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Archive for Cookies-Cake-Pastry

FOOD FUN: DIY Filled Donut Holes

Filled Donuts
[1] David Burke’s Warm Drunken Donuts.

Chef David Burke Warm Drunken Donuts
[2] A showman as well as a chef, David Burke often has special serveware made for his creations. Donut carousel, anyone? (photos #1 and #2 courtesy Chef David Burke).

Beignets

[3] Banana beignets add another popular flavor to donut holes. Here’s the recipe from Food Network.

 

Chef David Burke, master of invention, has intrigued us yet again with Warm Drunken Donuts: fresh-fried donut holes with three “drunken” fillings: bourbon caramel, chocolate kahlua and raspberry limoncello.

David Burke serves the donuts with three small squeeze bottles of the fillings, and you get to inject your own filling. It’s fun.

Although we haven’t gotten to one of his restaurants to try them, we cobbled together our own version using store-bought donut holes (not as good as homemade, but they let us try the concept).

The recommended wine pairing is a sparkling rosé.

The drunken donuts are powdered sugar munchkins with several plastic needle pointed syrups that you squeeze into the donuts holes.
 
 
RECIPE: OUR ROUGH APPROXIMATION OF DAVID BURKE’S WARM DRUNKEN DONUTS)

Prep time is 15 minutes plus 5 minutes frying.

Ingredients For 2-3 Dozen (depending on size)

  • 4 cups canola or grapeseed oil (high smoke point oil)
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoons of salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Optional: cinnamon sugar or powdered sugar
  •  
    Plus fillings: see note below.
     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder together, sift together and set aside as you whisk together the egg, milk and vanilla extract in a small bowl.

    2. ADD the oil to a deep, heavy saucepan and heat it to 350°F over medium heat. Watch the thermometer closely: If the oil goes above 350°, your donuts may get too crunchy.

    3. ADD the egg mixture into the flour mixture a bit at a time, and whisk until the dough is well combined. Add the melted butter and thoroughly combine.

    4. DROP small balls of dough into the hot oil, using a small cookie scoop (plan B: roll them in your hands). Fry in small batches: You don’t want to crowd the pan, because the dough balls need to float without making contact with each other. When they start to turning brown on the underside, flip them over with a fork. Continue to cook until both sides are golden brown.

    5. REMOVE the donut holes with a slotted spoon, onto a baking sheet or platter lined with paper towels. Allow them to cool and then roll them in the optional sugar. We used a bit of cinnamon sugar on half of them (we’re not keen on powdered sugar garnishes: they’re too messy).

    Serve warm.

     
    FOR THE FILLINGS

    Taste and add more as alcohol as desired. You should go for a subtle layer of flavor, not a knockout.

  • For the Bourbon Caramel filling: We had so much delicious caramel sauce from The King’s Cupboard that we simply warmed it, added bourbon to taste, and then added cream to thin it for pourability.
  • For the Chocolate Cream filling: make this recipe and add a teaspoon of Kahlua or other coffee liqueur.
  • For the Raspberry Limoncello filling: We took the easy way out and combined quality raspberry jam with Limoncello and a bit of lemon zest. You can substitute Grand Marnier for the Limoncello.
  •  
     
    WHO INVENTED DONUT HOLES?

    First, we thank the Dutch for olykoeks, meaning oil cake, batter fried in oil.

    While dough was fried the world over, we can thank the Dutch for the sweet balls fried in hog fat that became modern doughnuts.

    An old word for ball was nut; a doughnut is literally a nut (ball) of dough. The term “doughnut” was first used in print in 1809 by American author Washington Irving in his satirical “Knickerbocker’s History Of New York.” Irving wrote of:

    “…balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog’s fat, and called doughnuts, or olykoeks.”

    Because the center of the cake did not cook as quickly as the outside, the softer centers were sometimes stuffed with fruit, nuts, or other fillings that did not require cooking (think of the chopped onions in the center of a bialy).

    What about the hole?

    Per Smithsonian, a New England ship captain’s mother made a notably delicious, deep-fried doughut that used her son’s spice cargo of nutmeg and cinnamon, along with lemon rind. She filled the center with hazelnuts or walnuts.

    As the story goes, in 1847, 16-year-old sailor Hanson Crockett Gregory created the hole in the center of the doughnut. He used the top of a round tin pepper container to punch the holes, so the dough would cook evenly.

