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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
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Archive for Cookies/Cake/Pastry

RECIPE: Star Cookies For July 4th

star-cookies-WS-230

It’s beginning to look like July 4th! The Silpat cookie sheet is from Williams-Sonoma.

 

Want to bake cookies for July 4th?

1. MIX up and roll out your favorite sugar cookie dough (or other rolled cookie dough).

2. USE a star cookie cutter to cut shapes. If you have small and large star cutters, make large and small sizes.

Here’s a set of 6 nested star cookie cutters, that you can also use for Christmas cookies.

3. BAKE, cool and ice the cookie tops white royal icing (recipe below); then decorate with red and blue stripes. Voilà: the Stars and Stripes.

Check out the different types of cookies in our delicious Cookie Glossary.

 
ROYAL ICING RECIPE

Ingredients

  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons meringue powder
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • Red and blue food color
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MIX first three ingredients together for 7 to 10 minutes, until icing stiffens. If icing appears too stiff, add more water, one teaspoon at a time. You want the icing to be thin enough that you can pipe it easily. Tint 1/4 of the icing red, and 1/4 blue (see instructions below).

    2. DECORATE the cookies when they are cool. Use an offset spatula to ice the cookie tops white. Then place the tinted icing into separate piping bags fitted with a very small round tip.

    3. CREATE the red and blue stripes. If you don’t have a steady hand, wavy lines are fine. Keep the tip about 1/2 inch above the cookie as you ice. This helps to achieve a straighter line.

    Variation: Instead of piping stripes, you can sprinkle red, white and blue star decorations on the white royal icing base while it’s still wet. Here are large stars and small stars.

    4. DRY the cookies completely, usually 1 to 2 hours.

     
      

    Comments

    JULY 4th: American Flag Pie Top

    While we just said that our favorite pie topping is streusel (crumb topping), here’s something special for July 4th.

    You can buy or bake an open face pie (no top crust) or a tart, and decorate it as the American Flag.

    All you need to decorate are:

  • Blueberries
  • Strawberries
  • Whipped Cream
  •  
    Older children can do the decorating, and everyone can enjoy a piece of “grand old pie.”

    If you’ve purchased the pie, the dessert can be ready in 10 minutes!

    For those who don’t know the lyrics/tune to George M. Cohan’s classic, “You’re a Grand Old Flag,” practice on You Tube.

     

    flag-tart-agata-valentina-230b

    It’s a grand old pie! Photo courtesy Agata and Valentina | NYC.

     
    A NOTE ABOUT WHIPPED CREAM

    If you use an aerosol whipped cream like Reddi-Wip, the air will deflate much sooner than if you whip your own stabilized whipped cream.

    Even if you don’t stabilize the whipped cream, your own beater-whipped cream will stay fluffy longer. You don’t need to create whipped cream stars, which the Reddi-Wip nozzle enables. Instead, just emulate the real white bars of the flag, and use one long line of whipped cream in-between the rows of strawberries.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Crumb Top Instead Of Pie Crust

    unbaked-pie-streusel-grandcentralbakery-230

    Use a yummy streusel topping instead of a dough top crust. Photo courtesy Grand Central Bakery | Portland.

     

    We’re not a huge pie crust pan. We prefer thicker, buttery, cookie-like tart crusts (here are the differences between pies and tarts).

    Personally, we’d rather have a cobbler, crisp or grunt (the difference).

    If it has to be a conventional pie, give us a crumb topping instead of a top crust. For thus, that means streusel—the same topping that goes on top of crumb cake.

    WHAT IS STREUSEL?

    Streusel is a crumb topping made from butter, flour and sugar. It can also contain chopped nuts or rolled oats. We think it’s easier than a conventional dough crust.

    Pronounced SHTROY-zul, the word derives from the German “streuen,” meaning to sprinkle or scatter.

    Streusel is used as a topping for a variety of pies, fruit crisps, cakes and pastries, most notably coffee cakes.

    A pie with a streusel topping is sometimes referred to as a “crumble pie.”

     

    RECIPE: EASY STREUSEL TOPPING

    Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the flour, sugar, cinnamon and salt in a medium bowl. With a pastry blender or fork, cut in the butter until fine crumbs form.

