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Archive for Ice Cream-Sorbet-Yogurt

FOOD FUN: Unconventional Sundae Ingredients

Cornflakes Sundae

Beef Sundae

Tomato Basil Sundae

[1] Not your typical vanilla ice cream sundae (photo courtesy Ogawa Coffee. [2] How about a beef sundae with cheddar (photo courtesy Dairy Max). [3] Tart frozen yogurt like Pinkberry is an opportunity to try savory toppings, like marinated cherry tomatoes and basil (photo courtesy Pinkberry).

 

For National Sundae Day, November 11th, commemorates the history of the ice cream sundae, which dates to around 1892 in Ithaca, New York.

While we love conventional ice cream sundaes (particularly hot fudge over pistachio ice cream), there are novel approaches as well.

Why not think beyond the conventional and create a delicious ice cream sundae with at least one “different” ingredient.
 
WHAT IS NOT DIFFERENT

  • Berries and other sundae fruits
  • Crushed cookies and cake cubes
  • Popular candies, sprinkles, dragées
  • Any fruits or nuts—fresh, dried, raw, roasted, etc.
  • Any conventional ice cream sauce (butterscotch, chocolate, strawberry, etc.)
  • Marshmallow cream or whipped cream
  •  
    WHAT IS DIFFERENT

  • Cereals and granola
  • Crushed honey sesame bites
  • Exotic fruits: carambola/star fruit, dragon fruit, lychee, rambutan, etc.
  • Honey (especially flavored honey), preserves, pie filling
  • Jell-O or other gelatin cubes, including cubed Jell-O shots
  • Scoops of other frozen desserts (granita, sorbet, yogurt)
  • Seeds: pumpkin, sesame, chia
  • Flavored whipped cream: recipes for bourbon, five spice, lavender, pumpkin pie spice, etc.); mascarpone
  • Garnishes: colored sanding sugars, peanut butter cream
  •  
    Photo #1 shows a sundae, from Ogawa Coffee in Boston, an offshoot of a Japanese chain.

    It’s made in a pint glass with two unconventional ingredients: coffee gelatin (a Boston specialty, originating as a way to use yesterday’s leftover coffee) and Corn Flakes. As a coffee house, the coffee gelatin makes perfect sense. It’s made with coffee and unflavored gelatin; here’s a recipe.

     
    RECIPE: OGAWA MOCHA CORNFLAKE ICE CREAM SUNDAE (PHOTO #1)

    Ingredients

  • Vanilla ice cream (substitute coffee, chocolate, or a small scoop of each)
  • Cubes of house-made coffee gelatin
  • Cubes of chocolate terrine (substitute brownie or chocolate cake cubes
  • Chocolate/fudge sauce
  • Corn Flakes
  • Whipped cream
  • Garnish: dried cranberries (substitute dried cherries, chocolate-covered espresso beans or pomegranate arils
  • Preparation

    1. PLACE some chocolate sauce on the very bottom. Then add one scoop ice cream, topped with chocolate terrine. Add more chocolate sauce, the second scoop of ice cream and the gelatin cubes.

    2. ADD the third scoop of ice cream and the Corn Flakes. Top with more gelatin, whipped cream and garnish.

     
    HOW ABOUT A SAVORY SUNDAE?

    You can make savory sundaes as well. Some are made with savory ice cream; others are sundae in name, but aren’t cold.

    We have recipes for a:

  • Beef Stew Sundae (Photo #2)
  • Spaghetti & Meatball Sundae
  • Savory Yogurt Sundae (Photo #3)
  • Sour cream ice cream with salmon caviar garnish (we’re still working to perfect the amount of herbs in the sour cream ice cream, but here’s an Ideas In Food recipe for sourdough ice cream they top with caviar)
  •  
    But we’re not suggesting that you whip up a caviar sundae. Yet.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Make Sorbet With Fruit Juice

    If you’re switching your menus to fall vegetables and fruits, you can still a variety of seasonal ice creams and sorbets.

    In this easy recipe, you don’t even need fruit: You use the bottled juice. Apple, blood orange, grapefruit, pear and pomegranate are delicious fall sorbet flavors.

    You can set out different garnishes and let everyone style their own dessert or snack.

    This sorbet recipe comes to us from US Apple, which has many recipes and apple-cooking and -baking tips.
     