    He recounted the story in an interview with the Boston Post at the turn of the century, 50 years later.

    He effectively eliminated the need to fill the less-cooked center, and provided an inner cut-out that enabled the dough to be evenly cooked.

    This was a breakthrough not just for donut holes, but for the donut in general. Previously, it had been cooked as a solid piece (no hole), so the sides were always crisper than the center. In fact, toppings were often put on the soggy center to cover up the flaw.

    After the creation of the doughnut hole, donut makers also fried the dough “holes.”

    It took more than a century and a mass marketer to popularize donut holes in America.

    While the forerunner of Dunkin’ Donuts began in 1948 (here’s the history of Dunkin’ Donuts), Munchkins “donut hole treats” were not introduced until 1972. Tim Hortons followed with Timbits in 1976.
     
     
    WHO CHANGED THE SPELLING FROM DOUGHNUT TO DONUT?

    The first known printed record of the shortened word “donut” appears (likely an inadvertent misspelling) in “Peck’s Bad Boy And His Pa,” a story by George W. Peck published in 1900.

    The spelling did not immediately catch on. That impetus goes to Dunkin’ Donuts.

    Donut is a easier to write, but we prefer the old-fashioned elegance of doughnut. Take your choice.

    Doughnuts didn’t become a mainstream American food until after World War I. American doughboys at the front were served doughnuts by Salvation Army volunteers. When the doughboys returned, they brought their taste for doughnuts with them [source].

    The name doughboy wasn’t related to the doughnuts, by the way. It dates to the Civil War, when the cavalry unchivalrously derided foot soldiers as doughboys. Two theories are offered:

  • Their globular brass buttons resembled flour dumplings.
  • They used flour to polish their white belts.
  •   

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Snack Factory Dessert Thins

    Our Top Pick Of The Week is Snack Factory Dessert Thins, a new line of thin cookies that are just 30 calories apiece. If you’re cutting back on sweets but are yearning for “just a bite,” consider these a solution.

    Our runners up span good-for-you foods like Pete & Jerry’s Organic Hard Boiled Eggs, Bonne Maman’s new Lemon Curd, and a new line extension from one of our favorite yogurts, Noosa Yoghurt (the Australian spelling).
     
     
    SNACK FACTORY DESSERT THINS

    We have long enjoyed Snack Factory Pretzel Crisps, so when they announced a new line of Dessert Thins cookies, we had hope.

    And we are not disappointed! lightly textured, airy biscuits in delectable dessert flavors! Made with non-GMO ingredients, Dessert Thins are available in

  • Brownie
  • Chocolate Chip
  • Lemon Tart
  •  
    All three are fragrant, flavorful, and a calorie bargain. Use them for mini cookie sandwiches, an ice cream garnish, dippers for chocolate fondue, or an alternative to biscotti with coffee.

    When you want just a bit of cookie, without fear of overdoing it, you can be satisfied with just one (the recommended serving size is 4 pieces, 120 calories).

    Following America’s desire for natural, better-for-you foods, Dessert Thins are non-GMO, contain zero grams of trans-fat, no cholesterol, no artificial colors or flavors.

    As for why the company calls them by the British word for cookies—biscuits—we can’t fathom. In the U.S., “biscuit” does not indicate a sweet treat. But why ask why?

    We hope the new line is a success for selfish reasons: We want to keep eating them.

    See more at SnackFactory.com.
     
     
    BONNE MAMAN LEMON CURD

    Lemon curd has been a favorite British spread for centuries. Why it isn’t more popular in the U.S., we have no idea. You have to hunt for it in specialty food stores.

    Thanks to Bonne Maman’s national supermarket distribution, you may now find it in an aisle near you. Don’t pass it by!

    The combination of eggs, butter, lemon juice and sugar has uses beyond toast and croissants. Use it:

  • As a snack, on crackers.
  • As a dessert topper.
  • As a quick fix when you want a spoonful of something sweet.
  •  
    Bright yellow, delightfully lemony, this rich spread belongs at your breakfast table…and beyond.

    The line is non-GMO, Certified Gluten Free and certified kosher by OU.

    Discover more at BonneMamanUS.

       

    Snack Factory Dessert Thins - Lemon
    [1] Snack Factory’s new Dessert Thins in Brownie, Chocolate Chip and Lemon Tart (photo courtesy Pinterest).

    Bonne Maman Lemon Curd
    Bonne Maman French preserves and spreads debut a new spread flavor: Lemon Curd (photo courtesy Bonne Maman).