    2. USE your fingers to squeeze the fine crumbs into large clumps (size as desired—we like large crumbs). Sprinkle over the top of the pie and bake per recipe instructions. That’s it!

     
      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Cookie Dough Icing

    cookie-dough-carolinacupcakery-230r

    A fresh-baked cupcake topped with cookie dough. Photo courtesy Carolina Cupcakery.

     

    Who needs icing?

    Carolina Cupcakery tops this cupcake with a scoop of cookie dough.

    Who can top that?

    Make your own cookie dough, or top your homemade cupcakes with a slice from a roll of cookie dough.

    If you’re concerned with raw eggs, read the label on purchased dough to see if the eggs are pasteurized. If not, make your own cookie dough with Safe Eggs pasteurized eggs.

    For more cupcake fun, visit CarolinaCupcakery.com.
     
    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FROSTING & ICING

    Although the words are used interchangeably, professional bakers know that there’s a difference:

  • Frosting is made with table sugar (granulated sugar).
  • Icing is made with confectioner’s sugar (also called icing sugar).
  •  
    Of course, when you top the cake with cookie dough, there’s no issue!

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Bake A Special Coffee Cake

    Many of us would love a delicious piece of coffee cake with our morning coffee—or to serve to Dad on Father’s Day.

    If you can find an artisan-baked coffee cake in your area, great. We live in a big city where the rents are so high that the beloved neighborhood mom and pop bakery is largely a thing of the past.

    So the only solution: Order by mail (check out this terrific povitica, an Eastern European coffee cake) or bake your own.

    But first….

    WHAT IS COFFEE CAKE?

    Coffee cake is a yeast-leavened cake that is typically served at breakfast or as a snack with coffee or tea. It is often glazed with a white confectioner’s sugar icing or topped with streusel. The latter is also called crumb cake.

    Coffee cake can contain raisins, nuts, other dried fruits and/or chocolate chunks. Most are flavored with cinnamon. More elaborate recipes incorporate cream cheese, jam or fruit curd.

    According to FoodTimeline.org, food historians generally agree that the tradition of eating sweet cakes with coffee likely originated in northern or central Europe in the 17th century, when coffee was introduced (see the history of coffee).

       

    blueberry-muffin-coffee-cake-thebakerchick-230

    A coffee cake inspired by the blueberry muffin. Photo courtesy The Baker Chick.

     
    These areas already had sweet yeast breads, a natural accompaniment that evolved into “coffee cake” The made with flour, eggs, sugar, yeast, nuts, dried fruit and spices.

    German, Dutch and Scandinavian immigrants brought the recipes with them to America. Over time, coffee cake recipes evolved to contain sugared fruit; cream cheese, yogurt and other creamy fillings; streusel and other toppings.

    See the different types of cake in our Cake Glossary.

     

    cinnamon-roll-cake-thebakerchick-230r

    The “cinnamon roll” coffee cake. Photo courtesy The Baker Chick.

     

    There are many great coffee cake recipes out there. If you don’t have one, ask family and friends if they have a favorite before heading to recipe websites.

    For an inspired coffee cake recipe, we looked to Audra Fullerton, a.k.a The Baker Chick, the writer, recipe developer and photographer for this blog. We’re big fans.

    The “Blueberry Muffin” Coffee Cake

    The first coffee cake from Audra, photo above, is a blueberry muffin recipe baked as a cake, with an extra brown sugar topping. It’s not a yeast cake but is super moist, with plump blueberries in every bite.

    It takes all of 10 minutes to mix, and 40 minutes in the oven. How can you resist?

    Here’s the recipe.

     
    The “Cinnamon Bun” Coffee Cake

    The second recommendation is a jumbo cinnamon roll, the size of a cake.

     

    Instead of rolling and cutting the dough into individual rolls, you cut the dough into strips and attach them one by one until a monster cinnamon roll is achieved.

    It’s more time consuming than the blueberry coffee cake, but isn’t that “wow” factor worth 1 hour and 15 minutes of your time to assemble?

