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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Condiments

PRODUCT: Fischer & Wieser Raspberry Chipotle Sauce

fisher-wieser-raspberry-chipotle-sauce-230

Original Roasted Raspberry Chipotle Sauce
is an award winning condiment. Photo
courtesy Fischer & Wieser.

 

Perhaps we’re in a raspberry state of mind. Yesterday we recommended the delicious jam from Chad’s Raspberry Kitchen. Today it’s the Original Roasted Raspberry Chipotle Sauce from Fischer & Wieser.

The motto of the Fischer & Wieser specialty foods company is “inspiring your culinary adventure.” The company manufactures more than a hundred items, but the one that lingers in our memory is smoky Raspberry Chipotle Sauce.

A blend of raspberries and chipotle peppers, it is a smokey, sweet and spicy condiment for meat, fish or poultry. We mix it with a bit of mayo for a sandwich spread, and also enjoy it with scrambled eggs or an omelet. It is delectable!

You can’t run out of ways to use it. For example:

  • Bacon-wrapped stuffed jalapeños
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Baked beans
  • Brie en croute
  • Chicken dippers
  • Cowboy coleslaw
  • Easy appetizer with cream cheese and crackers
  • Grilled beef or pork tenderloin or roast
  • Grilled salmon
  • Kebabs
  • Ribs
  • Shrimp tacos
  • Salsa
  • Sandwiches (great with ham and cheese)
  • Spinach salad and other salad dressings
  • Steak
  • Stuffed chicken breasts
  • Tomato and feta salad
  • Turkey
  • Wings
  • Don’t forget dessert:

  • Bread Pudding
  • Brownies
  • Chocolate Cake with Chocolate-Sherry Sauce
  • Chocolate Chip Cookies
  • Melon Salad
  • Peach sorbet
  •  
    All of the recipes can be found on the company website. There’s even one for a spicy Margarita.

     

    WHERE TO FIND IT

    Raspberry Chipotle Sauce is sold online, at specialty food stores, club stores and grocery stores in the U.S., and internationally in Canada, Mexico and the U.K. We really like it as a small house gift, party favor or stocking stuffer.

    A 15.75-ounce bottle is $8.74 on Amazon.com; a 40-ounce bottle is $17.95.

    From its origins as a road-side peach stand, Fischer & Wieser now produces more than one hundred products in the same tradition as their first jar of peach preserves. Nestled in the fruitful farmland of the Texas Hill Country, Fischer & Wieser Specialty Foods, Inc. is still family owned and operated. But it’s now a bustling international company that has become the number one specialty food company in Texas.

    The company’s URL reflects its origins: Jelly.com.

    Fischer & Wieser recommends “sauce pooling,” serving a grilled, roasted or poached protein (in the photo, roasted turkey) with an assortment of sauces and other condiments. It’s our friend Andy’s favorite way of eating!

     

    turkey-sauce-plate-fisherwieser-230

    Fischer & Wieser recommends “sauce pooling,” serving a plain protein with an assortment of sauces and other condiments. Photo courtesy Fischer & Wieser.

     

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Homemade Tomato Ketchup

    Not surprisingly, cookbook author Danielle Walker makes her own condiments. Why? They deliver better flavor than mass-produced products, and in the case of tomato ketchup and barbecue sauce, a better sweetener than high fructose corn syrup, and less sweetener.

    Danielle is following up on her the Paleo Diet-focused Against All Grain (10 months on the New York Times Best Sellers list) with the upcoming Meals Made Simple (out September 2nd, but you can pre-order now).

    You can make your own ketchup in just five minutes of prep time, plus 45 minutes of cooking. How can you resist the opportunity to impress your palate, your family, your friends?

    After you’ve made your first batch, you can experiment with your favorite seasonings: chipotle, curry, garlic, horseradish, jalapeño, sriracha, whatever.

    Danielle chose honey as the sweetener in her recipe, but you can use agave (just use half the amount, since it’s twice as sweet), maple syrup, even cane sugar.

    RECIPE: HOMEMADE TOMATO KETCHUP

    Ingredients For 2 Cups

  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1/2 yellow onion, halved
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 26-ounce jar or box tomato purée
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 8 whole cloves*
  • 10 whole allspice berries*
  •    

    homemade-ketchup-daniellewalkerMealsMadeSimple-230r

    Make it yourself! Photo courtesy Danielle Walker.

     

    *If you’ve had these spices on the shelf for years, they’ve lost a lot of potency. It’s time to buy fresh versions, or “borrow” some from a friend or neighbor.

     

    lumberjack-cheddar-swiss-230

    It tastes even better with quality ketchup.
    Photo courtesy Cheese & Burger Society.