    Noosa Mates Coconut Almond Chocolate

    [3] Noosa Mates score! Four mix-in yoghurts worthy of dessert (photo curry Noosa).

     

    NOOSA YOGURT: NOOSA MATES

    Noosa, the Australian yoghurt brand made in Colorado for the U.S. market, has been a NIBBLE favorite since it first landed here.

    Made with 5% milk, instead of 2% or 0%, it is sumptuous, silky, and the closest yogurt you’ll find that can pass for pudding.

    The 5.5-ounce containers have a separate container that holds the mix-ins. It’s a lot of packaging, but it’s delicious to the max.

    Flavors include:

  • Banana Chocolate Peanut, banana yoghurt with Guittard dark chocolate chunks, banana chips and roasted peanuts.
  • Coconut Almond Chocolate, coconut yogurt with Guittard dark chocolate chunks, toasted coconut crisps and whole almonds.
  • Honey Cranberry Almond, honey yoghurt with crunchy granola, dried cranberries, roasted almonds and pepitas.
  • Honey Pretzel Peanut, honey yoghurt with Guittard dark chocolate chunks, mini pretzels and honey roasted peanuts.
  • Maple Ginger, maple yoghurt with granola, gingersnap streusel and candied ginger.
  •  
    They’re all so good, we can’t even pick a favorite—although a nod goes to Banana Chocolate Peanut. Why is there not more banana yogurt out there???

    The line is certified kosher by OU. See more Noosa at NoosaYohgurt.com.

     

    Pete & Jerry's Organic Hard Boiled Eggs

    [4] These organic, grab-and-go hard-boiled eggs from Pete & Jerry’s are from free-range hens who are treated very well (photo courtesy Pete & Jerry’s).

     

    PETE & JERRY’S ORGANIC HARD BOILED EGGS

    There’s a difference in the flavor of eggs produced by faceless factory farms, and eggs produced by small farmers dedicated to treating hens like the queens they are.

    We have long admired Pete & Jerry’s organic eggs, from free-range chickens who live happy lives.

    How, following the trend to nutritious, grab-and-go peeled, hard-boiled eggs, Pete & Jerry’s has packaged their eggs in pouches and larger containers.

    We love them as snacks, with a bit of pepper or chili flakes.

  • Throw them into your lunch bag.
  • Slice them onto salads or sandwiches
  • Enjoy them as a snack, whenever and wherever.
  •  
    It’s a food you can feel good about, both in terms of nutritional and humanity.

    Learn more about Pete & Jerry’s organic farming at PeteAndJerrys.com.

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Ice Cream Donuts

    A fun project for a long weekend: ice cream donuts.

    There are two ways to look at them. One requires a donut pan and some fabrication. The other requires nothing but donuts and ice cream.

     
    RECIPE #1: DONUT ICE CREAM SANDWICHES (Photo #1)

    Ingredients

  • Donuts of choice (without frosting or filling)
  • Garnishes of choice: chopped nuts, cookie crumbs, mini-chips, sprinkles, etc.
  • Optional: chocolate chips or chopped chocolate for a chocolate dip
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SOFTEN the ice cream by leaving the container on the counter for 10 minutes or more.

    2. HALVE the donuts. Pile ice cream on the lower half and smooth the edges with a spatula. Add the top donut half.

    3a. ROLL the ice cream in a dish of garnishes. Wrap in plastic and return to the freezer to harden – or –

    3b. MELT the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl. Dip part of the donut in the chocolate, then in garnishes as desired.
     
     
    RECIPE #2: ICE CREAM DONUTS (Photo #3)

    These donuts have no cakey component; they’re solid ice-cream shaped like donuts. You can add a crumb bottom for some donut effect.

    Ingredients

  • Ice cream of choice
  • Frosting
  • Garnishes of choice: chopped nuts, cookie crumbs, mini-chips, sprinkles, etc.
  • Optional: cookie crumb or cake bottom (we used purchased coffee cake crumbs, which we broke into smaller pieces)
  •  
     
    Preparation

    1. COAT the wells of the pan (photo #2) per manufacturer’s instructions.

    2. SOFTEN the ice cream by leaving the container on the counter for 10 minutes or more.

    3. SPOON the ice cream into the donut wells. Level with a spatula. Add the optional cake or cookie crumbs and lightly tamp down. Place the pan in the freezer.

