a taco or on a salad. A few slices equal the three-ounce portions that nutritionists and healthcare professionals recommend, and you still get your steak delivered in a delicious way.

Steak tacos and steak salad are also ways to stretch leftover steak or other grilled meat (we especially enjoy a grilled lamb salad).

RECIPE: STEAK TACOS WITH CHIPOTLE SLAW & AVOCADO SALSA

This recipe is from QVC’s David Venable. David suggests: “A fun way to make sure you get a beer that will go with your meal is to shop by region. If you’re cooking a big Italian meal, try an Italian beer. If you’re going Mexican, stock up on your Coronas. Try this recipe with a dark Mexican beer (like Negra Modelo) to match the heartiness of the steak.”

Ingredients

For The Steak

  • 1 2-pound-to-2-1/2 pound flank steak
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2/3 cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and quartered
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 package (10-12 count) 8″ soft taco shells
  •    

    steak-tacos-target-230jpg

    Steak tacos let you enjoy steak—just less of it. Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    For The Chipotle Slaw

  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 teaspoons canned chipotle in adobo (or more, to taste), chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 6 cups shredded cabbage
  •  
    For The Avocado Salsa

  • 3 avocados, diced
  • 1/3 cup red onion, minced
  • Juice of 4 limes
  • 1/2 of a large jalapeño, seeded and minced
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1/3 fresh cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 plum tomato, seeded and diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  •  

    steak_salad_McC-230

    Steak salad (recipe below) provides the opportunity to enjoy steak and salad, while cutting back on the steak. Photo courtesy McCormick.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREPARE the marinade. Combine the garlic, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, jalapeño and chili powder in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely minced.

    2. PLACE the flank steak in a large zip-top plastic bag, pour in the marinade and squeeze out any excess air before sealing. Allow the steak to marinate in the refrigerator for at least two hours; do not exceed 8 hours.

    3. PREPARE the slaw. Combine the sour cream, milk, chipotle and vinegar in a large bowl and whisk until combined. Add the cabbage and stir until it’s completely coated with dressing.

    4. PREPARE the salsa. Combine all the ingredients in a medium-size bowl; toss until combined. If kept refrigerated, this can be made up to 2 hours prior to serving.

    5. GRILL the steak: Preheat a barbecue or indoor grill and set the temperature to medium high. Grill the steak for 8 minutes on each side, or to your desired degree of doneness. Let it rest for 10 minutes before cutting, diagonally across the grain, into thin slices.

    6. ASSEMBLE the tacos. Place 4-5 slices of steak in a taco shell, top with approximately a quarter cup of salsa and the same amount of slaw.

     

    RECIPE: STEAK SALAD

    Hearty greens, including spinach, peppery arugula and bitter watercress, are good counterpoints to the steak. In the summer, a garnish of berries adds seasonal festiveness.

    Ingredients

  • Mixed greens (try mixed greens, including arugula and baby spinach)
  • Kalamata olives (or olive of choice)
  • Raw mushrooms, sliced
  • Red onion, sliced
  • Halved cherry tomatoes or beefsteak tomato wedges
  • Grilled steak, lamb or other meat
  • Optional: blue cheese or goat cheese
  • Optional: blueberries or other berries
  • Vinaigrette (soy sauce mixed with rice wine vinegar makes a delicious, low-calorie dressing)
  •  
    Also check out this Thai Beef Salad.

    Find more of David Venable’s recipes at QVC.com.

     
    Preparation

    1. TOSS salad greens with tomatoes, mushrooms, onion, olives and dressing.

    2. LAYER sliced steak atop the salad. Garnish with crumbled or sliced cheese and berries.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Pork Belly Lettuce Wraps

    kuromitsu-glazed-pork-belly-sushisamba-230

    Pork belly lettuce wraps: a real treat! Photo
    courtesy Sushi Samba.

     

    In honor of the World Cup Games in Brazil, Brazilian-Japanese fusion restaurant Sushisamba will be serving a signature dish from Chef Pedro Duarte: Kuromitsu Pork Belly Lettuce Wraps.

