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Archive for Jam/Peanut Butter

GIFT OF THE DAY: Emily G’s Jams

Last year we received a gift of Emily G’s Jam Of Love, an exquisite artisan bramd. When the last jar was scraped clean, we were despondent.

We taste a lot of quality jams, jellies, marmalades and preserves that are perfectly nice. But on rare occasions, we come across a knockout. That’s how we feel about Emily G’s Jam Of Love, a lovely line of artisan jams and other condiments.

(If you don’t know the difference between chutney, jam, jelly, marmalade and preserves, we’ve got that covered in our Jam Glossary.)

Emily Myer, a culinary school graduate, has great recipes and top-notch jam-making skills. Superb fruit flavor, exquisite texture, creative recipes: These are jams (and marmalades) to treasure. Made by hand in small batches with the finest ingredients, these jams deliver a depth of flavor and texture that can’t be bested.

They’re a treat for the table, and a wonderful gift anytime. We love it for stocking stuffers and teacher gifts; and the heart on the label makes it a contender for Valentine’s Day, too.

Not to mention, place settings for Thanksgiving: a bounty for guests to take home.
 
EMILY G’S FABULOUS FLAVORS

Ten best-sellers are available year-round, with seasonal additions. Current selections on the website include:

  • Apple Pie
  • Blackberry Vanilla
  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Fig Pomegranate
  • Jalapeno Raspberry
  • Peach Marmalade
  • Pear Honey
  • Roasted Red Pepper
  • Strawberry Chipotle
  • Strawberry Pineapple
  • Tipsy Onion and Garlic
  • Tomato Jam
  • Triple Berry
  •  
    All are superb, but be sure to get Cabernet Sauvigon and Tipsy Onion and Garlic. They’ll really expand your horizons.

    A 10-ounce jar is $8.50, there are different gift boxes with three jars (up to $29.99).

    The jams are sold on EmilyGs.com, and there’s a store locator as well.

    We [heart] you, Emily.
     
    20 FAVORITE WAYS TO USE JAM

    Bread is a given, as is a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In truth, we eat these jams right from the jar, a heaping tablespoon for dessert; or on a buttery croissant or fresh or toasted baguette slices.

    But here are 20 different ways to use [any] jam:
     
    Jam With Breakfast

  • Breakfast Cheese. Serve as a condiment with cottage cheese, ricotta or any breakfast cheese.
  • Hot Cereal. Use a dab instead of sugar.
  • Pancake/Waffle Topping. Substitute jam for syrup.
  • Yogurt. Add jam to plain yogurt to customize your perfect fruit yogurt.
  •  
    Jam With Lunch

  • Grilled Cheese. Sharp cheeses like blue cheese and cheddar are perfect pairings for jam. Grill the jam with the cheese or serve it on the side as a condiment. For more flavor, use rye or a textured whole grain bread.
  • Salad Dressing. Warm a spoonful of jam and whisk it into salad dressings.
  • Sandwich Spread. Spread jam on the bread with a sandwich of cheese, ham, lamb, poultry or roast pork. To cut the sweetness, you can mix the jam with plain yogurt.
  •  
    Jam With Appetizers & Snacks

  • Canapés. Top a cracker or slice of baguette with cheese, ham, turkey or other favorite and a bit of jam.
  • Cheese Condiment. Wonderful with a cheese plate (more cheese condiments) or atop a baked Brie. The popular appetizer of jam poured over a brick of cream cheese or a log of goat cheese, and served with crackers, is vastly improved with fine jam.
  • Dipping Sauce. Mix jam in a small bowl with sriracha, a hot chile and vinegar-sauce; or with plain hot sauce plus vinegar. You can also make a dip with fresh grated ginger and soy sauce.
  • Pepper Jelly. Mix in some red pepper flakes or dried or fresh minced chipotle, jalapeño or other chile (the different chile types).
  • Pretzel or Breadstick Dip. Mix with Dijon or other mustard. For a sweet-and-hot profile, add some hot sauce.
     
