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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Fish/Seafood/Caviar

TIP OF THE DAY: Sashimi Salad

Love sashimi? Looking for a light lunch or first course? Make sashimi salad.

Pick up some of your favorite raw fish from your fishmonger—salmon, tuna and yellowtail, for example. You can also add cooked varieties, such as shrimp and squid.

Then, create a salad of choice:

  • Western-style salad of mixed greens
  • Japanese-style salad of seaweed, mizuna or microgreens, grated daikon and carrot
  • Either style embellished with avocado, cucumber, an Asian-style vinaigrette and a sprinkle of sesame seeds
  •  
    Some Asian markets, fish markets and even supermarkets carry wakame salad. Wakame, pronounced wah-kah-MAY, is a type of seaweed; for wakame salad, it is marinated in vinegar and seasonings. If you can’t find it, you can substitute a fresh herb like cilantro.

       

    Fjordørret Norges Sjømatråd juni12

    Easy sashimi salad: There’s nothing to cook! Photo courtesy SalmonFromNorway.com.

     
    This recipe is courtesy of Salmon From Norway and focuses on raw salmon and salmon roe. The dressing is a stripped-down variation of ponzu sauce.

    The toughest part of making sashimi salad is slicing the fish. There’s no cooking required for this delicious, lower-calorie, healthful dish.

    RECIPE: SASHIMI SALAD

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 pound salmon top loin, skin removed
  • 2 tablespoons wakame salad
  • 2 tablespoons Norwegian Salmon roe
  • Optional garnish: shredded nori sheets, wonton chips, minced red bell pepper
  •  
    For The Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons yuzu juice (or equal parts lemon and lime juice)
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 5 tablespoons dashi (Japanese fish stock or any fish stock)
  •  

    sashimi-salad-tsunamisushilafayette-230

    This variation uses cubed tuna, garnished with raw green beans, green onion and avocado. Photo courtesy Tsunami Sushi.

     

    Preparation

    1. MAKE the dressing: Combine the ingredients and whisk thoroughly.

    2. CUT the top loin in half crosswise With a sharp knife. Place the knife at a 45° angle and slice into ¼- to-½ inch strips.

    3. ARRANGE the fish on plates along with wakame salad and salmon roe. Drizzle the dressing over the fish.

     
    RECIPE: HAWAIIAN POKE DRESSING

    Another dressing that works with sashimi salad is poke dressing, used in Hawaii’s version of sashimi salad, called poke (POE-kuh).

    Ingredients

  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • 3/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
  • Option: crushed red pepper flakes to taste
  •  

    Preparation

    1. BLEND all ingredients thoroughly.

      

    Comments

    SUPER BOWL: The “Bivalve Bowl”

    From January 26th through January 31st, the New England Patriots-Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl match-up will be preceded by a competition between bodaceous bivalves.

    The storied Grand Central Oyster Bar in the heart of Manhattan is hosting “Super Bowl XLIX Oyster Platter,” pitting two New England oysters (Katama and Wellfleet) against two Washington challengers (Discovery Bay and Skookum—note that oysters are typically named for the bodies of water where they are harvested).

    Chef Sandy Ingber has selected beverage pairings to complement the oysters: for Patriots fans, Cisco “Whales Tale” Pale Ale from Nantucket; for Seahawks fans, Washington State’s Chateau St. Michelle 2013 Dry Riesling 2013.

    If you have a supplier of fresh oysters and a talent for shucking, you can serve this gourmet fare during the game.

    If not, call the Grand Central Oyster Bar for lunch or dinner reservations: 1.212.490.6650. The eight-oyster combination is $22.35 with beverages extra.

     

    Wellfleet-Mass-230r

    Game on: Will these Wellfleet oysters from Massachusetts best the Skookums from Washington? Photo courtesy J.P.’s Shellfish.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Grilled Fish Or Chicken With Salsa

    Salsa has been America’s favorite condiment since 2000, when it supplanted ketchup in sales. But it actually has been a favorite condiment for thousands of years.