    Kuromitsu is a Japanese sugar syrup, similar to but milder than molasses. We could eat an entire tray of these sweetly glazed pork belly treats. Consider them as a first course for Father’s Day dinner…or make all four and keep them for yourself.

    RECIPE: KUROMITSU GLAZED PORK BELLY LETTUCE WRAPS

    Ingredients

    For The Pork Belly Confit (Yields 4 Five-Ounce Portions)

  • 1.25 pounds pork belly
  • 1 ounce salt
  • 1 ounce sugar
  • 1 liter canola oil
  • 1 bouquet garni (thyme, garlic, bay leaf, black pepper)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. RUB the pork belly with the sugar/salt mixture and allow to marinate for 6 hours.

    2. RINSE, pat dry and submerge in a hotel pan (also called a steam table pan—a deep roasting pan will do) with the canola oil and bouquet garnish. Cover with tin foil and cook in the oven for 4 hours at 325°F.

    3. REMOVE from the oil when the pork belly is soft and allow to cool in the refrigerator with some weight on top. You can reuse the oil for another cooking process.
     
    FOR THE LETTUCE WRAPS

    Ingredients Per Serving

  • 4.5 ounces pork belly confit
  • 1 ounce kuromitsu glaze (see below)
  • Lemon zest, to taste
  • 1 ounce hearts of palm (palmito), julienned
  • 1 ounce frisée
  • 1 bibb lettuce leaf
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREPARE the pork belly a day in advance in advance (6 hours marinating plus 4 hours cooking). To assemble:

    2. MIX lemon zest, palmito and frisée to create garnish. To plate, place 1 piece of pork belly on 1 piece of bibb lettuce. Brush pork belly with kuromitsu glaze. Top with the fresh palmito-frisée salad. It’s delicious!
     
    WHAT IS KUROMITSU

    Kuromitsu is a Japanese sugar syrup, typically made from unrefined Okinawan kurozato (black sugar). The term means “black honey”; it is similar to molasses, but thinner and milder.

    It is used to add sweetness to sweet Japanese dishes. It is one of the ingredients used in making wagashi, and it serves well with kuzumochi, fruits, ice cream and cakes. matcha soy milk jello. Drizzle on your choice of Japanese sweets, such as anmitsu, shiratama dango, kudzu mochi, warabi mochi, or kinako on toast.

     

    kuromitsu-sugar-syrupa-alibaba-230

    You can purchase kuromitsu at Asian markets or online. Photo courtesy AliBaba.com.

     

    You can find premade kuromitsu in Asian products stores, but here’s a recipe courtesy of Taste Of Zen.

    RECIPE: HOMEMADE KUROMITSU

    Ingredients For 1 Cup

  • 2/3 cup dark muscovado or other unrefined brown cane sugar (the different types of brown sugar)
  • 2 tablespoons light muscovado sugar
  • 1/2 cup white table sugar
  • 1/2 cup hot or boiling* water
  •  
    *It is better to stir boiled water, not cool water, as it won’t spatter and burn you.
     
    Preparation

    1. PLACE sugars and water in a nonstick pot and heat over medium heat. Once sugars starts to melt, shake the pot extensively while gently stirring with a wooden spoon. Do not over-stir or lumps can form. While stirring, add hot water a little at a time. The syrup may bubble and spurt; wear protective clothing to avoid burns. When the sugar is completely melted…

    2. REDUCE the heat and simmer over low heat for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. The syrup will thicken and a caramel-like aroma will emanate. If the syrup starts to lump or stick to the bottom of the pot, lower the heat.

    3. REMOVE from heat and let cool. Store any extra syrup in an airtight glass jar at room temperature or in the fridge. It should keep for 2 to 3 months. Bring refrigerated syrup to room temperature before using (you can heat it for 10 seconds in the microwave).

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: More Modern Surf & Turf

    poached-egg-salmon-cafeSFA-230

    Surf and turf can combine any foods from
    each realm. Above, grilled salmon and a
    poached egg from Cafe SFA in New York City.

     

    We love surf and turf in all forms, and recently added this tasty dish from Cafe SFA to our list of unusual surf and turf combinations (below).

    There’s a chicken egg, from the turf, and a fish filet from the surf.

