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Archive for Food Holidays

RECIPE: Turkey Neck Soup

Broth With Vegetables

Turkey Necks

[1] The vegetables in this soup are made with a vegetable spiralizer. (photo courtesy Wholesomeness.au). [2] Turkey necks ([photo courtesy Oma’s Pride).

 

THE NIBBLE first created its Daily Food Holiday Calendar in 2004. But it’s taken us this long to address one of the more unusual holidays: National Turkey Neck Soup Day, March 30th.

Turkey neck soup is a concept we’d only come across on the calendar. This year, for the first time, we had enough down time to wonder:

Who established a holiday for turkey neck soup?

And do you need more than one turkey neck?

We couldn’t find an answer to who, but it turns out that turkey neck soup is a more economical way to feed a family than, say chicken or turkey soup made with the main parts of the poultry.

And yes, you do need more than one turkey neck. Some people freeze the necks from the giblets bags that come in whole turkeys and chickens, until they have enough.

You can buy turkey necks in the poultry department of supermarkets from Perdue and Shady Brook Farms, along with non-branded packages.

Turkey necks themselves are bony, but they do have meat; and thus can be used to make that Paleo diet darling, bone broth.

Want to make turkey neck soup?

  • The classic, economical recipe combines turkey necks with root vegetables—carrots, parsnips, rutabaga, turnips—plus onion, celery and parsley. Potatoes, noodles or rice can bulk up the recipe. Here’s a recipe.
  • A variation, this recipe uses two pounds of turkey necks, with the more elegant leeks and mushrooms as the main vegetables, plus a carrot and onion. It employs a mix of brown rice and wild rice to create a heartier meal soup.
  • Some recipes called “turkey neck soup” start with the entire carcass from a roast turkey dinner. The neck from the giblets bag is usually available to toss in; and perhaps the other giblets, if they didn’t go into the gravy.
  •  
    However, if a so-called turkey neck soup has a good portion of turkey meat, then it’s regular turkey soup. If cooks have all that meat at hand, they don’t need to focus on the neck.

    For the first time in 13 years, we bid you a Happy National Turkey Neck Soup Day.
     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Deconstruct Your Favorite Foods

    For National Black Forest Cake Day, March 28th, we deconstructed the Black Forest Cake (photo #1), inspired by the dessert (photo #2) at Compère Lapin in New Orleans.

    We had so much fun with it, that today’s tip is: Deconstruct one of your favorite recipes.

    Here’s what we did with Black Forest Cake:

    Instead of a chocolate layer cake with cherry filling, garnished with shaved chocolate and whipped cream, we followed Compère Lapin’s lead with:

  • An individual chocolate round covered with ganache.
  • A side of morello cherries in kirshwasser (cherry liqueur).
  • A scoop of cherry sorbet atop a bed of flakes of grated chocolate.
  •  
    We like the deconstructed even better than the traditional.

  • It’s elegant and sophisticated, as opposed to the old-fashioned layer cake with whipped cream.
  • The richness of the chocolate ganache added an intense chocolate hit, lacking in the original.
  • The morello cherries in kirschwasser added just the right counterpoint to a sweet dessert.
  •  
    Serve it with a liqueur glass (or snifter, or jigger) of kirschwasser.

    If this seems like too much work, here’s a super-easy deconstructed Black Forest Cake:

    Take a slice of chocolate pound cake, chocolate sour cream cake or even a brownie. Top with the Red Sour Cherry Topping from Chukar Cherries (or a quality cherry pie filling) cooked with kirschwasser, and a generous topping or side of whipped cream.

       

    Black Forest Cake

    Deconstructed Black Forest Cake

    [1] A conventional Black Forest Cake (photo courtesy Sweet Street Desserts. [2] Black Forest Cake deconstructed, at Compère Lapin restaurant | New Orleans.

     
    There’s more about Black Forest Cake below, including its origin and a link to traditional recipes.

    WHAT ARE DECONSTRUCTED RECIPES

    Deconstruction is an avant-garde culinary trend of the last 15 years or so, championed by the famed Catalan chef Ferran Adrià, who has referred to his cooking as “deconstructivist.”

