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TIP OF THE DAY: Sansaire Sous Vide Machine

Sansaire Sous Vide Machine

Sansaire Sous Vide

Sous Vide Filet Mignon

Sous Vide Filet Mignon

Sous Vide Filet Mignon

Sous Vide Machine

[1] The Sansaire Sous Vide Immersion Circulator. [2] The back and side of the Sansaire, showing the clip that attaches to any pot. Step 1: Attach Sansaire to pot filled with water (photos 1 and 2 courtesy Sansaire. [3] Step 2: Season your food and place it in a cooking bag. [4] Place the bag in the water and set the time and temperature (photos 3 and 4 courtesy Williams-Sonoma). [5] Voilà: Cooked to your exact wishes. (Photo courtesy Frankie Celenza, Frankie Cooks | You Tube. Watch the video to see him cook the meat). [6] Before Sansaire, a sous vide machine was this big (photo courtesy Sous Vide Supreme).

 

COOKING SOUS VIDE WITH SANSAIRE

You’ve no doubt heard about sous vide (soo VEED) cooking. You may even have heard other home cooks say it produces the moistest, tenderest, most succulent and flavorful food, cooked to perfection.

So why haven’t you tried it?

Maybe it’s the lack of counter space for a sous vide machine (photo #5, about 14″ x 11″ footprint); or maybe it’s the price tag (up to $400, even $800)?

Now, you can spend less than $200 and cook sous vide with pots you already have, with Sansaire’s Sous Vide Immersion Circulator.

There’s no bulky countertop machine, but a far smaller device that stores and travels easily.

Sous vide cooking uses precise temperature control to achieve perfect, consistent results, portion after portion, time after time.

Foods are cooked evenly from edge to edge, to exactly the doneness you want. Temperature control keeps water within one degree of its ideal setting—a process that can’t be replicated by any other cooking method.

You don’t have to be a gourmet cook.

Sous vide cooking is an easy way to prepare any everyday dish as well as fancier ones. One of our editors even cooks his scrambled eggs sous vide to his desired consistency. (It also poaches and makes hard-boiled eggs.)

The sous vide technique was developed in France to easily cook fine meals on trains, many portions at a time. Sous vide guarantees, for example, that a steak or piece of fish will turn out exactly as the client wishes.

The quality of the food it produced attracted fine French chefs and caterers. Sous vide machines quickly appeared in some of the world’s best restaurants.

It took a number of years for a home version to appear (photo #5), and just a couple of years after that for Sansaire’s conveniently small model that simply clips on to your pots.

It’s not just for dedicated home cooks: It’s for those who don’t cook more often because they don’t have the time to cook and clean.

Treat yourself to a Sansaire sous vide for $168, on Amazon.

Give one as a Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or graduation gift.

You can also give it as a new baby gift! It heat milk or formula to precisely 98.6°F for worry-free feeding.

Is sous vide cooking an adjustment to your process? Yes, but a very small one, like switching to an induction cooktop. You get the hang of it in very short order.
 
 
THE BENEFITS OF SOUS VIDE COOKING

We love sous vide: consistency, perfection, precise, predictable results. Plus no pots, pans, grills or ovens to clean. The only thing your pots contain are water, and sealed bags containing individual portions.

Sous vide tenderizes tough cuts, keeps poultry juicy (no dry white meat!), cooks fish to perfection, retains the nutrients of vegetables, and uses less fat without sacrificing flavor. It makes perfectly poached eggs (or other style) every time.

You can turn out perfect filet mignon and duck confit, but also everyday dishes from breakfast eggs, grain dishes, vegetables, sides, fish tostadas, chicken tikka masala, to dulce de leche.

You can pasteurize raw eggs for mousse, Caesar salad, steak tartare and other recipes.

There’s no cooking food to check and re-check. The machine keeps the water at a specific temperature for a specific time, at the end of which your food is ready to eat.