    The wild chile was domesticated about 5200 B.C.E. and tomatoes by 3000 B.C.E., both in Central America. The two ingredients were combined into a condiment, incorporating other ingredients like squash seeds and even beans (the predecessor of one of our favorites, tomato, corn and bean salsa). The Spanish conquistadors, taking over in 1529, called it “salsa,” the Spanish word for sauce.

    Salsa was not used as a dip for tortilla chips, which weren’t invented until the late 1940s in Los Angeles. It was a general sauce for meat, poultry, fish and vegetables. (Here are the history of salsa and the history of tortilla chips.)

    So today’s tip is: Take salsa back to its origins and use it as a sauce for fish and poultry. Here’s the easiest way, from Jillipepper, a New Mexico-based salsa maker.

  • Fish steaks or fillets, 4-6 ounces each
  • 1 salsa, jar or homemade
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BRUSH the fish liberally with the salsa.

       

    montreal-salsa-chicken-mccormick-230

    Salsa-coated chicken. Photo courtesy McCormick.

     
    2. COOK on a grill over medium heat or under the broiler. Turn and brush with salsa every 5 minutes until fish is done.
     

    When you use salsa with chicken or fish, it can be traditionally savory, or sweetened with fruit. (See the different types of salsa.)
     

    SWEET SALSA

    If you like things sweet—and easy—McCormick has a popular Salsa Chicken recipe that combines canned tomatoes with apricot preserves, and a Montreal Salsa Chicken that combines mild salsa with peach preserves.

    Both of those combine tomatoes with fruit, but you can also make a pure fruit salsa with no tomatoes.

    Peach salsa is the best-selling fruit salsa flavor in the U.S., beating mango and pineapple. While most bottled peach salsa is tomato-based salsa roja, you can make fresh peach salsa without tomatoes. Wait for peach season, though; then combine 2 cups peeled, finely diced peaches, 1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onion, 2 tablespoons finely chopped red bell pepper, 1 de-seeded and finely chopped jalapeño, juice of 1 lime, 2-3 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro or basil leaves and 1 clove minced garlic. Add salt to taste.

    Mango pineapple salsa is also easy to whip up. Combine 1 diced mango and 2 cups of diced pineapple with ½ medium onion, diced; ½ cup cilantro, diced; the juice of one lime, and salt and pepper to taste. You can also add minced jalapeño for heat.

    Cherry salsa goes nicely with chicken or fish. You can use fresh cherries in season, but frozen cherries work fine. Here’s a salmon recipe with cherry mango salsa.

    And when watermelon season returns, how about a watermelon, corn and black bean salsa?

     

    Grilled fish with a savory salsa. Photo from the cookbook, South American Grill, courtesy Rizzoli USA.

     

    SAVORY SALSA

    We prefer a largely savory salsa with grilled fish, sometimes with diced fruit—mango, peach or pineapple tossed in for balance, but never, ever with added sugar.

    While you can use salsa from a jar, making your own is easy and you can customize it with your favorite ingredients. You can also create your preferred texture, from chunky hand-diced to puréed in the blender.

    The possible combinations are [almost] endless”

    POSSIBLE SALSA INGREDIENTS

  • Tomatoes: in the off season, use cherry tomatoes
  • Fruit: grape, mango, melon, peach, pineapple or other fruit
  • Onions: green onion, red onion, sweet onion
  • Herbs: basil, cilantro, parsley
  • Acid: wine vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice
  • Heat: jalapeño or other fresh chile
  • Seasonings: salt, pepper, garlic
  • Enhancements: black beans, capers, corn kernels, gherkins, olives
  •  

    HOMEMADE SALSA RECIPE

    Ingredients

  • 3 pounds tomatoes, diced and seeded
  • Optional: 1/2 pound diced fruit
  • 1/2 small red onion (more to taste), small dice
  • 2 or 3 small jalapeño chiles
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar (or more to taste)
  • 1/2 of a lemon or lime, juiced
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup or more cilantro (if you don’t like cilantro, substitute parsley)
  • 2 splashes of red wine vinegar (about a 1/2 teaspoon)
     
    Preparation

    1. REMOVE the stems from the cilantro. Remove the white membrane and seeds from the jalapeños and mince the flesh.

    2. COMBINE the tomatoes, fruit, onions, jalapeño and garlic. Add the seasonings (vinegar, citrus juice, salt, pepper, cilantro) and toss to thoroughly combine. Allow flavors to blend for a half hour or more (overnight is fine); then taste and adjust seasonings. You may want more vinegar, more jalapeño, etc.