    Chef Alex Reyes topped grilled asparagus with a salmon fillet and a soft poached egg, garnished with asparagus puree, sesame hollandaise sauce, nori powder and green tea salt.

    Create your own version of surf and turf, a 50-year-old concept that serves proteins from the land and sea on the same plate.

    Although it started with a lobster and steak, any items from the realms of the earth and the sea can be combined into surf and turf. Clever Japanese chefs have even created surf and turf sushi, such as a lobster maki topped with torched tenderloin from Ten Prime Steak And Sushi in Providence, Rhode Island.

     

    SURF & TURF HISTORY

    While meat and seafood have been served at the same meal since since the dawn of plenty, and Diamond Jim Brady (1856-1917) famously consumed platters heaped with steaks and lobsters, the pairing known as surf and turf originated in 1960s America.

    Some sources noted in FoodTimeline.org claim that the concept originated on the East Coast, based on a 1966 print article in the Miami News. The columnist says that the restaurant La Hasta has created the best thing since lox and bagels—surf and turf; and that on some weekends the management had to take the dish off the menu, since demand exceeded supply.

    Others say the West Coast has the honors: Food writers Jane and Michael Stern claim, without printed proof, that the same dish by the same name was served at the Sky City restaurant in the Seattle Space Needle, at the 1962 World’s Fair. That may be, but documentation is required. If anybody remembers it from the World’s Fair, please raise your hand. There’s a bonus if you have the menu.

    The earliest earliest print reference found by FoodTimeline.org, our favorite reference source on the history of all things food, was published in the Eureka [California] Humboldt Standard of August 14, 1964: “An entrée in restaurants in Portland [Oregon] is called surf and turf—a combination of lobster and steak.”

    Sorry, East Coasters: 1964 beats 1966.

    And regardless, surf and turf became the darling of American steakhouse menus, combining the two most expensive items on the menu: lobster (surf) and steak or filet mignon (turf). It has its own food holiday, February 29th, National Surf & Turf Day.

     

     
    Regardless of origin, consider serving a modern surf and turf variation for Father’s Day or other special occasion.

    Some versions don’t even require a special occasion—last night we had steak and tuna skewers.

    Each week we “invent” a different combination. Recent pairings have included:
     
    THE NEW SURF AND TURF COMBINATIONS

  • Bacon-topped halibut filet
  • Bass wrapped in pancetta, with caviar-topped oysters
  • Burger garnished with a fried shrimp (or make it edgy with a fish stick and tartar sauce)
  • Beef and tuna carpaccio (raw)
  • Eggs Benedict with Canadian bacon and lobster or crab
  • Grilled lamb chop or pork chop and scallops
  • Grilled skirt steak and shrimp or crab cakes
  • Filet mignon with lump crab meat or crab legs
  • Lamb chops with bacon-wrapped scallops
  •  

    lobster-filetmignon-whitewine-ruthschris-230

    Classic Surf & Turf. Photo courtesy Ruth’s Chris Steak House.

  • Lobster ravioli with veal sauce, veal ravioli with bay scallops, oxtail ravioli with lobster claws
  • Mixed greens salad with sliced steak (lamb, pork, chicken, etc.) and grilled scallops or shrimp
  • Salmon burgers and bacon
  • Seared scallop with crispy prosciutto
  • Shrimp skewers with beef skewers
  • Steak and rare grilled salmon, tuna or other favorite fish
  • Steak and shrimp: grilled steak with fried shrimp or with shrimp cocktail
  • Steak and fried oysters (or, garnish the steak with a raw oyster)
  •  
    Try your own hand at the new surf and turf and let us know your favorites.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Mushroom Stuffed Bacon Cheeseburgers

    mushroom-stuffed-cheeseburger-tasteofhome-230

    A bacon cheeseburger, stuffed with
    mushrooms. Photo courtesy Taste Of Home.

     

    Put a twist on the traditional cheeseburger and add in some mushrooms. They give the cheeseburger even more flavor. Plus, it’s healthier, given that some of the cholesterol and calories are replaced by the mushrooms (not that anyone eating a bacon cheeseburger is counting calories and cholesterol).