    Jam With Dinner
  • Condiment/Garnish. Serve with fish/seafood, chicken, lamb, pork.
  • Meat Glaze. Particularly delicious on poultry and pork. Mix with fresh herbs and garlic.
  • Sauce. Use jam with wine or vermouth to deglaze the pan. Add some to the pan while you’re cooking chicken or pork chops and let the flavor coat the meat.
  •  
    Jam With Dessert

  • Cheesecake. Fine jam makes a wonderful topping or a condiment on the side. Cookies. Thumbprints and rolled cookies with a jam swirl are classics.
  • Crêpe Filling. Delicious plain or with fresh goat cheese or mascarpone.
  • Dessert Sauce. Mix with plain or vanilla yogurt or sour cream.
  • Ice Cream & Sorbet Topping. Crown a scoop of sorbet with a dab of fine jam. Lightly warm the jam so it flows like a sauce over ice cream.
  • Layer Cake Filling. A coat of jam between the layers is a classic: Think Sacher Torte! Apricot or raspberry jam is delicious with chocolate cake; any flavor works with lemon cake.
  • Tarts & Tartlets. Fill tart or tartlet shells with jam. Top with a dab of crème fraîche, Greek yogurt, mascarpone or sour cream.
  •  
    Enjoy your jam!

     

    Emily G Jams

    Peach Marmalade

    Pate With Berry Jam

    Jam & Ricotta

    Swordfish With Fig Jam

    Brownie Bites

    [1] A treasure in each jar (photo courtesy Emily G’s Jams). [2] A bread and cracker spread with 20 more uses (the list is below; photo Al 62 | IST). [3] Garnish paté and canapes (photo Vicki F | IST). [4] For breakfast, add to cottage cheese, ricotta or yogurt (photo © Kirsten Photo). [5] Swordfish with fig jam (photo courtesy Fresh Originals). [6] Brownie bites with berry jam (photo Emily G’s).

     

      

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    PRODUCT: Justin’s Peanut Butter & Banana Chips Snack Packs

    How do you enjoy bananas as a better-for-you snack?

    From the peel? With PB? On your cereal? With yogurt? As snack chips? On PB sandwich?

    Justin’s has created a new way: a better-for-you grab-and-go snack that combines Justin’s artisan peanut butter and organic bananas chips.

  • Justin’s Original Peanut Butter + Banana Chips Snack Packs
  • Justin’s Honey Peanut Butter + Banana Chips Snack Packs
  •  
    They’re the world’s first all-in-one, non-perishable fruit and nut butter pairing.

    Toss them in briefcases, cars, desk drawers, handbags, gym bags, lockers, lunch bags, pockets and tote bags.

    The new Snack Packs are:

  • All natural.
  • Convenient/shelf stable.
  • Dippable (no plate or utensils required).
  • Energy Giving.
  • Filling.
  • Fiber (3g).
  • Filling.
  • Gluten Free.
  • Kosher (OU).
  • Made to Matter* (handpicked by Target).
  • Non-GMO.
  • Portable.
  • Potassium-rich (200mg).
  • Protein (5-6g).
  •  
    Calories

  • The Original Peanut Butter is 200 calories, 140 from fat.
  • The Honey Peanut Butter is 210 calories, 150 from fat.
  •  
    See the section below on peanut butter healthfuliness†.

     
    The snacks with banana chips join Justin’s nut butter and pretzel snacks:

  • Classic Almond Butter + Pretzels Snack Packs
  • Chocolate Hazelnut Butter + Pretzels Snack Packs
  • Honey Almond Butter + Pretzels Snack Packs
  • Maple Almond Butter + Pretzels Snack Packs
  •  
    LOOK FOR THEM AT TARGET STORES NATIONWIDE.

     

    Justin's Peanut Butter With Bananas

    Justin's Honey Peanut Butter Jar

    [1] Toss a Snack Pack anywhere. [2] A jar of Justin’s Peanut Butter, which is scooped into the Snack Packs. Photos courtesy Justin’s.

