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RECIPE: Deconstructed Banana Split, For National Banana Split Day

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[1] The deconstructed banana split at Sushi Samba in New York City (photo courtesy Sushi Samba).

Banana Split

[2] The traditional banana split (photo courtesy California Milk Advisory Board).

 

How should you celebrate August 25th, National Banana Split Day?

There’s the tried and true banana split, of course. Classically served in a long dish, called a boat (which gives the sundae its alternative name, banana boat), the recipe is familiar to most ice cream lovers:

A banana is cut in half lengthwise and set in the dish with scoops of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream. The strawberry ice cream is garnished with pineapple topping, chocolate syrup is poured on the vanilla ice cream and strawberry topping covers the chocolate ice cream. Crushed nuts, whipped cream and maraschino cherries garnish the entire boat.

Today, there are many variations to the classic banana split. We’ve had other Banana Split Sushi, Banana Split Cheesecake and the recipe below, Deconstructed Banana Split.

DECONSTRUCTED BANANA SPLIT

Ingredients

  • Banana slices
  • Unsalted butter
  • Optional: dash cinnamon
  • Ice cream flavors of choice
  • Optional: caramel corn
  • Whipped cream
  • Berries of choice
  • Sauces: chocolate, strawberry (you can easily make strawberry purée)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CUT the bananas in half width-wise, and then lengthwise. Sauté in butter with a dash of cinnamon until browned. Arrange on a plate, as shown in the photo.

    2. ARRANGE the other ingredients: whipped cream, caramel corn and fruit.

    3. DRIZZLE with sauce or fruit purée of choice.

     

    BANANA SPLIT HISTORY

    According to the Pennsylvania town of Latrobe, the banana split was invented in 1904 by David Evans Strickler, a 23-year-old apprentice pharmacist at Tassel Pharmacy*. He enjoyed inventing sundaes at the store’s soda fountain. His first “banana-based triple ice cream sundae” sold for 10 cents, which was double the cost of the other sundaes.

    News of the new sundae was picked up by the press and spread nationwide. Variations of the recipe appeared in newspapers.

    The enterprising Strickler went on to buy the pharmacy, re-naming it Strickler’s Pharmacy. The city of Latrobe celebrated the 100th anniversary of the invention of the banana split in 2004, and the National Ice Cream Retailers Association (NICRA) certified the city as its birthplace.

    The annual Great American Banana Split Celebration is held throughout the downtown Latrobe in late August, in 2017 from August 25th-27th.
     
     
    SUSHI HISTORY
    ________________

    *According to Wikipedia, Walgreens is credited with spreading the popularity of the banana split. A chain of drug stores established in the Chicago area in 1901 by Charles Rudolph Walgreen, Walgreens promoted the banana split as a signature dessert. But was it served when the store opened, or did someone at Walgreens read the recipe and adopt it. Did Walgreens bestow the name Banana Split to the “banana-based triple ice cream sundae”? So far, the record is mute.
     
      

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    COCKTAIL RECIPE: Blackberries = Purple Cocktail = A Delicious Smash!

    Blackberry Smash Cocktail Recipe
    [1] Watch the sunset with a Blackberry Smash.

    Bourbon Peach Smash Recipe
    [2] A Bourbon & Peach Smash. Here’s the recipe from Imbibe Magazine (photo courtesy Imbibe Magazine).

    Tequila Sage Smash Recipe
    [3] This Tequila & Sage Smash is served in a tall glass with ice cubes (photo courtesy Imbibe Magazine).

    Basil Hayden's Bourbon

    [4] Basil Hayden’s Bourbon is made in small batches by Beam Suntory (photo courtesy Basil Hayden’s).

     

    The only problem with this stunning cocktail is that kids will clamor for it.

    Otherwise, it’s deliciously refreshing summer smash (double entendre: smash is the name of the cocktail category). Just make it in a kid-free environment.

    The recipe came to us from Basil Hayden’s Bourbon. It was crafted by mixologist Benjamin Schiller of Chicago, who called it the Market Street Smash (a local reference).

    It’s easy to make, and it comes with a history (below).
     
     
    COCKTAIL RECIPE: BLACKBERRY SMASH

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 2 parts Basil Hayden’s Bourbon
  • ¾ parts simple syrup
  • ½ part fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 4 fresh blackberries plus 3 for garnish)
  • Garnish: mint sprig
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE all ingredients in a mixing tin and muddle the blackberries. Add ice, shake and strain over crushed ice inri a rocks glass.