    3. Pulse until desired consistency.
     
    This is making us hungry. Guess what we’re having for lunch!

      

  • Comments

    RECIPE: Tuna Salad With Poached Egg & Vinaigrette

    We love Ozery Breads, and as we were checking out recipes on the company’s website we came across this tasty idea: Tuna Salad With Poached Egg.

    Hard boiled eggs are included in various salads—Chef Salad, Cobb Salad and Spinach Salad, for example—and chopped into egg, potato and tuna salads. So why not experiment with a poached egg, with a runny yolk that can augment the dressing?

    At Ozery, they enjoy this salad with their Zero Low Low Light Rye OneBun.

    Optional avocado slices also contribute to the richness of the dish.

    RECIPE: TUNA SALAD WITH POACHED EGG

    Ingredients

  • Mixed salad greens
  • 1 egg per person
  • Tuna
  • Olive oil vinaigrette (recipe below)
  • Optional: avocado slices
  • Garnish: sunflower seeds
  • Bread of choice for toast
  •    

    tuna-salad-poached-egg-ozery-230

    A new way to enjoy salad: with tuna and a poached egg. Photo courtesy Ozery.

     

    Preparation

    1. FILL a larage pan with water and a pinch of salt, and bring it to a light simmer over a medium heat. Crack the egg and gently float it into the water. Cook for about 3-4 minutes and remove with a slotted spoon. While the egg poaches…

    2 TOAST the bread. Cut into 4 pieces.

    3. PLACE the greens on a plate and drizzle with the dressing. Top with avocado, tuna and poached egg. Sprinkle with sunflowers seeds and season with fresh-ground pepper.

     

    salad-vinaigrette-230

    A vinaigrette will separate easily. To keep it emulsified, whirl it in the blender. Photo by Elena Thewise | ISP.

     

    BASIC VINAIGRETTE RECIPE

    Recently, a dinner guest asked us the “secret” to making a good vinaigrette. It’s simple: Good ingredients make good vinaigrettes. Use the best olive oil and vinegar in the right proportions (3:1) with a bit of seasoning.

    But we like more elaborate flavors in our vinaigrettes. We have an entire shelf of oils and vinegars. In the vinegar category: balsamic, champagne, fruit, herb, malt, red and white wine, rice, sherry and white balsamic. In the oil category: different EVOOS with different flavor profiles (grassy, herbal, mild, peppery and infused—with basil, rosemary, chile, etc.), flavored avocado oils, sesame and roasted nut oils (almond, pecan, pistachio, walnut).

    We do have canola and grapeseed oils, but we don’t use them in salad dressing—not enough flavor.

    When we’re ready to make a vinaigrette, we consider the main course and pick a complementary oil and vinegar. There’s no right or wrong answer as long as you don’t pair heavily-flavored oils and vinegars with delicate dishes. For example, you wouldn’t want a sesame oil vinaigrette with an omelet.

    Which brings up another point: There are different ways to manufacture oil. You have to know what you’re buying.

     
    Seeking walnut oil for a holiday vinaigrette—it delivers a rich, nutty, toasty flavor—we recently purchased a bottle made by International Oils. We were looking for a French import, but it was the only walnut oil on the shelf at Fairway. (Boo, Fairway!) When we got it home, it was bland, with scarcely any walnut flavor.

    Most health food store oils are produced in this style. If you want the true flavor, you need a traditionally produced oil, either imported or from La Tourangelle, a California producer and a NIBBLE Top Pick.

