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TIP OF THE DAY: Make Ice Cream Without An Ice Cream Maker

You need only four ingredients to make ice cream—and NO ice cream maker.

There may be an extra ingredient, such as lemon juice with fruit flavors.

Just whip the cream, fold it into the sweetened condensed milk with the other ingredients, freeze in a loaf pan and voilà, ice cream!

The other ingredients are sugar or other sweetener (use Splenda for sugar-free ice cream), and flavor: coffee, cocoa, peanut butter, strawberry, vanilla, etc.). With some recipes, other ingredients substitute for the sugar; for example, a box of cake mix for cake batter ice cream.

Then, of course, there are optional mix-ins: brownie chunks, chocolate chips, crushed Oreos, fruit, M&Ms, nuts, sprinkles, etc.
 
 
NO-CHURN VS. CONVENTIONAL ICE CREAM

Traditional ice cream starts with a sweetened base—usually a combination of heavy cream, milk and sugar and sugar (add eggs for a French custard base).

The custard and added flavors are churned in an ice cream maker, which incorporates air and breaks up ice crystals as they form, creating a creamy texture. The mixture is then frozen.

No-churn ice cream uses sweetened condensed milk as the base. The whipped cream adds the air and produces the creamy texture.

The result is very similar, with a few minor differences:

  • If you have a sensitive palate, you may taste the sweetened condensed milk. It’s a rich, slightly “cooked” flavor that many people don’t even notice in dulce de leche, Key Lime Pie and other favorite sweets. Some of us even eat it straight from the can, with a spoon.
  • The density of the sweetened condensed makes slow-churn more scoopable. It doesn’t get rock hard like conventional ice cream can.
  •  
     
    NO-CHURN ICE CREAM RECIPES

    For most no-churn recipes, prep time is less than 10 minutes, plus 4-5 hours freezing time.

  • No-Churn Cake Batter Ice Cream
  • No-Churn Chocolate Peanut Butter Chip Ice Cream
  • No-Churn Chocolate Ice Cream with Brownie Chunks
  • No-Churn Coconut Peach Ice Cream (substitute banana)
  • No-Churn Fresh Blackberry Ice Cream (substitute any berry)
  • No-Churn Mexican Chocolate Ice Cream
  • No-Churn Snickerdoodle Ice Cream
  • No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream
  •  

    Chocolate Brownie No Churn Ice Cream
    [1] Chocolate brownie ice cream, made in a loaf pan. Here’s the recipe from Wonky Wonderful.

    No Churn Blackberry Ice Cream

    [2] Blackberry ice cream (here’s the recipe from Baked By An Introvert).

     
    There are vegan options as well. Just search for “no-churn ice cream” and you’ll be overwhelmed by the choices.
     
     
    THE HISTORY OF NO CHURN ICE CREAM

    Alas, we could not find the origin of no-churn ice cream. This bugs us, because it is a relatively recent recipe—no reaching into the distant past required.

    Our best guess is that it is Eagle Brand Borden sweetened condensed milk, which is constantly testing new recipes for its product.

    There are no-churn recipes on their website, but we hadn’t heard back from them by press time. We’ll update this when we do.

    Borden and Eagle brand, the two big names in sweetened condensed milk, merged and are now owned by Smucker’s.

    Here’s the history of sweetened condensed milk.

      

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    FOOD HOLIDAY: 15 Ways To Celebrate National Coffee Ice Cream Day

    With all the cups of coffee purchased at coffee shops in the U.S, you’d think coffee ice cream sales would be up there.

    About 1.54 billion gallons of ice cream and related frozen desserts were produced in the U.S. in 2015. But coffee ice cream didn’t even make The Top Tens lists* (it’s #11). But we went to the source: See below.

    So show your love: Celebrate National Coffee Ice Cream Day, September 6th, with a coffee ice cream cone. It can be plain coffee ice cream or its brothers:

  • Cappuccino
  • Coffee Almond Fudge
  • Coffee Chocolate Chip
  • Coffee Toffee Crunch
  • Espresso
  • Tiramisu
  •  
    Hold the mocha ice cream for another occasion.
     
