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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Entertaining

TIP OF THE DAY: Christmas Tree Napkin Fold

A few decades back when napkin folds were a staple of fancy entertaining, we bought a book on the topic and created everything from fans to fleurs-de-lis.

If you’re not familiar with the art of napkin folding, here are 27 basic napkin folds and many more types of napkin folding on Pinterest.

Napkin folding may seem old fashioned, but every formal dinner table still features crisp napkins. And there’s no better time than Christmas dinner to show off.

Here’s how to make the Christmas tree napkin fold in the photo, from crafting site


Napery is another term for linens used for household purposes, including napkins and tablecloths.

In wealthy medieval households, there was an “office” responsible for the washing and storage of these items, headed by a naperer who worked closely with other offices.



Fold green, red or white napkins into Christmas trees. Photo courtesy

These included the office of the laundry, charged with the washing and storage of clothing; and the office of the ewery, which managed the water and the vessels for drinking and washing. In smaller affluent households that couldn’t keep up with the Joneses (or the Lord Joneses), these three functions were managed by the same staff. [Source]

Crisp napkins were folded in style at the tables of the 19th-century elite and through the early 20th century. The art has been kept alive at certain fine restaurants and catering establishments.

These days, things are more casual at our home—except for very special holiday dinners. We’ll be folding Christmas tree napkins on the 25th!



TIP OF THE DAY: Write A Thanksgiving Poem

If you’ve got time to fill before or after Thanksgiving dinner, have a poetry jam.

Have guests compose their own poems, or print out some of the many at for recitation. Here’s our choice:

by Maude M. Grant

Take a turkey, stuff it fat,
Some of this and some of that.
Get some turnips, peel them well.
Cook a big squash in its shell.
Now potatoes, big and white,
Mash till they are soft and light.
Cranberries, so tart and sweet,
With the turkey we must eat.
Pickles-yes-and then, oh my!
For a dessert a pumpkin pie,
Golden brown and spicy sweet.
What a fine Thanksgiving treat!

It could become an annual tradition, with judging and chocolate turkey prizes.




This heritage turkey breed is the Bourbon Red. Photo by Matt Billings | Wikimedia.




TIP OF THE DAY: Cut Back On The Hors d’Oeuvre

People who love to put out a good spread typically go whole-hog on the hors d’oeuvre. The problem, in advance of a big feast, is that those who have been holding back on eating in anticipation of the big meal may go overboard with the pre-meal tidbits.

Guests may have eaten very lightly that day in anticipation of the dinner, only to be very hungry when by the time they arrive at your doorstep. They then dive into the platters of whatever you’ve put out: bruschetta, canapés, cheese, crudités, dips and spreads, paté.

If they arrive an hour or two in advance of sitting down to dinner, by the time the main meal begins, they could be halfway stuffed. The solution:

1. Let everyone know what time you expect to sit down at the table. Then, whether you plan a cocktail hour or multi-hour get together before serving dinner, everyone will be prepared. (If you’re the guest, call ahead and ask.)

2. Limit what you serve to little nibbles—the kind most people won’t eat in bulk.



Mixed olives and caperberries with fresh parsley and pink peppercorns. Photo courtesy Foods From Spain.



  • Olives, either by themselves or as part of an old-fashioned relish platter with gherkins, radishes, carrot and celery sticks (or the modern alternative, baby carrots and fennel sticks).
  • If you want to do something more creative, consider an olive platter with different flavors: plain olives with very distinctive flavors, such as Cerignola and Kalamata; a hot and spicy mix; olives stuffed with anchovy, blue cheese, garlic, jalapeño, etc.
  • Nuts, including spiced nuts, like Planters Pumpkin Spice Almonds; or a selection of different nuts.
    But forewarned is forearmed. You’ve slaved over that dinner, and the last thing you want to hear are guests groaning that they don’t have enough room for it.



    FOOD FUN: Party Plate Decals For Any Occasion


    Just a few of the Christmas decal choices. Photo courtesy Create UR Plate.


    We absolutely love this line of plate decals, created by party planner Sandy Casey of Create UR Plate.

    Hundreds of choices let you tailor your dishes to any party occasion. The “magic” comes from adhesive decals, which adhere to the base of glass or plastic plates from the underside.

