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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Food Holidays/History/Facts

FOOD HOLIDAY: National Chocolate Eclair Day

June 22nd is National Chocolate Éclair Day. Le Méridien Hotels & Resorts has gone beyond mere classic chocolate, announcing the launch of a global éclair program helmed by the great Johnny Iuzzini, James Beard Award winner for Outstanding Pastry Chef. Le Méridien guests worldwide can indulge in a variety of modern twists on the Parisian pastry.

Chef Johnny will create eight seasonal éclair recipes, inspired by his travels through various Le Méridien destinations (tough job!). Each hotel will offer modern takes on three signature éclair flavors—chocolate, coffee and vanilla—as well as one locally inspired flavor.

You’ll find Maple Bacon Éclair and Texas Honey Pecan Éclair at Le Méridien Dallas, and Dulce de Leche Éclair, infused with coconut, at Le Méridien Panama. In Germany, Le Méridien Munich will offer a savory éclair with goat cheese, cranberry and pumpernickel crumbs, while Le Méridien Bangkok will feature a citrus-inspired treat with mango, lime and ginger.

How do we get onto the global Le Méridien éclair tour?

 

eclairs-iuzzini-lemeridien-230

Chef Johnny Iuzzini gets groovy with éclairs. Photo courtesy Le Meridien Hotels.

 

ÉCLAIR HISTORY

An elongated, finger-shaped pastry made of pâte à choux (puff pastry), filled with whipped cream or custard and topped with ganache or a glacé icing (glaze), the éclair is known to have originated in France around the turn of the 19th century. \

The Oxford English Dictionary traces the word “éclair” in the English language to 1861. The first known recipe for éclairs appears in the 1884 edition of the Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, edited by Mrs. D.A. Lincoln (and later by Fanny Farmer). “Éclair” is the French word for lightning. It is suggested that the pastry received its name because it glistens when coated with confectioner’s glaze. We would suggest that it is because they are so popular that they disappear as quickly as lightning.

Many food historians speculate that éclairs were first made by Marie-Antoine Carême (1874-1833). This brilliant man, cast out by his impoverished family at the age of 10, made his way in the world to become the first “celebrity chef.” He is considered to be the founder and architect of French haute cuisine; an enormously popular cookbook author and chef to Talleyrand, the future George IV of England, Emperor Alexander I of Russia and Baron James de Rothschild. The elite clamored for invitations to dinners cooked by Carême.

We can only dream…and live vicariously by reading his biography.

  

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FOOD HOLIDAY: National Vanilla Milkshake Day & A Spiked Milkshake

Twist and Shout Shake-hardrockcafe-230

Shake guinness and spiced rum with vanilla ice cream. Photo courtesy Hard Rock Cafe.

 

Get ready for tomorrow, June 20th: National Vanilla Milkshake Day. Here are two spiked vanilla milkshakes courtesy Hard Rock Cafe.

RECIPE: SALTED CARAMEL VANILLA MILKSHAKE WITH
GUINNESS & SPICED RUM

Hard Rock calls this the “Twist and Shout.”

Ingredients For 1 Shake

  • 2 ounces Guinness Draught
  • 1 ounce Bacardi OakHeart or other spiced rum
  • ½ ounce dark Crème de Cacao
  • ½ ounce chocolate Syrup
  • ½ ounce Monin Salted Caramel Syrup
  • 2 scoops vanilla ice cream
  • Optional garnishes: crispy bacon or candied bacon, whipped cream
  •  

    1. COMBINE ingredients in a blender. Pour into a tall glass.

    2. GARNISH as desired and serve.

     

     

    RECIPE: VANILLA & PEAR MILKSHAKE WITH BEER & VODKA

    Want something fruitier? Hard Rock’s “Voodoo Brew” is a beer-based shake with blueberry vodka and pear syrup.

    Ingredients For 1 Shake

  • 2 ounces Shock Top or other Belgian white ale
  • 1 ounces Smirnoff or other blueberry vodka
  • ¾ ounces Monin desert pear syrup
  • 2 scoops vanilla ice cream
  • Optional garnishes: fresh blueberries, pear slices, whipped cream
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE ingredients in a blender. Pour into a tall glass.