    ________________
    *Target’s Made To Matter program brings together 20 purpose-driven brands to make natural, organic and sustainable products more accessible to consumers. The products meet at least one of these five criteria: reduced waste and packaging, reduced sugar, dietary and allergen restrictions, clean label products and closed loop systems.

    †Editor’s Note: People are healthy; products are healthful.
    _______________
     
    WHY IS PEANUT BUTTER HEALTHY?

    Doesn’t it have saturated fat?

    Here’s an abridged response from Walter C. Willett, M.D., Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health

    The presence of saturated fat doesn’t automatically kick a food into the “unhealthy” camp. Olive oil, wheat germ, and even tofu [are healthy foods that] have some saturated fat. It’s the whole package of nutrients, not just one or two, that determines how good a particular food is for health.

    Let’s take a look at the peanut butter [fat] package. One serving (about 2 tablespoons) has 3.3 grams of saturated fat and 12.3 grams of unsaturated fat, or about 80% unsaturated fat. That puts it up there with olive oil in terms of the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fat.

    (Justin’s Snack Packs have a bit less than 2 tablespoons of PB. Here’s more on the different types of fats and how good they are for you.)

    Peanut butter also gives you some fiber, some vitamins and minerals (including 200 milligrams of potassium), and other nutrients. Salted peanut butter still has about twice as much potassium as sodium. That profile compares quite favorably with bologna, roast beef, and many other sandwich fixings [unsalted PB is even better].

    Over the years, numerous studies have shown that people who regularly include nuts or peanut butter in their diets are less likely to develop heart disease or type 2 diabetes than those who rarely eat nuts.

    Saturated fat isn’t the deadly toxin it is sometimes made out to be. The body’s response to saturated fat in food is to increase the amounts of both harmful LDL and protective HDL in circulation. In moderation, some saturated fat is okay. Eating a lot of it, though, promotes artery-clogging atherosclerosis, the process that underlies most cardiovascular disease. In contrast, unsaturated fats, which make up the majority of the fat content in peanut butter, help reduce LDL cholesterol and lower the risk of heart disease.

    In other words, as with most things, enjoy it in moderation.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Cheese Spreads, Cheese Condiments

    Fig Spread With Cheese

    Bonne Maman Fig Spread

    Top: Crostini with Brie, Serrano ham and Fig Spread (photo courtesy Favor The Moments). Bottom: Enjoy trying the different spreads with different cheeses (photo courtesy Bonne Maman).

     

    What’s a cheese condiment? What’s a cheese spread? you may ask. Here’s the food nerd explanation:

  • Cheese spread is one of the sweet cheese condiments.
  • A condiment is an auxiliary food product that adds flavor to another food.
  • “Condiment” is first found in print in French around 1420, and derives from the Latin condimentum, spice.
  • Mankind has been enjoying condiments for much longer, even before the dukkah of ancient Egypt the ancient Romans’ beloved fish sauce, garum.
  •  
    Chutney, ketchup, mustard and pickle relish are examples of condiments that enhance burgers and franks. Although you may not think of them as such, fudge sauce, marshmallow cream and whipped cream are ice cream condiments.

    Given America’s growing familiarity with fine cheeses, here’s an…

    INTRODUCTION TO CHEESE CONDIMENTS

    What is the difference between a mostarda and a mustard? Why would you put honey on cheese? Can you use the same condiments on a log of fresh goat cheese and an aged Gouda?

    Cheeses are wonderful on their own, but cheese condiments can bring out their nuances. Similar to wine pairings, the flavor and age of the cheese are taken into account when deciding on pairings.

    We have an elaborate chart of cheese condiment pairings, from aged balsamic and mustard to sweet condiments such as chutney, honey and preserves.

    Cheeses served with sweet condiments make delicious appetizers, desserts and snacks.

    Take a look at the newest cheese condiments in town: three fruit spreads from premium jam, jelly and preserves company, Bonne Maman. They are all natural, non-GMO and certified kosher by OU.

     
    MEET THE NEW CHEESE SPREADS FROM BONNE MAMAN

    First, a word about “spreads.”

    There are different types of fruit spreads, including chutney, jam, jelly, preserve and others.