    Made in sizes to fit both dinner plates and dessert plates, they’re $1.99 each and are reusable. The company also sells glass and plastic plates.

    Can you think of a more elegant—and fun—idea for party plates? The many decal themes include:

  • Anniversary
  • Baby Shower
  • Birthday
  • Bridal Shower
  • Easter
  • Graduation
  • Halloween
  • Hanukkah
  • New Years
  • Passover
  • Patriotic
  • St. Patrick’s
  • Tailgaiting
  • Thanksgiving
  • Valentine
  • Wedding

    You can also create your own custom design with your own photos and jpgs. Perhaps some Bark Mitzvah plates for Fido?

    See why we find this product so exciting. Check out the plates for

  • Thanksgiving
  • Christmas
    You can also create plates as gifts, with photos of the kids, pets, team logos and so forth.

    Party on!



    One of many different ways to customize your holiday dishes with reusable decals. Photo courtesy Create UR Plate.




    TIP OF THE DAY: Dessert Bites & Picks


    Instead of full-size desserts, serve tasty
    mouthfuls: picks and bites. Photo courtesy
    Eat Wisconsin Cheese.


    Yesterday we published a list of hors d’oeuvre picks and bites for holiday entertaining. Today, it’s on to desserts!

    These irresistible desserts are easy to make and almost guiltless. Enjoy just a bite or two instead of a full-size dessert.

    Not only are they the best way to enjoy some sweetness at the end of a big feast, but they’re lower in calories. And you can have a few different varieties for a miniature “dessert sampler.”

    From the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (, you can see all the images and download a recipe brochure.

    Serve a selection of five or so different choices.

  • Brie Berry Pick: Mini Brie Cheese Wedge, Strawberry
  • Brie Nut Pick: Brie Cheese Log Slice, Chopped Pistachios, Raspberry Preserves, Red Raspberry
  • Brie & Fruit Pick: Strawberry, Brie Cheese Log Slice, Star Fruit Slice, Red Grape
  • Coffee Bite: Chocolate Cordial Cup, Mascarpone Cheese, Instant Espresso Crystals, Chocolate Covered Coffee Bean of Coffee Bean
  • Figgie Blue Bite: Fresh Fig, Blue Cheese, Candied Walnut, Honey Drizzle
  • Lemon Meringue Bite: Shortbread or Sugar Cookie, Mascarpone Cheese, Lemon Curd, Powdered Sugar Sprinkle, Lemon Peel
  • Tiramisu Bite: Chocolate Dessert Cup, Mascarpone Cheese Mixed with Chocolate Syrup, Small Wafer Cookies, Instant Espresso Crystals, Chocolate Covered Coffee Bean or Coffee Bean
  • Strawberry Shortcake Bite: Sugar Cookie or Short Bread, Mascarpone Cheese, Sliced Strawberry


    You can use ordinary toothpicks, but special (and inexpensive!) party picks will make your miniature desserts even tastier. Click on the links to check out:

  • Holiday party picks, silver and gold picks with a star on top
  • Christmas party picks: assorted red, green and white with Christmas trees on top.
  • Foil party picks: fun metallic fringe in blue, green, purple and silver for New Year’s Eve.
  • Conventional frilled party picks, with cellophane frills in bright colors for Thanksgiving.


    A tiramisu bite in a miniature chocolate shell. Photo courtesy Eat Wisconsin Cheese.




    TIP OF THE DAY: Appetizer Bites & Picks

    Our friends at, the consumer site of the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board, spend their creative time developing delicious new ideas for cheese. We had a lot of fun with these picks and bites, which we served last night as an alternative to a cheese plate.

    Picks are finger foods served on cocktail picks or toothpicks that holds the ingredients together. Bites are self-containing and require no pick. Both are easy to create and make a big impression.

    Arrange a plate of contrasting colors, flavors and styles to serve with holiday cocktails. Or, serve them alongside soups or salads—for example, a shot of tomato soup with a Greek Salad Bite.

    While they are delicious as is, you can enhance them with a variety of mustards and sauces. While we’ve provided a long list for your perusal, you can see them all online and download a recipe brochure.
    Peruse the 44 options below and pick five or so for your hors d’oeuvre plate. And check out the dessert picks for a sweet finish.