    A final tip: If you’re using a strongly-flavored oil or vinegar, you can omit the mustard and shallot. However, we enjoy complex layerings of flavor, so tend to keep them.

    Ingredients

  • 1/4 vinegar (balsamic, red wine, white wine, other)
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon finely chopped shallot or capers
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • Pinch of sugar
  • 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  •  
    Preparation

    1. WHISK together in a small bowl the vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and sugar.

    2. SLOWLY whisk in the olive oil until emulsified. Or, if you’re not going to dress the salad immediately, do a more intense emulsification: Shake the ingredients vigorously in a jar; or better, whirl them in a blender or use an immersion blender (an Aerolatte milk frother works great).

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Marinated Cod

    If you’re looking to put together a Feast Of The Seven Fishes, or simply would like a new way to prepare cod, here’s a recipe from Landana Cheese.

    The company uses its Landana 1000 Days, an aged Gouda, in the recipe. Serve the cod with a Chablis or other dry white wine. Find more recipes at LandanaCheese.com.

    RECIPE: MARINATED COD

    Ingredients

  • 2.6 ounces (75g) aged Gouda cheese
  • 1 bottle of dry white wine
  • 2 cloves
  • Thyme
  • Bay leaf
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • 2 onions
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 28.2 ounces (800g) whole cod
  • Garnish: 1 lemon, sliced
  •    


    Cod marinated in white wine and herbs. Photo courtesy Landana Cheese.

     

    For The Sauce

  • 1 cup clarified butter
  • 1-3/4 cups flour
  • 1 cup cream
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  •  

    types-of-Roux-rouxbe-230

    Roux types. Photo courtesy Rouxbe.com.

     

    Preparation

    1. MAKE a marinade from the wine, cloves, some thyme, bay leaf, rosemary and sage. Peel the onion, cut into large pieces and add to the marinade. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Bring to the boil, simmering for 10 minutes; then leave to cool until lukewarm.

    2. WASH the fish and lay it in a pan that can be tightly covered. Pour the lukewarm marinade into the pan. If it doesn’t fully cover the fish, add broth or water. Cover and let the fish to marinate for 5 hours.

    3. BRING the mixture to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

    4. MELT the butter, add enough flour to make a white roux (see instructions below). Dilute with strained cooking liquid until a creamy sauce is created. Simmer gently for 10 minutes. In the meantime…

     
    5. GRATE the cheese and mix it, along with the cream, into the sauce. Season to taste and keep warm.

    6. DRAIN the fish and lay it carefully on a preheated serving dish. Drizzle the sauce over the fish and garnish with thin slices of lemon and fresh herbs. Serve the rest of the sauce on the side.
     
    HOW TO MAKE A WHITE ROUX

    A roux (pronounced roo) is a combination of fat and flour, that has been used for centuries as a thickening agent in French cuisine. White and blonde roux are used to thicken sauces and soups. Brown and dark brown roux are primarily used in Cajun and Creole dishes, such as gumbo and jambalaya. They have more flavor than the white and blonde versions, but are thinner and thus do a lighter job of thickening

    1. MELT the clarified butter in a saucepan over medium heat. When the butter is hot enough, a pinch of flour sprinkled on top of it will slowly start to bubble. Then…

    2. WHISK the flour into the clarified butter until a thick, rough paste forms. Whisk constantly while the paste bubbles over medium heat. As it cooks, the roux will become smooth and begin to thin. After about 5 minutes, the raw smell of the flour becomes a nutty aroma and you have a white roux.
     
    For Other Roux

    As it continues to cook—with continuous stirring—the roux becomes smoother and thinner and the bubbling becomes slower.

