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FOOD HOLIDAY: Pi Day

Pizza Pie

Pi Day Pie

Top: You could have a piece of pie for Pi Day. We’ll have a pizza pie

instead! Photo courtesy Ribalta Pizza | NYC. Bottom: Want a dessert pie? Try pumpkin pie. It must be better for you, since it didn’t make the list of the 16 worst pies. Photo courtesy FromTheMixedUpFiles.com.

 

Mathematically, March 4th is Pi Day: 3.14. As we learned in high school geometry, the Greek symbol is used in mathematics to represent the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, a constant that begins with 3.14159.

Food folks have co-opted Pi Day, turning it into Pi[e] Day and recommending that one celebrate it with a piece of pie.

This might be the time to include one of the numerous “Top 10 Pies” lists; but this year, we have a twist: a list of the 16 worst pies in terms of calories, fat and sugar, as determined by EatThisNotThat.com. You can read the explanations for each pie here.

The worst-for-you pie is #1, the best of the group is #16.

1. Pecan Pie
2. Key Lime Pie
3. Vanilla Caramel Pie
4. Turtle Pie
5. Fruit-Topped Cream Cheese Pie
6. Lemon Meringue Pie
7. Mince Pie
8. Banana Cream Pie
9. Mixed Berry Pie
10. Sweet Potato Pie
11. Peach Pie
12. Cherry Pie
13. Apple Pie
14. Pumpkin Pie
15. Blueberry Pie
16. Coconut Cream Pie
 
Who would have thought that Coconut Cream Pie could be a “better for you” option?

The choice is yours. Happy Pi Day.

 

 
  

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TIP OF THE DAY: Leprechaun Pie

St. Patrick's Day Pie

Grasshopper Ice Cream Pie

Top: Use a cookie cutter to make cut-outs or shape marzipan shamrocks on a pie crust (photo courtesy American Pie Council). Bottom: Our favorite: a Grasshopper Ice Cream Pie (photo courtesy Taste Of Home). The recipe is below.

 

Make a Leprechaun Pie for St. Patrick’s Day.

What’s a Leprechaun Pie? It’s anything you want it to be, as long as it has a St. Pat’s theme: green color and/or shamrock decorations, Irish cream liqueur for adults.

Just pick a “base” pie and decorations. Most of these recipes are so easy, you can enlist a willing tween or teen to do the prep work.

LEPRECHAUN PIE OPTIONS

  • Your favorite two-crust pie with shamrock cut-outs or add-ons on the top crust (top photo).
  • Bailey’s pudding pie with green whipped cream (recipe).
  • Grasshopper pie (mint with chocolate accents, recipe).
  • Key lime pie (recipe—add a touch of green food color to tint the yellow filling green).
  • Mint ice cream pie (bottom photo, recipe below)
  • Pistachio pudding pie (very easy, no-bake recipe).
  •  
    Decorations

    If your pie has no top crust, you can decorate the surface with:

  • Green baking chips
  • Green sprinkles
  • Green-tinted marzipan
  • Green whipped cream
  • Lucky Charms cereal
  • Kiwi slices
  • Lime zest (especially nice atop the whipped cream)
  •  
    RECIPE: ICE CREAM GRASSHOPPER PIE

    You can make this pie (photo above) in 10 minutes plus freezing time, using store-bought mint chocolate chip ice cream and a chocolate cookie crust.

    If you don’t like mint, add 2 tablespoons of Irish cream liqueur to softened vanilla ice cream. You can also tint the vanilla green with food color.

     
    Ingredients

  • 2 pints mint chocolate chip ice cream, softened
  • 1 chocolate crumb crust (8 inches—store-bought or made with the recipe below)
  • 5 Oreo cookies, chopped
  • 1/3 cup chocolate-covered peppermint candies (e.g. Junior Mints)
  • Chocolate hard-shell ice cream topping
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SPREAD the ice cream into the pie crust. Sprinkle with the cookies and candies.

    2. DRIZZLE with the ice cream topping and freeze until firm. Remove from the freezer 15 minutes before serving.
     
    RECIPE: CHOCOLATE COOKIE CRUST

    Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon chocolate wafer crumbs, divided (about 32 wafers)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, melted
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the wafer crumbs, sugar and butter in a bowl. Pat the mixture onto the bottom and up the side of a buttered 8- or 9-inch pie plate.