    2. GARNISH as desired and serve.
     

    Here’s another vanilla milkshake recipe and the history of the milkshake.

     

    smirnoff-blueberry-vodka-bkgd-230

    Use beers, liqueurs or flavored vodkas to spike conventional milkshakes. Photo courtesy Smirnoff.

     

      

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    FOOD HOLIDAY: Easy Cherry Tart

    cherry-tart-seandooley-redjacketorchardsFB-230r

    Queen Anne cherries in a tart for National
    Cherry Tart Day. Photo courtesy Sean Dooley
    | Red Jacket Orchards..

     

    Today is National Cherry Tart Day. You’d be surprised how easy it is to make a delicious cherry tart—or any fruit tart.

    Pick any seasonal pie fruit—currently apricots, figs, nectarines, plums and strawberries. Don’t bother with a filling: You won’t notice it with the delicious fruit and the delicious crust.

    You can buy or make crème fraîche; here’s a recipe. Or, substitute vanilla ice cream.

    Prep time is 90 minutes.

    RECIPE: EASY FRUIT TART

    Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups all purpose flour, plus more for rolling
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 11 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
  • 1 egg yolk, beaten
  • 2-1/2 to 3 pounds fruit: apricots, cherries, figs, nectarines, peaches, plums, etc.
  • 6 tablespoons red currant jelly, melted
  • Garnish: 1 cup crème fraîche, for serving (recipe)
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 375°F. COMBINE flour, salt and 2 tablespoons of the sugar in a bowl or food processor. Dice 8 tablespoons of the butter. Use a pastry blender or two knives to blend the flour mixture and butter in a bowl until crumbly, or pulse them together in a food processor.

    2. BEAT the egg yolk with 3 tablespoons of cold water. Dribble over the flour mixture, then stir (in bowl) or pulse slowly (in food processor) until the mixture starts clumping together. Add more water as necessary. Shape the dough into a loose ball and form into a disk on a lightly floured surface.

    3. ROLL out the dough and line a 10-inch loose-bottom fluted tart pan. Cover the pastry with a sheet of foil and place pastry weights or dry beans on top. Bake for 12 minutes, then remove foil and weights from the crust. Return the crust to the oven and continue baking until it is lightly browned, another 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from oven; increase temperature to 400°F.

    4. PIT and slice the fruit: cherries in half, most other fruit in eighths, figs or other small fruit in fourths.

    5. BRUSH the crust with the melted preserves (this prevents the crust from becoming soggy). Arrange the fruit in tight concentric circles, skin side down, starting with the perimeter. The fruit should “stand up.”

    6. MELT the remaining butter on low and cook until it turns a light nut brown. Brush the fruit with the butter and dust with the remaining sugar.

    7. BAKE 35 to 40 minutes, until the edges of the crust have browned but fruit is still perky (not collapsed). Cool and serve with crème fraîche.

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Savory Parmesan & Garlic Doughnuts

    garlic-parmesan-donuts-elegantcaterers-230r

    Serve savory Parmesan-garlic doughnuts
    with cocktails or beer. Photo courtesy Elegant
    Affairs Caterers | NYC.

     

    It’s National Donut (or Doughnut) Day, and your chance to do something you’ve probably never done before: make savory Garlic Parmesan Donuts.

    They’re delicious with wine, beer or cocktails, and the recipe is easy! It’s from caterer Andrea Correale, founder of Elegant Affairs Caterers in New York City.

    The donuts require very little prep time and are served with purchased or homemade tzatziki, fresh pico de gallo salsa, and/or a spicy Thai cucumber relish.

    RECIPE: GARLIC PARMESAN DOUGHNUTS WITH DIPPING SAUCES

    Ingredients For 6 Doughnuts

  • 1 cup rolled oats, ground into oat flour in blender or food processor
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • A pinch of savory seasoning blend*
  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs, chopped (rosemary and thyme work well)
  •  
    *You can purchase savory seasoning blend or make your own. Here’s a recipe from McCormick: Combine 1-1/2 teaspoons oregano, 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1 teaspoon garlic powder, 1 teaspoon paprika, 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper. Store in an airtight container.