     
    BEYOND THE CONE:
    15 OTHER WAYS TO CELEBRATE WITH COFFEE ICE CREAM

  • Affogato: Place a scoop(s) of ice cream in a cup and pour espresso over it.
  • À la mode cake: angel cake, carrot cake, pound cake.
  • À la mode pie: chocolate silk pie, pecan pie, Snickers pie, fruit cobbler or crisp (the difference).
  • Boozy float: coffee ice cream with bourbon, Kahlúa or stout; whipped cream optional.
  • Coffee and donut: Your favorite donut with a scoop of coffee ice cream in the center.
  • Dessert sauce: Just let the pint melt and use it as a sauce on brownies, cakes, pies and puddings.
  • Espresso ice cream shooters: A smaller version of affogato. Here’s the recipe.
  • Homemade or half-made coffee ice cream (photo #1), with mix-ins or garnishes: chocolate chips, chocolate-covered coffee beans, crushed coffee beans, crushed Oreos.
  • Ice cream soda or shake: Here’s the difference.
  • Ice cream cake: An easy recipe is to buy pound cake and ice cream, slice the cake horizontally, add softened ice cream, and re-freeze. Serve with warm chocolate sauce.
  • Ice cream pie (photo #2): Simply buy a chocolate cookie crust, the ice cream and chocolate sauce.
  • Ice cream sandwich with cookies, chocolate pound cake slices or a split brownie.
  • Ice cream sundae with caramel or fudge sauce.
  • Iced coffee float: Two scoops of ice cream, iced coffee (no sweetener), whipped cream and optional garnish.
  • Irish coffee: Make the basic recipe topped with coffee ice cream instead of whipped cream. Consider omitting the sugar.
  •  
     
    ICE CREAM TRIVIA

  • The majority of U.S. ice cream and frozen dessert manufacturers have been in business for more than 50 years and many are still family-owned businesses.
  • The ice cream industry in the United States contributes more than $39.0 billion to the national economy and creates more than 188,000 jobs in communities across the country.
  • The first-known written ice cream recipe is in the recipe book of Lady Anne Fanshawe, dated 1665. It was flavored with orange flower water, mace or ambergris [source].
  •  

    Coffee Chip Ice Cream
    Make your own coffee ice cream, or partially soften store-bought ice cream. This version, from Dashing Diva, is a no-churn diet version with just 35 calories per scoop.

    Coffee Ice Cream Pie
    [2] Three-ingredient ice cream pie: cookie crust, coffee ice cream, chocolate sauce. Here’s the recipe from Betty Crocker.

    Kahlua Float

    [3] Who needs a Black Russian? Simply pour Kahlúa (or bourbon) over coffee ice cream (photo courtesy A Better Happier St. Sebastian).

  • Both vanilla and chocolate were found in what is now Mexico by Hernàn Cortez, and brought back to Spain in 1527 or 1528 [more].
  • While sorbet had been made since ancient times, Bernardo Buontalenti of Florence, Italy, a Medici banquet impressario, is credited with inventing ice cream (gelato) in the mid-1500s [more].
  • discovered how to quickly pollinate the vanilla orchid with a thin stick or blade of grass and a simple thumb gesture.

  • Vanilla may be the number-one flavor sold today, but it was quite exotic and rare in the late 1700s. It was difficult to acquire before the mid-19th century.
  • That’s because the plant is sterile and can’t be pollinated by insects. In 1841,a 12-year old slave, Edmond Albius, discovered how to quickly pollinate the vanilla orchid with a thin stick or blade of grass and a simple thumb gesture.
  • Wealthy colonial Americans enjoyed coffee, pistachio, strawberry and vanilla ice cream. They also feasted on asparagus, oyster and parmesan ice cream (all really delicious; just not for dessert).
  •  
     
    THE TOP ICE CREAM FLAVORS IN THE U.S.

    In June 2017, International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) conducted an anonymous ice cream survey among its members who make and market ice cream, as well as members of the National Ice Cream Retailers Association, which includes operators of ice cream parlors in the United States.

    Here’s what they responded regarding America’s top 10 favorite ice cream flavors:
    1. Vanilla
    2. Chocolate
    3. Cookies N’ Cream
    4. Mint Chocolate Chip
    5. Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough
    6. Buttered Pecan
    7. Cookie Dough
    8. Strawberry
    9. Moose Tracks
    10. Neapolitan

    Yes, coffee is not on the list. But when asked about daring and creative flavors, says Audra Kruse of IDFA, they “received one that’s relevant for National Coffee Ice Cream Day: a bourbon- and caffeine-spiked concoction called Exhausted Parent.”