    2. BAKE in the middle of a preheated 450°F oven for 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.

      

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    ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Rainbow Bundt Cake

    There’s a surprise in this Bundt cake: a rainbow of colors. For St. Patrick’s Day, garnish the cake platter with gold foil chocolate coins—the ones in the pot at the end of the rainbow. (We filled the center of the Bundt with the coins.)

    In this recipe from McCormick, prep time is 30 minutes, cook time is 35 minutes. The cake yields 12 servings.

    RAINBOW BUNDT CAKE

    Ingredients

  • 1 package (2-layer size) white cake mix
  • 1 teaspoon pure orange extract
  • Food colors: blue, green, red and yellow
  • 1-1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Garnish: whipped cream
  •  
    For The Whipped Cream

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon Irish Cream liqueur*
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour a 12-cup Bundt pan.

    2. PREPARE the cake mix per package directions, stirring in the orange extract. Divide the batter evenly among 4 bowls. Tint each bowl a different color. Stir 50 drops (about 1/2 teaspoon) of red, green or blue food color into each of 3 of the bowls. Stir 25 drops (about 1/4 teaspoon) of yellow food color into the last bowl.

    3. POUR the red batter, followed by the yellow, green and blue batters, into the Bundt pan. Pour each color batter gently into the pan so that each batter is layered over, instead of mixed into, the previous one.

    4. BAKE for 30 to 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Invert cake onto wire rack. Cool completely. Meanwhile…

    5. MIX the confectioners’ sugar, water and vanilla until smooth. Drizzle the glaze over the cooled cake. Prior to serving…

    6. MAKE the whipped cream. Combine the ingredients in a medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

     

    Rainbow Bundt Cake

    McCormick Food Color

    Chocolate Coins

    Rainbow Bundt and food color from McCormick. The chocolate coins from SweetGourmet.

     
    BUNDT CAKE HISTORY

    What does “Bundt” mean? Who invented the shape of the cake?

    Check out the history of the Bundt cake (scroll down below the recipe for the Apple Streusel Bundt).
     
     
    _________________________________
    *If using liqueur in the whipped cream, reduce the vanilla extract to 1/2 teaspoon.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Flavored Whipped Cream

    While classic whipped cream is a festive topping on everything from shortcakes to ice cream sundaes, flavored whipped cream tends to be memorable. While Reddi-Wip makes chocolate whipped cream, usually the only way to experience flavored whipped cream is to make your own.

    It’s not a new idea! By the end of the 19th century, the industrial revolution had enabled centrifuge-separated, high-fat cream. Cooks could buy the cream and whip it directly, without tedious hours spent skimming it from the top of milk.

    Pastry chefs went to town making a myriad of whipped cream desserts, shaped in molds, flavored with chocolate, coffee, fruits and liqueurs. Here’s the history of whipped cream.

    Today, it’s not surprising that you can buy Baileys Irish Cream Whipped Cream in Ireland. But you can make your own as quickly as making a trip to the store.
     
    RECIPE: WHIPPED CREAM WITH IRISH CREAM LIQUEUR

    How about some whipped cream for St. Patrick’s Day that’s flavored with Irish Cream liqueur? Use it on brownies, pound cake, in your coffee or hot chocolate, and anywhere you can: It’s delicious!

    If you’d like a mint-flavored whipped cream (delicious with anything chocolate), substitute green Creme de Menthe liqueur. A deep green color, it will tint the whipped cream green.
     
    Ingredients

  • 2 cup heavy whipping cream chilled
  • 1/3 cup Irish Cream liqueur chilled
  • 1/4 cup powdered sugar
  • Optional: green food color
  •  
    Preparation

    1. CHILL the heavy cream thoroughly so it will whip better. Put the cream and the liqueur in the freezer for 20 minutes prior to whipping.

    2. ADD the ingredients to a stand mixer or a large bowl (if using a hand mixer). Beat on high until stiff peaks form, about 5-7 minutes. It’s ready to serve!
     