  • Blonde Roux. You’ll get a blonde roux after 20 minutes of continuous cooking and stirring. The bubbles begin to slow, the color is tan and the aroma is of of popcorn or toast.
  • Brown Roux. After approximately 35 minutes of cooking you’ll get a brown roux—actually a tan, peanut butter color. The aroma is roasted and nutty.
  • Dark Brown Roux. After about 45 minutes of cooking, the roux becomes the color of milk chocolate, is very thin and is no longer bubbling. Its will actually smell a bit like chocolate.
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Trash Fish

    http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photos-dish-steamed-fish-image21409028

    Steamed dogfish: delicious, especially at $5.50 a pound. Photo © Marco Guidi | Dreamstime.

     

    Our friends at GQ magazine sent us their 50 Best Things To Eat Right Now article, and we learned something new: trash fish.

    In the fishing industry, a by-catch is a fish or other marine species that is caught unintentionally while catching the target species (recall the dolphins swept up in tuna nets).

    A subspecies of by-catch is rough fish—the slang term is trash fish. The term is used in the U.S. to describe fish that are less desirable to sport anglers.

    While not desirable by anglers for sporting purposes, trash fish species can be very important in the commercial fishing industry, where they make up the bulk of commercial food fish catches in inland fresh waters. The challenge is turning them into popular fish, desired and asked for by consumers.

    There is no standard list of trash fish. A fish that is considered trash in one region may be treasure in another. For example, the common carp is considered undesirable in the U.S. and Australia, but is the premier game fish of Europe and the most valuable food fish across most of Asia.

     

    Dogfish, a.k.a. Cape shark, travel in schools with flounder, hake and pollock, so are often landed as by-catch. Fishermen in the U.S. toss them overboard because dogfish don’t often command prices worth the effort of processing them. Yet, the mild, sweet, boneless flesh is desired for fish and chips in the U.K. In Germany, the belly section of the fish, smoked, is considered a delicacy. [Source]

    You can buy a trash fish like dogfish for say, $5.50 a pound to substitute for the fashionable cod or haddock, which command $15 a pound.

    Today’s trash fish lack the marketing heft to become glamorous fish like branzino, cod, flounder, salmon and tuna. But with the increasing demand for fresh fish, the overfishing of popular species and the ever-increasing prices, attention must be paid.

    So today’s tip is: Don’t turn your nose up at a trash fish because it’s oily (blue fish, mackerel), ugly (scorpion fish) or small (sardines). Once it’s cleaned and in the pan or the pot, it looks like other fish, and taste just as delicious. For a fraction of the price.

    Get some suggestions from your fishmonger, and make an entire Feast Of Seven Fishes!

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Pumpkin Seed Chicken Or Fish

    Give chicken breasts or fish fillets a harvest touch with this recipe, which employs a pumpkin seed crust, adding flavor and nutrition.

    It’s a great idea, but we must admit: We have no idea where this recipe came from. We found it in a drafts folder, without the attribution that we attach to all outside content. We searched the web and couldn’t find it; so we apologize to whomever sent it to us. Thanks: We love your recipe.

    RECIPE: PUMPKIN SEED CHICKEN OR FISH

    Ingredients

    • 2 chicken breasts or 6-ounce fish filets
    • 2 cups of panko bread crumbs
    • 2 cups of pumpkin seeds
    • 4 whole eggs beaten
    • 1 cup all purpose flour
    • 1 tablespoon kosher salt or coarse sea salt
    • 1 tablespoon fine chopped oregano leaves
    • 1 tablespoon orange zest
    • 1 cup cooking oil
    • 1 tablespoon black pepper
     

    pumpkin-seed-crusted-chicken-cookforyourlifeorg-230

    Pumpkin seeds-crusted chicken breast with sauteed carrot strips. Photo courtesy EatForYourLife.org, which has a gluten-free variation of the recipe that includes Parmesan cheese.

     

    Preparation

    1. SLICE. Preheat the oven to 350°F for 10 minutes. Slice chicken breasts in half, width-wise. Pound down lightly until they are ¼ inch thick.

    2. FILL. Fill 3 separate bowls with flour, eggs and the dry ingredients: panko, pumpkin seeds, salt, black pepper, chopped oregano and orange zest.

