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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Desserts

NO-BAKE DESSERT: Strawberries & Mascarpone

If you’re a fan of no-bake summer desserts, here are two of our favorites from Driscoll’s, a California-based marketer of berries.

In both bite-size recipes, lush summer strawberries are filled with a mascarpone whipped cream, a combination of rich mascarpone and heavy cream. Mascarpone cheese gives the whipped cream filling extra body and flavor.

The strawberries are easy to fill and decorate.Prep time is just 15 minutes. Add some blueberries for a red, white and blue dessert.

RECIPE: STRAWBERRIES & MASCARPONE WHIPPED CREAM

Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 16 large strawberries
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Optional garnish: almond sliver, chopped pistachios, blueberry
  •    

    strawberries-mascarpone-driscolls-230

    Strawberries filled with mascarpone whipped cream. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

     

    Preparation

    1. CUT stems off of the strawberries and place stem-side down on on cutting board. You have two choices to proceed: (1) Cut the berry into three, including a “hat,” as shown in the photo; or cut off the pointed end and scoop out a bit of the strawberry pulp to create room for more filling. Both versions are shown in the photo.

    2. PLACE the mascarpone cheese, heavy cream, sugar and vanilla in a medium bowl and beat with an electric mixer until thickened and smooth.

    3. PLACE the mascarpone mixture in a piping bag with a star tip attached or in a plastic bag with one corner cut off. In option 1, slowly pipe the mascarpone cream atop the bottom and middle thirds of the berry and top with the “hat.” In option 2, pipe the mixture into the center of the berry, and create a rounded mound on top, and top with optional garnish.

    4. REFRIGERATE until ready to serve.

     

    Lemon-Mascarpone-Strawberry-Tulips-driscolls

    Strawberry “tulips” filled with lemon
    mascarpone. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

     

    RECIPE: LEMON MASCARPONE STRAWBERRY TULIPS

    Here, the simple yet elegant strawberry treat is enhanced with with a lemon-flavored filling and a tulip shape. Prep time is 15 minutes.

    Ingredients For 16 Pieces

  • 16 large strawberries
  • 1/2 package (6 ounces) fresh blueberries
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon curd
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Garnish: grated lemon zest
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CUT stems off of the strawberries and place stem-side down on cutting board. Cut each strawberry lengthwise into quarters, stopping just before knife hits cutting board, so berries stay intact. Place on a serving platter.

    2. COMBINE mascarpone cheese, heavy cream, sugar, lemon curd and vanilla in a medium bowl and beat with an electric mixer until cream is thickened and smooth. Place mascarpone mixture in a piping bag with a star tip attached or a plastic bag and cut off one corner of the bag to pipe.

    3. PRESS one small blueberry down through the center of each strawberry, taking care to keep berries intact. (It’s a blueberry “surprise.”) Slowly pipe the mascarpone cream into the strawberries until filled. Top berries with a single blueberry and garnish with lemon zest.

    4. REFRIGERATE until ready to serve.
     
    WHAT IS MASCARPONE

    Mascarpone is sometimes referred to as “Italian cream cheese.” It’s softer and richer than American-style cream cheese, with less of a tang.

    Mascarpone has an extraordinarily high butterfat content, unsurprising given that it’s made from the cream skimmed from cow’s milk. Truly fresh mascarpone has almost a sweet flavor, and this is a cheese with very low or no sodium. It’s highly perishable and must be kept cold.

    In Italy, mascarpone is often served with fresh fruit instead of the American preference for whipped cream. It is what gives tiramisu its creaminess. While some think mascarpone is the chief component of cannolis, it is actually ricotta. Mascarpone or ricotta is used in Italian cheesecake.

    Mascarpone is believed to have originated in the Lombardy region of Italy, most likely in the late 1500s or early 1600s. The name “mascarpone” may come from the Spanish “mas que bueno” (“better than good”), a holdover from the days when the Spanish ruled Italy.

    Another possibility is that the name derived from “mascarpia,” the local dialect term for ricotta, because both ricotta and mascarpone are made by very similar processes.