More blessings of sous vide cooking:

  • Save time: Make whole meals in the one pot with no cookware to clean afterwards.
  • Foolproof results: Temperature control keeps water within one degree of its ideal setting.
  • No watching the pot. Sous vide enables unattended cooking, so you can spend more time with your guests or family.
  • No meal prep stress: One less pot to watch while turning out a meal.
  • Dinner is ready when you are: Foods won’t overcook while they hang out in the water bath.
  • No unwanted cooking aromas. You may enjoy the scent of meat and garlic from conventional cooking for a while. But unless you have a great ventilation set-up, you may not enjoy them hanging around the next day or the next.
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  • Try different recipes at the same time, in the same pot: Individual bags allow for individual flavors. Try sweet and sour chicken in one bag, teriyaki chicken in the other.
  • Please everyone: If someone doesn’t like cilantro, use another herb or seasoning in his/her pouch.
  • Use less fat: Cooking foods in a sealed environment allows you to coat proteins and vegetables with a fraction of the amount of oil or butter. Plus, vegetables retain all their nutrients in the sealed bag.
  • Gentle cooking: especially with meat, it means that the juices stay in the muscle and don’t run out when cut.
  • No plastic, no landfill option: Reusable silicone bags are available to enable green and plastic-free cooking*.
  • Small footprint: Roughly the size of a bottle of wine.
  • Better than slow cooker cooking: There’s never anything overcooked.
  • Portable: It’s easy to take the unit to another home to cook your dish.
  • Saves money over the original sous vide technique. The original Sous Vide Water Oven was $499 and required a vacuum sealing system to contain each serving, for another $80 plus plastic refill rolls at about $16 to $30 (depending on size).
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    ADD-ONS

    To ease yourself into sous vide cooking, consider:

  • Sous Vide At Home Cookbook (photo #7): It’s the bible to start you off with confidence, showing times and temperatures to cook just about anything. On Amazon.
  • Reusable Bags (photo #2): If you’re not down with disposable plastic bags, these are the solution.On Amazon.
  • Sansaire Searing Kit: Put a perfect sear on a sous-vide steak. Blisters chiles, crisp chicken skin, add a char to anything. Designed specifically for home kitchen use, the kit includes a torch, a stainless steel rack and an enameled drip tray. On Amazon.
  • Steak Aging Sauce gives any steak the complex flavor of dry aging. Just add a spoonful to each pouch of meat before cooking. Se how lesser cuts taste like the expensive, aged cuts from steakhouses. On Amazon.
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    For a large number of portions, consider:

  • Polycarbonate Tub. On Amazon.
  • Cooking Rack. On Amazon.
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    Enjoy the era of sous vide cooking. Who knows what the next better-faster technique will be…but it sure won’t be for a while.
    ________________

    *Standard ziplock bags are fine and contain no BPA. S.C. Johnson, the company that makes both Ziploc brand bags and Saran Wrap, states on its website that it does NOT use BPA in the manufacture of these products.

     

    Sous Vide Cookbook

    Reusable Sous Vide Bags

    Sous Vide Cooking

    [7] Start with the Sous Vide At Home cookbook (photo courtesy Ten Speed Press). [8] Consider reusable plastic pouches (photo courtesy TopsHome). [9] Sous vide salmon (from the Sous Vide At Home cookbook).

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Eggs In A Nest & Dark Vs. Light Baking Pans

    Baked Eggs In Nests

    Easter Bunny Rabbit Rolls

    [1] Eggs in nests for breakfast (photo courtesy Cooking Light). [2] Bunny rabbit rolls (photo courtesy Artisan Bread In Five).

     

    What’s on tap for Easter breakfast? How about eggs in crispy hash brown nests (photo #1).

    If you want to make the adorable bunny rabbit rolls to serve with them, bake them first. You can make the dough the night before, and bring to room temperature before baking.

    EASTER EGG NESTS FOR BREAKFAST

    We adapted this recipe from one in Cooking Light. Prep time is 10 minutes, cook time is 30 minutes.

    You can also place a bacon or ham surprise on the bottom of the basket.