    Tips

  • If you want to make the whipped cream an hour in advance, under-whip it; then give it a final whip by hand to right before serving.
  • If you want your whipped cream to keep its shape and not deflate, stabilized whipped cream, which has added gelatin, will keep the whipped cream stiff for days. Here’s a recipe.
  •  
    MORE FLAVORED WHIPPED CREAM RECIPES

  • Bourbon, Five Spice, Holiday Spice, Lavender, Rum & Salty Caramel Whipped Cream
  • Candy Cane Whipped Cream
  • Chocolate Whipped Cream
  • Frangelico Whipped Cream (substitute any liqueur)
  • Savory Whipped Cream Infused With Herbs Or Spices
  •  
    What do you do with savory whipped cream?

    First, you ditch the sugar and vanilla extract in favor of savory flavors. Then, you garnish a bowl of soup, top a baked potato, garnish a plate of asparagus.

    Add lemon zest to whipped cream for fish and seafood (including smoked salmon); bourbon for grilled meats; grated Parmesan cheese for soup, meats and fish; horseradish for beef; herbs or spices with vegetables.

    You’ll love how flavored whipped cream adds new life to recipes.

     

    Brownie With Whipped Cream

    Making Whipped Cream

    Pouring Baileys Irish Cream

    Pudding Parfaits

    Top photo: A brownie with a side of Irish Cream whipped cream (Piyato | Dreamstime). Second: Whipping the cream (Kuhn-Rikon photo). Third: For St. Patrick’s Day, make your flavor Irish Cream Liqueur (photo Diageo). Bottom: Whipped Cream tinted green in this cookie parfait recipe from Yummly.

     

      

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    FOOD FUN: Three Crusts In One

    3 in 1 Pie Crust

    Why not make your pie or cheesecake with three crusts, with this idea from Reynolds Kitchns?

     

    Can’t decide which type of crust you want on your pie or cheesecake?

    Use two or three different crusts!

    This idea is from Reynolds Kitchens, which used gingersnap, chocolate wafer and vanilla wafer crumbs in one crust: something for everyone.

    Whenever you have a recipe with a cookie crust, try it with your own two or three favorite cookie types.

    We did, and decided we like chocolate cookie crust with a plain cheesecake (and even with a fruit topping), and gingersnap crust with a pumpkin cheesecake.

    That’s the way the cookie crumbles.

    Don’t you just love food fun?

     

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Don’t Crowd The Pan…& Use The Right Pan


    Top Chef Sylvain Harribey of the Sofitel New York shares this tip:

    When you cook, don’t overcrowd the pan with the ingredients. In a packed pan, foods end up steaming rather than caramelizing. This adds cooking time and subtracts taste.

    All ingredients should fit comfortably in one layer. Either use a pan that’s big enough for the job, or cook in batches as necessary.

    Need more tips? Head to YouTube and search for basic cooking lessons or specific techniques.
     
    SECOND TIP: USE THE RIGHT PAN

  • Skillet vs. Sauté Pan (Frying Pan): A skillet has low, sloped sides that help with evaporation and steam dissipation. It is used for browning and/or caramelizing, and for reducing sauces. The sloped sides make it easy to flip food and slide it out of the pan. A sauté pan has straight sides and can come with a lid. It is used for braising and pan frying; the high sides reduce splatters and keep in the moist heat.
  • Saucepan vs. Saucier: A saucepan has straight sides and is used for basic heating and boiling. A saucier is rounded and bowl-shaped, ideal for the preparation of sauces, custards, risotto and creamy foods. Unlike the saucepan, the saucier has no angle on the bottom where food can hide and burn; and the wider mouth is better for whisking.
  •  

    Roast Chicken

    Cook potatoes and other vegetables in one layer. The roast chicken was added after the potatoes were cooked. Photo of All-Clad skillet from Williams-Sonoma.

  • Griddle vs. Grill: A griddle is a heavy, flat cooking utensil. A grill is an open web on which foods are placed to directly expose them to fire.
  •  

      

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    ACADEMY AWARDS RECIPE: Popcorn Cupcakes

    Popcorn and a movie?

    How about popcorn cupcakes and a movie awards show?

    Jessica of PNP Flowers Inc. created these fun cupcakes with popcorn. The popcorn is both in the batter and a garnish on top of the icing.

    Why not whip up a batch for your Oscar nibbles?

    Here’s Jessica’s recipe; the original recipe is from the Food Network.

    More fun:

    Can you guess which country has the most motion picture award organizations, after the U.S.? The answer is in the footnote below.

    Here’s a list of film awards worldwide.