    RECIPE: APPLE CIDER POMEGRANATE SORBET

    Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh apple cider (or other juice)
  • 1-1/4 cup pomegranate juice (or other juice)
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Optional garnish: dried apple chips, fresh apple slices*, pickled apple slices (recipe below), pomegranate arils
  •  
    Preparation

    1. STIR together the juices, sugar, cinnamon and salt in a medium saucepan over high heat. Boil for 5 minutes; then transfer to a large bowl, stir in the lemon juice, add the cinnamon stick, cover and chill in the fridge until cold.

    2. FREEZE the mixture in an ice-cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.
     
    __________________
    *Leave the skin on—it’s more attractive. Be sure to dip the sliced apples in acidulated water to prevent browning: 2 tablespoons lemon juice, lime juice or wine per quart of water.
    __________________
     
    CHECK OUT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF FROZEN DESSERTS
    in our Ice Cream & Sorbet Glossary.

     

       

    Apple Pomegranate Sorbet

    Natalie's Pumpkin Apple Juice

    [1] Easy apple-pomegranate sorbet, served with a fresh apple slice (photo and recipe courtesy USApple.org). [2] Use your favorite juice. Two of our fall favorites from Natalie’s: Pumpkin Apple and Orange Cranberry (photo courtesy FreshPlaza.us).

     
    RECIPE: PICKLED APPLE SLICES

    Make your own pickled apples. In addition to a sorbet garnish, you can use them on sandwiches, slaws, sides with grilled meats and seafood, baked ham and any fat-laden recipe that needs a slightly tart counterpoint.

    This recipe makes a quart or more, depending on the apple size. If you want to test the recipe, halve it, taste and adjust accordingly. If you make the recipe but have more than you’ll use in a month, you can send some home with guests.

    Note that these are not sterilized, shelf-stable pickles. You can keep them in the fridge for up to a month. The flavors will intensify for a week.

    If you don’t like the “pumpkin pie spices,” substitute black peppercorns, cardamom, coriander seeds or other favorite.

    Make extra for gifting!

     

    Pomegranate Arils

    Pickled Apple Slices Recipe

    [3] Pomegranate arils are colorful and easy garnish (photo courtesy Good Eggs | SF). We buy the arils-only in plastic bags. [4] Pickled apple slices, featured in the Apple Lovers Cookbook by Amy Traverse. Here’s her recipe.

     

    RECIPE: PICKLED APPLE SLICES

    Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup tap water
  • 1/2 cup ice water
  • 1 cup cider or white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon whole allspice berries
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 6 apples
  • Optional: 1/8 cup liqueur (apple or elderflower liqueur, schnaps [the difference])
  •  
    Plus

  • 1-2 one-quart jars or other containers.
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE the tap water, vinegar, sugar and spices into a small pan (for convenience, you can put the spices in a spice ball or cheesecloth). Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Then add the ice water to cool the brine. Meanwhile…

    2. PEEL, core and slice them 1/2- or 3/4-inch-thick (we used a mandoline for even slices). Immediately place into the pickling containers and cover with the brine.

    3. KEEP the open jars on the counter until cool. Then cover with the lid and place in the refrigerator. Let infuse for at least 60 minutes. For the first week, the apples will continue to pick up flavor from the brine.

     
    Quick Pickling Variation

    We use this recipe to pickle fruits and vegetables when we have only an hour or so.
     
    APPLE CONVERSION GUIDE

    For cooking or baking, here’s an apple conversion guide from Kercher’s Orchard:

  • 1 large apple (3″ to 3-3/4″ diameter) yields 2 cups sliced
  • 1 medium apple (2-3/4″) yields 1-1/3 cups
  • 1 small apple (2-1/4″) yields 3/4 cup
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    RECIPE: Blueberry Ice Pops For National Blueberry Popsicle Day

    Blueberry Ice Pops

    Blueberry Cream Ice Pops

    [1] Puréed blueberries, perked up with a bit of lemon juice (photo courtesy Will Cook For Smiles). [2] Make a creamy blueberry pop with yogurt or non-dairy milk (photo courtesy A Healthy Life For Me). Here’s the recipe with almond and coconut milks; the recipe for a yogurt pop is below.

     

    September 1st is National Blueberry Popsicle Day, following close on the heels of National Cherry Popsicle Day, August 24th.

    Here’s the history of Popsicles (a happy accident!).

    But the name of the holidays needs to be changed. The Popsicle® brand doesn’t make blueberry Popsicles (here are the current flavors), for starters.

    Regardless of the flavor, only Unilever can call its ice pops Popsicles.

    Well sure, you can call it Popsicle for your own private use; but try to give brands the respect they deserve. Call them ice pops instead of Popsicles®, a slow cooker instead of Crock-Pot®, a food processor instead of Cuisinart®, tissues instead of Kleenex® and lip balm instead of Chapstick® (and on and on).