    Preparation
     
    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F and grease the doughnut pan. Combine oat flour, baking powder, salt and savory seasoning in a bowl.

    2. WHISK together the butter, egg, buttermilk and garlic in a separate bowl. Slowly add liquid mixture to dry ingredients and stir to combine. It will be lumpy. Gently fold in herbs and cheese.

    3. SPOON the batter into the doughnut pan, filling it almost to top (leave about a 1/8″ space).

    4. BAKE 10 minutes. Remove from oven and allow cooling for 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.

    5. SERVE donuts with tzatziki (Greek yogurt dip), fresh pico de gallo salsa (recipe below), and/or a spicy Thai cucumber relish (recipe below).

     

    RECIPE: PICO DE GALLO

    Ingredients

    Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups seeded, diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup diced red onion
  • 1 tablespoon diced green jalapeño
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CHOP vegetables as finely as possible.

    2. COMBINE ingredients in a bowl; season to taste. Refrigerate for an hour or more to allow flavors to blend.

     

    garlic-parmesan-donuts-elegantcaterers-dips-230

    Serve with a choice of dipping sauces. Photo courtesy Elegant Affairs Caterers | NYC.

     

    RECIPE: SPICY THAI CUCUMBER RELISH

    Ingredients

  • 1 large Japanese cucumber†, peeled, halved and thinly slices
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 1 small Thai chile or serrano chile, thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup white vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons palm sugar or brown sugar
  •  
    †The Japanese cucumber is a long, slender, dark green fruit that has few seeds. If you can’t find one, substitute another variety with few or no seeds.
     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE cucumber, shallot and chile slices in a small bowl.

    2. HEAT the vinegar, sugar and salt in a small saucepan, stirring, until the mixture reaches a boil and the sugar is dissolved, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, cool to room temperature, and then pour over cucumber mixture.

    3. GARNISH with cilantro leaves and set aside until ready to use.

      

    Comments

    FOOD 101: What’s A Kir? What’s A Margarita?

    It’s a teaching moment: When is a Kir not a Kir? Or a Margarita not a Margarita? Or a Martini not a Martini?

    Every drink made with vodka is not a Martini, every drink made with Tequila is not a Margarita. Yet, each week we are sent a mis-named recipe that only serves to misinform.

    Capricious cooks and mixologists, professionals and amateurs alike, give names to their recipes through ignorance or selfishness; for example, “We need a cocktail for St. Patrick’s Day. Let’s call this drink an Irish Kir.”

    An omelet is not a frittata. Both are beaten eggs with mix-ins. But for an omelet, the egg is cooked and then folded over the filling, while a frittata blends the mix-ins with the egg and cooks it like a crustless quiche, on the stove top or in the oven.

    Since much of our mission is education that you can imagine the consternation this causes.

    Here’s that “Irish Kir” story. Why didn’t we publish it around St. Patrick’s Day? We wanted to take a moment to note that regular or “royale,” it’s a delightful summer drink.

    So, let’s start at the beginning:

       

    Kir_cocktail-wiki-230

    A Kir is a combination of blackcurrant liqueur and white wine or sparkling white wine. The color is red. Photo courtesy Wikimedia.

     
    WHAT’S A KIR?

    Kir is a drink that was created by a major of Dijon, in France’s Burgundy region. For an apéritif, Félix Kir (1876-1968) added a splash of cassis (blackcurrant liqueur, a specialty of Burgundy) to Aligote, a local white wine.

    The “Kir,” as it was known, became very popular and led to eight different variations, the best known of which, the Kir Royale, substitutes Champagne for the still wine.

     

    green-sparkling-volcano-cocktail-blog.relishinteriors-230s

    Champagne and apple schnapps can be
    called lots of things, but not a Kir Royale.
    Photo courtesy RelishInteriors.com.

     

    THE PROBLEM

    We received a pitch from Benjamin Steakhouse Westchester for a St. Patrick’s Day cocktail called the “Shamrock Kir,” made of Champagne and Apple Pucker. Huh?

    It’s a recipe for a Champagne cocktail, but has nothing to do with Kir, the distinguishing feature of which is blackcurrant liqueur.