    3. DIP: Coat the chicken breast with flour, then dip into beaten eggs, followed by a dip into the panko mix.

    4. SAUTE. In a sauté pan, heat up the oil at medium heat. Lightly sauté the coated chicken breast until it reaches a golden color—about 1 minute on each side.

    5. BAKE. Place the chicken breasts onto a sheet pan and cook it for an additional 10-15 minutes. If you are using fish, it requires just 5-10 minutes in the oven; or you may finish it in the pan.

    6. SERVE with vegetable(s) of choice and a green salad tossed with whole pumpkin seeds. For a seasonal touch, add some pumpkin seed oil to the vinaigrette!

     

    pepitas-bag-bowl-230

    Pumpkin seeds (called pepitas in Spanish).
    Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    ABOUT PUMPKIN SEEDS

    Pumpkin seeds (called pepitas in Spanish) are flat seeds that lend themselves to a crust. They have a chewy texture and a subtly sweet, nutty flavor.

    Pumpkins are indigenous to the Americas. Their use in medicine and cuisine traces at least as far back as the Aztecs, 1300-1500 C.E. The name “pepita,” which translates to “seed,” comes from Mexico, where Spanish settlers called them “pepita de calabaza,” “little seed of squash.”

    Pumpkin seeds are available year-round: raw and shelled, raw and unshelled, roasted and shelled, roasted and unshelled. For recipes, choose unshelled seeds.

    PUMPKIN SEED TRIVIA

    • Pumpkins, other squash and gourds belong to the Cucurbitaceae botanical family, along with cantaloupe, cucumber and watermelon.
    • Today, China produces more pumpkins and pumpkin seeds than any other country. Other major producers include India, Mexico, Russia, the Ukraine and the U.S.
    • In the U.S., more than 100,000 acres of U.S. farmland are planted with pumpkins, in virtually every state. Illinois is the largest producer of pumpkins, followed by California, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and New York.
     
    HOW TO ROAST PUMPKIN SEEDS

    It’s easy and fun to roast your own pumpkin seeds, using your seasonings of choice (salt, garlic salt, chile powder, etc.) You can also buy organic raw pumpkin seeds in bulk.

    1. PREPARATION: If you’re using seeds straight from the pumpkin, first wipe them off with a paper towel to remove excess pulp. Spread them out evenly on a paper bag or paper towel and let them dry overnight.

    2. PREHEAT the oven to 160°-170°F (75°C). Place the seeds in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Season as desired.

    3. ROAST for 15 minutes, but for no longer than 20 minutes. (After then, the heat engenders a negative change in the healthful pumpkin seed fat structure.)
     
    MORE WAYS TO SERVE PUMPKIN SEEDS

    • Sprinkle on salads, grains and vegetables.
    • Add chopped pumpkin seeds to your favorite hot or cold cereal.
    • Add pumpkin seeds to your oatmeal raisin cookie or granola recipe, carrot or zucchini cake.
    • Grind pumpkin seeds with fresh garlic, parsley and cilantro leaves. Mix with olive oil and lemon juice for a tasty salad dressing or bread dipper.
    • Add ground seeds to ground meat for burgers or meat loaf (including veggie burgers).

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Stone Crab

    Our friends at the Grand Central Oyster Bar in New York City remind us that stone crab is now in season. Florida stone crabs are legal for harvest from October 15th through May 15th. Frozen stone crab is available year-round, but the true palate pleaser is the fresh crab.

    The stone crab (Menippe mercenaria), also known as the Florida stone crab, lives in the western North Atlantic, from Connecticut down to Belize; and the Caribbean, including the Bahamas, Cuba and the Gulf of Mexico.

    The stone crab is a cousin of the Maryland blue crab (Callinectes sapidus, also known as the blue crab, Atlantic blue crab or Chesapeake blue crab) and the Gulf stone crab (Menippe adina), a closely related species. It tastes like a cross between the blue crab and the Maine lobster—less definitive than lobster but more so than crab.