    Aside from the jam and jelly group, some people hear “cheese spread” and think of like Port Wine Cheddar. Not here.

    As regards jam, in the U.S., “fruit spread” is generally a reduced-calorie product, replacing all or part of the sugar with fruit juice concentrate and low-calorie sweeteners. Not the case with Bonne Maman.

    The new spreads from Bonne Mamam are very thick and concentrated preserves that don’t run or dribble: They stand firm, enabling you to use them in more ways. The flavor, too, is more intense—glorious, in fact. It was all we could do not to eat them directly from the jar. (Well, maybe we did.)

    The best pairings are the ones you like. We’ve made some suggestions, but let your palate be your guide.

     

    Black Cherry Spread Cheese Pairings

    Tart cherries pair well with both sharp and creamy cheeses. We pair it with goat cheese, Brie and Camenbert.
     
    Purple Fig Spread Cheese Pairings

    This one is easy: Fig pairs well with all types of cheese.
     
    Quince Spread Cheese Pairings

    For centuries, membrillo, quince paste, has been the classic condiment for aged Spanish cheeses. Cabrales and Manchego are most often found in the U.S., but your cheesemonger may also have Idiazabal, Roncal, Zamorano and others. Italy’s Parmigiano-Reggiano, with nuances similar to Manchego, pairs well; so does aged provolone. The nutty Swiss mountain cheeses are also a match: Appenzeller, Emmental (with the big holes called eyes), Gruyère* and French Comté.
     
    NEXT STEPS

    Plan a cheese tasting with fruit spreads and other condiments. Your family and friends will love it!

    As of this writing, you can download a $2 coupon on the Bonne Maman website.
     
    PARTY FAVORS

    Looking for small Mother’s Day gifts or party favors? Jet.com is currently selling a six-pack with free shipping.

    The spreads are also available at retailers nationwide.

     

    Quince Spread

    Bonne Maman Purple Fig Cheese Spread

    Top: Quince Spread atop a pyramid-shaped cheese (photo courtesy Taylor Takes A Taste). Bottom: A jar of Purple Fig Spread (photo courtesy Jet.com).

     
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    *Switzerland has produced Gruyère for hundreds of years, but after an appeal to the EU, France was also allowed to use the name. French Gruyère must be made with tiny eyes—“between the size of a pea and a cherry”—to distinguish it from the original.

      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Peter Pan Simply Ground Peanut Butter

    Peter Pan Peanut Butter

    Peter Pan’s Simply Ground is part creamy, part crunchy. Photo courtesy Mastercook.com.

     

    Something great has happened in the world of peanut butter. Peter Pan has introduced all natural Peter Pan Simply Ground Peanut Butter.

    What’s new about that, you ask? While there’s plenty of all-natural peanut butter on store shelves, Simply Ground is delightfully ground.

    Its unique texture lies between creamy and crunchy, reminiscent of finely home-grouund PB. It spreads easily and evenly and is universally useful for everything from sandwiches and soups to baking.

    There are two varieties, Original and Honey Roast, the latter with a touch of real honey. There’s not a big flavor difference; eating the peanut butter straight from the spoon is a nuanced experience. The main difference is 3g sugar per serving versus 6g sugar per serving.

    It’s a winner! National Peanut Butter & Jelly Day is April 2nd, so head to the nearest store.

    FOOD TRIVIA: Peanut butter was developed by a physician to provide a protein food to people who lost their teeth and could no longer chew meat. Here’s the history of peanut butter

     
    RECIPE 1: KING OF MONTE CRISTO SANDWICH

    This recipe is from Chef Spike Mendelsohn, owner of D.C. restaurant Béarnaise, a Top Chef contestant and consulting chef for Peter Pan Simply Ground.

    Ingredients For 4 Sandwiches

  • 8 slices country bread
  • 1/2 cup Peter Pan Simply Ground Original Peanut Butter
  • ¾ cup banana slices
  • 8 slices applewood-smoked bacon, cooked
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  • 4 teaspoons butter
  •  
    For The Topping

  • 1 cup blackberry preserves
  • 1 tablespoon water
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MAKE the blackberry topping: Combine the preserves and water in a pot add heat, stirring, until smooth. Serve on the side

    2. SPREAD the bread with peanut Butter; fill with bananas and bacon to make 4 sandwiches. Press the edges of sandwiches together to seal.