    Not to mention, a kir made with Champagne is a Kir Royale—so mis-name your cocktail an Irish Kir Royale, at least! Would any responsible person argue the facts otherwise?

    Said the email:

    “Add ½ oz of Apple Pucker or other apple schnapps to a Champagne flute and top of with Champagne or another sparkling wine. Those of you going to Benjamin Steakhouse Westchester and ordering the drink should be sure you’re getting authentic Champagne and not a less expensive sparkling wine.”

    Those of you going to Benjamin Steakhouse Westchester should ask why they call this drink a Kir of any kind, instead of a “Sparkling Shamrock,” for example.

    The teaching moment:

     

    The publicist who sent this pitch, her client, and all supervisors involved, clearly don’t fully grasp what they’re writing about. Would they call a yellow cake with chocolate frosting a chocolate cake?

    Ignorance isn’t bliss: It’s aggravating! To all those involved: You have the Internet at your fingertips. There’s no excuse not to do your research.

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: Rocky Road Bark For National Rocky Road Day

    rocky-road-bark-2-browneyedbaker-230

    Make it in 15 minutes! Photo courtesy Brown
    Eyed Baker.

     

    June 2 is National Rocky Road Day, a flavor created in 1929 when William Dreyer mixed chocolate ice cream with nuts and marshmallows, the “rocks” in the road. Here’s the history.

    Today, have a dish of rocky road ice cream and make some rocky road bark to go with it. Thanks to Brown Eyed Baker for this easy recipe. See more photos and the original article and more photos.

    Prep time is 15 minutes, total time 45 minutes.

    RECIPE: ROCKY ROAD CHOCOLATE BARK

    Ingredients For 1 Pound Of Bark

  • 16 ounces good-quality milk or semisweet
    chocolate (like Lindt), finely chopped
  • 1 cup miniature marshmallows
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  •  
    Preparation

    1. LINE a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

     

    2. MELT the chocolate over a double boiler (or in 30-second intervals in the microwave on 50% power, stirring after each). Once the chocolate is melted, remove from the heat and let sit for a few minutes to cool slightly, stirring occasionally. Add the marshmallows and walnuts and stir to combine.

    3. SPREAD the chocolate mixture onto the prepared pan in an even layer, covering about a 7×7-inch space. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but that’s a good guideline.

    4. REFRIGERATE for at least 30 minutes, or until set.

    5. CUT the bark into pieces, using a sharp knife. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

      

    Comments

    FOOD 101: What Is Comfort Food

    Banana Pudding

    Banana pudding is one of America’s favorite comfort foods. Here’s the recipe for this version. Photo by M. Sheldrake | IST.

     

    A tweet from FoodTimeline.org sent us to the site to drill down on the origins of comfort food.

    According to the site, the first record in print is in the magazine section of the Washington Post of December 25, 1977: “Along with grits, one of the comfort foods of the South is black-eyed peas.”

    Judith Olney’s book Comforting Food, published in 1979, began the discussion.

    There is no single definition or list of “comfort food.” Food psychologists note that provide solace and food feelings, and are typically items our loved ones cooked for us when we were children. Thus, favorite comfort foods are based on where you grew up and your heritage; for example, hush puppies or grits for Mississippians and bagels and lox or cheesecake for New Yorkers.

    Typically, comfort foods are:

  • Smooth & creamy (easy to chew and digest)
  • Carb intensive (give us energy)
  • Fondly remembered from childhood (good food memories)
  •  

    Here’s what comes up on the list of all-American comfort foods on About.com:

  • Apple pie
  • Baked beans
  • Banana pudding
  • Beef stew
  • Brisket pot roast
  • Chicken and dmplings
  • Chicken pot pie
  • Chicken soup
  • Chili
  • Chocolate chip cookies
  • Corn on the cob
  •  

    [Calling tech support: We have to add this full-width sentence here because our WordPress code is screwing up the formatting.]

  • Fried chicken
  • Gelatin (Jell-O)
  • Green bean casserole
  • Hot dogs
  • Ice cream
  • Macaroni and cheese
  • Mashed potatoes
  • Meatloaf
  • Potato salad
  • Pumpkin pie
  • Shepherd’s pie
  • Spaghetti
  • Tomato soup
  • Tuna casserole
  •  
    Hey, what happened to grilled cheese and rice pudding?