    Hervé This, the “father of molecular gastronomy,” reintroduced the concept in 2004 as “culinary constructivism.” Essentially, all of the components and flavors of a classic dish are taken apart and presented in a new shape or form.

    The idea is art plus fun, and the deconstruction must taste as good as the original. For example:

  • Deconstructed pecan pie could be brown sugar custard [emulating the filling], with crumbled shortbread cookies [for the crust] and a side of caramelized pecans.
  • Deconstructed key lime pie could be the key lime filling in a Martini glass, topped with graham cracker crumbs.
  • Deconstructed stuffed cabbage is our favorite way to make stuffed cabbage. We’ve done this for some 25 years—who knew we were so avant garde? We slice the cabbage and cook it in the tomato sauce (sweet-and-sour, with raisins and vinegar) along with rice-filled meatballs.
  •  
    The deconstruction saves hours of blanching cabbage leaves, filling them with chopped meat and rice, rolling them and simmering in tomato sauce.

    All the flavors are there, and it’s also easier to eat: One often needs a steak knife to saw through those blanched cabbage leaves. We say: Our deconstructed version is better than the original.

     

    The first “Black Forest Cake” was probably not a conventional cake but a dessert comprising cooked cherries, cream, kirsch and a biscuit: similar to the original berry shortcake.One of the quintessential Old World desserts, Black Forest Cake transports us to eras past, when the thought of chocolate cake, cherries, liqueur and whipped cream were a dessert equivalent of heaven.If you want to make a traditional Black Forest Cake, here’s a recipe.

      

    Deconstructed Buffalo Wings

    Deconstructed Buffalo Wings

    Two ways to deconstruct Buffalo Wings: [3] as a parfait (Hungry Girl) and as a chicken meatball topped with blue cheese (Carlos Andres Varela Photography).

     


    SOME DECONSTRUCTED RECIPES

    Study these for ideas. When you’ve created your own masterpiece of deconstruction, send us a photo.

  • Deconstructed Bloody Mary
  • Deconstructed Buffalo Wings #1
  • Deconstructed Buffalo Wings #2
  • Deconstructed Caesar Salad
  • Deconstructed Coffee Ice Cream
  • Deconstructed Crab Cake
  • Deconstructed Fruit Loops Cereal
  • Deconstructed Guacamole
  • Deconstructed Ratatouille

  • WHAT IS BLACK FOREST CAKE

    The Black Forest region of southern Germany is known for its sour morello cherries and kirsch, or kirschwasser, a clear cherry brandy made from them.

    It’s not surprising, then, that desserts made with both the cherries and the kirsch are part of the regional repertoire.

    Black Forest Cherry Torte—torte is the German word for cake and Schwarzwälderkirschtorte is its name in German—is a chocolate layer cake filled with layers of whipped cream and Kirsch-soaked morello cherries.

    The cake is garnished with more whipped cream, morello or maraschino cherries (the latter more readily available in the U.S.), and chocolate curls or shavings.

    In the traditional German cake, the chocolate layers are soaked in kirsch syrup, although brandy or rum can substitute. American recipes tend to omit all spirits to make the cake family-friendly (and nowhere near as interesting).

     

    The earliest version of the recipe possibly dates to the late 16th century, when cacao ground from costly New World beans was first integrated into cakes and cookies.

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    RECIPES: Spinach Salad with Pan-Seared Salmon & Other Recipes For National Spinach Day

    March 26th is National Spinach Day, and you know what that means: Eat some spinach to celebrate!

    This colorful, nutritious recipe (photo #1) makes a nice lunch or dinner. Fresh spinach, orange segments, peppers and red onion make a colorful base for salmon or other fish fillets.

    And there are many more recipes below, including spinach mashed potatoes: a great idea (photo #4).

    RECIPE #1: SPINACH SALAD WITH PAN-SEARED SALMON, ORANGES, RED ONION & AVOCADO

    The recipe, sent to us by the California Avocado Commission, is from Salmon: A Cookbook, by Diane Morgan (photo #3).