    After that, in just 20 minutes in the oven you have a warm, fragrant, gooey 9-inch “coffee cake.”

    Here’s the recipe.
     
    MORE BREAKFAST CAKE OPTIONS

    Special enough for Father’s Day: this Apple Streusel Bundt Cake.

    Also for your consideration: a Hummingbird Coffee Cake, a Southern tradition.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Angel Food Cake For Summer

    One of our favorite summer cakes is angel food cake, a light, flourless cake made with sugar, cream of tartar, salt, extract (almond, lemon or vanilla). a dozen or so egg whites and a touch of salt. There is no leavening, no cholesterol, no gluten and just 72 calories for a slice equal to 1/12 of the cake.

    Angel food cake is typically baked in a tube pan; a bundt pan doesn’t work (don’t try it!). The tube pan should have a removable bottom and “feet”, so you can invert the hot cake pan directly onto the counter to cool.

    The tender, snowy white cake is popularly served with berries and whipped cream, although it can be served plain, with other fruits or with a dessert sauce (caramel, chocolate, custard, fruit curd, fresh fruit).

    Fluffy, airy cake, berries and whipped cream: It was the summer cake baked by our mother, who whipped heavy cream with an electric beater until she purchased an iSi professional cream whipper with nitrous oxide cartridges. (We still have her 60-year-old whipper. It works great, and the whipped cream is so much more delicious than supermarket aerosols.)
     
    THE HISTORY OF ANGEL FOOD CAKE

     

    angel-food-cake-iambaker.net-230

    A delicious hot weather cake. Whipped cream optional or imperative, depending on your point of view. Photo courtesy IAMBaker.net.

     
    Angel food cake is an American creation. Some historians think that the first angel food cakes were baked in the South by African-American slaves, due to the strength required to hand-whip the air into the whites with a whisk (the hand-cranked rotary beater didn’t appear until 1865-1870).

    Others theorize that the cake originated in Pennsylvania Dutch country in the early 1800s, based on the quantity of old tube pan-like cake molds in the area. There is a National Angel Food Cake Day, October 10th. Whoever picked that date didn’t read the memo on best summer cakes.

    Here’s a recipe sent to us by McCormick, contributed by Amanda of IAmBaker.net, who adapted it from the JoyOfBaking.com. She used McCormick extracts and spices.

    Read the entire recipe and see the tips at the end of this article before preparing the recipe.

    For July 4th, instead of the roasted strawberry sauce, make Red, White & Blue Angel Food Cake with fresh berries.

    RECIPE: ANGEL FOOD CAKE WITH ROASTED STRAWBERRY SAUCE

    Ingredients For The Angel Food Cake

  • 1-1/4 cups sifted cake flour
  • 1-1/2 cups granulated white sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups egg whites, at room temperature (from about 12 large eggs—but it’s better to purchase egg whites only if you have no uses for the yolks)
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
  •  
    Ingredients For The Roasted Strawberry Sauce

  • 2 cups fresh strawberries, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 10 ounces of strawberry spread (or jam, jelly preserves)
  • Whipped cream (make your own from scratch)
  •  
    Preparation

    For The Angel Food Cake

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. If you have not tested your oven recently, use an oven thermometer to verify that the temperature has been reached.

    2. SIFT together in a large bowl 3/4 cup of the sugar and the sifted cake flour (this is half of the sugar and all of the flour).

    3. FIT a stand mixer with the whisk attachment and beat the egg whites in the bowl until foamy, about 2 minutes. Add the cream of tartar, lemon juice, vanilla and almond extracts, balsamic and salt, and continue to beat until soft peaks form, roughly 2-3 minutes.

    4. GRADUALLY BEAT in the remaining 3/4 cup of sugar, a tablespoon at a time, until glossy stiff peaks form. You may need to scrape down the sides of the bowl.

    5. REMOVE the bowl from stand and sift the flour mixture, 1/4 cup at a time, over the beaten egg whites. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold (do not stir) the flour into the egg whites.

    6. DO NOT butter or spray or grease the tube pan. Pour the batter into the ungreased pan and run a metal spatula or knife through the batter to eliminate air pockets. Smooth the top and bake in the preheated oven for 40-45 minutes. The cake is done when the cake springs back when gently pressed or there are cracks over the top.