    3. HEAT a large skillet, add the butter and melt over medium heat.

    4. WHISK the egg, cinnamon and milk in bowl until well blended. Add the sandwiches, one at a time, turning to evenly moisten the bread.

    5. ADD the sandwiches to the skillet and cook for 2 minutes on each side, until golden brown.

    ABOUT THE MONTE CRISTO SANDWICH

    A Monte Cristo is a fried ham or turkey sandwich with cheese. It’s an American variation of the French Croque Monsieur sandwich.

    Traditionally, the sandwich is dipped in batter and deep fried, but there are regional variations. In some regions of the U.S. it’s just grilled; in others, French toast is used as a base, with cheese melted under a broiler.

    In this version, the sandwich is fried like French Toast.

    Monte Cristo sandwiches originated in southern California; the earliest reference is printed on a 1941 menu from Gordon’s restaurant in Los Angeles and a recipe was published in the 1949 The Brown Derby Cookbook. The sandwich became very popular in the 1950s-1970s.

    Check out the different sandwich types in our Sandwich Glossary.

     

    Peanut Butter Monte Cristo Sandwich

    Peanut Butter Wraps

    Top: Spike Mendelsohn’s re-interpretation of the Monte Cristo Sandwich. Photo courtesy Peter Pan. Bottom: PB&J Lettuce Wraps. Photo courtesy CoffeeandQuinoa.com.

     

    RECIPE 2: PEANUT BUTTER & JELLY LETTUCE WRAPS

    The recipe is adapted from Crofter’s Organic.
     
    Ingredients For 2 Servings, 4 Wraps

  • 4 spring roll wrappers
  • Boston lettuce or romaine leaves
  • 4 spring roll wrappers
  • Peanut butter, smooth or crunchy
  • Mango or apricot fruit spread
  • Optional: 1/4 cup lightly crushed peanuts—raw, roasted, honey or spicy
  • Optional: peanut dipping sauce (recipe)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREPARE the spring roll wrappers by softening in hot water, one at a time to avoid sticking.

    2. SPREAD a teaspoon of peanut butter over each, followed by a teaspoon of fruit spread. Sprinkle the optional crushed nuts over the fruit spread.

    3. WRAP the lettuce over the spring roll wrappers. Cut if desired and serve.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: 25+ Uses For Apple Butter

    We were recently searching for something in the back of a friend’s pantry—at her request—and came across a jar of apple butter that looked past its prime. We checked the date. Yep, way gone.

    “Do you know you have expired apple butter?” we queried. “Oh that,” she replied. “Someone gave it to me years ago and I didn’t know what to do with it.”

    Apple butter is not butter, we explained. It’s a fruit spread so creamy, it spreads like butter. There’s no dairy in it. Think of it as creamy apple jam.

    Today’s tip is for anyone who needs suggestions for using apple butter, and for those who want to make their own from the fall crop of just-picked apples. There’s a slow cooker recipe below.

    WHAT IS APPLE BUTTER?

    Apple butter is a highly concentrated form of apple sauce, as dense as a spread. While the skins are used, since the apples are cooked to a point where the sugar in the flesh caramelizes and the flesh turns brown, the color of the apple doesn’t make a difference.

       

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/apple butter tasteofhome 230

    Ready, set spread your delicious homemade apple butter. Photo courtesy TasteOfHome.com.

     
    THE HISTORY OF APPLE BUTTER

    In the Middle Ages, the first monasteries with large fruit orchards began to appear in Europe. Apple butter, developed at that time, turned out to have a long shelf life (due to the concentration of sugars). It was an ideal way to conserve part of the apple crop.

    Villagers made their own apple butter, and a popular bread spread was born. As imported spices became more affordable, apple butter was enhanced with allspice, cinnamon, clove and nutmeg.