    4. ASSEMBLE: Invert the pan to remove the donuts. Quickly frost, garnish and serve. Alternatively, just frost and serve the garnishes separately, in DIY fashion.
     
     
    DOUGHNUT VS. DONUT

    An old word for ball was nut; a doughnut is literally a nut (ball) of dough.

     

    Donut Ice Cream Sandwich
    [1] The easy way: slice a donut, add the ice cream. Paper ‘N Stitch Blog uses glazed donuts with colorful ice creams, like black cherry chip and mint chocolate chip.

    Donut Pan - Wilton
    [2] With a donut pan, you can soften ice cream and fill the circles. Refreeze, then frost and decorate (photo by Hannah Kaminsky, Bittersweet Blog.

    Ice Cream Donuts

    [3] If you invest in a donut pan, you can use it for other things. Check out 101 Donut Pan Ideas.

     
    The term “doughnut” was first used in print in 1809 by American author Washington Irving in his satirical “Knickerbocker’s History Of New York.” Irving wrote of:

    “…balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog’s fat, and called doughnuts, or olykoeks*.”

    These balls, or nuts of fried dough, are what we now call (in a smaller size) doughnut holes.

    Because the center of the cake did not cook as quickly as the outside, the softer centers were sometimes stuffed with fruit, nuts, or other fillings that did not require cooking (think of the chopped onions in the center of a bialy).

    What about the hole?

    Per Smithsonian, a New England ship captain’s mother made a notably delicious, deep-fried doughut that used her son’s spice cargo of nutmeg and cinnamon, along with lemon rind. She filled the center with hazelnuts or walnuts.

    As the story goes, in 1847, 16-year-old sailor Hanson Crockett Gregory created the hole in the center of the doughnut. He used the top of a round tin pepper container to punch the holes, so the dough would cook evenly.

    He recounted the story in an interview with the Boston Post at the turn of the century, 50 years later.

    He effectively eliminated the need to fill the less-cooked center, and provided an inner cut-out that enabled the dough to be evenly cooked.

    Who changed the spelling to donut?

    The first known printed record of the shortened word “donut” appears (likely an inadvertent misspelling) in “Peck’s Bad Boy And His Pa,” a story by George W. Peck published in 1900.

    The spelling did not immediately catch on. That impetus goes to Dunkin’ Donuts, founded in 1950.

    Donut is a easier to write, but we prefer the old-fashioned elegance of doughnut. Take your choice.

    Doughnuts didn’t become a mainstream American food until after World War I. American doughboys at the front were served doughnuts by Salvation Army volunteers. When the doughboys returned, they brought their taste for doughnuts with them [source].

    The name doughboy wasn’t related to the doughnuts, by the way. It dates to the Civil War, when the cavalry unchivalrously derided foot soldiers as doughboys. Two theories are offered:

  • Their globular brass buttons resembled flour dumplings.
  • They used flour to polish their white belts.
  • ________________

    *Olykoek is Dutch for oil cake, i.e., batter fried in oil. While dough was fried the world over, we can thank the Dutch for the sweet balls fried in hog fat that became modern doughnuts.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: It’s Time To Make Turnovers

    Cherry Turnovers
    [1] Turnovers can be any shape you can seal and crimp (photo courtesy Country Living Magazine).

    Cherry Turnovers
    [2] A cherry turnover from Pepperidge Farm. With the quality of the cherries and cream cheese dough in our recipe, below, no garnishing is necessary.

    Bing Cherries

    [3] Bing cherries, sweet but fleeting (photography courtesy Washington State Fruit Commission).

     

    Most people have never had a fresh cherry turnover.

    We make this statement categorically, because turnovers are not a commonly-found or -made food; and fresh cherries are ephemeral. Add these facts together, and the sum is that the cherry turnovers you’re likely to encounter are made with frozen cherries or cherry pie filling.

    So today, buck tradition and make cherry turnovers. The cherries are waiting for you in the produce section; and the cream cheese pastry pocket is so delicious, you’ll want to use this as your signature turnover recipe, with seasonal fruits.

    Seasonal Variations

  • Summer Fruit: berries, figs and stone fruits in (a magical combo with the cream cheese dough)
  • Fall/Winter Fruit: apple, banana, blood orange, pear, pumpkin/squash and quince turnovers in the fall and winter
  • Spring Fruit: kumquat, rhubarb and strawberry turnovers
  •  
    We adapted this recipe from one in Country Living. When you taste your first batch, there’s a good chance you’ll be back at the store for more cherries and cream cheese.