    The recipe is from Joyce Guth of Mohnton, Pennsylvania, sent to us by Taste Of Home magazine. “No need to call my family twice when these burgers are on the menu.” says Joyce. “Get ahead of the game and stuff them ahead of time, then grill later.”

    RECIPE: MUSHROOM-STUFFED CHEESEBURGERS

    Ingredients For 8 Burgers

  • 2 bacon strips, finely chopped
  • 2 cups chopped fresh mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped green pepper
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons steak sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
  • 4 slices provolone cheese, halved
  • 8 kaiser rolls or other roll of choice, split
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COOK bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp, stirring occasionally. Remove with a slotted spoon; drain on paper towels.

    2. ADD mushrooms, onion and peppers into skillet with bacon drippings, cooking until tender. Stir as needed. Using slotted spoon, remove to a small bowl; cool completely. Stir in bacon.

    3. COMBINE beef, steak sauce and seasoned salt in a large bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Shape into 16 thin patties. Top eight of the patties with cheese, folding over cheese to fit within 3/4 inch of edge. Spread with mushroom mixture. Top with remaining patties, pressing edges to enclose filling.

    4. GRILL burgers, uncovered, over medium-high heat or broil 4 inches from heat for 5-6 minutes on each side or until a thermometer inserted in meat portion reads 160°F. Serve on rolls.

    Find many more recipes at TasteOfHome.com.

     

    ButtonMushrooms-PaulCowan-230crop

    Buy the least expensive fresh mushrooms for this recipe. Once they’ve been chopped and blended, the original beauty factor doesn’t matter and you won’t notice a taste difference. Photo by Paul Cowan | BSP.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Bacon Cheese Dogs

    hot-dogs-bacon-kraft-230

    Bacon cheese dogs, cousins to the bacon
    cheeseburger. Photo courtesy Kraft.

     

    Like the hamburger, the hot dog is a sandwich: meat “sandwiched” in bread. It was invented in the U.S. in 1871, when an enterprising Coney Island sausage vendor thought to serve a Frankfurt-style sausage in a roll. The rest is history.

    Over time, fans have created gourmet hot dog recipes, but nowhere to the extent of burger variations.

    Even looking at the basics: How many bacon cheeseburger lovers have ever tried a bacon cheese dog? So today’s tip is: serve up bacon cheese dogs along with bacon cheeseburgers in your Memorial Day grillfest.

    Start with this from Kraft, which used Oscar Mayer hot dogs, Kraft Singles and Claussen sweet pickle relish.

    RECIPE: BACON CHEESE DOGS

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 6 hot dogs
  • 6 hot dog buns
  • 6 cheese slices, cut diagonally in half
  • 6 slices bacon, cooked
  • 1/4 cup sweet pickle relish
  • Preparation

    1. HEAT grill to medium-high heat.

    2. GRILL franks 7 to 9 minutes or until heated through, turning occasionally.

    3. PLACE in buns; top with remaining ingredients.

     
    Variations

  • Use brioche or whole wheat hot dog buns (toasted, of course).
  • Try different cheeses. In this recipe, we prefer mozzarella, provolone or Swiss instead of American or Cheddar cheese.
  • Serve with chopped onions.
  • Add optional heat with fresh jalapeño slices.
  •  
    Kraft calls this recipe “Steamwhistle Hot Dogs”; but we’re not sure why. Steam whistles are a familiar sound of yore, the “woo woo” of the old locomotive. Steam whistles were also used in factories and elsewhere to signal the start or end of a shift.
     
    TIP: The opposite of the bacon cheese dog—all three main ingredients chock full of saturated fat—is the garden hot dog. Wrap the dog in a lettuce leaf before placing it in the bun. Tuck sliced radishes and cucumbers on either side of the dog, and top with diced tomatoes or sliced grape tomatoes.
     
    MORE ABOUT HOT DOGS

  • The history of hot dogs.
  • Conventional versus organic hot dogs.
  • Hot dog trivia quiz.
  • How to set up a hot dog bar.
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Leftover Ham Recipes

    white-bean-ham-soup-qvc-230

    Use leftover ham in a delicious bean soup.
    Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    You can just enjoy so many ham sandwiches and ham scrambles with the leftover Easter ham. Here are two recipes from QVC’s David Venable, that take a different approach.