    Prep time is 10 minutes, cook time is 10 minutes.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • Fresly gound pepper
  • 7 cups (about 6 ounces) lightly packed baby spinach leaves
  • 1 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 1 red bell pepper, halved lengthwise, seeded, deribbed, and cut into long, thin slices
  • 2 navel oranges, peeled and white pith removed, cut into segments
  • 4 Copper River or other salmon fillets (about 5 ounces each), skin and pin bones removed
  • Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 ripe avocado, seeded, peeled, and cut into 16 thin wedges*
  • ________________

    *Brush the exposed avocado with olive oil or cover tightly with plastic wrap to prevent oxidation (browning). As with all fruits and vegetables, wash the avocado before cutting.
    ________________
     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the olive oil, vinegar, mustard and sugar in a small jar with a tight-fitting lid, with salt and pepper to taste. Cover tightly and shake vigorously to blend. Taste and adjust the seasonings; set aside.

    2. PLACE the spinach, onion and bell pepper in a large salad bowl. Put the orange segments in a separate, small bowl.

    3. SEASON the salmon on both sides with a bit of salt and pepper. Place a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. When the skillet is hot, add the remaining olive oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the salmon, skin-side down, and cook until the skin is crisp, about 4 minutes.

    4. CAREFULLY TURN the salmon and cook until the fillets are almost opaque throughout, but still very moist—or an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center registers 125°F to 130°F—about 4 minutes. Transfer to a warm plate and set aside while you toss the salad.

    5. TO SERVE: Add the orange segments to the salad bowl, give the dressing a last-minute shake, and pour it over the salad. Toss gently. Arrange the salad on 4 dinner plates. Place a salmon fillet in the center, on top of the salad; garnish each salad with 4 slices of avocado; and serve immediately.

       

    Spinach Salad With Salmon

    Fresh Spinach

    Salmon: A Cookbook

    Spinach Mashed Potatoes

    [1] Top a spinach salad with a salmon fillet (photo courtesy California Avocado Commission). [2] Pick up some perky, fresh spinach (photo courtesy Ocean Mist | Chronicle Books). [3] Thanks to Salmon: A Cookbook for this recipe (photo courtesy Chronicle Books). [4] Recipe #2: mashed potatoes and spinach (photo courtesy Idaho Potato Commission).

     
    RECIPE #2: SPINACH & MASHED POTATOES

    What a great idea! Sun chokes add another dimension to the recipe, but if you can’t find them or don’t want them, leave them out.

    In fact, here’s a very easy preparation for spinach mashed potatoes: Simply make mashed potatoes. Cook frozen spinach and press out the water. Blend with the mashed potatoes. Add butter or cream, garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Roasting a head of garlic (photo #5) and mashing it into the potatoes and spinach is a delicious idea.

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

  • 2 pounds Idaho/russet potatoes, washed but unpeeled
  • 1 head garlic
  • ½ pound sunchokes (Jerusalem artichokes)
  • 1 head (bulb) of garlic, unpeeled but with a half inch removed from the top
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon fresh cracked pepper
  • 1½ cups heavy cream, divided into ½ cup measure and 1 cup measure portions
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 3 cups packed baby spinach
  • Ice water bath for blanched baby spinach
  • Additional salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK the potatoes: Place the potatoes in cold water and heat the water to just below boiling. The water will be steaming but not moving. Cook the potatoes in the steaming water until fork tender, about 1½ hours.

    2. HEAT the oven to 350°F. Toss the sunchokes in olive oil and salt and pepper. Rub the garlic head with olive oil and wrap it in foil. Place the sun chokes and garlic on a sheet pan. While the potatoes are cooking…

     

    Roasted Garlic Head

    Spinach Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms

    Baked Spinach Chips

    [5] Roast garlic bulb (photo courtesy Domesticate Me). [6] Portabellas stuffed with spinach (here’s the recipe from Healthy Recipes Blog). [7] Baked spinach chips (here’s the recipe from Hungry Couple).