     

    Mackenzie-mac-cheese-230r

    Another all-American comfort food: macaroni and cheese. Photo courtesy Mackenzie Ltd.

     

      

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    FOOD FUN: Watermelon On A Stick ~ And Many, Many Other Foods

    Many people believe that everything tastes better on a stick. That’s why we consistently come across foods that have no need to be on a stick, served on a stick. County fairs and urban street fairs are full of them.

    We’re not talking about skewers, which make grilling and serving easier; or ice pops, candy apples or cotton candy, which require a stick to be held and eaten.

    No, many foods that were once served with a fork or a toothpick, with or without a dipping sauce, are now placed atop wooden ice-pop sticks. Consider chicken nuggets, fried ravioli, meatballs, mini franks, rumaki, bacon-wrapped baby potatoes and Caprese stacks. You can find them all on sticks.

    Why? It’s fun. (We hate to think, cynically, that the movement was started by manufacturers of the ice pop sticks.)

    We particularly liked the fun of watermelon slices on sticks: an idea for your upcoming Memorial Day festivities.

    The idea is from South Fork And Spoon, a Bridgehampton, New York-based caterer and “food concierge” that has a website full of tempting fare for lucky Hamptonians.

       

    watermelon-on-a-stick-southforkandspoon-230

    Watermelon on a stick: more elegant than hands-only, more fun than a fork. Photo courtesy South Fork And Spoon.

     

    Intrigued by watermelon-on-a-stick, we delved into the food-on-a-stick category.

    The Iowa State Fair touts “60 foods on a stick,” from hard-boiled eggs to deep-fried brownies. The blog Brit.co features 100 foods on a stick.

    Here’s a selection from both, which includes everything from junk food to elegant fare. Visit the sites directly to see the photos.
     
    BREAKFAST ON A STICK

  • Breakfast Sausage
  • Doughnut Holes
  • French Toast Squares
  • Griddle Stick (turkey sausage wrapped in a pancake)
  •  
    CANDY, FRUIT & SWEET SNACKS ON A STICK

  • Assorted Fruit & Cheese
  • Carmellows
  • Chocolate-Covered Tiramisu
  • Chocolate-Covered Turtle Mousse Bar
  • Deep-Fried Cupcake
  • Deep Fried Fresh Pineapple
  • Deep-Fried Milky Way & Snickers Bars
  • Fruit (with yogurt dipping sauce)
  • Monkey Tail (chocolate-covered banana)
  • Rock Candy
  • Salted Chocolate Dipped Almond Pretzel
  • Peanut Butter & Jelly
  •  

    sandwich-on-a-stick-onecharmingparty-230

    Sandwich on a stick. Photo courtesy
    OneCharmingParty.com.

     

    COOKIES, CAKE, PIE & ICE CREAM ON A STICK

  • Cake Pops
  • Cheesecake & Chocolate-Covered Deep Fried Cheesecake
  • Chocolate-Covered Chocolate Chip Cannoli
  • Chocolate-Covered Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Pop
  • Chocolate-Covered Frozen S’mores
  • Chocolate-Covered Key Lime Dream Bar
  • Chocolate-Covered Peanut Butter Bar
  • Coconut Mountain (coconut ball dipped in fresh chocolate)
  • Deep-Fried Brownie
  • Deep-Fried Ho-Ho, Twinkie & Twinkie Log (frozen Twinkie dipped in white chocolate and rolled in cashews)
  • Ice Cream Wonder Bar
  • Ice Cream Sandwich
  • Mini Pie Pops
  • Smoothie On-a-stick (frozen strawberry smoothie)
  • Strawberry Shortcake Pops (shortcake pieces, strawberries, whipped cream)
  •  

    MEAT & OTHER PROTEINS ON A STICK

  • Bacon Wrapped Pork Riblet
  • Cajun Chicken
  • Corndog & Cornbrat
  • Chicken Drumsticks & Thighs
  • German Sausage
  • Hard-Boiled Egg
  • Hot Bologna
  • Hot Lips (breaded chicken breast smothered with hot sauce, served with blue cheese dressing)
  • Octodog (hotdog in the shape of an octopus)
  • Pork Chop
  • Tandoori Tofu
  • Teriyaki Beef
  • Sesame Chicken
  •  
    SAVORY SNACKS ON A STICKv