    Ingredients Per Serving

  • 1/4 cup refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes (such as Simply Potatoes*)
  • 2 tablespoons shredded carrot (substitute beet or zucchini)
  • li>Optional: 1 tablespoon diced onion

  • Optional: 2 tablespoons crumbled crisp bacon or diced ham
  • 1 large egg
  • Crunchy salt (kosher or coarse or flaky sea salt)
  • Garnish: 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh chives and/or 1 teaspoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
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    Plus

  • Light-colored muffin pan
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    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 400°F. Combine the shredded potato, carrot and optional onion, and lightly season with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly.

    2. MAKE the nests: Coat the muffin cups with cooking spray. Spoon 1/4 cup of the mixture into each muffin cup. Press it into the bottom and up the sides of the cup, to above the rim. Bake at 400°F for 30 minutes. Once baked…

     

    3. ADD the optional meat to the bottom of the nest. Crack 1 large egg into each nest. Bake at 400° for 8-10 minutes for runny eggs, or 12 to 15 minutes for set eggs.

    4. SPRINKLE the top with a dash of salt and garnish the egg and the plate with the chopped herbs.

    WHEN TO USE LIGHT VS. DARK COLOR BAKING PANS

    Depending on your age, all of your mother’s and grandmother’s baking pans were aluminum, a metal that absorbs and conducts heat evenly and is not reactive or corrosive.

    Then, test kitchens discovered that food browns better (e.g., the bottom of a baking sheet and the bottom and sides of a cake pan). This is because dark pans absorb more heat and thus, more heat radiates off the surface.

    For foods you want to brown (pizza, pie crusts, potato wedges, roasted vegetables), darker metal baking pans, sheets, and pie plates give you an edge.

    For recipes where you don’t want the extra browning on the bottom (breads, cakes, some cookies, muffins), use a light-colored pan, which absorbs less heat.

    That being said, we don’t know why Cooking Light specified a light muffin pan. There is no comments section on the page so we couldn’t ask; but we wouldn’t mind a browner potato nest (as opposed to a browner blueberry muffin).

    You don’t have to get rid of your pans. According to Cooking Light, if you bake in either dark metal pans or glass dishes, reduce the oven temperature by 25° and check for doneness early.

    Here’s an interesting article on the history of cookware and bakeware.

    ________________

    *1 package (19.7 ounces, 560 grams) yields 6 egg nests.

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: One-Pan Main & Side

    Our pots and pans don’t go into the dishwasher: They need to be hand-washed.

    While hot sudsy water and a Scrub Daddy do the job, we wouldn’t overlook the opportunity to save our manicure.

    So we were all ears when Good Eggs sent us this recipe to cook the main and the side in one dish. Home cooks have been doing this for years—but not the cooks in our family.

    With great enthusiasm we made this recipe, and then ordered a couple of books on one-pan cooking to see how we could make kitchen life easier (recommendations below).

    RECIPE: LAMB & ZUCCHINI WITH GREEK ACCENTS

    We love lamb and Greek cuisine with its accents of lemon and mint, so we didn’t wait to try it. In 30 minutes, we were ready to dig in.

    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 2 lamb chops (we used two per person)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 1 pound zucchini, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • ½ cup plain yogurt
  • 1 garlic clove, ground to a paste
  • ½ lemon, juiced
  • 1 handful mint, roughly chopped (substitute basil)
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • Flaky salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SALT and pepper both sides of each lamb chop and set aside. Add about ½ cup olive oil to a cast iron pan and heat over high. When the oil is hot (almost to the point of smoking), carefully add the zucchini in one layer and cook on high heat until browned, flipping so both sides are crispy and deeply golden-brown.

    2. USE a slotted spoon to remove the zucchini from the pan; place on a plate and set aside.

    3. COMBINE the yogurt, garlic, lemon and a tablespoon of the mint in a clean bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

    4. POUR off some of the oil from the zucchini pan, leaving a thin layer on the bottom. Turn the burner to high. When the oil is hot, add the chops and cook for about 4 to 5 minutes on each side. Check for doneness—you want it still a bit pink in the middle.

    If the chops sear before the meat cooks through, pop the pan into a 400°F oven until they are cooked to your liking. For medium-rare, the temperature should be 145°F on a meat thermometer.

    5. FINISH the zucchini: Sprinkle with the red wine vinegar, add the rest of the mint, and a few pinches of flaky salt to taste. Arrange the chops and the zucchini on a platter and serve with the yogurt sauce.