    Look for American-made mascarpone from Crave Brothers or Vermont Creamery. Try eating it from the container with a spoon!

    More about mascarpone.

      

    Comments

    JULY 4th: Red, White & Blue Parfaits

    parfait-red-white-blue-mccormick-230

    Patriotic parfaits. Photo courtesy McCormick.

     

    Sweeten your July 4th celebration with these creamy, layered red, white and blue parfaits. The vivid colors come from McCormick’s Neon food colors.

    RECIPE: RED, WHITE & BLUE PARFAITS

    Ingredients For 12 Parfaits

  • 3-1/2 cups heavy cream, divided
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, divided
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons red food color
  • 1 teaspoon pure lemon extract
  • 1 box McCormick Assorted NEON Food Colors & Egg Dye
  • 2 tablespoons white chocolate chips
  •  

    Preparation

    1. BEAT 1-1/2 cups of the heavy cream, 2 tablespoons of the sugar, the cocoa powder and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed, until stiff peaks form. Add the red food color; stir gently with spatula until evenly tinted.

    2. BEAT the remaining 2 cups of heavy cream, the remaining 1/2 cup sugar and the lemon extract in large bowl with electric mixer on high speed, until stiff peaks form.

    3. REMOVE 1 cup of the mix; add neon blue and purple food colors. Stir gently with spatula until evenly tinted.

    4. ASSEMBLE parfaits: Alternately layer red and white mousses in dessert glasses. Top with blue mousse and white chocolate chips. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

     
      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Chocolate Pudding With Strawberry Rose

    chocolate-pudding-strawberry-rose-driscolls-230

    It’s really easy to make this beautiful rose
    garnish. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

     

    Here’s another special chocolate pudding recipe for National Chocolate Pudding Day, June 26th.

    Created by Driscoll’s, growers of premium berries, the elegant strawberry roses are actually very easy to make. Keep this recipe on file for anniversaries, Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day and other special occasions.

    There‘s no need to make instant pudding when it’s easy to make from-scratch chocolate pudding, which tastes so much better. All you gain from instant is pre-measured dry ingredients: the cornstarch, sugar, cocoa, salt, plus powdered vanilla instead of liquid vanilla extract.

    RECIPE: HOMEMADE CHOCOLATE PUDDING
    WITH A ROSE GARNISH

    Ingredients

    For The Pudding

  • 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  •  
    For The Rose Garnish

  • 1 package fresh strawberries (16 ounces)
  • 8 fresh mint leaves
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the pudding. Melt the chocolate. Whisk together 1/2 cup milk and cornstarch.

    2. BRING the remaining 1-1/2 cups milk, sugar, cocoa and salt just to a simmer over medium heat. Stir the cornstarch mixture, then add to the milk mixture in pan and bring to a boil, whisking constantly. Cook 1 minute.

    3. REMOVE from the heat and stir in melted chocolate and vanilla. Spoon into glasses. Cover surface directly with plastic wrap to prevent skin from forming. Chill.

    4. MAKE the roses. Hull 16 strawberries by removing the green calyx. Take 4 strawberries and cut the tops off. These strawberries will be used as the center for the roses. Slice the remaining strawberries into eighths. These sections will become the rose petals.

    5. ARRANGE the sliced strawberries around the pudding, making sure the ends of the slices are facing out and extend slightly beyond the rim of the glass. After the first circle of strawberries is placed, begin making a second circle of strawberries but position slightly more forward toward the center of the glass. Continue with a third layer. Once finished, add the cut strawberry to the center and garnish with mint leaves. Serve immediately.

     
      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Baked Honey Chocolate Pudding

    June 26th is National Chocolate Pudding Day. Throughout history, “pudding” has meant different things (scroll down to the history of pudding).

    This recipe, developed by chef Rocco di Spirito for FAGE Yogurt, combines the old and the new: a cake-like pudding with a soft, creamy pudding-like center.