    2. GARNISH with a sprig of mint and 3 blackberries.
     
     
    WHAT’S A SMASH COCKTAIL?

    Smash is a family of easy-to-make cocktails that generally include a:

  • Spirit
  • Sweetener
  • Herb
  • Seasonal fruit
  • Crushed ice
  •  
    Imbibe Magazine calls them “those fruity, icy concoctions that highlight the best of the cocktail season

    The Cocktail Novice notes, “It’s like a Mint Julep with seasonal fruit.” Adds Imbibe: “a smash is a julep, but a julep is not always a smash.

    Here are Cocktail Novice’s recipes for:

  • Gin, Cucumber & Basil Smas
  • Jalapeño Tequila Smash
  • Strawberry Lemonade Smash
  • Whiskey Smash
  •  
    From Imbibe Magazine:

  • Añejo Smash (with tequila)
  • Bourbon & Peach Smash
  • Pepper Smash (with aquavit and bell pepper)
  • Philly Smash (with rye, Averna [herbal liqueur] and seasonal berries)
  • Ranger Smash (with whiskey and Cocchi Americano, a quinine-laced aperitif)
  • Rhubarb-Thyme Smash
  • Tequila & Thyme Smash
  •  
     
    THE HISTORY OF THE SMASH COCKTAIL

    Per Imbibe Magazine, one of the earliest examples of a smash is a julep recipe in Jerry Thomas’ 1862 The Bartender’s Guide.

    Thomas doesn’t mention the cocktail by name, but his definition of the julep “clearly lays the foundation for the future of the category.”

    Thomas, who literally wrote the book—the first cocktail recipe book—begins by calling the julep a “peculiarly American beverage” that is most popular in the South.

     

    He qualifies that a “real Mint Julep” must be made from a dozen mint leaves, a spoonful of white sugar and “equal parts peach and common brandy,” topped with crushed ice (and he acknowledges that there were many versions in existence).

    In 1888, barman Harry Johnson distinguishes the smashes from the julep, and includes four distinct smash recipes:
    “His Old Style Whiskey Smash is a casual concoction of sugar, water, mint, “small pieces’ of ice [crushed or shaved ice] and one ‘wineglass’ of whiskey (about 2 ounces). He added that to a glass with ‘fruits in season,’ gave it a mix and served it with a julep strainer.”

    Subsequent cocktail books include the smash in the category of juleps. In 1930 The Savoy Cocktail Book mentions a choice of spirits: “Either Bacardi Rum, Brandy, Gin, Irish Whisky or Scotch Whisky as fancy dictates” [source].

    “His Old Style Whiskey Smash is a casual concoction of sugar, water, mint, “small pieces’ of ice [crushed or shaved ice] and one ‘wineglass’ of whiskey (about 2 ounces). He added that to a glass with ‘fruits in season,’ gave it a mix and served it with a julep strainer.”

    Subsequent cocktail books include the smash in the category of juleps. In 1930 The Savoy Cocktail Book mentions a choice of spirits: “Either Bacardi Rum, Brandy, Gin, Irish Whisky or Scotch Whisky as fancy dictates” [source].

    Our fancy this summer is a Blackberry Smash.

    (Why is it called a smash? Our guess is that in the days before crushed ice machines, the ice was smashed with a hammer.)

     
      

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    RECIPE: Frozen Bourbon Milk Punch

    Frozen Milk Punch
    [1] What’s better than Bourbon Milk Punch on a hot day? Frozen Bourbon Milk Punch, with ice cream instead of half and half (photo courtesy Bourbon House | NOLA).

    Bourbon Milk Punch
    [2] Traditional Bourbon Milk Punch, made with half-and-half instead of ice cream (photo courtesy The Cocktail Project).

    Bourbon Milk Punch

    [3] Make Bourbon Milk Punch even more festive by using your coupe glasses (photo courtesy Bread Booze Bacon).

     

    This recipe was a big hit this weekend chez nous (we add the French in homage to the heritage of New Orleans, which was founded in 1718 by the French as Nouvelle-Orléans).

    This recipe is from one of the popular restaurants of the Brennan family, Bourbon House.

    Bourbon milk punch is a local specialty in New Orleans. When the restaurant opened in 2002, Dickie Brennan and his team set wanted to create a noteworthy versopm pf Bourbon Milk Punch.