    Our personal favorites: The Top 5! And we wouldn’t mind some Exhausted Parent, as well.

     
    HERE’S THE HISTORY OF ICE CREAM

    ________________
    *The only way to truly look at the top flavors is to look at sales data. However, that number is strongly skewed by commercial sales to food service providers (restaurants, caterers, etc.). Other statistics, including this one, are based on consumer surveys.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Faloodeh or Faludeh, It’s Delicious Rose Water Sorbet

    Faloodeh Sundae
    [1] Faludeh with a sour cherry topping (ba albaloo) at The Persian Fusion.

    Faloodeh With Sour Cherries
    [2] A squeeze of fresh lime juice blances the sweetness of the sobet (photo courtesy Tishineh, a site for Irani tourism).

    Persian Ice Cream
    [3] A “sundae” of faludeh combined with saffron ice cream (bastani in Arabic; photo courtesy Fun Love And Cooking). The combination of flavors is called makhloot.

    Elegant Faloodeh

    [4] An elegant update. Here’s the recipe from Tasting Table.

     

    We first encountered faludeh, Persian rose water sorbet, years ago. It was an eye-opening frozen dessert among the many jewels at the ice cream emporium of Mashti Malone, in Los Angeles—to us, the most magical ice cream emporium in America.

    We couldn’t believe how good it was—as is everything at Mashti Malone. Transliterated from the Arabic, you may also see it spelled faludeh or faloodeh, and also falude or palude.

    A sidebar: The Mashti Malone ice cream shop is owned by Mashti and Mehdi Shirvani, two brothers from the northeastern Iranian city of Mashhad. In 1980, Mashti bought an ice cream shop called Mugsy Malone on the corner of La Brea and Sunset in Hollywood. Because he had little money left over for a new sign, he simply replaced “Mugsy” with “Mashti,” and a legend was born.

    WHAT IS FALUDEH

    Faludeh is one of the earliest known frozen desserts; it has been dated to ca. 400 B.C.E. in Persia. Flavored with rose syrup, which also delivers a flowery scent, it’s a cross between shaved ice or granita, and sorbet.

    Raw angel hair or vermicelli noodles, made from rice starch or corn flour and water, are mixed in. The result: a unique frozen dessert and sensory eating experience.

    We’ve had Asian and Middle Eastern ice cream flavors before, but the rose water sorbet is a truly refreshing experience. The sorbet melts on the tongue, leaving the al dente rice starch noodles to crunch.

    Unusual as it may sound, the noodles provides are so delightful that you may try adding them to other granita and sorbet flavors.

    In its region of origin, it is a favorite dessert and party food.

  • Faludeh is served in one of two ways: ba limoo, with a splash of fresh lime juice or lime wedges; or ba albaloo, with a drizzle or sour cherry syrup. Or both!
  • We tried it with lemon juice and yuzu juice, too. Our favorite was yuzu juice and a lime wedge. The acidic citrus balances the floral, sweet flavors of the sweet rose flavors.
  • Pistachios and mint are popular garnishes.
  • Variations in texture, syrups and other ingredients exist across the Middle East, India and Pakistan.
  • In Iran, a scoop of faludeh is often served with a scoop of saffron-pistachio ice cream, a combination known as makhloot. It can be turned into a sundae with a splash of sour cherry syrup, and maybe a few sour cherries.
  •  
    Mashti Malone also makes saffron ice cream, and it is divine. Field trip, anyone?
     
     
    MAKING FALUDEH

    We tried a few different recipes in preparation for this article. The recipe below is a hybrid, taking what has worked for us to attain the best flavor with the simplest technique.

    Serve it in a bowl, on a plate, in a coupe or Martini glass.

    These days, faludeh can easily be made into granita; but we think that churning it into a smooth sorbet makes it even more magnificent.

    The rose water and rose syrup purchased for the occasion also are a delicious enhancement to vanilla ice cream.

  • Add rose water if you make your own vanilla ice cream.
  • You can also soften a pint of store-bought vanilla and vigorously whisk in the rose water, returning it to th4 freezer to harden.
  • In addition to refreshing yourself in the heat of the summer, also make faludeh on Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day. It is, in essence, edible roses.