    7. INVERT the pan immediately upon removing from the oven and allow the cake to cool for about 1-1/2 hours. If your pan does not have feet, invert on the neck of a full wine bottle. When completely cool…

    8. RUN an offset spatula or knife around the sides and center tube of the pan to loosen the cake, then remove the cake from the pan. Next, use the offest spatula (or knife) along the bottom and remove. Set the cake on a serving plate or cake stand.

     

    angel-food-cake-slice-iambaker.net-230

    A slice of angel cake has just 72 calories (without the toppings). Photo courtesy IAMBaker.net.

     

    Preparation For The Roasted Strawberry Sauce

    Why roast the strawberries instead of simply slicing them? It creates juice and a very soft texture. Strawberries are not a great baking berry, since they tend to lose their shape and texture. Roasted, their flavor becomes more intense.

    Note that you can’t roast the berries in advance. As they sit, some of the color will start to leach from the berries into the juice. So when the cake comes out of the oven, turn up the heat and roast the strawberries.

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 400°F. Place the sliced strawberries in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Drizzle evenly with the maple syrup and sprinkle the cinnamon on top. Roast at 400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the berries are tender and have begun to release their juices.

    2. PLACE the strawberry spread into a medium bowl. Scoop the roasted strawberries on top of the spread and mix them together with a fork. If the mixture seems too thick, add up to 1/2 cup warm water, a bit at a time.

     
    3. TO SERVE: Pour some of the sauce (not all) over the cake. Cut the cake using an eight- or ten-inch serrated knife (bread knife) in a sawing motion. Try not to press the cake down as you cut. Place each piece on a plate and drop a dollop of whipped cream on top. Cover with more strawberry sauce.

    OPTIONAL: For a smooth strawberry sauce, use a blender or food processor. If you do this, you may not need to add the strawberry spread.
     
    TIPS FOR SUCCESS

  • BRING all ingredients to room temperature.
  • MEASURE or weigh the egg whites. Eggs can vary greatly in size and weight, and there are lots of them in this recipe. If you are separating whole eggs instead of buying egg whites, the eggs must be very fresh. It makes separating them easier, as does separating them fresh from the fridge instead of at room temperature.
  • ENSURE that the mixing bowl and beaters are absolutely clean and cool (we place ours in the freezer—it helps with the volume). Even a speck of grease can limit the volume you get from the egg whites.
  • DON’T OVERBEAT! Follow these three words: stiff glossy peaks.
  •   

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Pie Crust Cutters

    Surrounded by luscious spring and summer fruits, it’s hard not to want to bake a pie—or to learn how to bake one, if you’ve never dipped a toe in the oven.

    Two pie gadgets from Williams-Sonoma make even a novice seem like a sophisticated pie baker.

    LATTICE PIE CRUST CUTTER

    Like lattice crusts but lack the time or patience to make them?

    Williams-Sonoma offers this solution: a lattice pie crust cutter. It quickly and easily cuts a lattice-like crust from rolled-out dough.

    You simply place the lattice insert in the bottom of the gadget’s frame, then lay a sheet of rolled dough on top. To create the pattern, use a rolling pin to press the cutter into the dough. Lift off the insert and invert the latticed dough onto the pie.

    It’s not as dramatic as a hand-woven lattice, but it’s certainly more interesting than a solid top crust!

       

    lattice-pie-crutter-230sq-WS

    Press a lattice-style pie crust in 1-2-3. Photo courtesy Williams-Sonoma.

     

    Get yours at Williams-Sonoma.com, $19.95.

     

    american-flag-pie-cutter-WS-230

    A patriotic pie, indeed! Photo courtesy Williams-Sonoma.com.

     

    AMERICAN FLAG PIE CRUST CUTTER

    What we really love is this American flag pie crust cutter, also from Williams-Sonoma and also $19.95.

    While we try to avoid bringing single-use gadgets into our small kitchen, we made an exception for this one. Now, a patriotic pie will be our annual contribution to July 4th festivities.