    Rocco says, “These are great for a dinner party, as they can be prepared and stored in the fridge for up to 48 hours in advance.”

    Prep time is 20 minutes, cook time is 10 minutes.

    RECIPE: BAKED HONEY CHOCOLATE PUDDING

    Ingredients For 8 Servings

  • 1 cup dark chocolate (75% cocoa solids)
  • 4 FAGE Total with Honey split cups*
  • 16 tablespoons diced butter (two sticks of butter)
  • 1/2 cup fine granulated sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup plain flour, sieved
  •  

    Baked-Honey-Chocolate-Pudding-dispirito-fage-230

    Old-fashioned and modern pudding textures combine in this recipe. Photo courtesy FAGE Total.

     
    *The FAGE cups are 5.3 ounces each, for a total of 21.2 ounces. You can substitute an equivalent amount of plain Greek yogurt (2-3/4 cups) with 2 tablespoons of honey.
     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Prepare eight ramekin dishes by thoroughly buttering the inside and dusting with flour. Place a disk of greaseproof paper in the bottom of each ramekin.

    2. MELT the chocolate, honey from one FAGE Total Honey Yogurt (or 2 teaspoons honey) and butter together over a pan of water.

    3. WHISK together sugar, egg yolks and eggs until the mixture forms soft peaks. Fold the chocolate mix into the egg mix, and then fold in the flour.

    4. POUR into ramekins and bake in the center of the oven for 7 minutes, or until the puddings have risen above the ramekins. Allow to rest in a warm place for 2 minutes.

    5. SERVE: Turn out onto the center of a plate with a generous spoonful of FAGE Total Yogurt (half of the yogurt in a FAGE Total with Honey split cup). Drizzle with the remaining honey.
     
    Find more delicious recipes with yogurt at Fage.com.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Pudding, A Cool Dessert

    It’s getting hot and humid in our neck of the woods, and frozen desserts are a welcome way to cool down.

    But what about the pudding family? A chilled dish of pudding is a cool summer dessert.

    This group of comfort foods includes banana, butterscotch, chocolate, coffee, salted caramel, vanilla…just name your favorite flavor and you can find a recipe for it.

    You can use instant pudding or make it from scratch, which, in our opinion, tastes even better. Here’s a from-scratch pudding recipe, which can be used to make any pudding flavor.

    Try this recipe for banana pudding from QVC’s David Venable. It starts with a base of instant vanilla pudding. We tried it both ways; and yes, we preferred our homemade vanilla pudding version.

    The difference in labor between from-scratch and instant is not great: Instant pudding mixes simply save you the time of measuring the sugar, cornstarch, vanilla and salt. Some added stirring is required, but it’s no big deal.

    Says David, “This dessert is impossible to mess up. While it always turns out beautiful, it’s really just dumping a bunch of yummy ingredients into a bowl. Make it extra special by serving it in a footed glass bowl.”

    You can prepare the pudding up to two days ahead of time.

       

    banana-pudding-davidvenableQVC-230

    Banana pudding with vanilla wafers and a twist: chopped nuts. Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    NANA’S “NANNER” PUDDING

    We substituted pistachios for the walnuts in Nana’s recipe. If you don’t want nuts, try mini chocolate chips or a salted caramel layer.

    We also made fresh whipped cream instead of using commercial whipped topping. Sorry, David: Our Nana would never approve of the shortcuts taken by your Nana.

    Ingredients

  • 3 packages (3.4 ounces) vanilla instant pudding
  • 4-3/4 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 carton (8 ounces) sour cream
  • Fresh whipped cream or 1 container (8 ounces) whipped topping, divided
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, divided (or other nut of choice)
  • 1 box (12 ounces) vanilla wafer cookies
  • 9 or 10 bananas, sliced
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon
  • Optional: salted caramel
  •  

    assorted-puddings-east&westYotelNYC-230

    On the menu at East & West at the Yotel
    New York: A posse of puddings.