    Fast forward some centuries to the colonization of North America: Housewives brought the technique for making apple butter with them. In the 1700s, the German Rhinelanders and Moravians who settled into the Blue Ridge Mountains, especially in Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia, “really honed apple butter-making to a deliciously fine art.” (Source: FoodTimeline.org.)

    In the 1800s, another German immigrant group, the Pennsylvania Dutch (a misspelling of Deutsch), established the tradition in southeastern Pennsylvania. In the latter half of the century, with the invention of the Mason jar, apple butter was “put up” by even more households. These days, you can freeze it.

    Apple butter’s popularity declined in the 20th century, with the proliferation of store-bought brands of jam and jelly providing a wide variety of fruit options year-round.
     
    WHAT KIND OF APPLES SHOULD YOU USE?

    You can use any apples, but soft apples work best because they cook down the fastest. Choose one (or more) of these varieties, and you’ll have apple butter in no time:

  • Braeburn
  • Cortland
  • Fuji
  • Gravenstein
  • Jonamac
  • Jonagold
  • Ida Red
  •  
    WAYS TO USE APPLE BUTTER

    Breakfast

  • On oatmeal
  • On toast or biscuits
  • On pancakes and waffles
  • As a topping for yogurt or cottage cheese
  • Muffin surprise (cut a channel, scoop out and fill, replace the top)
  •  
    Lunch

  • Panini: ham or turkey, brie or cheddar (or other cheese), apple butter
  • Sandwich spread, including with cheese: grilled cheese, cream cheese, semihard cheese
  • PB&AB, or instead of the PB, apple butter with almond butter and sliced bananas
  • Turkey burger
  •  

    apple_butter-gift-espressoandcream-230

    All you need to turn apple butter into a homemade gift is a ribbon! Photo courtesy EspressoandCream.com.

     

    Dinner

  • As a condiment for pork chops or roast
  • In barbecue sauce (recipe)
  • In a baked potato with sour cream or yogurt
  • Instead of applesauce
  • Ham glaze
  • Sauce for chicken
  • On baked sweet potatoes, or as a dip with sweet potato fries
  •  
    Dessert

  • A cup of apple butter as dessert, with heavy cream or whipped cream.
  • Crepe filling, topped with cinnamon sugar (substitute tortillas for crepes)
  • Warmed or melted over vanilla ice cream and garnished with pecans
  • Cookie sandwiches
  • Baking†
  • Loaf cake sandwiches
  • Snack

  • On crackers
  • On a spoon, right from the jar
  • In a smoothie*
  •  
    RECIPE: SLOW COOKER APPLE BUTTER

    Because the apples cook for a long period, this is a recipe best made in a slow cooker. Plan to start cooking early in the morning. For gifting, use 8-ounce Mason or Ball jars, or other attractive jars. Note that the apple butter won’t have any preservatives, so should be refrigerated or frozen. This recipe is courtesy Taste Of Home.
     
    Ingredients For 4 Pints

  • 5-1/2 pounds apples, peeled and finely chopped (we kept the peel on)
  • 4 cups sugar‡
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE the apples in a 3-quart slow cooker. Combine the other ingredients, pour over the apples and mix well. Cover and cook on high for 1 hour.

    2. REDUCE the heat to low; cover and cook for 9-11 hours or until thickened and dark brown, stirring occasionally. Stir more frequently as the spread thickens, to prevent sticking.

    3. UNCOVER and cook on low 1 hour longer. If desired, stir with a wire whisk until smooth.

    4. SPOON into jars or freezer containers, leaving a half inch of space at the top. Cover and refrigerate or freeze.
     
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    *Freeze apple butter in an ice cube tray; blend frozen cubes with almond milk and banana, with spices to taste.

    †You can use apple butter like applesauce, as a replacement for oil, eggs and butter, in most baked good recipes. Like applesauce, it provides sweetness and moistness in breads, cakes, cookies, muffins, pancakes and waffles. Look for tested recipes.

    ‡You can cut back on the sweetness, or try one batch and then adjust it.

      

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