    For yet more fun, pull down the Holidays & Occasions menu at the right and select Academy Awards.

     

    popcorn-cupcake-pnpflowersincFB-230sq

    Cupcakes for the movies, with popcorn both inside and on top. Photo courtesy PNP Flowers Inc.

     
    *The country that bestows the second largest number of film awards is India.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Make A Savory Galette

    Beet Galette

    Beet and Sweet Potato Galette from Vermont
    Creamery.

     

    Shoo the winter blues away with a colorful galette.

    In the pastry world, a galette is a rustic, open-face pie, made without a pie pan. It is flat, with a turned-up crust that wraps around the filling to create a “dough pan.” It can be round, square or oblong.

    Galette (gah-LET)—called crostata in Italian and rustic pie or rustic tart in English—hails from the days before people had pie plates, and the days after that when only the kitchens of the wealthy had them.

    Way before then, the precursor of the galette probably dates from the Neolithic Age, a.k.a. the New Stone Age, which lasted from about 10,200 B.C.E.and ending between 4,500 and 2,000 B.C.E. Thick cereal pastes—barley, oats, rye, wheat—were sweetened with honey and spread on hot stones to cook.

    The recipe below, from Vermont Creamery, uses their Spreadable Goat Cheese and Unsalted Cultured Butter.

    It can be served as a light lunch or brunch with salad and soup, or as a first course at dinner.

     
    The Most Exquisite Butter

    Palates, take note: Vermont Creamery’s cultured butter is churned to 86% butterfat. This is higher than most other butters available and creates an especially flaky and delicious pie crust.

    Supermarket butter is 80% butterfat, and most European-style butters are 82%-84%. We’ve only seen the 86% varieties from Vermont Creamery and California’s Straus Family Creamery. If you want the best butter, this is it.

    And, we must note: Our favorite butter for bread is Vermont Creamery’s Cultured Salted Butter. It’s amazing: We never use salted butter unless it’s this one, with the lightest touch of sea salt. It’s irresistible.

    See the different types of butter in our Butter Glossary.

     

    RECIPE: BEET & SWEET POTATO GALETTE

    Ingredients
     
    For The Crust

  • 8 ounces unsalted butter, softened but still cool
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1–2 tablespoons ice water
  •  
    For The Filling

  • 8 ounces spreadable goat cheese
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 1 large red beet
  • Fresh thyme
  • Salt and pepper
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 375°F.

    2. PEEL the sweet potato and beet, then slice them into 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Set them aside on separate plates, to keep the beets from bleeding onto the sweet potato slices.

     

    Squash Galette

    For summer, make the galette from zucchini and yellow squash. This example, from Good Eggs, shows an individual-size galette.

     
    3. PLACE the flour in large bowl and add the salt; stir to combine. Add the butter. Using two fork, knives or a hand-held dough blender, cut the butter into the flour, gently mixing to ensure that every crumb of butter is pea size and coated in flour. Once the butter is combined…

    4. ADD the ice water one tablespoon at a time, mixing until the dough begins to take shape. Gently knead with your fingers to help bring the dough together. If needed, add additional water a little at a time. Once the dough is formed…

    5. SHAPE it into a disk and roll it into a rough circle on a piece of parchment, to a uniform thickness of ¼ inch. If you have trouble creating a uniform thickness, consider a pie crust mold for “perfect crusts every time.”

    6. SPREAD the goat cheese onto the dough, leaving an inch border around the edge. Layer rounds of the cut sweet potato and beets on top of goat cheese. Gently fold the bare edge of dough inwards on top of the layered vegetables, working around the entire circle.

    7. SPRINKLE the top of the galette with fresh thyme, salt and pepper and bake for 40–50 minutes, or until vegetables are cooked through and the crust is golden. Serve it hot from the oven, at room temperature or in-between.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Rose Pear Galette & The Different Types Of Pears

    Given the mark-up on roses for Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day, you might want to bake your own roses. These lovely individual tarts are made from seasonal pears. (See the different types of pears below.)

    If you prefer an apple rose tartlet or a vegetable rose tart, take a look at these rose pastry recipes.
     
    RECIPE: ROSE PEAR GALETTE

    Treat yourself with this elegant and refined after-dinner delight from Adrianna Adarme of A Cozy Kitchen. It’s included in her book The Year of Cozy: 125 Recipes, Crafts, and Other Homemade Adventures.