    Get yours at Williams-Sonoma.com.

    Both inserts are designed for use with a 12″ diameter pastry crust.

     

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Grilled Fruit Flatbread

    As long as the grill is fired up, grill your dessert!

    In this recipe from McCormick, naan flatbread, an Indian staple, serves as the base for fresh fruit.

    Both the bread and the fruit are grilled separately, then assembled with a yogurt sauce, chopped pistachios and a garam masala-spiced honey drizzle that continue the theme.

    Grill your favorite fruit: apricot, mango, nectarine, peach, pineapple, plum or strawberry work well.

    If you’re concerned about buying a bottle of spice for just one recipe, fear not:

    Garam masala, which adds warm, sweet flavor, is an all-purpose seasoning for chicken, fish, lamb, potatoes, rice pilaf, even breads. Read more about it below. You may even already have the spices to blend your own (see the end of this article).

    Prep time is 20 minutes, cook time is 10 minutes.

    RECIPE: GRILLED FRUIT FLATBREAD WITH INDIAN ACCENTS

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

       

    Grilled_Fruit_Tart_with_Spiced_Honey_Drizzle_mccormick-230ps

    A peach tart made on the grill. Photo courtesy McCormick.

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2-1/4 teaspoons garam masala, divided (we used McCormick Gourmet Garam Masala Blend)
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon honey, divided
  • 1 package (8.8 ounces—2 pieces) plain naan
  • 2 ripe peaches, pitted and quartered
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt (substitute vanilla yogurt)
  • 2 tablespoons flaked coconut
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped pistachios (substitute sliced almonds, chopped walnuts or pecans)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MIX the butter, 2 teaspoons of the garam masala and 1 teaspoon of the honey in small bowl. Brush the naan and peaches with honey mixture.

    2. GRILL the naan over medium heat 2 to 3 minutes per side or until toasted. Grill the peaches 2 to 3 minutes or until grill marks appear. Slice the peaches into 1/4-inch thick slices.

    3. MIX the yogurt and coconut; spread atop each naan. Top with the sliced peaches and sprinkle with the pistachios. Mix the remaining 1 tablespoon honey and 1/4 teaspoon garam masala and drizzle over the top of the peaches. Serve warm or at room temperature.

     

    garam-masala-mccormick-230

    Garam masala, a popular Indian spice blend. Photo courtesy McCormick.

     

    WHAT IS GARAM MASALA

    Garam masala is an aromatic spice blend originating in northern India, but used in both northern and southern cuisines. It is like other spice blends in that the ingredients and proportions will vary somewhat by cook or manufacturer.

    Garam means hot in Hindi, and masala is a mixture of spices. The ingredients generally include black, brown and green cardamom pods; black and white peppercorns; cinnamon; clove; coriander; cumin; nutmeg and/or mace*; and turmeric.

    Other ingredients can include bay leaf, fennel seeds, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, mace, malabar leaf, mustard seed, saffron, star anise and tamarind.

    In Northern Indian cuisine, garam masala is typically used in powder form, while in Southern India it is often made into a paste with coconut milk, vinegar or water.

     

    In fine cooking, the spices are toasted and ground before use, to maintain the intensity of the flavor. But you can buy preground blends, like McCormick’s garam masala.
     
    RECIPE: GARAM MASALA

    If you want to blend your own, here’s a very simple recipe. Start with these proportions and then adjust to your particular preferences:

  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground coriander (cilantro seed)
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  •  
    Store unused spices in an airtight container away from heat and light.
     
    *Nutmeg is the seed of the nutmeg tree, while the more mild mace is the dried reddish covering of the seed.

      

    Comments

    FOOD 101: Crisp, Crumble, Cobbler ~ The Difference

    peach-cobbler-zulkasugarFB-recipe-230sq

    Peach cobbler: The biscuit dough dropped
    on top resembles cobblestones. Photo
    courtesy Zulka Sugar.

     

    Do you know the difference between a cobbler, a crisp and a crumble? Have you ever had a betty, bird’s nest pudding (a.k.a. crow’s nest pudding), buckle, grunt, pandowdy or slump?