    Anyone can make or sell blueberry ice pops. And making them couldn’t be easier.

    RECIPE: EASY BLUEBERRY ICE POPS

    Ingredients

    First, chose what kind of blueberry you’ll use: blueberry juice, fresh or frozen blueberries. See the conversion table below.

  • 24 ounces blueberry juice (our favorite is Knudsen)
  • 1 pound bag frozen blueberries, puréed*
  • 1-2 pints fresh blueberries, puréed*
  •  
    Sweetener

    Next, choose your sweetener. These are pretty low caloric pops if you use non-caloric sweetener or agave (you need only half the amount of agave, as it’s twice as sweet).

  • Agave
  • Granulated (table) sugar
  • Honey
  • Non-caloric sweetener (the different types of sweeteners)
  • Simple syrup
  •  
    Plus

  • 1/3 cup water
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons fresh lemon or lime juice (add a 3:1 ratio of juice to zest if you like)
  • Ice pop molds or paper cups with sticks or plastic spoons
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BRING bring the sugar (or other sweetener) and the water to a boil in a small sauce pan over high, stirring until the sugar (or other sweetener) dissolves. Transfer to a large measuring cup or other container and refrigerate for 30 minutes, until cool. If using blueberry juice, it may be sweet enough to avoid this step. Taste and decide.

    2. COMBINE the blueberry juice or puréed blueberries with the lemon or lime juice. Add the sweetener/water mix to taste. (The juice may need far less sweetening than the fresh or frozen berries.)

    3. STIR thoroughly and pour into ice pop molds. Freeze for 4-6 hours, with the mold tops on. If you’re not using ice pop molds with built-in handles, insert a stick into each mold after 1 or 2 hours when it can stand up straight.

    4. RUN the molds under warm water to release the pops for serving.
     

    BLUEBERRY CONVERSION MEASUREMENTS

    These measurements are from CooksInfo.com. Volume equivalents will vary based on size of the berries.

    Depending on how many pops you’re making and how many ounces are in each mold, determine how much fruit you need:

  • 1 pint fresh blueberries = 2 cups
  • 1 pound bag frozen berries = 3-1/2 cups
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries = 9 oz
  •  

    RECIPE: YOGURT & BLUEBERRY POPS

  • 2 cups blueberries, fresh or frozen
  • 2 tables honey or other sweetener (see list above
  • 2 cups vanilla or blueberry Greek yogurt (or any flavor)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PURÉE the blueberries and sweetener together (see footnote below).

    2. POUR into a large bowl, add the yogurt mix gently: For a swirled effect, use a spatula to make swirls in the bowl. You can also add the yogurt first, then the blueberries, to get a half-and-half effect in photo #2, above. Otherwise, combine thoroughly for a lighter purple pop.

    3. TASTE and adjust sweetener if desired, then pour into the molds or cups. Freeze for 4-6 hours, with the mold tops on. If you’re not using ice pop molds with built-in handles, insert a stick into each mold after 1 or 2 hours when it can stand up straight.

    4. RUN the molds under warm water to remove the pops.

     

    Blueberry Yogurt Pops Recipe

    [3] Don’t have ice pop molds? Use paper cups and sticks or plastic spoons. But ice pop moles are inexpensive. If you enjoy making pops, treat yourself to a set.

    ________________
    *To purée, place the berries in a food processor or blender and blend on high speed until the consistency of a smoothie.

      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: JonnyPops, A Smoothie On A Stick

    JonnyPops Mango & Strawberry

    JonnyPops Boxes

    JonnyPops & Yogurt

    JonnyPops in Banana Cinnamon & Cream and Strawberries & Cream. Each bite is a joy. [2] Look for this box. [3] A creative snack or breakfast: added to yogurt. You can also top a pie, or dip the whole bar in chocolate. All photos courtesy JonnyPops.

     

    In 2011, still in college, Jonny Pop’s CEO Erik Brust and his cousin Jonathan imagined starting a business, selling an “all-natural, fruit-forward, purely delicious frozen treat that would take the market by storm.”

    They tried every fruit bar and ice cream novelty they could find, dividing the pops into two categories: icy and artificial, or decadent and unhealthy. A year later, in his dorm room, Erik decided to make it a reality.

    Blend fresh fruit, cream, cane sugar, purified water and a pinch of salt, the team has achieved something special: what they describe as a smoothie-on-a-stick and “frozen goodness.” These are apt descriptions.

    Smooth and creamy, redolent of fresh fruit (often with toothsome bits of fruit in each bite), the ingredients may be simple but the way they come together is outstanding.
     