    Many hors d’oeuvre can be served on a pick. Photo courtesy


  • Antipasto Pick: Artichoke, Caper Berry, Salami Chunk, Red Pepper, Parsley Garnish, Sharp Provolone Cheese, Olive Oil
  • Antipasto Bite: Canned Artichoke Cup, Cubed Sharp Provolone Cheese, Roasted Red Pepper, Diced Salami, Capers, Olive Oil, Parsley Leaf
  • Asiago Egg Bite: Hard Cooked Egg White Cup, Egg Yolk, Red Pepper, Parsley, Green Onion, Asiago Cheese, Mayonnaise
  • Baby Pick: Baby Swiss Cheese Cube, Ham Chunk, Green Grape, Topped with a Pretzel Knot
  • BBLT Pick: Crustless White Bread, Brick Cheese, Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato, Mayonnaise
  • Beef Roll Bite: Horseradish Cold Pack Cheese, Roast Tenderloin or Skirt Steak, Arugula Leaves, Red Bell Pepper Strips
  • Belgian Bite: Belgian Endive, Ricotta Cheese, Olive Tapenade, Parsley Garnish
  • Brie-O-Politan Pick: Bias-Sliced Cucumber, Bias-Sliced Roma Tomato, Bias-Sliced Brie Cheese Log, Arugula, Pitted Niçoise Olive
  • Caesar Bite: Small Romaine Lettuce Leaf, Thinly Sliced Romaine Lettuce, Caesar Salad Dressing, Cherry Tomato Wedge, Crouton, Shaved Parmesan Cheese, Anchovy Filet, Mini Lemon Wedge
  • Caprese Pick: Grape Tomato, Basil Leaf, Fresh Mozzarella Cheese Ciligene
  • Club Sandpick: Sandwich Bread Slice, Monterey Jack Cheese Slice, Cucumber Slices, Ham Slice, Tomato Slices, Wisconsin Monterey Jack Slice, Leaf Lettuce
  • Cobb Pick: Bread Slice, Blue Cheese, Bacon, Cherry Tomato, Hard Cooked Egg Wedge
  • Cordon Blue Pick: Ham Slice, Cream Cheese, Red Pepper, Gruyère Cheese Cube, Mini Dill Pickle
  • Del Mar Pick: Fontina Cheese, Flat Leaf Parsley Leaf, Smoked Oyster, Pimento-Stuffed Olive
  • Dutch Pick: Medjool Date, Edam Cheese Chunk, Ham Slice
  • Gorgonzola Bacon Bite: Cooked Baby Red Potato Cup, Crumbled Gorgonzola Cheese, Bacon Bits, Sliced Green Onion, Mayonnaise
  • Gorgonzola Date Bite: Seeded Medjool Date, Gorgonzola Cheese Wedge, Prosciutto Slice Strip
  • Greek Salad Pick: Cucumber Chunk, Grape Tomato, Feta Cheese Cube, Pitted Kalamata, Olive Oil Drizzle, Oregano Garnish
  • Grinder Pick: Pepperoncini, Hard Salami Slice, String Cheese, Pimento Stuffed Olive
  • Ham & Cheese Pick: Sharp White Cheddar Cheese, Arugula Leaves, Sliced Ham
  • Half-Shell Bite: Oyster on the Half-Shell, Pico De Gallo, Crumbled Cotija Cheese, Cilantro Leaf