    Prep time is 30 minutes, cook time is 20 to 25 minutes.

    Ingredients For 4 Individual Tarts
     
    For the Crust

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons white granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, frozen
  • 4-8 tablespoons very cold water, divided
  • 1 large egg, beaten (for egg wash)
  • 1 tablespoon turbinado* sugar
  • Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil
  • Reynolds parchment paper
  •  
    For The Filling

  • 2 Bartlett pears, cored and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon coffee grounds, finely ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt
  •  
    For Serving

  • Whipped cream or vanilla ice cream
  • ________________________________
    *Turbinado sugar is partially refined light brown cane sugar, similar to demerara sugar but with larger crystals. It is sold in bulk packages, and in packets as Sugar In The Raw. See the different types of sugar.
     
    Preparation

    1. MIX together the flour, sugar and salt in a large bowl. Using a box grater, grate the cold butter atop the flour mixture. Working quickly and using your hands, break the butter bits into the flour until they’re evenly distributed and resemble the size of small peas.

       

    Pear Galette - Reynolds Kitchens

    The Year Of Cozy

    Bartlett Pear

    Top: Rose Pear Galette from A Cozy Kitchen | Reynolds Kitchens. Center: The Bosc pear used in this recipe, although you can substitute the varieties below. Bottom: The Year of Cozy: 125 Recipes, Crafts, and Other Homemade Adventures.

     
    2. ADD 4 tablespoons of water and mix. The mixture will be shaggy at this point. From here, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until the dough comes together (generally about 3 additional tablespoons). Flour a work surface and dump the dough onto it. Knead a few times until it comes together. Form the dough into a disk. Wrap the disk in plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator to chill for at least 1 hour, or ideally overnight.

    3. MIX this filling together just before the dough is ready to be removed from the fridge: In a medium bowl, toss together the pear slices, brown sugar, cocoa powder, coffee grounds, vanilla extract and salt.

    4. REMOVE the disk of dough from the refrigerator and allow it to come to room temperature for 10 minutes. Liberally flour a work surface and a rolling pin. Begin to roll the dough into a 16-inch round, being sure to rotate it every so often to avoid sticking. Using the bottom of a bowl or plate that measures about 6 inches in diameter, cut out 3 circles. Re-roll the scraps to get 1 additional circle.

    5. ARRANGE the pear slices neatly in a circular pattern in the center of each of the pie crust rounds, leaving about 1-1/2 inches clear at the edges. Fold over the edges to cover about 1/2 inch of the filling. Repeat with the remaining rounds. Transfer the galettes to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and place them in the freezer to chill for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F.

    6. BRUSH the pie crust edges with the egg wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar. Transfer to the oven to bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the edges are golden brown. Check on the galettes periodically. If at any time the crusts’ edges are getting too brown, take a piece of Reynolds Wrap® Aluminum Foil and tent over the edges. When the edges are golden brown, remove from the oven. Serve warm with a dollop of whipped cream or a scoop of your favorite vanilla ice cream.

     

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/bosc pear 230

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/comice 230

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/forelle pear 230

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/green anjou pear 230

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/seckel 230

    Some of America’s most popular pears. From
    top to bottom: Bosc, Comice, Forelle, Green
    Anjou, Seckel.

       

    A SEASONAL GUIDE TO PEAR TYPES

    Thanks to USA Pears for this background material.

    Fresh domestic pears are available year-round. Although each pear variety has its own unique properties, most can be substituted for each other in recipes.
     
    Bartlett Pears: August to February
    The Bartlett pear turns from bright green to golden yellow as it ripens. Very juicy and sweet, with aromatic flesh, it is used most for canning and for salads or desserts (photo above).
     
    Red Bartlett Pears: August to January
    The Red Bartlett turns bright red as it ripens and is similar in flavor and texture to the yellow Bartlett.
     
    Bosc Pears: September to April
    Bosc pears have long, tapered necks and skin that is naturally russet to a cinnamon brown. Dense, fragrant, and honey-sweet flesh with a texture that holds its shape when heated, the Bosc is a good choice for baking, poaching, grilling and roasting.
     