    RECIPE: WHITE BEAN SOUP WITH HAM

    This recipe uses the ham bone, hock, or shanks.

    David comments, “Though it may officially be spring, there are still plenty of days that call for a recipe that takes out the chill. This broth-based soup is a great way to use leftover ham: It’s light enough for spring, but hearty enough to be filling.”

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound dry Great Northern beans*
  • 8 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 meaty ham hock or 2-3 lbs of ham shanks
  • 1 cup carrots, chopped
  • 1/2 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon mustard powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 cups ham, chopped
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • Garnish: fresh parsley
  •  
    *A mild, white, oval bean, similar to the white kidney bean.

    Preparation

    1. RINSE the beans, sorting out any that are broken or discolored.

    2. BRING a large pot of water to a boil. Add the salt and the beans and remove the pot from the heat. Let the beans sit in the hot water for at least 60 minutes.

    3. RETURN the pot to high heat and place the ham bone, carrots, celery, onion, garlic, mustard and bay leaves in the pot. Stir well, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for 60 more minutes.

    4. REMOVE the ham bone and discard. Stir in the chopped ham and simmer for 30 more minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with fresh parsley (if desired).

     

    RECIPE: SMOKED HAM & CHEDDAR HASH

    David advises, “This hash recipe works just as well with ham that hasn’t been smoked. Try serving it as a breakfast item by throwing some fried eggs on top. Like a little spice in your hash? Add some hot sauce to the pan!”

    Ingredients

  • 5 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon paprika (preferably smoked)
  • 6 cups smoked ham, diced
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 10-ounce can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 bunch scallions, sliced
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 3/4 cup coarse breadcrumbs (such as panko)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  •  

    smoked-ham-cheddar-hash-qvc-230

    Yummy smoked ham and Cheddar hash. Photo courtesy QVC.

     
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F. In a large sauce pot, boil the potatoes until fork tender. Drain the water and set aside.

    2. ADD the butter to a 10″ or larger, deep nonstick skillet and melt over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 3-4 minutes, or until slightly colored.

    3. STIR in the paprika and ham. Add the broth, cream of mushroom soup and scallions. Stir well to combine and bring to a simmer.

    4. ADD the parboiled potatoes and stir carefully to evenly incorporate all ingredients. Season the hash, to taste, with salt and pepper.

    5. COMBINE the Cheddar cheese, breadcrumbs and parsley in a small bowl and sprinkle over the top of the hash. Bake for 15-18 minutes, or until evenly browned.

      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Delicious, Nutritious, Better-For-You Bison

    “Meet the better meat,” invites The Bison Council, and we agree.

    Bison is a red meat lover’s dream come true. It provides all the flavor of beef (even more, we think!) without the negatives. You can enjoy succulent steaks without high cholesterol and juicy burgers without all the fat. Bison is lower in fat, cholesterol and calories than even chicken and turkey, and is a great source of iron.

    Here’s how bison compares nutritionally with other proteins.

    The one catch impacts those who like their meat cooked medium-well. Because it has very low fat content (less fat than turkey!), bison must be eaten rare to medium rare (just the way we like our meat!). Tender and juicy, good bison gets raves from every food lover we know.

    If you’re concerned because you don’t like rare beef, we still urge you to try rare bison—in fact, how about bison filet mignon or tenderloin roast for Mother’s Day or Father’s Day?

    Here’s how to cook bison.

     

    tenderloin-roast-green-beans-230

    A bison tenderloin roast. Photo courtesy AllenBrothers.com.

     

    OH GIVE ME A HOME WHERE THE BISON ROAM

    Let us interject a quick lesson: Bison and buffalo are not the same animal. They are cousins in the same family and sub-family, but of different genuses—like the dog and the wolf. Here’s how the taxonomy compares among bison, buffalo and cattle, complete with photos.