     

    One Pan Cooking

    One Pan & Done Cookbook

    One Pan Wonders Cookbook

    [1] Lamb chops and zucchini, a one-pan dinner (photo courtesy Good Eggs). [2] One Pan & Done, an oven-to-table cookbook. [3] One-Pan Wonders for casserole, Dutch oven, pan, skillet and slow cooker.

    ONE-PAN COOKBOOKS

  • One Pan & Done: Hassle-Free Meals from the Oven to Your Table
  • One Pan, Two Plates: More Than 70 Complete Weeknight Meals for Two
  • One-Pan Wonders: Fuss-Free Meals for Your Sheet Pan, Dutch Oven, Skillet, Roasting Pan, Casserole, and Slow Cooker
  • Sheet Pan Suppers: 120 Recipes for Simple, Surprising, Hands-Off Meals Straight from the Oven
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    TIP OF THE DAY: Sheet Pan Dinners

    For its Fish Friday Favorites series, McCormick enlists food bloggers to develop easy recipes.

    This week’s theme is “baked in sheet pans,” using McCormick’s packets of seasoning mixes.

    McCormick makes 18 different seasoning packets: two each for Bag & Season (for meats), Chili, Gluten Free, Gravy, Home Style Classics, Italian, Mexican, Slow Cooker and Snacks & Dips. Here’s more about them (scroll down the page).

    We thoroughly endorse these easy dinner ideas: fresh, nutritious home cooking in a half hour or less, with big flavors and minimal clean-up.

    RECIPE #1: SHEET PAN SHRIMP-LIME FAJITAS

    Who doesn’t like fajitas?

    “Sheet pan chili lime shrimp fajitas make an easy, healthy, and delicious one-pan 20-minute meal—with tons of flavor the whole family will love,” says Tiffany of La Creme De La Crumb.

    Prep time is 10 minutes, cook time is 10 to 15 minutes.

     
    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 pound large white shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 3 bell peppers, thinly sliced (go for a combination of red, yellow, and green)
  • ½ medium onion, chopped
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 1 packet McCormick Fajita Seasoning Mix
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice, plus additional lime wedges for serving
  • 8-10 six-inch flour tortillas*
  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • Garnish: chopped cilantro
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 400°F. Combine the first 7 ingredients (shrimp through lime juice) in a large bowl. Stir to combine and coat the shrimp and peppers well in the seasonings.

    2. SPREAD everything out on a large baking sheet pan in a single layer (note: line the pan with foil or parchment for easy clean-up). Items can overlap; just not heaped in a pile. Bake for 10-15 minutes until shrimp is pink, the tails begin to char slightly and the peppers are tender.

    3. DISTRIBUTE the shrimp and peppers on top of the tortillas along with avocado slices. Top with freshly shopped cilantro and serve with lime wedges for squeezing.

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    *Traditionally, a fajita uses the smallest tortilla, 6 inches in diameter; a soft taco 8 inches; and a burrito 10 inches.
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    RECIPE #2: SHEET PAN SHRIMP SCAMPI WITH ASPARAGUS

    “Those of you who are observing Lent: Don’t let Lent have you fishing for flavor! This sheet pan meal is big on flavor—and you don’t have to sacrifice on taste,” says Alyssa, The Recipe Critic.

    “I love using McCormick’s seasoning mix packets in recipes. They make it so easy to put together flavors and bust out a complete meal that will your family will love.”

    Who doesn’t love Shrimp Scampi†? Prep time is 5 minutes, cook time is 8 minutes.

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

  • 1 pound large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 1 pound asparagus, cut into two inch pieces
  • ¼ butter, melted
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 packet McCormick Garlic Butter Shrimp Scampi Seasoning Mix
  • Garnish: 1 lemon, sliced
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    Sheet Pan Fajitas

    Shrimp Scampi Recipe

    Sheet Pan Shrimp & Asparagus

    [1] Shrimp and lime fajitas (photo courtesy Le Creme De La Crumb | McCormick). [2] Seasoning the ingredients and [3] the final dish, emerging from the oven (photos The Recipe Critic | McCormick).