    The body is relatively small without much meat; the part that is eaten is the big, meaty claw, which is very distinctive in appearance with black tips. When harvesting, one or both claws are removed on the boat and the live crab is returning to the ocean, where it will regenerate its claws.

    Sustainability-oriented fishermen remove only one claw, so the crab can protect itself while the other regenerates. The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch has given the Florida stone crab industry its highest rating of “Best Choice,” for maintaining high fishing standards and working hard to keep the stone crab population viable.

    The claws are strong enough to break an oyster’s shell—like us, stone crabs love to eat oysters. Claws are sold by size, generally in four sizes: medium, large, jumbo, and colossal.

       

    Florida-Stone-Crab-claw-frugeseafood-230r

    A stone crab claw. Photo courtesy Fruge Seafood.

     

    RECIPE: STONE CRAB CLAWS

    The easiest way to serve stone crab claws is to boil them, and serve them hot or chilled with melted butter or other sauce (the two most popular are mustard sauce and remoulade sauce).

    What looks like a very impressive dish couldn’t be easier to make. The difficult part comes when the diners have to extract the meat from the shell—you may have heard of the “Maryland crab bash,” where diners get a bib and a hammer. Or, you can remove the shells yourself, prior to serving (instructions are below).

    Note that there is a hard center membrane inside the meat, so take care if biting into what looks like a large lump of meat. It’s better to pull the meat off with a fork.

     

    stone-crab-claws-cracked-uberstonecrabs-230

    Ready to dip and eat. Photo courtesy
    UberStoneCrabs.com.

     

    Ingredients

  • 1 to 1-1/2 pounds stone crab claws per person
  • 1/4 stick butter per person
  • Lemon or lime wedges
  • Optional garnish: dill or parsley
  •  
    Serve With

  • Cole slaw
  • Mixed green salad
  • Mixed vegetables: Brussels sprouts, carrots, other favorites
  • Garlic bread
  •  
    Optional Dips

  • Compound butter: chipotle, olive, red pepper, shallot herb, etc. (recipes)
  • Mustard sauce (recipe)
  • Remoulade sauce (recipe)
  •  

    Preparation

    1. BRING a pot of 12 cups of water, plus a teaspoon of salt, to a rapid boil; remove from the heat. When the water stops bubbling, place the crab claws in the water for about five minutes. Do not submerge the claws into the rapidly boiling water, as they can toughen.

    2. DRAIN the crab claws into a colander (warning: the claws and water will be very hot) and rinse under cold water to make them easier to handle.

    3. PREPARE the dip. The easiest is to combining 4 tablespoons of butter with minced garlic and salt or other seasoning of choice (for example, Old Bay Seasoning). Microwave butter mixture until melted, about 90 seconds (time will vary by microwave).

    4. SERVE with melted butter and wedges of lemon.
     
    How To Crack The Crab Claws

    1. PLACE the claw on a cutting board or other hard surface. Then, place a plastic bag over the claw to prevent the juices from splattering.

    2. USE a mallet or hammer (cleaned, of course!) and lightly crack the claw in the first and second knuckles; then crack slightly harder in the center of the claw.

    3. PEEL the shell from the claw and then separate the two knuckles from the main pincher. Serve with sauce and citrus wedges.

    NOTE: Crack only as many as claws as you plan to eat at one meal. Once cracked, the claw meat will not hold up well for a long period of time.

     
    THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF CRAB: A CRAB MEAT GLOSSARY

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make Easy Tuna Tartare & Steak Tartare

    If you‘re looking for a fine-dining restaurant in the heart of South Beach or in Cleveland, check out Red, The Steakhouse. The menu is loaded with steakhouse specialties (look here if you want to develop an appetite).

    They kindly shared their recipes for Tuna Tartare and Steak Tartare with us. These are two dishes we adore, and don’t get often enough. Yet, they’re easy to make at home, using top-quality proteins. The only challenge is cutting the tuna or steak into small enough pieces.

    So if you enjoy making small dice and love a good tartare, get the proteins, sharpen the knife, and get going!
     