    Bison is a native American animal; buffalo are the water buffaloes of Africa and Asia. The first Europeans to see bison presumed the huge, shaggy beasts to be another type of buffalo, and the misnomer has lasted for centuries, aided and abetted by the U.S. government’s minting of the “buffalo” nickel. Here’s the difference between bison and buffalo.

    And it doesn’t help that the unofficial anthem of the American West (and the official state song of Kansas) was/is “Home On The Range.” The poem, written in the early 1870s in Kansas, was set to music, and the rest is tuneful—if inaccurate—history.
     
    THE BISON REVIVAL

    Bison once ranged over most of the North American continent: from the Rockies all the way to the East Coast (hence the city of Buffalo, New York), from Mexico north to the Northwest Territories of Canada.

    Most American students learn the tragedy of the bison: how the great natural herds were slaughtered to the brink of extinction in the 1870s and 1880s by commercial hunters and sports hunters. The near-extinction also caused the demise of many Native American tribes, who relied on the bison for food, clothing, coverings for their lodges, sinew for bow strings, tools and fuel.

    By 1889, the few remaining animals were saved by the combined efforts of William Hornaday, Director of the New York Zoological Park (now the Bronx Zoo) and a small group of private ranchers. In 1905, the American Bison Society was formed to save the bison and provide protect rangeland for the animals. In 1907, some offspring of the bison saved by Hornaday became the nucleus of the present-day herd of 600 in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.

    Fast forward to the late 20th century: In the 1970s an 1980s, as the high cholesterol content of beef was raised as a health issue, the search for better meat options led to the bison.

    Today, the estimated 75 million North American bison of the mid-1800s are greatly reduced but thriving, with an estimated 500,000 animals. They live on approximately 4,000 privately owned commercial ranches; about 15,000 wild bison are free-ranging on protected lands. [Source: Wikipedia]

    The bison is the largest land mammal to roam North America since the end of the Ice Age. It is a descendant of ancient animals that crossed the Bering Strait land bridge some 300,000 years ago. Americans can once again see magnificent herds of this noble heritage beast.

     

    bison-burger-gorgonzola-230r

    A bison burger, with Gorgonzola blended into
    the patty. Photo courtesy Wisconsin Milk
    Marketing Board.

     

    BISON CUTS

    Bison is available in cuts similar to those of beef. You’ll find:

  • Cooked & raw sausages: franks, brats and sausages in different styles
  • Deli meats: bison bacon, bologna, pepperoni, salami
  • Ground: ground meat and burger and slider patties
  • Ribs: back rib racks and short ribs
  • Roasts: brisket, chuck, pot roast, prime rib, rump, sirloin butt, tenderloin (Chateaubriand), tri-tip
  • Steaks: filet mignon, flank, flatiron, hanging tender, ribeye, sirloin, strip
  • Plus: center cut shank (osso buco), jerky, liver, snack sticks, stew meat
  •  

    You can can replace bison in any recipe, from chili and meat balls to kabobs and stir frys. Check out the wealth of beautiful bison recipes from The Bison Council.

    Always look for bison that is 100% USDA certified. Many cuts are also American Heart Association certified—it’s that good for you.

     

    THE BISON COUNCIL

    Just as some beef is tough and some is celestial, so it goes for bison. To have that heavenly bison experience, you need to buy from a good butcher, who buys from a top rancher.

    The Bison Council is dedicated to the promotion, preservation, and stewardship of the North American Bison. Members pledge to maintain the highest standards and ideals of animal care and husbandry, sustainability, food safety, purity of ingredients and quality of finished consumer products.

    Charter members include:

  • Carmen Creek Gourmet Bison
  • Chinook Bison Ranch
  • Double T Bison Ranch
  • High Plains Bison
  • Jackson Fork Ranch
  • Wild Rose Meats
  •  

    The website is a wealth of information about bison. Take a look!

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Popcorn Meat Loaf, A Healthier Recipe

    Here’s how to add fiber to a meatloaf and have fun with it. The recipe is courtesy Popcorn.org, the website of The Popcorn Board.

    Don’t expect pieces of popcorn popping up in the slices of meatloaf. The popcorn is ground in the food processor and used instead of breadcrumbs, which (unless they’re whole wheat breadcrumbs) contribute zero fiber.