     

    3. ROAST the sunchokes and garlic until soft, 35 to 45 minutes. Remove them from the oven and turn down the oven temperature to 325°F. Squeeze the cloves from the garlic and set aside. Remove the cooked sunchokes from oven and puree with 1/2 cup cream, using an immersion blender or food processor.

    4. REMOVE the fork tender potatoes from the water. Place in the to dry the potato skins. While potato skins dry…

    5. HEAT a second pot of water to boiling, to blanch the spinach. While waiting for the water to boil, melt the butter in a small saucepan, and blend in the remaining cup of cream until hot. Set aside.

    6. PREPARE the ice bath (ice cubes in a bowl of water). Prepare the spinach in boiling water for two minutes. Remove it with a strainer and plunge into the ice water. Squeeze out the water and purée the spinach with a food processor or immersion blender. Set aside.

    7. REMOVE the potatoes from oven. Leave the skins on. In a large pot, smash the potatoes with a potato masher, adding small amounts of the hot cream/butter mixture as you go, until potatoes are fluffy. Squeeze in the garlic cloves and sunchoke purée and continue to smash. Fold in the puréed spinach. Adjust seasoning, adding salt and pepper to taste.
     
    THE HISTORY OF SPINACH

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), is native to central and western Asia (think ancient Persia). It is a member of the botanical family Amaranthaceae, which also includes amaranth, beet, chard, lamb’s quarters (mache) and quinoa, plus numerous flowering house and garden plants.

    At some point, spinach was introduced to India and subsequently to Nepal. It arrived in China around 647 C.E., where it was known as “Persian vegetable.”

    It became a popular vegetable in the Arab Mediterranean, and in 827 was brought to Italy by the Saracens. It arrived in Spain by the latter part of the 12th century, and in Germany by the 13th century.

    Spinach first appeared in England and France in the 14th century and quickly became popular because it could be harvested in early spring, when other vegetables were scarce.

    Spinach was supposedly the favorite vegetable of Catherine de’ Medici (1519-1589), wife of King Henry II of France. Dishes served on a bed of spinach are known as “Florentine” after her birthplace, Florence.

    “Florentine” dishes are sometimes served with Mornay sauce, a béchamel sauce with cheese (usually Gruyère or Parmesan).

     
    MORE SPINACH RECIPES

  • Artichoke & Spinach Stuffed Potato
  • Beet, Spinach & Apple Salad
  • Cheese Tortellini Recipe With Spinach & Wild Mushrooms
  • Creamed Spinach Without The Cream
  • Curried Spinach Tart
  • Grill-Wilted Spinach With Tzatziki
  • Kansas City Crab Grass Dip (warm crab and spinach dip)
  • Mushrooms, Ramps & Spinach Tart
  • Penne Pasta Salad With Spinach
  • Portabella Mushrooms With Spinach Stuffing
  • Pxali, Georgian spinach dip with walnuts
  • Savory Spinach Bread Pudding
  • Shrimp & Grilled Spinach Pizza
  • Spanakopita, Greek spinach pie
  • Spinach & Artichoke Dip
  • Spinach Dip: 13 Ways To Use It
  • Spinach & Grapefruit Salad With Dijon-Honey Vinaigrette
  • ats/stuffed-pork-roast-recipe.asp” target=”_blank”>Spinach-Stuffed Pork Roast
  • Turkey & Peanut Butter Club Sandwich With Spinach
  • Warm Spinach & Mascarpone Dip (also great on baked potatoes)
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    TIP OF THE DAY: Quick & Easy Paella Recipe For National Paella Day

    March 27th is National Paella Day. Many people think that paella is a complex, time-consuming dish—and classic recipes can be.

    But you can make this simplified version from Good Eggs easily on any weeknight.

    After 20 minutes of prep time, 20 mins active time plus 40 minutes simmer time.