    There are many kinds of baked fruit desserts, from the simplest—cored fruits, baked or roasted—to pies and tarts, which cradle the baked fruit between one or two crusts.

    But one group of recipes gets confusing: deep dish baked fruit, made in pans or casseroles. There’s no crust, per se; but each variety is distinguished by its topping.

    These desserts can be made with any type of fruit, but are typically made with apples, berries or stone fruits—cherries, peaches, nectarines and plums.

    In observance of National Cherry Cobbler Day, May 17th, we explain the differences among the different baked fruit dishes.

    Baked in early American kitchens, these dishes were simple to make, using seasonal fruits, flour and sugar. According to What’s Cooking America, colonists often served them for breakfast, as a first course or even a main course. It was not until the late 19th century that they were served primarily as desserts.

     
    PAN-BAKED FRUIT DISHES

  • BETTY, or brown betty, alternates layers of fruit with layers of buttered bread crumbs. Some modern recipes use graham cracker crumbs.
  • BIRD’S NEST PUDDING is a bit different: A pan of fruit is covered with a batter that bakes into an uneven top with the fruit poking through. It’s served in a bowl topped with heavy cream and spices.
  • BUCKLE, very similar to the French clafoutis (often spelled clafouti in the U.S.), adds fruit, usually berries, to a single layer of batter. When baked, it becomes a cake-like layer studded with berries. It is topped with a crumb layer (streusel), which gives it a buckled appearance. Alternatively, the cake, fruit and crumbs can be made as three separate layers.
  • COBBLER has a pastry top instead of a crumb top. Biscuit pastry is dropped from a spoon, the result resembling cobblestones.
  •  

  • CRISP is a deep-dish baked fruit dessert made with a crumb or streusel topping. The crumbs can be made with bread crumbs, breakfast cereal, cookie or graham cracker crumbs, flour or nuts.
  • CROW’S NEST PUDDING is another term for bird’s nest pudding. In some recipes, the fruit is cored, the hole filled with sugar, and the fruit wrapped in pastry.
  • CRUMBLE is the British term for crisp.
  • GRUNT is a spoon pie with biscuit dough on top of stewed fruit. Stewed fruit is steamed on top of the stove, not baked in the oven. The recipe was initially an attempt to adapt the English steamed pudding to the primitive cooking equipment available the Colonies. The term “grunt” was used in Massachusetts, while other New England states called the dish a slump.
  • PANDOWDY or pan dowdy is a spoon pie made with brown sugar or molasses. It has a rolled top biscuit crust that is broken up during baking and pushed down into the fruit to allow the juices to seep up. It is believed that the name refers to its “dowdy” appearance. Sometimes it is made “upside down” with the crust on the bottom, and inverted prior to serving.
  • SLUMP is another word for grunt.
  •  

    crumble-230r

    An apple crumble. Photo courtesy Spice Islands

     
    And don’t overlook:

  • SONKER or ZONKER, a North Carolina term for a deep-dish cobbler made of fruit or sweet potato.
  •  
    As Kim Severson, writing in The New York Times about sonkers and zonkers, notes: “These dishes are so regional that people within the same county will disagree on the proper form.”

    Your family may call it a particular dish by a particular name, correct or not. But the most correct thing is: Bake fruit in season, and bake it often!

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Brownie Mortarboards

    If you’d like to make a treat for a graduate, how about brownie mortarboards*?

    These, from Sugar Bowl Bakery in Hayward, California, show you how to do it.

    1. MAKE mini round brownies in a baba pan or cut circles with a cookie cutter from a regular pan of brownies.

    2. FIND a rectangular cookie covered in chocolate. We used these, but you can bake your own shortbread or sugar cookies and dip them.

    3. DECORATE with a jelly bean and a piece of licorice whip. Use a dab of chocolate frosting to afix the garnish to the cookie.

     

    brownie-mortarboard-sugarbowlbakery-230

    Happy graduation! Photo courtesy Sugar Bowl Bakery.

     

    *A mortarboard is the square academic hat, or graduation cap, so named long ago because of its similarity in appearance to the plasterer’s tool used to hold mortar.

      

    Comments

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