     

    Preparation

    1. MIX the pudding and milk according to the package directions and then add the vanilla.

    2. FOLD in the sour cream, 4 ounces of whipped topping, and 1/4 cup of chopped nuts. Refrigerate until the pudding is set or is needed (you can prepare the recipe in advance up to this point).

    3. COMBINE the lemon juice with the banana slices in a medium-size bowl; set aside.

    4. ALTERNATE layers of wafers, bananas, pudding, and optional salted caramel, in large bowl or casserole dish, ending with the pudding.

    5. DOLLOP the remaining whipped topping, followed by 6 or 7 crushed wafers and the remaining chopped walnuts. Refrigerate until set. If using fresh whipped cream, wait until serving to add the whipped cream, wafers and nuts.
     
    Find more of David Venable’s recipes at QVC.com.

     

    PUDDING HISTORY

    “Pudding” means different things in different cultures, and at different points in history. The creamy, rich dessert that Americans call pudding is more closely related to custard, which is made with eggs and dates to the Middle Ages. Today in the U.K., pudding typically refers to dessert but can be a savory recipe, such as Yorkshire pudding.

    The first puddings enjoyed by Greeks and Romans were similar to sausages, and for most of history, puddings were this type of boiled, meat-based dish. It was often stretched with other ingredients: The “pease porridge” in the old English nursery rhyme was a simple boiled pudding of pease meal, a roasted flour made from yellow field peas.

    The word “pudding” is believed to derive from the French boudin, meaning a small sausage. In these Medieval European puddings, encased meats similar to sausages were steamed or boiled to set the contents. Blood sausage and haggis are examples that are still “on the menu” in the U.K. These recipes helped to stretch a small amount of meat to feed a family.

    By the latter half of the 18th century, traditional English puddings no longer included meat; they were still boiled, but the finished product was cake-like (like plum pudding). Our creamy, modern puddings descend from this tradition of steaming sweet ingredients.

    According to Wikipedia, “The distinction between European custard and American pudding became muddled sometime in the 1840s.” Food was plentiful, so traditional boiled puddings were no longer necessary to feed a family.

    At the same time Alfred Bird, an English chemist, invented custard powder as an alternative to egg thickeners. Soon after, Americans began using the imported custard powder and other cornstarch derivatives as thickeners for custard-type desserts. Puddings no longer required the addition of fresh eggs to thicken, and this is where modern, eggless American puddings diverged from traditional egg custards.

    Instant pudding first appears in the U.S. in 1949. By 1952, Royal Pudding & Pie Fillings, still manufactured by Clabber Girl, advertised: “New homogenized Royal Instant Pudding makes your favorite desserts turn out better than ever before. New Royal Instant Pudding is completely different!”

    Our Nana still made pudding from scratch; but the rest is pudding history.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Salted Caramel Pudding

    For pudding lovers and dads who enjoy a sweet-and-salty dessert, here’s a silky pudding that emulates the one served at California Pizza Kitchen. Thanks to FransFavs.com who had the same pudding, went home and recreated it. Thanks, Fran!

    The rich caramel pudding is garnished with chocolate cookie crumbs, whipped cream, caramel sauce and flaked sea salt. Any sea salt will do; but if you’re going out to buy sea salt for garnishing, look for Maldon, with its unique triangle-shaped crystals (see photo below, and check out the different types of sea salt).

    RECIPE: SALTED CARAMEL PUDDING

    Ingredients For 3 Cups (6 Half Cup Servings Or 3 One Cup Servings

    For The Cookie Crust

  • 1/2 cup finely crushed chocolate wafer cookie crumbs, about 10 cookies
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • Pinch sea salt
  •  
    For The Pudding

  • 3 cups whole milk, room temperature (or 2 cups whole milk and 1 cup heavy cream)
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3 large egg yolks, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into 12 chunks
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Whipped cream for garnish
  • Optional garnish: caramel sauce
  •    

    salted-caramel-pudding-calpizzakitchen-230ps

    Salted caramel pudding. Photo courtesy California Pizza Kitchen.