    An example of a bite: No toothpick required. Photo courtesy

  • Monk Pick: Pretzel Roll Slice, Wholegrain Mustard, Gruyere, Les Frères or Muenster Cheese Slice, Mini Dill Pickle, Cocktail Onion
  • Monroe Bite: Pumpernickel Cocktail Bread, Limburger Cheese, Red Onion, Green Onion, Whole Grain Mustard
  • Muenster Beef Pick: Muenster Cheese, Sliced Roast Beef, Green Onion
  • Mushroom Pick: Pickled Mushroom, Ricotta Salata Cheese, Kalamata Olives, Capers, Parsley Garnish, Olive Oil Drizzle
  • Napoli Pick: Fresh Mozzarella Roll, Mascarpone, Pesto, Sliced Prosciutto, Roasted Red Pepper, Fresh Basil Leaves
  • Norwegian Pick: Fresh Mozzarella Cheese, Cream Cheese, Lox/Cured Salmon, Baby Dill Garnish
  • Oscar Pick: Ham Slice, Garlic & Herb Cheese Spread, Crabmeat, Blanched Asparagus Spear
  • Parmesan Potato Bite: Cooked Baby Red Potato Cup, Shredded Parmesan Cheese, Bacon Bits, Diced Hard-Boiled Egg, Chives, Mayonnaise, Prepared Mustard
  • Peppadew Bite: Peppadew, Garden Vegetable Cheese Spread, Parsley Garnish
  • Potato Salad Bite: Red Potato Slice, Hard Cooked Egg Slice, Mascarpone Cheese, Dijon Mustard, Sweet Pickle Wedge

  • Pesto Pick: Pesto Gouda or Gouda Cheese, Basil Leaf, Grape Tomato, Chicken Breast
  • Roman Bite: Bread Coin, Oil Cured Tomato, Oregano, Romano Cheese Chunk, Cracked Black Pepper, Olive Oil Drizzle
  • Reuben Pick: Corned Beef Slice, Swiss Cheese Slice, Mixture of 1,000 Island Salad Dressing and Sauerkraut, Mini Dill Pickle
  • Rustica Pick: Mild Provolone Cheese, Salami, Pepperoni, Basil, Roasted Red Pepper, Pitted Kalamata Garnish
  • Smorg-More Pick: Caper Berry, Dill Havarti Cheese, Lox/Cured Salmon, Baby Dill, Lemon Wedge Garnish
  • Shrimp Bite: Bias-Cut Seedless Cucumber Slice, Mayonnaise Ketchup Mixture, Cooked Tail-On Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, Fresh Mozzarella Cheese Pearl, Lemon Peel
  • Shell Pick: Fontina Cheese, Kalamata Olives, Roasted Red Peppers, Pepperoncini, Capers, Basil Leaf Garnish
  • Shooter Bite: Shot Glass, Pico De Gallo, Fresh Shucked Oyster, Crumbled Cotija Cheese, Cilantro Leaf, Lemon Peel Strip
  • Shrimp Pick: Thick Cucumber Slice, Cooked Shrimp, Fresh Mozzarella Cheese Pearl, Lemon Rind
  • Tapas Pick: Quince Paste, Queso Blanco Cheese, Serrano Ham, Green Grape
  • TexMex Bite: Corn Chip Cup, Salsa Jack Cheese Cube, Black Bean Salsa, Cilantro Garnish
  • Torte Pick: Camembert Cheese, Gorgonzola Cheese, Walnut, Red Grape
  • Waldorf Lettuce Bite: Small Bibb or Butter Lettuce Leaf, Gouda Cheese, Diced Celery, Diced Apple, Raisins, Chopped Walnuts, Mayonnaise, Lemon Juice, Parsley Leaf
  • Watermelon Pick: Watermelon Cube, Fresh Mint Leaf, Feta Cube, Watermelon Half-Ball
  • Wisconsin Pick: Sausage, Pepper Jack Cheese, Sweet Pickle, Cheddar Cheese Curd or Cube

    These special party picks will make your hors d’oeuvre even tastier:

  • Holiday party picks, silver and gold picks with a star on top
  • Christmas party picks: assorted red, green and white with Christmas trees on top.
  • Foil party picks: fun metallic fringe in blue, green, purple and silver for New Year’s Eve.
  • Conventional frilled party picks, with cellophane frills in bright colors for Thanksgiving.


    TIP OF THE DAY: Pairing Chocolate Bars & Wine

    If your idea of grown-up Halloween does not include costume parties, how about a chocolate and wine tasting?

    For years, THE NIBBLE has been updating its highly-regarded wine and chocolate pairing chart. You can use it to prepare a memorable Halloween tasting.