    RECIPE: TUNA TARTARE

    Ingredients Per Appetizer Serving

  • 4 ounces sushi grade tuna
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Optional garnish: fried plantain chips
  • Crostini or gourmet potato chips
  •    

    Tuna_Tartare-redthesteakhouse-southbeach-230

    Tuna tartare, one of our favorite foods. Photo
    courtesy Red, The Steakhouse.

     

    RECIPE: TUNA TARTARE VINAIGRETTE

    Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup shallots, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon mirin
  • 1/4 cup fresno chiles (substitute jalapeño or serrano chiles)
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the vinaigrette. Finely chop the shallots and season them with the kosher salt. Stir in the rest of the ingredients, saving the extra-virgin olive oil for last. Set the mixture aside.

    2. CHOP the tuna with a sharp knife into very small pieces. Place in a small bowl and season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

    3. ADD 1 tablespoon of the vinaigrette and mix until it is evenly combined with the tuna.

    4. PLATE as desired into individual servings or a single serving plate. Serve with crostini, gourmet potato or plantain chips.

     

    Steak_Tartare-redthesteakhouse-southbeach-230

    Steak tartare, so easy to make at home. Photo courtesy Red, The Steakhouse.

     

    RECIPE: STEAK TARTARE

    Ingredients For 1 Appetizer Serving

  • 4 ounces prime tenderloin
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  •  
    RECIPE: STEAK TARTARE VINAIGRETTE

    Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup shallots, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon chopped capers
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/8 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 2-1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MAKE the vinaigrette. Finely chop the shallots and season with the kosher salt. Stir in the rest of the ingredients, saving the olive oil for last. Set the mixture aside.

    2. CHOP the tenderloin with a sharp knife into very small pieces. Place in a small bowl and season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

    3. ADD 1 tablespoon of the vinaigrette and mix until evenly combined with the tenderloin.

    4. SERVE with crostini.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: StarKist Tuna Pouches To Help Wounded Warriors

    StarKist has joined forces with the Wounded Warrior Project, pledging $100,000 to support our nation’s wounded service members and their families. To rally shoppers to support the Wounded Warrior Project, StarKist has introduced an “Outdoors” Tuna Creations Pouch with a camouflage-inspired design (photo below), available through the end of 2015.

    The celebratory pouches are available in Lemon Pepper and Sweet & Spicy in a 4.5-ounce pouch. The tuna pouches provide an on-the-go source of lean protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, ready to eat with no draining or mixing required.

    In fact, when you by StarKist tuna pouches, you eat what the troops eat. For the past decade, StarKist has provided tuna pouches for all military MRE kits.

    StarKist is also participating in the 2014 Wounded Warrior Project Believe in Heroes campaign, that calls on Americans to show their appreciation for this generation of veterans through the simple act of everyday grocery shopping.

  • StarKist will offer consumers a coupon for a $1 off any two StarKist Tuna Pouch products in a special Believe in Heroes free-standing insert, which will be circulated to 53 million households nationwide in newspapers, on Sunday, November 2, 2014.
  • The coupon will be available for download online in both English and Spanish through the end of November at WWPBelieve.org.
  •    

    Tuna Salad Sandwich

    Do tuna proud with new pouches from StarKist. Photo by Kelly Cline | IST.

     

     

    StarKist Co Tuna Creations Wounded Warrior Project

    Each bite helps Wounded Warriors. Photo
    courtesy StarKist.

     

    About Starkist Flavor Pouches

    StarKist, the number one canned tuna brand in the U.S. was the first brand to introduce tuna in pouches. The company has a dolphin-safe policy for all of its tuna products. Charlie the Tuna first swam into the hearts of tuna fans in 1961 and remains a fan favorite today.

    About The Wounded Warrior Project

    Founded in 2003, Wounded Warrior Project was created to honor and empower service members returning from post-9/11 conflicts who suffer from both visible and invisible wounds of war. It raises awareness and enlists the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members. For more information, visit WoundedWarriorProject.org.

     

      

    Comments

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