    “Through much trial and the occasional error,” says the website, “the Frozen Bourbon Milk Punch was born.” [Editor’s lament: Why don’t we ever get in on these trial and error tastings?]

    The Bourbon House inspiration: add vanilla ice cream to create Frozen Bourbon Milk Punch.

    The final recipe combined house-made vanilla gelato and Old Forester Bourbon in a frozen daiquiri machine.

    Where Magazine New Orleans included the drink on the list their “30 Favorite Things About New Orleans.” Tales of the Toddy has voted it the “Best Milk Punch.”

    And now, the Bourbon House team invites you to create it drink at home, using your blender. The regular milk punch version from Brennan’s restaurants is below.

    RECIPE #1: FROZEN BOURBON MILK PUNCH

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 4 cups vanilla ice cream
  • 1 cup Old Forester bourbon (or substitute)
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon simple syrup
  • Garnish: dash of nutmeg
  •  
    Preparation

    Combine all ingredients and blend until smooth. Pour into rocks glasses and garnish with nutmeg.

    For a taller, colder drink, add ice cubes to a collins glass.

    RECIPE #2: BRENNAN’S BRANDY MILK PUNCH

    This, and other cognac-based milk punches, often use Napoleon brandy, a designation for a brandy or cognac aged at least five years. Feel free to use VSOP; with all the cream and sugar, the nuances of the Napoleon will be covered up.

    If you don’t like or don’t have brandy, you can substitute bourbon, rum, whiskey and even tequila.

    RECIPE #1:

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 2 ounces/4 tablespoons brandy or cognac
  • 4 ounces/1/2 cup half & half
  • 1 ounce/2 tablespoons simple syrup* (recipe)
  • 1/4 ounce/1.5 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Garnish: freshly grated nutmeg
  •  
    Plus

  • Cocktail shaker and ice
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice.

    2. SHAKE vigorously and pour into a chilled old-fashioned glass. Garnish with nutmeg.

    ________________

    *We prefer less sweetness, so we reduce the simple syrup by half. We also had homemade cinnamon simple syrup on hand, a nice added twist.
     
    MILK PUNCH HISTORY

    Milk punch is in the category of drinks made with milk or cream: Brandy Alexander, Classic Ramos Gin Fizz, Grasshopper, Irish Coffee, Mudslide, Pink Squirrel, White Russian, and many others (hey—another idea for a themed cocktail party: cream-based cocktails).

    The recipe combines brandy or bourbon with milk, sugar and vanilla extract, and a typical garnished of grated nutmeg.

    Milk punch was popularized in the 17th century by Aphra Behn, one of the first English women to earn her living by her writing. At the time, all types of punch were served from a punch bowl.

    The milk punch of the era was made with cream curdled with lemon juice. Those recipes gave way to milk punches that use(d) fresh milk or cream, like egg nog—which is a milk punch enriched with eggs.

    Milk punches—egg nog or other—became holiday and celebratory traditions (for example, Mardi Gras).

    In modern-day New Orleans, milk punches vie as brunch drinks with the Bloody Mary, created in 1940 in New York City (Bloody Mary history).

    There are as many recipes for milk punch as for anything else, but for Mardi Gras we serve up the recipe from Brennan’s, a favorite New Orleans restaurant since 1946.

    For a 17th-century-type recipe, try Benjamin Franklin’s recipe. He used brandy and included lots of lemon juice (which curdled the milk).

     
      

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    RECIPE: Chocolate Pecan Pie

    August 20th is National Chocolate Pecan Pie Day (July 12th is Pecan Pie Day).

    Our question: Why eat heavy pecan pie during the summer—not to mention add rich chocolate to it—when there are so many seasonal, ephemeral berries and stone fruits to turn into pies?

    Our tip: Keep this recipe from Melissa Clark of The New York Times for the fall, when a hearty, dense pie is just the thing to stick to the ribs.

    Don’t be tempted to substitute milk chocolate or semisweet chocolate chips. Pecan pie is sweet enough.

    The bittersweet chocolate specified here is just the thing: intense chocolate flavor without a lot of added sugar.

    Two tablespoons of bourbon add just a hint of flavor. Try it; and if you want to add more next time—or some praline liqueur—go for it.

    Ms. Clark’s pie has a conventional pie crust. You can also use a chocolate wafer crumb crust.