    You can leave out the crystallized ginger if you’re not a ginger fan, but it’s a wow factor.

    RECIPE: FRESH CHERRY TURNOVERS

    Ingredients For 15 Turnovers

    For The Dough

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup unsalted butter
  • 4 ounces cream cheesei>
  • 4 tablespoons ice water
  •  
    For The Filling

  • 1 pound bing cherries
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • ¼ tablespoon salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the dough: Combine the flour, sugar, ginger and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Pulse until well blended; then add the butter and cream cheese and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. With processor running…

    2. ADD the water slowly and mix just until dough comes together. Form dough into a disk, cover with plastic wrap and chill the dough for 30 minutes.

    3. FORM the turnovers: In a medium bowl, mix the cherries, lemon zest, lemon juice, cornstarch and salt together. Set aside.

    4. ROLL out the dough on a lightly floured surface and cut out 6-inch circles. Invert a 6″ diameter plate or bowl atop the dough and cut out with a pizza cutter or knife; if it’s a little larger or smaller, that’s fine. Gather and re-chill the dough scraps and repeat until you have 15 dough circles.

    5. Evenly divide the cherry filling among the dough circles, leaving an edge to fold and crimp. Dampen the edge of each dough circle and fold in half over the cherry filling. Lightly press the edges with the tines of a fork to seal each half-moon-shaped turnover. You can also cut squares or rectangles. For a triangular shape, follow these guidelines for spanakopita, making the triangle as large as you like.

    6. PLACE the turnovers on two parchment-lined baking sheets and chill for at least 30 minutes. While they chill, position the oven rack in the middle and preheat the oven to 400°F. When ready for the oven…

    7. USE a sharp knife to cut 2 or 3 small vents on top of each turnover. Place the baking sheets on the middle rack of the oven and bake until the crust is golden and cherry juice begins to ooze from the vent holes, 20 to 25 minutes. Cool turnovers on a wire rack. Store in an airtight container for up to 2 days.
     
     
    TURNOVER HISTORY

    The concept of cooking fruits and meats in pastry is thousands of years old. Given the lack of bakeware at the time—especially among the less affluent—it is easy to envision cooks of ancient eras filling squares of dough with whatever, folding the dough to seal the filling, and baking them in the fireplace.

    Turnovers can be sweet or savory and can be folded into half moons, rectangles, squares or triangles. Savory varieties are often used as a portable meal, as Americans grab a sandwich (think around the globe, from calzones to dosas to empanadas to spanakopita).

    In England, printed recipes start to appear around 1750. But given the paucity of printed cookbooks (and the literacy level of the general public), they may have been popular for centuries.

    Add to that a challenge: Turnovers were often called apple pies (apple being the most popular and widely available fruit filling).

    Sweet turnovers typically have a fruit filling and are made with a puff pastry or shortcrust pastry dough. Savory turnovers generally contain meat and/or vegetables and can be made with any sort of dough, although a kneaded yeast dough seems to be the most common in Western recipes.

    Turnovers are usually baked, but may be fried.

    Savory turnovers are often sold as convenience foods in supermarkets. Perhaps the largest number of [sweet] turnovers are sold by Kellogg’s Pop-Tarts, launched in 1965.

     
     
    MORE ABOUT CHERRIES

  • History Of Cherries
  • Types Of Cherries
  •  
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Summer Naked Cake With Stone Fruits

    The summer’s selection of stone fruits are begging for a naked cake. June through September is prime stone fruit season in the U.S.

    WHAT ARE STONE FRUITS?

    Stone fruits are members of the Prunus genus, and include:

  • Apricots
  • Cherries
  • Lychees
  • Mangoes
  • Nectarines
  • Olives
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Cross-breeds such as apriums, plumcots and pluots
  •  
    A stone fruit, also called a drupe (it’s , is a fruit with a large, hard stone (pit) inside a fleshy fruit. The stone (pit) is often thought of as the the seed, but the seed is actually inside the stone.

    Most stone fruits are native to warmer climates. That’s why in the U.S., much of the local supply comes in July and August.

    A drupe is a fleshy fruit with thin skin and a central stone containing the seed. Not all drupes are stone fruits.