    JONNYPOPS FLAVORS

    Each flavor as splendid as the next, each bite a joy. We were fortunate to receive samples of each. It’s impossible to choose; but by the same token, there’s no wrong choice. Try them all:

  • Banana Cinnamon & Cream
  • Coffee & Chocolate (coffee lovers: you’ll go wild for it)
  • Mango & Cream
  • Pineapple Coconut & Cream
  • Raspberries Blueberries & Cream
  • Strawberries & Cream
  • Strawberry Banana & Cream
  •  
    The manufacturing facility is completely peanut- and tree nut-free with the exception of the coconut flavor; and are gluten-free.

    Try them direct from the wrapper, as well as:

  • Cubed and added to yogurt.
  • Cubed and used for pie à la mode.
  • Dipped in chocolate (at the Minnesota State Fair—so much better than deep-fried Twinkies).
  •  
    PAY IT FORWARD

    The company’s mission is to make the world a better place, one pop at a time. Each JonnyPops stick is printed with a good deed to be paid forward. You can suggest good deeds on their Facebook page.

    Now for the sad part: Cousin Jonathan, the original co-imaginer, died of a drug overdose before the company came to be.

     
    The product is named in his memory, and the company donates a portion of the proceeds—plus a supply of JonnyPops—to the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, a national leader in addiction treatment and recovery. Every pop you buy helps in the fight against substance abuse.
     
    ASK YOUR GROCER

    Here’s the rub:

    JonnyPops is a small start-up with concomitant resources to sell in to retailers. The pops are currently distributed in the Midwest, California, New York and Texas, but in not enough locations.

    You can help! Print out this product request form and bring it to your grocer, deli or convenience store. (Bring it to all of them!)

    We promise, it’s worth the wait!

    For more information visit JonnyPops.com.
     
    FOOD TRIVIA: HOW DID THE ICE POP GET IT’S NAME?

    In 1923 Frank Epperson, a California real estate salesman, made his homemade treats—frozen juice on a stick—for a Fireman’s Ball.

    His “Epsicles” were a sensation, and Frank obtained a patent for “a handled, frozen confection or ice lollipop.” His kids called the treat a Popsicle, after their Pop (so if Mom had made them instead of Pop, they could have been Momsicles).

    Here’s the bigger story.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Treats For Banana Lovers

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    Banana Split

    Banana Hot Fudge Sundae

    Bunch of Bananas

    [1] A grilled banana split: no need for a special banana split dish (photo courtesy Pampered Chef). [2] Another presentation from Women’s Day. Here’s their recipe. [3] Fusion food: a grilled banana hot fudge sundae (photo courtesy Weber). [4] The world’s most popular fruit (photo Nathan Ward | SXC)!

     

    Who doesn’t love a banana? It’s the world’s most popular fruit. Some 25 pounds of bananas are consumed per capita each year.

    In the U.S., more bananas are consumed than oranges and apples combined! And August 27th is National Banana Lovers Day.

    Bananas were introduced to the U.S. in 1880. By 1910, bananas were so popular that cities—which then lacked sanitation systems—had a problem disposing of the banana peels.

    People were literally slipping on banana peels that were discarded on sidewalks and streets (a reality appropriated by comedians), leading to injuries. The Boy Scout Handbook recommended picking up banana peels from the street as a Scout’s good deed of the day (source).
     
    MORE BANANA TRIVIA

  • Man has been growing bananas for some 10,000 years, since the dawn of agriculture. It’s the oldest cultivated fruit.
  • Bananas don’t grow on trees: The banana plant is actually the world’s largest herb. It’s a cousin to ginger and vanilla.
  • There are more than 1,000 varieties of bananas. The majority grow in Africa and Asia: 600 varieties in India alone.
  • The American supermarket banana is a variety called the Cavendish. It’s a more bland banana, but it travels well.
  • Bananas float in water (so do apples)!
  •  
    WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE BANANA RECIPE?

    Banana Bread? Banana Cream Pie? Banana Daiquiri? Banana French Toast? Banana Ice Cream? Banana Pudding? Peanut Butter and Bananas?

    We say YES! to all, but today are focusing on two: the kid favorite Banana Split and the over-21 Bananas Foster.
     
    BANANA SPLIT HISTORY

    Two towns in the U.S. lay claim as the home of the banana split.