     
    RECIPE: FALUDEH

    This recipe is granita-style, for those who don’t have an ice cream maker.

    If for some reason you don’t want to use noodles, you can substitute pistachio nuts or just enjoy the rose granita plain.

    If you’re a kitchen over-achiever, here are recipes to make your own rice starch noodles and cherry syrup.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon rose water
  • 1 ounce dried rice sticks or rice vermicelli noodles
  • Fresh lime juice or lime wedges
  • Traditional garnishes: lime wedge, sour cherries and/or sour cherry syrup (but you can substitute raspberries and/or raspberry syrup), pistachios (whole or chopped), mint leaves
  • Western-style garnishes: fresh berries, mint leaves
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the sugar and water in a small saucepan. Simmer over medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat and stir in the rose water. Set aside and let the syrup cool completely.

    2. PLACE the noodles in a heatproof bowl. Cover with boiling water and let stand until soft, about five minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Cut or tear noodles into two-inch pieces. Next time, if wish, you can try longer longer noodles. When softened, drain.

    3. PLACE the noodles and syrup in a shallow pan or metal ice cube tray (anything that works for granita) and place it in the freezer for an hour. Then remove it, stir it with a fork and return to the freezer for another hour.

    4. RAKE the granita with a fork, and return to the freezer until the desired consistency is reached, about one to three hours. To serve…

    5. RAKE with a fork (like granita), and scoop the faludeh into bowls. Garnish as desired and serve with fresh lime juice or lime wedges.

     

    HISTORY OF FALUDEH

    Faludeh is originally from Shiraz in southwestern Persia/Iran, known as the city of poets, literature, wine and flower. The dessert is is also known as Shirazi Paludeh.

    Faludeh is one of the earliest forms of frozen desserts, with references found as early as 400 B.C.E.. At that time, ice was brought down from the mountains and stored in tall refrigerated buildings called yakhchals, which were kept cool by windcatchers.

    The recipe for faludeh was brought to the Indian subcontinent during the Mughal period, the 16th to 18th centuries. Their cooks adapted it into a cold dessert beverage called falooda.

    A Brief History Of Frozen Desserts

    A brief history of ice cream and its predecessor, frozen fruit juice (sorbet), begins around 2000 B.C.E. Around 4,000 years ago, the Chinese elite enjoyed a frozen dessert. The earliest may have been a frozen syrup, mixed with overcooked rice and spices, and packed in snow to harden.

    Later, a mixture of snow and saltpeter was poured over the exteriors of containers filled with syrup. In the same way that salt raises the boiling-point of water, it lowers the freezing-point to below zero.

    Fruit ices were also developed, prepared with fruit juices, honey and aromatic spices. Through trade routes, frozen desserts were introduced to the Persians about 2,500 years ago.

    (The Persian Empire includes the countries now known as Iran, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Turkey and portions of western China and northern Iraq.)

    The Persians drank syrups cooled with snow called sharbat (“fruit ice” in Arabic, and the derivation of sherbet, sorbet and sorbetto). Alternatively, you can envision fruit syrups poured over a dish of snow

    The Macedonian king Alexander III (Alexander the Great) battled the Persians for 10 years before finally toppling the Persian Empire in 330 B.C.E.

    In Persia, he discovered fruit “ices” sweetened with honey and chilled with snow, and brought the concept back to Greece—although the early form of faludeh he knew probably had no noodles.

    Three centuries later, Roman Emperor Nero’s famous banquets always included fruit juices mixed with honey and snow. At that point, it was granita, roughly-shaved ice. As technology improved, smooth sorbet emerged in Renaissance Italy.

    And the rest is sweet, sweet history.

     

    Faluda

    [5] In India, faludeh was turned into a drink for Mughlai royalty, called falooda (photo courtesy Merwyn’s Fotomac).

    Rice Sticks

    [6] Rice sticks (rice vermicelli) can be found in the Asian products aisle or online. You can similarly find rose water and sour cherry syrup.

     
    Around the same time, during the Mughal Empire in 1526-1540, faludeh traveled to India with Muslim merchants who settled there. There, it was transformed by locals into a drink, falooda (photo #5), a “float” rose syrup, vermicelli, sweet basil seeds and pieces of jelly with milk.

    Modern falooda is often topped off with a scoop of ice cream.