    Pecan pie is traditionally garnished with whipped cream. Given the sweetness of the pie, a dollop of of unsweetened whipped cream, crème fraîche or sour cream is just right.

    Don’t like to bake? The easy way out is this excellent chocolate pecan pie filling from San Saba Pecan, spooned into a store-bought crust.
     
     
    RECIPE: MELISSA CLARK’S CHOCOLATE PECAN PIE (Photo #1)

    For The Crust

  • 1¼ cups all-purpose flour (150 grams), plus more for dusting
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter (preferably high-fat European style), chilled and cubed
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons ice water, as needed
  •  
    For The Filling

  • 1½ cups pecan halves (170 grams)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped (56 grams)
  • ¾ cup dark corn syrup
  • 4 large eggs
  • ½ cup packed light brown sugar (100 grams)
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder (5 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons bourbon
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the crust: In a food processor, pulse together the flour and salt. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture forms chickpea-size pieces. Add the ice water 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse until the dough just comes together. It should be moist but not wet.

    2. GATHER the dough into a ball on a lightly floured surface, and flatten it into a disk with the heel of your hand. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, and up to 2 days.

    3. REMOVE the plastic wrap and roll out the dough to a 12-inch circle, on a lightly floured surface. Transfer the crust to a 9-inch pie plate. Fold over any excess dough, then the crimp edges. Prick the crust all over with a fork. Chill the crust for 30 minutes. While the dough chills…

       

    Chocolate Pecan Pie
    [1] Celebrate National Chocolate Pecan Pie Day with this yummy recipe (photo Andrew Scrivani | The New York Times).

    Pecans In Shell
    [2] The Spanish explorers who encountered pecans called them “wrinkle nuts” (photo courtesy Home Depot).

    Pecan Tree

    [3] A pecan tree. If you live in warmer zones (6 through 9), you can grow your own (photo courtesy Perfect Plants Nursery). You can also grow the trees in zone 5, but they won’t bear nuts.

     
    4. HEAT the oven to 375°F. Line the chilled crust with aluminum foil and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake for 25 minutes; then remove the foil and bake until it’s a very pale golden color, 5 to 10 minutes longer.

    5. REDUCE the oven temperature to 350°F. Spread the pecans on a rimmed baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 8 to 10 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally. Cool.

    6. MAKE the filling: In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and chocolate, stirring until smooth. Cool.

    7. WHISK together in a large bowl the cooled chocolate-butter mixture, corn syrup, eggs, sugar, cocoa powder, bourbon and salt. Pour the mixture into the prepared crust. Arrange pecans over the filling.

    8. TRANSFER to a large rimmed baking sheet and bake until the filling is just set when the pan is jiggled, 30 to 40 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven and cool completely on a wire rack before serving.

     

    Chocolate Pecan Pie
    [4] Another way to make chocolate pecan pie: Drizzle chocolate on top, as in this recipe from Julia’s Treats And Eats.

    Pecan Pie

    [5] Hold the chocolate if you want a standard pecan pie (photo courtesy Good Eggs).

     

    PECAN PIE HISTORY

    It seems difficult to believe give the long history of pecan trees in the Colonial South*; but the pecan pie recipe we know, pecans on a brown sugar base, is a 20th century invention. No recipes have been found dating to earlier than 1925.

    According to FoodTimeline.com, The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and The Joy of Cooking did not include pecan pie recipes before 1940.

    While some sources claim that early French settlers in New Orleans invented pecan pie after encountering the nuts (which they called pacane, after the Native American paka·n), food historians have not been able to trace the dish’s origin prior to 1925.

    That doesn’t mean pecan pie didn’t exist, only that there is no record to prove it. Popular national cookbooks such as The Joy of Cooking and The Fannie Farmer Cookbook did not include the recipe prior to 1940.

    Yes, there were pies made with pecans; they just weren’t pecan pies as we know them or called “pecan pie.” References dating to 1886 and 1914 added the nuts to a milk-based custard.

    Then came a breakthrough on the road to modern pecan pie. In 1913, Mrs. Vesta Harrison of Fort Worth, then an unmarried teenager taking a cooking course, won a national competition with her Texas Pecan Pie, made with a filling of sorghum.