  • Cheese Stacks or Fried Cheese Skewers
  • Deep-Fried Pickle
  • Grilled Cheese, Tomato & Basil
     
    VEGETABLES ON A STICK
  • Corn On the Cob
  • Grilled Pumpkin & Other Squash
  • Salad
  • Zucchini Lollipops (fried zucchini)
  •  
     
    RECYCLE THE STICKS

    There’s no reason not to collect, wash and reuse wood Popsicle sticks—or Wooden Treat Sticks or craft sticks, as they are more properly known (Popsicle is a trademarked name, not a generic term). Why throw things into the landfill when they can enjoy a second (or tenth) life?

      

    Comments

    FOOD HISTORY: Whipped Cream

    Today is National Strawberries and Cream Day, a dish that no doubt dates to a prehistoric day at the dawn of dairying, when fresh cream was poured over the wild strawberries of summer.

    Milk-producing animals have been domesticated for thousands of years, long before the ancient Egyptians believed that cows and bulls were earthly manifestations of their gods. They bred cows for milk and the cheese it yielded, as well as for meat and as field animals, to work the fields and power grain mills and irrigation works.

    The strawberry was mentioned in ancient Roman literature, in reference to medicinal use (it was used to treat depression!). It took until the 1300s for the French to realized its potential; in the 1300s, they replanted wild berries that grew in forests, in their gardens. Charles V, France’s king from 1364 to 1380, had 1,200 strawberry plants under cultivation in his royal garden.

    By the 16th century, strawberries and cream took advantage of the newly popular whipped cream, often sweetened for desserts. It was called milk snow in English, neve di latte in Italian and neige de lait in French.

    The French term crème fouettée, whipped cream, appeared in print in 1629, and the English “whipped cream” in 1673. The term “snow cream” continued in use through the 17th century.

       

    Eton mess strawberry dessert

    Strawberries and whipped cream. Photo © Studio Barcelona | Fotolia.

     

    In early recipes through the end of the 19th century, naturally separated cream was whipped, typically with willow or rush branches. The resulting foam on the surface was skimmed off and drained, a process taking an hour or more, and was repeated until enough cream had been skimmed. (We’d never complain about hand-whipping with an electric mixer!)

     

    strawberries-cream-tbd-230

    A thought for National Strawberries and
    Cream Day. Photo courtesy SXC.

     

    By the end of the 19th century, the industrial revolution had produced centrifuge-separated, high-fat cream. Now, cooks could buy the cream and whip it directly, without tedious hours of skimming it from the milk.

    Pastry chefs went to work containing a myriad of whipped cream desserts, shaped in molds, flavored with chocolate, coffee, fruits and liqueurs. Flavors folded into the cream or poured over it were called crème en mousse, cream in a foam. Other terms included crème fouettée, whipped cream; crème mousseuse, foamy cream; mousse*, foam; and crème Chantilly, Chantilly cream†.

     
    *Modern mousses are a continuation of this tradition. Source for this article: Wikipedia.

     
    Some people use the terms crème Chantilly and whipped cream interchangeably. But there is a difference:

  • Crème Chantilly is sweetened whipped cream.
  • Whipped cream is not sweetened (and in fact, is a better choice than Chantilly to accompany very rich desserts, where extra sugar in the cream is overkill).
  •  
    We’ll follow American tradition and use the one term, “whipped cream,” unless differentiation is required.

     
    MORE WHIPPED CREAM

  • How to make classic whipped cream.
  • Flavored whipped cream recipes: Bourbon Whipped Cream, Five Spice Whipped Cream, Lavender Whipped Cream, Salted Caramel Whipped Cream, Spice Whipped Cream
  • Savory whipped cream recipes: with lemon peel for fish and seafood; bourbon for grilled meats; grated Parmesan cheese for soup, meats, fish; horseradish for beef, smoked salmon, vegetables; herbs or spices for other recipes
  •  
    †The name Chantilly (pronounced shon-tee-YEE) was probably chosen because the Château de Chantilly in northern France had become known for its refined cuisine. There is no evidence that it was invented there, although its creation is often credited, incorrectly, to François Vatel, maître d’hôtel at the Château in the mid-17th century. The terms “crème Chantilly,” “crème de Chantilly,” “crème à la Chantilly” and “crème fouettée à la Chantilly” only become common in the 19th century.