    Comice Pears: September to March
    Pronounced co-MEESE, these pears have a full, round shape with a short neck and stem. They are usually green, sometimes with a red blush. They are very succulent, with a custard-like texture and mellow sweetness. They are best as an eating pear and go well with cheese. They don’t hold up well in cooking.
     
    Concorde Pears: September to February
    The Concorde has a tall, elongated neck and firm, dense flesh, with skin that is golden green, usually with golden yellow russets. Its flavor has vanilla undertones and, like the Bosc, it has a firm texture that holds up well when baking, grilling or poaching. It is one of the newer varieties, introduced in the past 10 years.
     
    D’Anjou Pears: September to July
    Green D’Anjou pears, recognized by their egg-like shape, stay green when fully ripe. With moist, sweet and dense flesh, the D’Anjou is excellent for snacking or baking.
     
    Red D’Anjou Pears: September to May
    Sweet and succulent when ripe, red D’Anjou pears are similar to their green counterparts. The red skin is a colorful addition to salads, desserts and main dishes.
     
    Forelle Pears: October to March
    The Forelle, known for its smaller size and unique yellow-green skin, is tasty sweet with a crisp texture even when ripe. Ideal for kids’ lunches and baked desserts.
     
    Seckel Pears: September to February
    Seckel pears are another small variety, recognized by their maroon skin, with olive-green coloring. With their crunchy flesh and ultra-sweet flavor, they are great for snacks, pickling or garnishing.
     
    Starkrimson Pears: August to January
    Another new variety introduced within the past 10 years, Starkrimson pears have a brilliant crimson red skin and a thick, stocky stem. Juicy and sweet, they have smooth flesh and a distinct floral aroma.
     
    MORE DELICIOUS PEAR DESSERTS

  • Pears Hélène
  • Poached Pears
  •  

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Easy Valentine Heart Garnish

    Even if you’re going out for dinner on Valentine’s Day, you can use today’s tip to garnish something.

    Use dried herbs, spices or other ingredients to make heart-shaped designs on your foods.
     
    GARNISH THESE SWEET FOODS

  • Cake or other dessert
  • Pancakes or French toast
  • Toast
  • Anything flat
  •  
    Use One Of These Toppings

  • Cinnamon sugar
  • Finely chopped nuts
  • Ground citrus peel
  • Hot chocolate powder or other drink powder (such as Nesquik)
  • Powdered sugar
  •  
    For savory dishes, check the list below.
     
    Preparation

    1. USE one of these heart-shaped templates:
    – Buy a red paper heart at the card store or party store.
    – Use a cookie cutter.
    – Cut a heart from foil or paper. Fold the sheet in half and cut out half a heart; unfold and both sides will be even.
     
    2. SPRINKLE the sugar, spice or herb over the heart template, using a small strainer (sieve). Let the garnish settle. Remove the template with a pointed tweezers to lift off the heart template.
     
    USE THESE SAVORY GARNISHES

    Look for dried herbs, spices or other garnishes that are mild enough to complement the food item. For this reason, we’ve omitted intense flavors such as chili flakes and curry powder, but let your palate guide you.

  • Bacon crumbles
  • Capers
  • Celery leaf flakes
  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Chopped olives
  • Finely chopped nuts
  • Fines herbes
  • Garlic chips
  • Grated Parmesan cheese
  • Herbes de Provence
  • Italian herb blend
  • Parsley
  • Pizza seasoning
  • Salad sprinkles
  • Toasted onion
  • Toasted sesame seeds
  •  
    You can also make your own blend.
     
    Sprinkle The Garnish On These Foods

  • Chicken breasts
  • Chops
  • Fish fillets
  • Mashed potatoes (patted flat)
  • Sandwich tops
  • Savory pancakes
  • Toast
  •  
    As always, have fun with it!

     

    heart-decoration-the-baker-chick-230

    Valentine

    Strainer Set

    strawberry-powder-aayushfoodingredients-230

    Dried Parsley

    Top photo: Mini flourless chocolate cakes from The Baker Chick are garnished with powdered sugar. Here’s the recipe. Second: Use a paper heart for your template. Third: If you don’t have a small strainer, pick one up. This set, about $10, is from Culina and available on Amazon. Fourth: Make a pink heart with Strawberry Nesquik. Photo courtesy Aayush Food Ingredients. Bottom: For savory dishes, use dried parsley or other herb. Photo courtesy Alamy.com.

     

      

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