    RECIPE: SPRING SHRIMP PAELLA

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and cleaned
  • Optional: 1/2 pound mussels or clams
  • ¾ cup arborio rice, rinsed
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • ¼ teaspoon (generous) saffron threads
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed or minced
  • 12 ounces fresh spring peas or snap peas, cut on a diagonal (or a mix)
  • 1¼ cups chicken broth
  • 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt, more as desired
  • Garnish: 1/3 cup fresh parsley, roughly chopped (save the stems*)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PLACE a large pan over medium heat (a skillet or roasting pan will do). Add in 2-3 Tbsp of olive oil, and add the onions. Crush the saffron threads between your fingers and sprinkle over the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally until softened. Add in the garlic and cook for another minute.

    2. ADD the rice, broth, lemon juice and zest, and stir until well combined. Turn the heat to high and bring liquid the to a boil. Cover, turn the heat to low, and simmer for 25 minutes.

    3. ADD the peas and 1 teaspoon salt, and stir to blend. Cover and simmer another 10 minutes. Taste and season with more salt if desired.

    4. PLACE the shrimp in an even layer on top of the mixture. Don’t stir, but cover and cook another 10 minutes.

    5. REMOVE the cover and turn the heat to medium. Continue to cook without stirring until the shrimp are fully cooked. Watch carefully to avoid burning the bottom, although a golden-brown crunchy, crusty rice bottom crust—called soccorat—is ideal.

    ________________

    *Save the parsley stems: They add excellent flavor to soups and stews. Parsley stems also prevent artichokes from browning. Just drop them in a bowl of water with the cut artichokes. You can store the stems in the freezer.
     
    MORE ABOUT PAELLA

  • Paella History & Types
  • Paella On The Grill
  •  
     
    WHAT IS ARBORIO RICE

    If you want a creamy risotto or paella, you need to use Arborio rice.

    This medium-length, round-grained rice is named after the town of Arborio, in Italy’s Po Valley, where it is grown. The grains have a more beige color with a characteristic white dot at the center of the grain.

     

    Easy Shrimp Paella

    Shrimp Paella

    Scoop Of Arborio Rice

    [2] You don’t need a special paella pan like this one; but here’s why it helps—plus other uses for it (photo courtesy Imusa). [3] Arborio rice: more beige, and much more creamy when cooked (photo courtesy A Sassy Radish).

     
    Developed to create creamy risottos, Arborio rice develops its creamy texture around a chewy center (the creaminess comes from a high starch content). It has an exceptional ability to absorb flavors.

    Arborio is a cultivar of japonica rice, the same variety that produces the other “sticky rices” including mochi and sweet rice.

    Pricier, creamier rices developed by Italians for their beloved risotto are canaroli rice and vialone nano.

    Rice pudding fans: These three rice varieties make creamier rice pudding, too.

    Here are the different types of rice.

      

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    RECIPE: Melba Toast

    Melba Toast & Crostini

    Pate & Melba Toast

    Salmon Tartare & Melba Toast

    Raincoast Crisps

    Raincoast Crisps Copycat Recipe

    [1] Melba toast and olive tapenade. Here’s the recipe from Sprinkles & Sprouts. [2] Chicken liver paté and Melba toast, with a dab of marmalade. Here’s the recipe from Drizzle And Drip. [3] Salmon tartare and melba toast. Here’s the recipe from Olive Magazine. Crackers or crisps like these are thin and crunchy, but were baked that way. They are not toasted from bread, so are not toasts. [4] These are Raincoast Crisps (photo Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE), and [5] this is a copycat recipe from The Wandering Fig.

     

    March 23rd is National Melba Toast Day, celebrating dry, crisp and thinly sliced toasts.

    First, and with all due respect, packaged Melba toast has as much to do with homemade Melba toast as the Keebler Elves have with the best homemade cookies.

    Melba toast, which became a diet staple in the U.S. thanks to manufacturers such as Devonsheer and Old London, dates to the end of the 19th century.

    THE HISTORY OF MELBA TOAST

    Melba toast was born in 1897 at the Savoy Hotel in London, where the legendary French Chef Auguste Escoffier ruled the kitchen, and César Ritz ran the hotel. Dame Nellie Melba, the great Australian soprano, was a guest.

    There is an unsubstantiated tale that Melba toast was a mistake in the hotel kitchen; that the dieting diva asked for some dry toast which arrived as overtoasted, thin and crunchy slices. However, as with the story of the history of potato chips, the guest enjoyed the result.