    While our chart is quite extensive, your tasting can be as simple as four or five chocolate bars. John Scharffenberger, who got his start as a wine maker, shares his own favorites to pair with Scharffen Berger dark and milk chocolate bars:

  • Scharffen Berger 72% Signature Dark Chocolate. John Scharffenberger notes that darker chocolates pair beautifully with dry, rich, full-bodied red wines. He likes an Italian Amarone, a Spanish Rioja or French Bordeaux.
  • Scharffen Berger 72% Dark Chocolate with Pistachios and Sea Salt. While you can use the same wines when pistachios are included, lighter nuts like pistachio can be served with Mas Amiel, a dessert wine from the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France; Sauternes, a dessert wine from the Bordeaux region, or Cabernet Sauvignon, which can bring out nutty accents.
  • Scharffen Berger 33% Smooth Milk Chocolate. Lighter-flavored chocolates pair best with light-bodied wines. John Scharffenberger advises that buttery caramel overtones make this chocolate a perfect complement to a Sauvignon Blanc. Also try it with Armagnac, a single-distilled French brandy.


    For holiday gift giving, tie some fine chocolate bars with a ribbon and bestow them with or without matching wines. Photo by Hannah Kaminsky | THE NIBBLE.

    THE NIBBLE particularly likes these wines with milk chocolate: Hungarian Tokaji (pronounced TOE-coy); Muscat, a white dessert wine from France with peach and apricot flavors’ and Tawny Port, a fortified wine from Portugal. In fact, Tawny Port is our favorite match with milk chocolate. Its nutty nuances highlight milk chocolate’s nutty and caramel notes and enhance the overall chocolate flavor.

  • Scharffen Berger 33% Milk Chocolate with Toasted Coconut and Macadamia Nuts. For this delicious bar, THE NIBBLE recommends Brachetto d’Acqui, a light, ruby-colored sparkling dessert wine from Piedmont, with typical aromas of fruit and roses. It’s a great match with both nuts and coconut. A Sauternes from Bordeaux (Lafaurie-Peyraguey or similar style) or a Late Harvest Semillon from Australia are also good complements.
    The educational fun of a tasting is to be able to compare and contrast different wines with different chocolates, and decide what you like best. That’s more important, after all, than any expert opinion.



    TIP OF THE DAY: Make It A Trio

    Once upon a time there was a magical restaurant in Wheeling, Illinois, Le Français, the creation of chef-owner Jean Banchet. There, among other glories, we were first introduced to the “trio” approach he brought from his classic French training:

    Whatever protein you hungered for—beef, duck, seafood, veal—would be served in three different preparations on one plate. For example, the lobster trio might include truffled lobster, Lobster Thermidor and lobster sausage.

    By varying cuts, preparations and sauces, Banchet created a symphony of flavors and visual appeal. It became our favorite way of eating.

    The trio approach never took great hold in the U.S. In New York City, we find them mostly in seafood preparations:

  • The trio of fish tacos at Haru Japanese restaurants.
  • A trio of mussels, variously prepared as a seasonal special from Anita Lo of Annisa (see photo).
  • Wild salmon sushi with three different garnishes (fresh ginger and scallion, concasse of tomato and a lemon and vodka marinade topped with lemon zest) at Sushi Seki.


    Photo courtesy Annisa Restaurant | NYC.

    Following our enlightenment from Banchet way back in the 1980s, we took to making trios at home for dinner parties. You don’t need a large kitchen staff to turn out three completely different preparations. Here are some tricks:

  • Include a sausage as one of the trio. It requires only a quick grilling and an interesting flavored mustard, chutney or other condiment.
  • Consider poaching one of the other two, and grilling, pan frying or roasting the other two. Poultry, filet of beef and seafood are delicious when poached, and the texture is very tender.
  • Use a marinade. A very well-seasoned marinade (lots of herbs, spices, balsamic, etc.) on one of two remaining proteins will differentiate the flavor.
  • Use a dairy based sauce (butter, cheese or cream) and a non-creamy one. The choices are vast: caper, horseradish, mushroom, olive, tomato and wine reduction aren’t even the tip of the iceberg. Browse the sauces section in your cookbooks and check out the mother sauces of France.
  • Think garnishes. The options are endless, but go for good color contrasts.
    Today’s homework: Start to sketch out some trios: protein, preparation, sauce, garnish. Keep on the refrigerator door and update it as inspiration strikes.
    *Jean Banchet, a French chef, founded Le Français in 1973, and soon earned a rare five-star distinction from Mobil. In 1980, it was named the best restaurant in America by Bon Appetit magazine. Banchet retired from Le Français in 2001 and passed away last year.