      

    Comments

    HOLIDAY: Celebrate Nutella’s 50th Anniversary

    Nutella fans: This one’s for you.

    May 18th is the 50th anniversary of the debut of Nutella hazelnut spread. Do something special for yourself and fellow Nutella lovers:

    Sink your teeth into the Calzone di Nutella ($15), created by chef Chris D’Amico at New York restaurant Gemma in the Bowery Hotel.

    A calzone is a filled savory pastry that originated in Naples. It is made of pizza dough and folded to resemble a half-moon.

    Chef D’Amico created a dessert version of the calzone, dusted with powdered sugar and stuffed with a combination of rich Nutella spread and creamy ricotta cheese.

    At the restaurant, which includes an outdoor café and great people watching, the dessert can be shared by two or more people.

    Or, make it at home. Thanks to Chef Chris for the recipe!

     

    nutella-calzone-Gemma-at-TheBoweryHotel-230

    Nutella calzones. Photo courtesy Gemma Restaurant | NYC.

     

    NUTELLA CALZONES (CALZONE DI NUTELLA)

    Ingredients

    For The Dough

  • 3.5 cups high-gluten flour
  • 1/4 ounce fresh yeast
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1-1/2 cup warm water
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  •  
    For The Filling (Per Calzone)

  • 2 teaspoons Nutella
  • 2 teaspoons ricotta cheese
  • Garnish: cocoa powder, powdered sugar or chocolate syrup drizzle
  • Optional garnish: whipped cream, chocolate or vanilla ice cream
  •  

    nutella-amz-230

    One of America’s favorite sweet spreads.
    Photo courtesy Nutella USA.

     

    Preparation

    1. DISSOLVE the yeast and sugar in the water, using a large bowl, and let sit for 10 minutes. Stir the salt and oil into the yeast solution.

    2. MIX in 2-1/2 cups of the flour. Turn dough out onto a clean, well-floured surface, and knead in more flour until the dough is no longer sticky.

    3. PLACE the dough in a well-oiled bowl, and cover with a cloth. Let the dough rise until double; this should take about 1 hour. Punch down the dough and form a tight ball. Allow the dough to relax for a minute before rolling out.

    4. COMBINE Nutella and ricotta cheese.

    5. PREHEAT oven to 500°F. Stretch out the dough. Place the filling on 1/3 of the dough, leaving the other 2/3 to form the cover.

    6. PRESS the calzone tightly closed and cut off any excess dough. Place in oven immediately. Bake until the crust is golden brown, about 15 to 20 minutes. Garnish as desired.

     

    NUTELLA HISTORY

    Nutella hazelnut spread, in its earliest form, was created in the 1940s by Pietro Ferrero, a pastry maker and founder of the Ferrero company.

    At the time, there was very little chocolate because cocoa was in short supply due to World War II rationing. To extend the chocolate supply, Mr. Ferrero used hazelnuts, which are plentiful in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy.

    The spread is a combination of roasted hazelnuts, skim milk and a touch of cocoa. It is an all-natural product: no artificial colors or preservatives.

    Nutella was first imported to the U.S. more 25 years ago by Ferrero U.S.A., Inc. Its popularity has grown steadily, and it is the number one selling branded hazelnut spread in America.
     
    WHAT IS HIGH-GLUTEN FLOUR?

    Different types of flour are milled for different baking purposes. Protein content and gluten content affect the elasticity of the dough.

    High-gluten flour has a protein level of 14-15%. Higher protein flour, milled from hard wheat, makes firmer, stronger dough. It is used to make pizza crusts, calzones and bagels, among other items.

    All-purpose flour, by contrast, is a blend of hard and soft wheats and has a protein content of 10% to 11%. It is ideal for hearty cookies, like chocolate chip and oatmeal, and some pastries.

      

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