     
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 450°F. Lightly grease a sheet pan and set aside (note: first line the pan with foil or parchment for easy clean-up).

    2. PLACE the shrimp and asparagus in a large mixing bowl. Pour the melted butter, olive oil and lemon juice on top, sprinkle on the seasoning packet and mix until combined.

    3. SPREAD the shrimp and asparagus on the sheet pan in an even layer (note: line the pan with foil or parchment for easy clean-up). Scatter the lemon slices on top. Bake for 8 minutes or until the shrimp is pink and cooked through. Serve immediately.
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    †FOOD TRIVIA: Scampi is the Italian word for a prawn. In the U.S., it became the name of an Italian-American dish, Shrimp Scampi: broiled butterflied shrimp that been brushed with garlic butter or oil (and sometimes a splash of white wine). It’s amusing among the cognoscenti that Americans request a dish that translates to Shrimp Shrimp. But that’s not all of today’s trivia:

    SHRIMPS VS. PRAWNS: THE DIFFERENCE. Prawns and shrimps are both crustaceans with 10 legs. They can be found in salt water and fresh water all over the world, and have similar flavors. While the terms are often used interchangeably, with prawns, the first three of the five pairs of legs on the body have small pincers; with shrimps only, two pairs are claw-like. In the U.K. and Australia, prawn is the name consumers and restaurants use for what is called shrimp in the U.S. Both crustaceans are found in a variety of sizes. More information.

     

    Sheet Pan Baked Salmon

    [4] After 5 minutes of prep time, baked salmon in orange-butter sauce is ready in another 20 minutes (photo courtesy Avery Cooks | McCormick).

     

    RECIPE #3: SHEET PAN ORANGE CHILI SALMON

    “This salmon is healthy, so easy, ready in 30 minutes, and has restaurant-quality flavor,” says Averie of Avery Cooks. “It’s so moist and juicy. I seasoned the salmon with McCormick Chili Seasoning Mix (Original) for a pop of heat, which is perfectly balanced by the honey and orange juice. The seasoning adds flavor without being spicy and it doesn’t overpower the fish.”

    Prep time is 5 minutes, cook time is 20 to 25 minutes.
     
    Ingredients For 2 to 3 Servings

  • 1 to 1.25 pounds skin-on salmon fillet
  • 1 orange, sliced into thin rounds
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons honey
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons orange juice from about half an orange (substitute packaged orange juice)
  • 2 teaspoons McCormick Chili Seasoning Mix Original Flavor
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
  • Garnish: 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 375°F and place a piece of foil on the baking sheet to cover it completely. Place the salmon on the foil, skin-side down, with the longer side of the fish parallel to the longer side of the sheet pan. Pull the edges of the foil up 2 inches over the pan rim, or enough so that when you pour the butter sauce over the top, it will be contained in the foil.

    2. NESTLE the orange slices underneath the salmon, spaced evenly around the fillet. Set aside.

    3. PLACE the butter in a microwave-safe glass measuring cup or bowl and heat on high power to melt, about 1 minute. Stir in the honey and orange juice. Pour or spoon about two-thirds of the mixture over the salmon; reserve the remainder. Evenly season with the seasoning mix, and add salt and pepper, to taste.

    4. ADD another sheet of foil on top and crimp or pinch both pieces together to get the seal as tight as possible. If you have time, set the pan aside to allow the fish marinate for about 10 to 15 minutes; you’ll get enhanced flavor. Bake for 15 minutes.

    5. REMOVE the pan from the oven and cut open up the top of the packet so the salmon is exposed (but the edges are still raised to contain the sauce). Set the broiler to to high. Spoon the reserved sauce over the salmon, if desired. Use your judgment: If there’s already lots of juice, you don’t need to add more (you don’t want it to start leaking). If you have extra sauce, pour it over the finished dish or bring it to the table in a pitcher.

    6. BROIL the salmon for 5 to 10 minutes, or until as golden as desired. The exact broiling time will depend on the size and thickness of the salmon, oven variances and personal preference. Keep a close eye on the salmon because all broilers are different and you don’t want to burn the fish.