  • In 1904 in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, David Strickler, a 23-year-old druggist’s apprentice at Tassel Pharmacy is said to have created the first banana split sundae for the local college crowd.
  • In 1907 in Wilmington, Ohio, restaurateur Ernest R. Hazard held a dessert contest among his employees at The Café. One came up with a sundae of sliced banana topped with three scoops of ice cream, chocolate syrup, strawberry jam, pineapple bits, chopped nuts, whipped cream and cherries.
  •  
    Fortunately for the rest of us, the concept spread nationwide, affording all of us the joy of a Banana Split.

    RECIPE: GRILLED BANANA SUNDAE

    Banana splits are easy to make: Split a ripe banana vertically, place it in a long dish, top with three scoops of ice cream (traditionally vanilla, chocolate and strawberry) and toppings of choice. (You can get Anchor Hocking banana split dishes for about $2 each.)

    Here’s a twist: a grilled banana sundae, a cross between the classic and Bananas Foster. In the latter, bananas are caramelized in butter with brown sugar and cinnamon, then topped with dark rum and flambéed, with the bananas and the flaming sauce served over vanilla ice cream.

    We’ve included a Bananas Foster recipe below. The recipes are very similar, except that for Bananas Foster, the bananas are sautéed in butter instead of grilled; and alcohol is added to the caramel sauce. The banana is typically sliced in half lengthwise and crosswise.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 2 firm, ripe bananas
  • 2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups vanilla ice cream
  • 1/4 cup fudge sauce
  • 1/4 cup toasted slivered almonds
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT a grill pan over medium heat for 5 minutes.

    2. CUT the bananas in half lengthwise and crosswise for a total of 4 pieces each. Combine the brown sugar and cinnamon in shallow dish. Gently coat the bananas with the sugar mixture.

    3. SPRAY the grill pan lightly with vegetable oil and add the banana pieces, cut sides down. Grill for 2-3 minutes per side or until grill marks appear.

    4. SERVE warm with ice cream, ice cream topping and almonds.
     

     

    RECIPE: BANANAS FOSTER

    The original Bananas Foster recipe was created in 1951 by Paul Blangé (1900 to 1977), the Executive Chef at Brennan’s in New Orleans. The dish of sautéed bananas, flambéed and topped with ice cream, was named in honor of Richard Foster, a regular customer and friend of restaurant owner Owen Brennan Sr.

    Note that while both the recipes above and the original Bananas Foster cut the bananas into oblong pieces (see photo above), we prefer the round slices of banana, about 3/4-inch thick.

    While igniting the dish tableside is dramatic both at a restaurant and at home, it isn’t necessary.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 4 firm, ripe bananas
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 pint vanilla ice cream
  • 1/4 cup banana liqueur
  • 1/2 cup dark rum
  • Optional garnishes: toasted chopped pecans, grated orange zest
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CUT the bananas in half lengthwise and crosswise for a total of 4 pieces each (alternative: cut 3/4″ rounds; you’ll have more than 4 pieces).

    2. MELT the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the brown sugar and cinnamon and cook, stirring until the sugar dissolves (about 2 minutes—this creates a caramel sauce). Add the bananas and cook on both sides until they begin to soften and brown (about 3 minutes).

    3. ADD the banana liqueur and stir to blend into the caramel sauce. If you want to flambé, follow the instructions below. However, the drama of the flambé works only if the dish is prepared tableside. Otherwise, the drama is lost in the kitchen (the flame extinguishes quickly).

    4. LIFT the bananas carefully from the pan and top the four dishes of ice cream; then spoon the sauce over the ice cream and bananas and serve immediately.
     
    TIPS ON HOW TO FLAMBÉ

  • Liquors and liqueurs that are 80-109 proof are best to ignite. Don’t use a higher proof; it is highly flammable.
  • The liquor must be warmed to 130°F before adding to the pan. Higher temperatures will burn off the alcohol, and it won’t ignite.
  • Always remove the pan from the heat source before adding the liquor to avoid burning yourself.
  • Vigorously shaking the pan usually extinguishes the flame, but keep a pot lid nearby in case you need to smother the flames. The alcohol vapor generally burns off by itself in a matter of seconds.
  •  
    MORE

  • Read these tips
  • Watch this video
  •  

    Bananas Foster

    Bananas Foster

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    [1] Bananas Foster at the Bonefish Grill, looking like a more complex Banana Split. [2] It’s harder to sauté a lengthwise half of banana without breaking it. Hence, the suggestion of slicing lengthwise and crosswise (photo Fotolia). [3] This recipe from Taste Of Home slices the bananas into coin shapes (a.k.a. chunks), easier to salute.

     
    READY FOR A DRINK?

    Relax with a Banana Colada.

      

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