    She said the recipe for this pecan pie came to her in a dream. When she told the teacher at her cooking school, a Mrs. Chitwood of Chicago, that she was going to make a pecan pie, the teacher exclaimed “There is no such thing!”

    The future Mrs. Harrison, interviewed later in life, said she responded, “By gollies, I don’t know how, but I’m going to mess up something making a pecan pie.”

    Mrs. Chitwood sent the recipe to the contest in Washington, where it won first prize. So even if there already was a syrup-based pecan pie somewhere in the U.S., it was unknown in Texas, Chicago or Washington [source].

    Following the introduction of the sorghum-based pecan pie, versions were made with molasses.

    Enter Karo Syrup & The Modern Pecan Pie

    The modern pecan pie was born with the introduction of Karo Syrup, in 1902.

    One of the earliest recipes to substitute the sorghum or molasses with Karo corn syrup was by Mrs. Frank Herring, published in the Sallislaw, Oklahoma Democrat American on February 19, 1931:

     
    3 eggs, 1 cup Karo (blue label), 4 tablespoons corn meal, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup chopped pecans or less if desired, pastry. Method: Beat whole eggs slightly, add Karo, corn meal, sugar and melted butter, then stir all thoroughly. Line pie tin with flaky pastry and fill generously with mixture. Sprinkle chopped pecans on top, bake in moderate oven until well set when slightly shaken [source].

    Printed on the bottle label, the makers of Karo Syrup popularized the recipe that many people use today. It has similar ingredients to Mrs. Herring’s recipe, minus the corn meal and adding vanilla extract. It doubles the amount of Karo syrup and sugar and triples the pecans. Here’s the recipe.

    The Karo website says that the recipe was created in the 1930s by the wife of a senior sales executive. When the pie appeared on the bottle label and in magazines, it was known as Karo Pecan Pie.

    This unnamed executive wife may well have seen, and adapted, Mrs. Herring’s 1931 recipe. The rest is sweet history; although as soon as we have time, we’re going back to make the Karo pie using the smaller amounts of sugars in the Herring recipe. When a scoop of vanilla ice cream is needed to cut the sweetness of a pie, you know it’s too sweet.

    The History Of The Pecan Tree

    The pecan, Carya illinoinensis (photo #3), is a member of the Juglandaceae family, known as the walnut family of trees. The trees are native to the Americas, Eurasia and Southeast Asia.

    The family also includes the hickory, about 16 species of which are native to the Americas.

    Pecans are native to America. The tree originated in central and eastern North America and in the river valleys of Mexico*.

    The name “pecan” is a word of Algonquin origin that describes “all nuts requiring a stone to crack.”

    Long before Europeans arrived, pecans were widely consumed and traded by Native Americans. Nuts were an excellent food product for a pre-agricultural society, easy to harvesst and store (and an excellent source of protein and other nutrients).

    The first Europeans to come into contact with pecans were 16th-century Spanish explorers in what is now Mexico, Texas, and Louisiana. They called the pecan, nuez de la arruga, which means “wrinkle nut,” due to the deep lines resembling wrinkles in the nutmeats (photo #2). The explorers brought the pecan to Europe, Asia, and Africa beginning in the 16th century.

    Thomas Jefferson planted pecan trees, Carya illinoinensis (“Illinois nuts”) in his nut orchard at Monticello, in Virginia. George Washington wrote in his journal that Jefferson gave him “Illinois nuts” to grow at Mount Vernon.
    ________________

    *Currently, the largest pecan-producing states are, in order of tonnage: Georgia, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Pecans are grown coast to coast along the southern tier of the United States. The largest pecan orchard is Stahmann Farms in New Mexico.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Things To Do With Blueberries

    Got blueberries? There at an excellent price right now.

    When October brings half pints of blueberries for $5 and more, you’ll be sorry you didn’t enjoy more of these during peak blueberry season.