  • Nuts such as almonds, pecans and walnuts are examples of the seeds inside the stones. They’re also drupes, but a type in which we eat the seed inside the pit instead of the surrounding fruit.
  • The coconut is also a drupe, as are bramble fruits such as blackberries and raspberries.
  • Not all drupes have single large stones. Raspberries are a good example. To see their stones, the fruit has to be carefully broken open. Then, the tiny stones can be seen inside (that’s why raspberry “seeds,” or drupelets, are so crunchy). They are called stones because botanically, the seeds keep their covering (called an endocarp)— not because the seeds are large and hard.
  • Avocado is actually a berry, not a stone fruit (more). Berries are a different genus in the same botanical family as drupes.
  •  
    More for botany lovers: Drupes are members of the Rosaceae family—the rose family—which includes shrubs as well as other prominent fruits in non-drupe, genuses, such as apples, loquats, pears, quinces and strawberries.
     
     
    RECIPE: NAKED CAKE WITH MIXED STONE FRUITS

    Naked Cake is just the thing for summer. It requires no frosting on the sides (although some bakers like to use a thin swath.

    Here’s more about naked cake, with plenty of photos of different presentations.

    You can make any layer cake, but we prefer our homemade pound cake recipe (it’s more buttery). And guess what: box mixes don’t save time. The Kitchn did side-by-side tests; here are the results.

    What you do save is a wee bit of clean-up, although we just stick the measuring spoons and cups in the dishwasher.

    It’s different with whipped cream. Home-beaten cream is so luxurious, but does take 10 minutes. If you’re time-strapped, grab a couple of cans of Reddi-Wip.

    Round cake layers are more elegant to present, but loaf cakes are easier to slice. To use a loaf cake, cut two slices and put the filling and fruit on the bottom; add the top layer and the sauce.
     
    Ingredients

  • Pound cake or yellow butter cake (from scratch or a mix)
  • Sliced stone fruits (an assortment is the way to go)
  • Filling: lemon or other curd, custard, instant vanilla pudding, homemade whipped cream
  • Topping: fruit puree* While photo #1 uses chocolate sauce, we think summer is too heavy for the cream-based chocolate/butterscotch/caramel group, and suggest a raspberry purée
  • ________________

    *While photo #1 uses chocolate sauce, we think summer is too heavy for the cream-based dessert sauces (chocolate, butterscotch, caramel). A berry purée is just right.
     
    Preparation

     

    Stone Fruit Naked Cake
    [1] A couple of cake layers, sliced fruits and whipped cream or fruit purée are a light, luscious summer dessert (photo Wife Mama Foodie | Facebook).

    Naked Cake Fresh Figs
    [2] Does light swath of icing make this a semi-naked cake? This recipe, from Wife Mama foodie, is a spice cake topped with fresh figs.

    Mixed Berry Naked Cake
    [3] A mixed berry naked cake is also a summery treat (photo Wife Mama Foodie | Facebook).

    Betty Crocker Pound Cake Mix

    [4] If you don’t like to measure, use a box mix. But The Kitchn proves it’s not a time saver (photo courtesy Betty Crocker) .

     
    1. COVER the bottom layer with the filling, followed by the fruit. Add the top layer and press lightly. Add the topping and you’re ready to eat!
     
     
    RECIPE: BERRY FRUIT PUREÉ SAUCE

    This recipe is especially good with blackberries, boysenberries and raspberries. You can use fresh or frozen berries. Frozen is less expensive, and once you mix the purée with sugar and lemon juice, you can’t tell the difference.
     
    Ingredients For About 1 Cup

  • 12 ounces (approximately 1-1/2 cups fresh or defrosted frozen berries†
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar, less or more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SORT and wash the berries (or thaw if frozen). Drain, cap and de-stem unsweetened berries.

    2. COMBINE the berries, sugar, and lemon juice in a food processor fitted with the metal blade; process to a smooth purée, about 30 seconds. NOTE: Puréeing may be done in a blender or a food processor. If using a blender, make sure that any seeds are not ground so finely that they will pass through the sieve.

    3. POUR the mixture into a fine sieve set over a bowl. Use a rubber spatula to stir and press the purée through the sieve. Discard the solids. Taste and add more sugar if necessary. (Editor’s note: Less is more when it comes to sugar.)

    4. REFRIGERATE in a non-reactive container for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
    ________________

    †When making purée from frozen fruit, let the berries thaw in a colander over a bowl. Once the berries have thawed, pat them dry before blending. By draining the berries first, you get a thicker purée.

      

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