     

    Preparation

    1. MAKE the cookie crust. In a small bowl, mix together the cookie crumbs, butter and salt. Press 2 tablespoons of the crumbs into the bottoms of each of six clear custard/parfait dishes (you can use mason jars, wine goblets or other containers). Reserve the remaining crumbs to sprinkle on top of pudding as a garnish.

    2. MAKE the pudding. In a large measuring cup with a pour spout, add 3 cups milk. Set milk and a silicon (heatproof) spatula next to the stovetop.

    3. WHISK egg yolks with 1/2 cup of the milk in a medium bowl, until well combined. Set aside.

    4. WHISK cornstarch with 1/4 cup of the milk in a small bowl, until smooth. Set aside.

     

    maldon-translucent-230

    Maldon sea salt has pyramid-shaped crystals. Photo courtesy Maldon Salt Co.

     

    5. MAKE the caramel: In a stainless steel (or light colored) 3-quart saucepan, add the sugar and set over medium heat. Swirl the pan as the sugar begins to melt. Use the silicon spatula to move the sugar from side to side as necessary to help it melt and caramelize evenly. When the sugar melts entirely and is a medium-dark caramel color, promptly remove from the heat.

    6. STAND back and carefully stir in the remaining milk. The mixture will boil and sputter furiously. The caramel may seize into a solid sugary mass. If so, when the mixture stops sputtering, bring it to a simmer over medium heat while stirring to melt the seized caramel. Scrape the bottom and sides of the saucepan with the silicon spatula to make sure all seized caramel dissolves.

    7. STIR, and then add the cornstarch mixture to the pan; stir to combine and bring the pudding to a very slow simmer. Simmer, stirring or whisking for 2 minutes to thicken. Decrease heat to medium-low so that pudding is no longer simmering.

     

    8. LADLE 1/2 cup of the hot pudding into the egg yolk mixture and whisk rapidly. Repeat two times. Add the egg yolk mixture back to the saucepan (this tempers the egg and helps to prevent curdling).

    9. RAISE the heat slightly and continue stirring the pudding until it thickens to the point that it thickly coats the back of the spatula, 2-4 minutes. Don’t boil. Remove from the heat and stir in the butter, vanilla, and salt until the butter is melted.

    10. IMMEDIATELY POUR the pudding through a single mesh strainer into a medium mixing bowl or 4-cup glass measuring cup. Alternatively, you can pour pudding directly into six (or fewer if you want larger servings) 1/2-cup serving dishes. Quickly press a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding to prevent a skin from forming.

    11. COOL, then refrigerate until chilled, at least 2 hours. To serve, spoon pudding into six, 1/2-cup ramekins (if you didn’t do this earlier). Top each serving with a generous mound of whipped cream and sprinkle with reserved cookie crumbs. Drizzle with optional caramel sauce. Serve immediately.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Strawberry On A Stick

    Here’s a new take on strawberry lollipops: fresh strawberry “lollipops.”

    Whole strawberries are speared on lollipop sticks, dipped into honey and rolled in chopped nuts.

    This better-for-you sweet treat looks very tempting, and delivers:

  • The heart-healthy and anti-cancer power of strawberries, rich in phytonutrients and potassium.
  • The heart-healthy oil and protein of your favorite chopped nuts.
  • The minerals and vitamins of honey: amino acids, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamin B6 and zinc.
  •  
    For a lower-glycemic natural sweetener, substitute agave for the honey.

    Serve them on a cake pop stand or repurpose a piece of styrofoam.

     

    A good-for-you dessert or snack. Photo courtesy MolecularRecipes.com.

     

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Frozen Cappuccino Soufflé

    Fill homemade chocolate cups with frozen
    cappuccino soufflé. Photo courtesy Domaine
    Chandon.

     

    One of our favorite destinations in Napa Valley is Domaine Chandon—not just to sample the sparkling wines but to dine at Étoile, the winery’s acclaimed restaurant.

    Everything there is always a bit more special. The Frozen Cappuccino Soufflé is served in chocolate cups instead of ceramic ramekins, for example.