    So enjoy all the blueberry and mixed fruit salads, cocktails and pies. But also try the little blue orbs in:

    BEVERAGES

  • Blueberry Lavender Water
  • Blueberry Lemonade
  • Blueberry Lemonade Cocktail
  • Blueberry Mango Chile Smoothie
  • Blueberry Pom Smoothie
  • Coffee Shake With Blueberries
  •  
    BREAKFAST

  • Baked Oatmeal With Blueberries & Almonds
  • Blueberry Breakfast Salad
  • Blueberry Yogurt Granola Parfait
  • Fresh Blueberry Muffins
  • On cottage cheese, French toast, oatmeal, waffles and
    plain, blueberry and vanilla yogurt
  •  
    MAINS, SAUCES & SIDES

  • Blueberry Gastrique For Grilled Meat, Poultry & Fish
  • Green Salad With Blueberries & Blue Cheese
  • Rack Of Lamb With Homemade Blueberry Jam
  • Scattered blueberries as a plate garnish
  •  
    DESSERTS

  • Blueberry Cobbler
  • Topping for angel cake, cheesecake, pound cake
  • Blueberry Sorbet
  • Lemon Blueberry and White Chocolate Cream Cake
  • No Bake Blueberry Cheesecake
  •  
     
    THE HISTORY OF BLUEBERRIES

    Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum) are one of the few fruit species native* to North America and unknown in Europe: perennial flowering plants with indigo-colored berries. Also included in the Vaccinium genus are cranberries, bilberries and grouseberries.

    Vaccinum is a member of the Ericaceae family, which also includes the huckleberry (the most common in the U.S. is the black huckleberry, Gaylussacia baccata) and popular non-edibles including azalea, rhododendron and various common heaths and heathers.

    Blueberries are called by different names, including bilberry, cowberry, farkleberry and sparkleberry.

    Wild blueberries were gathered by Native Americans to eat as fresh fruit during the season, andused dried fruit thereafter.

  • The dried berries were used in soups and stews and as a rub for meats. They were mixed with dried meat and cornmeal into pemican, a nutritious, easily portable food carried by hunters and travelers.
  • Blueberry juice was used as a dye for bloth and baskets and to make cough syrup.
  • The leaves of the plant were made into a tea to “fortify the blood.”
  • With the introduction of honeybees by Europeans, the berries were mixed with cornmeal, honey and water to make a pudding called sautauthig.
  •  
    The blueberry was considered a sacred food by Native Americans, because the blossom-end of the berry is shaped like a five-pointed star. American Indians believed that the berries were sent by the Great Spirit during a great famine to relieve the hunger of their children [source].

    The Blueberries The Pilgrims Ate

    Dried blueberries also sustained the Pilgrims. When they arrived at Cape Cod in November 1620, blown off course from their Virginia† destination, it was far too late to plant crops.

    The settlers nearly starved to death until the Wampanoag people shared food and taught them to grow native plants such as corn and squash. The settlers of Plymouth learned which foods to gather and dry (blueberries, cranberries) to sustain them through the winter.

    The blueberries used by the Indians were the wild, or low bush variety, which are the state fruit of Maine, where they are a major crop.

    Most blueberries that are cultivated today are the high bush variety, domesticated in the early 20th century. The plants have been improved over the years to increase the size and color of the berry and the yield of the bush. Cultivation of the high bush blueberry has has been so successful that America now grows over 90% of the blueberries in the world.

    However, while Maine’s low bush blueberries are significantly smaller, they are more flavorful.

     

    Blueberry Breakfast Salad
    [1] Blueberry breakfast salad: combine any fruits atop greens (photo courtesy Blueberry Council).

    Blueberry Yogurt Parfait
    [2] Blueberry-yogurt-granola parfait (photo courtesy Fruits From Chile).

    Blueberry Vinaigrette
    [3] Blueberry vinaigrette for salads and broiled proteins (photo courtesy Wild Blueberries).

    Salad With Blueberries
    [4] Blueberries into a grilled chicken or salmon salad (photo courtesy CFAA).

    Salmon With Blueberry Sauce

    [5] Salmon with blueberry sauce (photo courtesy Munchery).

     
    Some 20 years ago, blueberries were anointed a “superfood” after studies of the benefits of antioxidants became part of healty eating in the U.S. Blueberries are one of foods highest in antioxidants.

    Blueberries are easily preserved by freezing, canning and drying. They can also be juiced or made into jam or preserves. The surge in the popularity of blueberries has caused home gardeners to plant these shrubs in nearly every growing area of America.

    ________________
    *Blueberries and cranberries, along with other indigenous fruits such as mayhaws and papwpaws, were unknown in the Old World. North America has its own native species such as cherries, grapes, plums, persimmons, raspberries and other species of which were well-known in the Old World. Here’s the list of fruits native to North America.

    †At the time, Virginia included the region as far north as the Hudson River in the modern State of New York. The Hudson River was their originally intended destination.

      

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