    See if anyone can guess what the “secret ingredient” is.

    Preparation time is 10 minutes; baking time is 1 hour.

    RECIPE: POPCORN MEATLOAF

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 5 cups popped popcorn
  • 1-1/4 pounds extra lean ground beef or turkey
  • 1/4 cup chopped celery
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup 2% milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup chili sauce, pasta sauce or ketchup
  •  

    meat-loaf-popcorn.org-230

    Popcorn in a meat loaf adds fiber and fun. Photo courtesy The Popcorn Board.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F. Spray an 8 x 4-inch loaf pan with cooking spray; set aside.

    2. PROCESS popcorn in a blender or food processor until finely ground; pour into a large bowl. Add ground beef, celery, onion, milk, egg, parsley, garlic, salt and pepper. Mix until thoroughly blended.

    3. PRESS meat mixture into pan; spread chili sauce over top.

    4. BAKE for 1 hour, or until cooked through. Allow to cool 15 minutes before slicing.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Prosciutto Wrapped Bell Peppers

    Print

    A tasty first course: a roasted bell pepper wrapped in prosciutto. Photo courtesy Westside Market | NYC.

     

    This recipe fits right in with a pink food party, Valentine’s Day, Easter or Mother’s Day.

    RECIPE: PROSCIUTTO WRAPPED BELL PEPPERS

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4 red peppers, roasted and peeled*
  • 8 ounces fresh mozzarella, cut into 4 pieces
  • 4 ounces sliced prosciutto
  • 4 basil leaves
  • 4 black olives
  • 4 toothpicks
  •  

    *This is the most laborious part of the recipe. Here’s how to roast peppers. As a substitution, you can purchase whole roasted red peppers in jars (pimento). They have a softer texture and different flavor, but it’s a good flavor.
     
    Preparation

    1. WHISK together olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. Add peppers and marinate for 1 hour.

    2. FILL each pepper with a piece of mozzarella. Wrap a slice of prosciutto around each pepper.

    3. TOP each with a basil leaf and olive, held together with a toothpick.
     
    It’s that easy!

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Spring Lamb

    “Spring lamb” is so called because before modern times, the sheep gave birth in the spring. If you wanted lamb in other seasons, it would be frozen.

    Today, animal breeders know how to enable birth year-round, so lovers of lamb need never be without it.

    We were inspired by this beautiful “edible art” from executive chef Shaun Hergatt of Juni restaurant in New York City. Use the ingredients of spring to create your own fantasy You don’t need the tecnique to wrap loin of lamb; a lamb shop or slice of leg of lamb is just fine.

    Ever wonder why leg of lamb with green peas is such a popular pairing? It’s because both are spring foods. In the days when everyone had to eat “locavore,” people could only eat what was in season.

    So today’s tip is: Celebrate this first day of spring by planning a lamb dinner. Beyond spring peas, we have a list of spring vegetables below.

    How about some fava beans with a nice Chianti?

     

    blu-lamb-chops-230

    A lamb lover’s delight. Who needs steak? Photo courtesy Blu Restaurant | NYC.

     

     

    Thinking outside the box: wrapped loin of
    lamb, spring peas and pea purée by Chef
    Shaun Hergatt of Resto | NYC.

     

    SPRING VEGETABLES

    Because of imports from the Southern Hemisphere, where the seasons are reversed, Americans have year-round access to traditional spring foods like artichokes, Belgian endive, spinach, radicchio, radishes and watercress.

    But spring brings specialties with short seasons, so eat them while you can!

  • Asparagus (look for purple asparagus)
  • Butter lettuce
  • Fava beans
  • Fennel
  • Fiddlehead ferns
  • Morel mushrooms
  • Mustard greens
  • Ramps
  • Rhubarb
  • Spring (English) peas, snow peas, pea pods
  • Sorrel
  • Vidalia onions
  •  

    One of the most celestial restaurant dishes we recall, from several springs ago, was a simple sauté of asparagus, fiddleheads, morels and ramps, seasoned with a little garlic.

    It’s a lesson on how the season’s bounty needs little preparation to impress.

      

    Comments

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