    By the way, both sorbetto/sharbat and pasta arrived in Italy with the Arab invasions of Sicily, in the 8th century (the Marco Polo story is a myth—see the history of pasta).

    Italian granita was born, flavored with fresh citrus, a wide range of fruits and coffee. The Italian cooks left out the noodles.

    Here’s more on the history of ice cream and other frozen desserts.

      

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    TOP PICKS OF THE WEEK: Muuna Cottage Cheese, Oui Yogurt & More

    Muuna Strawberry Cottage Cheese
    [1] Muuna’s cottage cheese cups with fruit on the bottom come in 6 fruit flavors (photo courtesy Muuna).

    Oui By Yoplait - Strawberry
    Yoplait’s new French-style yogurt line will have you saying “Oui!” (photo courtesy Oui By Yoplait).

    Reuse-a-Pop

    [3] Reuse-A-Pop is a mess-free opportunity for you to make your favorite flavor push-up ice pops (photo courtesy Russbe).

     

    1. MUUNA COTTAGE CHEESE WITH FRUIT

    We were probably the last person in New York to buy Breakstone Pineapple Cottage Cheese before they discontinued it. It was the Ascension Of Yogurt Era, and grocers eliminated slower-moving SKUs to give the space to the hot ones.

    Now, a new brand called Muuna is offering all the fruited cottage cheese our heart desires (photo #1). The line is lowfat and creamy, with the fruit on the bottom that you mix up, like a carton of sundae-style yogurt.

    It’s also rich in protein: 15g of protein per 5.3-ounce cup.

    The fruit is not the typical preserves at the bottom of of the cup but actual chopped fruit, in your choice of:

  • Blueberry
  • Mango
  • Peach
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberry
  •  
    There are also two plain options: 2% and 4% milkfat.

    The line is all natural, non-GMO, rBST-free and certified kosher by cRc.

    Welcome back, pineapple cottage cheese—and hello to you other flavors. You’re our Top Pick Of The Week.
    ________________

    *See the different types of yogurt.
     
     
    2. OUI BY YOPLAIT YOGURT

    Our co-Top Pick is the new Oui by Yoplait line of yogurt (photo #2). It’s different from every other container of Yoplait you’ve had.

    Eating yogurt from the perky glass jar, you could imagine you’re in France. The jar (repurposeable or recyclable) makes you look cool and in-the-know. And the yogurt does not disappoint.

    The company calls it saveur d’autrefois, the taste of yesteryear.

    Yoplait’s foray into premium, French-style yogurt (also called custard-style and Swiss-style) is on point, hitting the trending consumer checklist for all natural, non-GMO and reduced sugar products. The eight flavors include:

  • Black Cherry
  • Blueberry
  • Coconut
  • Lemon
  • Peach
  • Plain
  • Strawberry
  • Vanilla
  •  
    A final endorsement comes from the secretary of our building, with whom we shared our samples. She is a native of Greece who eats Greek yogurt every day. Her feedback: “Outstanding!”

    The line is certified kosher (dairy) by OK.
     
     
    3. RUSSBE REUSE-A-POP BAGS

    Russbe creates reusable lunch containers, but that’s not a product we have need for.

    What we do need, and love, are the Reuse-A-Pops bags for creating homemade frozen juice pops, puréed fruit, yogurt, and other frozen pops.

    The push-up bags (photo #3) with zipper seals ensures no messy leaks or spills. Freeze, enjoy, wash, reuse. At $6.99 for 12, you can’t go wrong.

    We just enjoyed our first batch: watermelon (from watermelon juice), cantaloupe (from puréed melon) and yogurt-garlic-dill (who says ice pops have to be sweet?). Yum!

     

    4. DI GIORNO CRISPY PAN PIZZA

    We live in a neighborhood where crisp, thin-crust pizza is what grown-ups eat. When people order from Pizza Hut, it’s for the kids.

    We have a reputation to uphold, and hesitate to be seen carrying a deep-dish pizza into the building, no matter how much we need that specific comfort food.

    But there’s a solution for our cravings: DiGiorno Crispy Pan Pizza, a frozen pizza from the supermarket in its own pan.