    The more likely explanation is that Melba toast was created by Escoffier* either as a lower-calorie food for the singer, or as simple fare during a bout of illness in 1897 when she was unable to tolerate richer foodstuffs.

    It is said that César Ritz bestowed the name Melba toast, and put it on the menu.

    Since then, manufacturers have marketed Melba toast as a reduced-calorie bread option.

    But for those who want to enjoy a piece of Melba toast, modern crostini are a much closer match.

    MELBA TOAST & CROSTINI VS. CRACKERS & CRISPS: THE DIFFERENCE

    Those thin toast points served with caviar, pâté and steak tartare…those crunchy toasts served with cheese…are they Melba toast?

    And what do they have to do with biscotti and bruschetta?

    Melba Toast Vs. Crostini

    These two are very similar. Both are cut from a loaf of bread and toasted. However:

  • Melba toast is toasted dry, saving calories.
  • Crostini are brushed with olive oil, and can be thicker than Melba toast.
  • Thin toast points made without added fat (butter, oil), as served with caviar, pâté, etc., are also Melba toast.
  •  
    Melba Toast Vs. Crackers/Crisps/Toasts

    In the U.S., makers of artisan crackers sometimes call them crisps, to sound more elegant. That works in the U.S., but in the U.K., crisps are potato chips.

  • Melba toast is a slice of bread that is toasted.
  • Crackers and crisps are made from a dough that is baked to its finished size and shape. They are not slices of anything
  • Toasts, or party toasts, are actually bread that is dry-toasted like Melba toast. They are baked to size, sliced and then toasted until dry and crunchy. They are a miniature, thicker type of Melba toast.
  •  
    Bruschetta Vs. Crostini

  • Bruschetta are grilled, crostini are toasted.
  • Bruschetta are larger and thicker than crostini.
  • Here’s more on the differences between bruschetta and crostini.
  •  
    Melba Toast Vs. Biscotti/Rusks

    What about savory biscotti?

  • Biscotti are made from a dough that is shaped into a loaf, then baked. The biscotti are then cut from baked loaf and baked again: twice baked, like Melba toast.
  • They are also called rusks (and have a history with teething babies).
  • However, biscotti, also known as rusks, are much thicker and larger than Melba toast.
  •  
    WAYS TO SERVE MELBA TOAST

    Whatever you call them, serve them:

  • As a crostini base.
  • With dips.
  • With pâté, rillettes and other fish and meat spreads.
  • With soft cheeses and cheese spreads.
  • With salads and soups.
  •  
    Are you ready to toast your own?
     
    RECIPE: MELBA TOAST

    Melba toast is made by lightly toasting thin slices of bread in an oven or under a grill (no grill marks!), on both sides.

    The thin slices are then returned to the heat with the untoasted sides towards the heat source.

     
    Ingredients

  • 1 unsliced loaf of bread, 1 or 2 days old
  • Serrated knife, sharpened
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 250°F. Remove the crust from the loaf. You can save them and turn them into parmesan crisps, or let them dry out overnight and pulse (or use other technique) to make bread crumbs.

    2. DECIDE on your toasting technique. 3a. Cut the loaf into sections 3 inches thick. Cut each chunk into triangles, then cut each triangle into three or more thin slices. 3b. Lightly toast thick slices of bread. While still hot, slice horizontally into two; then create triangles or rectangles as you prefer.

    3. PLACE on a baking sheet and toast until golden brown. Toast bread in oven, flipping slices halfway through, until dry, about 2 hours. Rotate the baking sheet for even browning.

    4. COOL thoroughly. Then store in an airtight container.
     
     
    *MORE FOODS NAMED FOR NELLIE MELBA

    Escoffier created four foods in total in Melba’s honor. In addition to Melba toast, there are:

  • Peach Melba, a dessert made of peaches, raspberry sauce, and vanilla ice cream.
  • Melba Sauce, a dessert sauce of puréed raspberries and red currants.
  • Melba Garniture, tomato stuffed with chicken, truffles and mushrooms in velouté sauce.
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