    7. GARNISH with parsley and serve immediately. This recipe is best warm and fresh, but will keep airtight in the fridge for up to 3 days.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Create A Spring Dinner

    A few days ago, our wine collectors group had its scheduled team spring dinner, an annual event that celebrates the emergence of spring fruits and vegetables.

    Problem is, nature isn’t cooperating. We’re still waiting for some of our favorite spring produce to show up in stores in the chilly Northeast.

    Even though some of them are now available year-round, in our grandmother’s generation and before, people had no choice but to eat seasonally. Hence, the popular roast leg of lamb with spring peas, and a delicate salad of butter lettuce, always on Nana’s menus.

    Thus, when when have a dinner to honor spring, we go full-out locavore. Here’s what you can choose from (we’ve left out the exotics; here’s the full list).

    SPRING FRUITS & VEGETABLES

    Because of imports from the southern hemisphere where the seasons are reversed, Americans have year-round access to what locally has been seasonal. There’s always someplace on earth that grows asparagus, for example.

    Spring Fruits

  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Black mission figs
  • Honeydew
  • Mango
  • Oranges
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberries
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    Spring Vegetables

  • Asparagus (for fun, look for the purple variety)
  • Belgian endive
  • Beets
  • Butterhead/butter lettuce (Bibb and Boston varieties)
  • Dandelion greens
  • Fava beans*
  • Fennel
  • Fiddlehead ferns
  • Garlic scapes
  • Morel mushrooms
  • Mustard greens
  • Nettles
  • Ramps
  • Red leaf lettuce
  • Spring (English) peas, snow peas, Chinese pea pods
  • Vidalia onions
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    THE NIBBLE’S SPRING EDITORIAL DINNER

    COCKTAIL: Blood Orange Margarita, Mimosa or Screwdriver with fresh-squeezed blood orange juice, or this Cherry Blossom cocktail.

    FIRST COURSE: Spring sauté: asparagus, fiddleheads, garlic, morels and ramps, sautéed in good butter and swerved with a sprinkle of salt. It’s simple, yet memorable.

    MAIN COURSE: Leg of lamb, spring peas, baby potatoes. We like to cook a leg for leftovers: lamb salad† and lamb sandwiches. See our Lamb Glossary for the different cuts and types of lamb.

    SALAD COURSE: Belgian endive, butter lettuce (Bibb or Boston), fennel, snow peas and garlic scapes, dressed with a Dijon and sherry vinaigrette and garnished with fresh parsley.

    CHEESE COURSE: Spring cheeses with black mission figs. We can find bucheron and charollais affine (goat), coulommiers (cow) and Pyrénées brebis (sheep), plus cheeses from local American artisan cheese makers. Ask your cheesemonger what he/she has that’s newly arrived in spring.

    DESSERT: Rhubarb, any way you like it; blood oranges supreme, or in sorbet. Since strawberries, now available year-round, are a traditional spring fruit, a strawberry-rhubarb pie or galette (photo #5) does the trick.

    Of course, there will be more than one spring dinner.

    We’ll feature more of the menus as we make them, and look forward to any contributions from you.
     
     
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    *Fava beans require a level of patience to shell, which we lack. Should you be come across shelled fava beans, it’s worth paying the premium for the labor involved.

    †Recipes: lamb, cucumber and watercress salad, lamb niçoise salad and Thai lamb and asparagus salad.

     

    Blood Orange Margarita

    Sauteed Ramps, Morels

    Leg Of Lamb

    Spring Bibb Lettuce Salad

    Lille Cheese Vermont Farmstead

    Strawberry Rhubarb Galette

    [1] Blood Orange Margarita (here’s the recipe via Betty Crocker). [2] A spring sautée (here’s the recipe from Honest Food. [3] Leg of lamb with spring peas (here’s the recipe from Good Eggs). [4] We love how the bibb lettuce is stacked in this salad (the recipe from My Man’s Belly). [5] Lillé, a cheese from Vermont, is the American-made version of French Coulommiers. [6] A strawberry rhubarb galette is the perfect seasonal pie (photo Hewn Bread | Chicago).

     

      

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