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Archive for Sugar-Free

TIP OF THE DAY: Sugar Free Sorbet

There’s a lot of good no-sugar-added ice cream out there, but it’s tough to find a no-sugar-added sorbet.

Even our sugar-free and lactose-free Top Pick Of The Week, Clemmy’s ice cream, offers only an Orange Creme flavor, a combination of vanilla ice cream and orange sorbet.

But if you’re on a sugar-free diet and miss sorbet, you can make it yourself with unsweetened fruit juice or pureed watermelon and other fruits. If you don’t have an ice cream maker, you can make granita, a “crunchy sorbet” (see recipes below).

To make no-sugar-added sorbet or granita:

  • Freeze 2 liters of unsweetened juice in your ice cream maker, along with artificial sweetener equivalent to one cup of sugar (you can adjust the sweetener to taste—the less you use, the better).
  • Use maltitol as the sweetener. It can be purchased online in crystal or syrup form (syrup blends better into the juice). Splenda is a good second choice.
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    Sorbet made with pomegranate juice. Photo
    courtesy Pom Wonderful.

     

  • Find sorbet and granita recipes in our Gourmet Ice Cream Section. Substitute maltitol for the sugar.
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    What’s The Difference Between “Sugar-Free” And “No-Sugar-Added?”
    No-sugar-added products still contain some sugar that is is naturally contained in the ingredients used. Milk, for example, contains lactose, or milk sugar. Plant and animal tissues contain dextrose; fruit contains sucrose.

    A product labeled sugar-free has absolutely no sugar. Whatever sugar occurs naturally in the ingredients has been removed. This is a much more expensive process, which is why most foods are no-sugar-added.

      

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    PRODUCT: Pillsbury Sugar Free Brownies, Cake & Frosting

    Cake lovers can be despondent if the doctor advises them to lay off the refined sugar.

    But thanks to Pillsbury, there’s no reason to go without delicious cakes and brownies.

    Delivering all of the flavor without the sugar, Pillsbury Sugar Free brownies, cakes and frostings can delight anyone. The treats include:

  • Brownies in Chocolate Fudge and Milk Chocolate
  • Cakes in Classic Yellow and Devil’s Food
  • Frosting in Chocolate Fudge and Vanilla
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    We tried everything. Actually, we did more than “try”: We consumed every last crumb.

    The products taste like they’re made with sugar—but, surprise—they’re sweetened with Splenda (sucralose) and sugar alcohols (isomalt, maltitol and sorbitol).

     

    Even if you can’t have sugar, you can have
    a delicious brownie or piece of cake. Photo
    courtesy Pillsbury.

     

    These are not low-calorie or low-carb foods. Cake still has flour and fat; a serving of frosting, which is 100 calories, comprises 60 calories of fat. A brownie has 150 calories, 70 from fat. But everything is cholesterol-free.

    As a surprise, bake a batch for a friend on a sugar-free diet. Just resist the temptation to devour it yourself.

    The line is certified kosher by OU.

      

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    PRODUCT: Limited Edition Papaya Mango Snapple

    Papaya Mango is the new limited edition
    Snapple tea. Photo courtesy Snapple.

     

    Last year, Snapple sponsored an episode of Celebrity Apprentice that allowed Bret Michaels to create one of our favorite Diet Snapple flavors ever, Trop-A-Rocka. The layering of mango, pear and cinnamon was the most complex Snapple flavor we’d come across. And it’s not just our opinion: the limited edition was so popular that it was made into a permanent member of the line.

    A couple of weeks ago, Snapple debuted its newest limited edition tea, Snapple Papaya Mango Tea, in Episode 6 of The Amazing Race.

    Inspired by the exotic flavors of India (where the contestants spent the second hour of the show), the flavor combines green tea, black tea and the lush fruit flavors of papaya and mango. It’s available in both regular and diet versions at participating retailers nationwide.

    If you like Peach Snapple (and we know people who buy it by the case), you’ll want to try Snapple’s Papaya Mango Tea. Like Tropa-Rocka, it deserves to be a permanent member of the family.

     

    What will be the next co-branded Snapple limited edition? Please, Snapple, not the Real Housewives. We’d have to draw the line.

    Find a Snapple retailer near you and print a $1.00 coupon at Snapple.com.

      

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    NEWS: The First Coca-Cola Recipe

    Asa Candler, who purchased the Coca-Cola recipe from John Pemberton in 1887 for $2,300, worked on the original recipe to turn it from a medicinal tonic to a soft drink.

    Candler was maniacal about protecting his secret recipe. He demanded that no one ever write it down. All labels were removed from ingredient containers. Staff had to identified the ingredients by sight and smell only. All invoices from the ingredients suppliers were shredded, so that employees could not discover what they were and sell the information to rivals.

    Over the years, the company has made much of its “secret recipe,” which is so cloak-and-dagger that a major “secret ingredient” is known only as Merchandise 7X. The formula is kept in a bank vault. The company claims that any given time only two people know how to mix the 7X flavoring, and they can never travel on the same plane in case it crashes. It makes for good press.

    While it’s easy to determine the general ingredients in a lab analysis, the Merchandise 7X unique flavoring has been elusive.

    Now, producers of the Public Radio show “This American Life” claim to have uncovered the identity of Merchandise 7X. It’s a mix of seven ingredients.

    A February 18, 1979 article on the history of Coca-Cola, published in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, included a photograph that claimed to be a handwritten copy of the Pemberton Coca-Cola recipe, written in a friend’s leather-bound recipe book of remedies and ointments.

  • Here’s the recipe.
  • The history of Coca-Cola.
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    A portion of an image from an early Coca-
    Cola company check. The original can be
    purchased at Scripophily.net.

     

    Instead of trying to recreate the original, we recommend that you purchase some Boylan’s Cane Cola. It has a wonderful old-fashioned taste that might be quite similar to Candler’s final product. Their sugar-free cola is just as delicious—you won’t know it’s sugar free.

    Like Coca-Cola, Boylan’s is certified kosher. Read our review of Boylan Bottleworks, a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week.

  • Find more of our favorite soft drinks and diet soft drinks.
  • See these old-fashioned medicine ads. The products included not just cocaine but heroin!
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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Chef Gerard & Chuck’s Salsa Verde

    Salsa verde is made from the green tomatillo
    berry, which is not a tomato. Photo by
    Hannah Kaminsky | THE NIBBLE.

     

    We’re a nation of salsa lovers; but much of that is salsa roja, red salsa.

    In Mexico, the land from which we obtained our love of salsa, it’s the opposite. Only the northern states of Mexico, closest to the U.S. border, have red salsa as their tradition.

    Green salsa is based on the tomatillo, which is a distant relative of the tomato (the difference between tomatoes and tomatillos).

    We’ve had salsa verde from jars, but only recently experienced the joys of fresh salsa verde, from Chef Gerard & Chuck’s. It made us ask, why isn’t there more fresh salsa verde on the market?

    Of course, that’s the very question that got Chef Gerard into the business!

  • Read the full review.
  • Watch the video and learn how to make salsa verde.
  • Check out all the different types of salsa in Latin America, including 20 types you’ve probably never heard of.
  • The history of salsa, all the way back to the Aztecs.
  • How did salsa, the food, become salsa, the dance? The origin of salsa dancing.
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