    If you like cappuccino, you’ll surely love this frozen version, an impressive frozen chocolate cup made of bittersweet chocolate and filled with frosty and frothy espresso soufflé. It’s a sweet dessert, but still light on the palate.

    It’s a special dessert, and a Father’s Day treat for a coffee and chocolate loving dad.

    Using a double boiler helps prevent the chocolate from burning. If you don’t have one, you can rig a simple double boiler with other tools in your kitchen:

    Just place the chocolate in a small saucepan and nest it in a larger saucepan partially filled with boiling water. To warm the egg yolks, you can simulate a double boiler by using a stainless-steel bowl and a saucepan in which the bowl fits snugly on top.

     
    On the other hand, if you don’t want to make the chocolate cups, you can buy them ready-made.
     
    RECIPE: INDIVIDUAL FROZEN CAPPUCCINO SOUFFLES IN CHOCOLATE CUPS

    Ingredients For 8 Servings

  • 9 ounces/255 g bittersweet chocolate, cut into 1-in/2.5-cm chunks
  • 1-1/2 cups/360 ml heavy (whipping) cream/double cream
  • 3 tablespoons instant espresso powder
  • 4 large eggs, separated, plus 1 whole large egg
  • 3/4 cup/150 g sugar, plus 2 tablespoons
  • 1 envelope (2-1/2 teaspoons) unflavored gelatin
  • 2 ounces/55 g semisweet/plain chocolate, grated
  • 8 small (5-oz/150-ml) wax-coated paper drinking cups
  •  

    Preparation

    1. FILL the bottom of a double boiler with enough water to reach the bottom of the top pan and insert the top pan. (Alternatively, fill a saucepan with enough water to reach the bottom of a smaller saucepan nested inside or a stainless-steel bowl fit snugly over the top and insert the small saucepan or bowl.) Bring the water to a simmer over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Do not let the water boil vigorously.

    2. PLACE the bittersweet chocolate in the top bowl of the double boiler and heat, stirring frequently with a rubber spatula, until the chocolate is thoroughly melted and smooth. Maintain a gentle simmer to prevent the chocolate from hardening.

    3. PLACE one of the paper cups on its side on a clean work surface. Using a soup spoon or a tablespoon, carefully spoon about 1 tablespoon of the melted chocolate into the cup and carefully roll and tip the cup to coat the sides, but leaving a 1/2 inch/12 mm rim uncoated at the mouth of the cup.

     

    The Domaine Chandon Cookbook is a treasure trove of delicious recipes. Photo courtesy Chronicle Books.

     

    4. ADD another 1 tablespoon of melted chocolate and again gently roll the cup to cover the sides with a second coat and to coat the bottom this time, still leaving the rim around the top uncoated. Place the coated cup, still on its side, on a plate. Repeat to coat the remaining cups. When the chocolate has hardened enough to stop running, place the coated paper cups upright in the freezer until ready to use.

    5. COMBINE in a medium bowl 1 cup/240 ml of the cream and the espresso powder. Using an electric mixer, beat until soft peaks form, 1–2 minutes. Set aside.

    6. PLACE the top pan of a clean double boiler on a work surface. In the bottom of the double boiler, bring about 1 in/2.5 cm water to a simmer over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to medium. In the top half of the double boiler, combine the 4 egg yolks, the whole egg, and the 3/4 cup/150 g sugar. Whisk to blend, then place over the simmering water. (Alternatively, bring about 1 in/2.5 cm of water to a simmer in a saucepan. Combine the eggs and sugar in a stainless-steel bowl and nest the bowl snugly over the top of the saucepan.) Cook, whisking gently and constantly, for 10 minutes. The mixture will become frothy. Remove from the heat and set aside.

    7. STIR together in a small bowl, using a fork, the gelatin with 2–3 tablespoons hot water. It should become thick and sticky. Scrape the gelatin into the egg-yolk mixture and whisk vigorously to mix well.