    The one-inch-plus-deep crispy crust pie, with extra cheese and plenty of toppings, comes in four flavors:

  • Pepperoni
  • Four Cheese
  • Supreme
  • Three Meat
  •  
    We like everything on our pie (or as much of it as we can get). We went for the Supreme: pepperoni, sausage, green and red peppers and black olives.

     

    DiGiorno Crispy Pan Pizza

    [3] Pan pizza in four flavors stays in the freezer. Twelve minutes in the oven delivers steaming, aromatic comfort food (photo courtesy DiGiorno).

     
    In just 12 minutes we pulled the pie—a crunchy outside and a soft inside— fragrant and bubbling from the oven.

    Now, we just have to clear out the freezer to make room for more DiGiorno boxes.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Ice Cream Toppings Beyond The Usual

    Most of us use particular condiments on foods out of habit. The convention differs among countries.

  • Americans might use steak sauce while Argentinians use chimichurri.
  • In the U.S., it’s maple syrup that goes on top of pancakes. In Eastern Europe and elsewhere it’s jam, in the U.K. it’s golden syrup, a.k.a. light treacle, a thick, amber-colored inverted sugar syrup that looks like honey, without honey’s distinctive flavor notes.
  •  
    Ice cream toppings around the world vary as well.

  • In the U.S., sweet sauces and whipped cream rule (photo #1).
  • In Japan, you might go for red bean sauce, mochi bits, gelatin and more (photo #2).
  •  
    On the last day of National Ice Cream Month (July), we went on an adventure by looking around the kitchen to see what we could put on ice cream, beyond our standard inventory of chocolate and caramel sauces.

    You can have the same adventure. Look beyond those and the other usual sauces (butterscotch, peanut butter, raspberry) or garnishes (candies, cookies, fruit, nuts), to what you may logically not think of.

    We invited some friends and a few quarts of vanilla and chocolate ice cream, to pair with our atypical ice cream toppings. We also found some “matching garnishes” and made a sundae event of it all.
     
    WHAT WE FOUND IN OUR KITCHEN

    BIRCH SYRUP, which has similar uses as maple syrup (more about it). Garnish: Corn Flakes.

    CHOPPED VEGETABLES, like raw corn kernels and sugar snap peas. We tried a mix of raw corn, popcorn and crunchy Inca corn kernels (like Corn Nuts), and had a heck of a corn sundae. These were the garnishes; we topped the ice cream with some golden syrup. If only we could have found some corn ice cream (recipe #1 and recipe #2).

    COCONUT SYRUP, a popular pancake syrup and sweetener in Hawaii. Toss on some flaked coconut.

    DATE SYRUP, called silan in Arabic, which refers to what we would call date honey, date molasses or date syrup. Garnishes: chopped dates and other dried fruits.

     

    Hot Fudge Sundae
    [1] Fudge, caramel, whipped cream and a cherry on top (photo courtesy Morton’s).

    Japanese Sundae

    [2] Red beans, marshmallows, gelatin, and more in Japan (photo courtesy Sumally).

     
    FLAVORED SALT, a few crunchy grains as garnish on top of the ice cream. We have a lot of these salts, from smoked salt to flavored salts (matcha, truffle, etc.). We’re glad to have another use for them (more about them). Especially nice with honey and maple syrup.

    GOLDEN SYRUP, the pancake syrup of choice in the U.K., also used on ice cream (more about it). Garnish: anything you want.

    HONEY: Plain honey is fine, but we loved using our flavored honeys (chile, cinnamon, lavender). Garnish: fresh fruit.

    LIGHT MOLASSES, a.k.a. sweet molasses, also used as pancake syrup or a sweetener, especially in the south and other areas that had no maple trees. Garnish: anything.

    MAPLE SYRUP: We used a walnut and raisin garnish. Trail mix works, too. And those crunchy Corn Flakes.

    OLIVE OIL: Mild or grassy olive oils (link) make a delightful drizzle. Top with some crunchy sea salt.

    PIE FILLING: No extra garnish is required, but we threw on some granola.

    SIMPLE SYRUP, the flavored syrups used at coffee shops to make your hazelnut (or other flavor) latte. Garnish: anything you like.

    SPICES: cayenne, chipotle powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, etc. For richer flavor, toast the spices in a hot dry pan until they release their aroma.
     
     
    Does this sound strange to you?

    We had such a good time, we’re going to do it again, with other flavors of ice cream.

      

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