    TIP OF THE DAY: Crescent Dogs On A Stick


    Crescent Rolls + Hot Dogs + Crescent Dogs. Photo and recipe courtesy Pillsbury.


    You don’t need a grill to cook memorable Labor Day fare. Make that classic fun food, Crescent Dog on a Stick, in your oven.

    A hot dog wrapped in a cheese and a Pillsbury Crescent roll, the stick is actually optional (as is the cheese). You can layer other flavor bursts inside the crescent, such as pickle relish or chopped jalapeños.

    The recipe is easy and the experience will be remembered happily for a long time. Prep time is 10 minutes, total time is 25 minutes.


    Ingredients For 8 Servings

  • 8 hot dogs
  • 4 slices (3/4 oz each) American, Swiss or other cheese slice, each cut into 6 strips
  • 1 can (8 ounces) Pillsbury refrigerated crescent dinner rolls
  • 8 wooden corn dog sticks
  • Condiments of choice

    1. PREHEAT oven to 375°F. Slit hot dogs to within 1/2 inch of ends; insert 3 strips of cheese into each slit.

    2. SEPARATE the dough into triangles. Wrap a dough triangle around each hot dog. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet, cheese side up.

    3. BAKE at 375°F for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Insert 1 stick in each crescent dog and serve.



    TIP OF THE DAY: Party With Veggie Sandwiches


    Pile grilled veggies onto a sandwich. Photo
    courtesy Philadelphia Cream Cheese.


    Why wait for Meatless Mondays to have a great veggie sandwich? Every healthcare professional advises eating less animal protein and more vegetables and grains. And of course, eating less meat is far better for the environment.

    So start by switching some of your sandwich intake to delicious vegetarian sandwiches. It’s painless!

    While we love a sliced avocado and tomato sandwich using local summer tomatoes, we think that grilled vegetables make the best vegetarian sandwiches. While it’s still prime grilling season, develop some signature veggie sandwich recipes. You can even turn the concept into a veggie sandwich party—a build-your-own sandwich buffet.

    Creative flavor layering is at the heart of a great veggie sandwich. Peruse the following groups for inspiration, and offer something from each group.


  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Bell peppers
  • Bok choy
  • Broccolini
  • Eggplant
  • Endive
  • Onions
  • Poblano Chiles
  • Portabella mushrooms
  • Romaine
  • Summer squash: yellow squash and zucchini
  • Tofu (not a vegetable, but an excellent vegetarian addition to this list)

  • Avocado, sliced or diced
  • Cabbage, shredded
  • Carrots, shredded
  • Cherry tomatoes in vinaigrette
  • Cucumber
  • Leafy greens: arugula, spinach, watercress
  • Mustard greens/mizuna/tatsoi
  • Sprouts


  • Bean dip
  • Greek yogurt or labneh, plain or seasoned
  • Guacamole
  • Hummus
  • Soft, spreadable cheeses
  • Tapenade
  • Tzatziki

  • Barbecue sauce
  • Chutney
  • Cocktail sauce
  • Ketchup
  • Mayonnaise/flavored mayonnaise
  • Mustard(s)
  • Pesto
  • Relish
  • Salsa/Chimichurri
  • Sauces: horseradish, yogurt-dill
  • Vinaigrette & other salad dressings

  • Chopped herbs
  • Dried fruit: cherries, cranberries, raisins
  • Kimchi
  • Pickled beets, cucumbers, onions or peppers
  • Sauerkraut
  • Sliced olives and/or chiles
  • Toasted seeds


    Grilled raddicho, endive and romaine are delicious, on a sandwich or as a side. Photo courtesy


    Of course, the remaining ingredient to make veggie sandwiches is bread. We won’t add more long lists here, just two bullets:

  • Bread and rolls: Three or more different styles for a party. If you’re grilling, grilled bread is delicious.
  • Sides: The usual suspects, including chips, cole slaw, potato salad, even green salad.
    Party on, veggie-style!



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