    8. BEAT the egg whites in a clean large bowl with the 2 tablespoons sugar, using the electric mixer and clean beaters until stiff peaks form, about 1 minute. Using a rubber spatula, fold the egg-gelatin mixture into the egg whites. Fold in the espresso whipped cream.

    9. REMOVE the frozen chocolate-coated paper cups from the freezer. Using a ladle or measuring cup, pour the soufflé base into the cups, filling each to the rim. Return the filled cups to the freezer and freeze until the soufflés are firm to the touch, 3–4 hours. (You can freeze the soufflés for up to 48 hours, but they will lose their lightness, with the consistency changing to something more akin to ice cream.)

    10. SERVE: Using an electric mixer, beat the remaining 1/2 cup/120 ml cream until soft peaks form, about 2 minutes. Set aside. Remove the frozen cappuccino cups from the freezer. Carefully insert the tip of a paring knife into the side the each paper cup, just above the bottom. Gently pry open and tear off the bottoms of the cup, then peel away the sides of each cup to reveal the frozen, molded chocolate. Place a cappuccino cup on each of 8 small dessert plates. Top each with a small dollop of whip cream and sprinkle with the grated chocolate. Serve at once.
     
    Find more delicious recipes on the Chandon.com website and in the restaurant’s cookbook, Domaine Chandon Cookbook: Recipes from Étoile Restaurant, by Jeff Morgan.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: A New Kind Of Fruit Cake

    Here’s a new take on fruit cake: a “layer cake” that’s made 100% from fresh fruit!

    It’s the creation of Jessica from Pen N’ Paperflowers Studio & Design.

    She made it as a birthday cake for a gluten-free friend. But we think it’s a dazzler for any occasion.

    Want to make one of your own?

    Here’s how Jessica made the “cake,” with step-by-step photos.

     

    Fresh-Fruit-Cake-pnpflowersinc-230

    Photo courtesy Pen N’ Paperflowers Studio & Design.

     

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Easy Cheesecake Topping

    NY_Blueberry_Cheesecake_cheesecake.com-230r

    Make a blueberry topping for your
    cheesecake with fresh or frozen blueberries.
    Photo courtesy Cheesecake.com.

     

    May 26th is National Blueberry Cheesecake Day. It may be hard to find a piece of blueberry cheesecake—cherry and strawberry are the popular berries toppings.

    But you can easily make your own, from fresh or frozen berries. A homemade sauce is much tastier than the gelled goop into which berries are set on many commercial cheesecakes.

    Then, just pick up a slice of cheesecake, top and celebrate. You can also use the berry topping on ice cream, pancakes, puddings and waffles.

    And you can bake your own cheesecake, too; and create a blueberry swirl cheesecake by swirling the topping into the batter. Here are some of our favorite cheesecake recipes.

    RECIPE: BLUEBERRY CHEESECAKE TOPPING

    Ingredients

  • 2 cups blueberries or other berries
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sugar (see Recipe Notes, below)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice or orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch, mixed with 2
    tablespoons cold water
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon or orange zest (about 1
    tablespoon)
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MIX the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons of cold water in a small bowl.

    2. COMBINE the blueberries, 1/2 cup of water, sugar and lemon juice in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the mix comes to a low boil.

    3. GENTLY STIR the cornstarch into the blueberries, taking care not to crush the fruit. Simmer until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a metal spoon (about 5 minutes).

    4. REMOVE from heat; gently stir in the vanilla and zest. Cool; refrigerate until ready to use. Warm very slightly in the microwave for easy pouring.

     

    Blueberry_Swirl_Cheesecake_cheesecake.com-230sq

    You can also swirl the blueberry topping into the cheesecake batter. Photo courtesy Cheesecake.com.

     
    RECIPE NOTES

  • Adjust the amount of sugar to the sweetness of the berries. We don’t oversweeten, to allow the flavor of the blueberries to come through.
  • For a thinner sauce, slowly add water by the tablespoon until you reach your preferred consistency.
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