     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE the oil in a deep skillet or saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for 5 minutes, until fragrant.

    2. ADD the remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer uncovered for 40 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and reduced by half.

    3. REMOVE the onion, cloves and allspice. Bring to room temperature before storing in the refrigerator.

    Variations

    Make the ketchup without the cloves and allspice. You can divide it into half cup batches and flavor them accordingly (seasonings provided per half cup of ketchup).

  • Chipotle Ketchup: 1/2 teaspoon each ground cumin, chipotle chile powder and lime juice
  •  

  • Cranberry Ketchup: 2 tablespoons chopped fresh or frozen cranberries, 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice.
  • Curry Ketchup: 1/2 teaspoon curry powder, 1-1/2 teaspoons lime juice.
  • Garlic Ketchup: 1 clove garlic, finely chopped, 1/2 teaspoon lime juice.
  • Horseradish Ketchup: 1/2 teaspoon prepared horseradish.
  • Jalapeño Ketchup: 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped canned jalapeños, 1/2 teaspoon onion powder, 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice.
  • Sriracha Ketcup: 1 teaspoon sriracha or other hot sauce, 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice.
  •  
    Your own blend: Anything goes!

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Sun Dried Tomato Ketchup

    sundried-tomato-ketchup-traina-230

    Ketchup with richer tomato flavor, thanks to
    sun dried tomatoes. Photo courtesy Traina
    Foods.

     

    Traina Foods says that they produce “the world’s finest sun dried fruit,” which they sell to manufacturers, ingredient companies and distributors.

    But they’ve taken some of their lush California sun dried tomatoes and turned it into ketchup.

    The sun dried fruit provides a deeper, richer taste than you’ll find in regular tomato ketchup. And because this is a specialty brand (as opposed to a mass market brand), the manufacturer uses less sugar and delivers notes of pepper and vinegar. It’s better quality ketchup, and you’ll notice the difference.

    For those who want heat, there’s a sriracha version.

    Either will add more punch to your hot dogs, burgers, fries, eggs, meat loaf, cocktail sauce and anything else that requires a hit of ketchup.

    Treat yourself to some, and consider the bottles as stocking stuffers for ketchup-loving friends. Just tie a ribbon around the neck!

    The regular Traina Sun Dried Tomato Ketchup is available on Amazon.com, in single bottles or six-packs.

    We couldn’t find the sriracha version online, but here’s a store locator and an email, customerservice@traina.com.

     
    Montebello Kitchens also makes a delicious sriracha ketchup that you can buy on Amazon.

    Their curry ketchup is one of our passions!

    WHO INVENTED KETCHUP?

    The first ketchup was made in Asia, and had no tomatoes whatsoever.

    Here’s the history of ketchup and a review of 42 specialty ketchup brands.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Ponzu Sauce

    ponzu-fotoosvanrobin-flickriver-230

    Ponzu sauce. Photo © Fotoos Van Robin |
    Flickriver.

     

    Following our recent endorsement of rice vinegar as an everyday condiment is this one for ponzu sauce.

    Ponzu is a thin, dark brown citrus-based sauce commonly used in Japanese cuisine. Often mixed with soy sauce (shoyu), it is a popular all-purpose condiment and dipping sauce.

    If you’ve ordered tempura in a Japanese restaurant, it was likely served with a small dish of ponzu.

    Ponzu sauce is traditionally made with rice vinegar, mirin (rice wine), katsuobushi (bonito tuna flakes) and konbu (seaweed). Some recipes use saké, a less sweet rice wine with a higher alcohol content.

    The ingredients are simmered and strained, and then citrus is added, typically yuzu, a bitter orange, or sudachi, a mandarin. (You can use lemon if you’re making it at home.)

    USES FOR PONZU SAUCE

    Mark Bittman of The New York Times calls it the rough equivalent of vinaigrette.

    Ponzu is an attractive condiment with both Western cuisine and its native Eastern cuisine. We recently substituted it for malt vinegar with French fries, and instead of mignonette sauce with oysters on the half shell.

     
    More ways to enjoy ponzu sauce:

  • With cooked and raw fish or seafood (try it with tataki, sashimi or a raw bar; it’s great with lightly-grilled fish and as a ceviche marinade.
  • With broiled or grilled beef, pork or poultry (baste with it).
  • As a dipping sauce for anything, from dumplings and tempura to nabemono and shabu-shabu from the East, to crudités and French fries from the West.
  • In marinades.
  • In stir-frys and stews (add during the last few minutes of cooking).
  • Instead of Worcestershire sauce in recipes.
  • Mixed into a dressing (with a little olive oil) for salads or cooked vegetables.
  •  

    RECIPE: HOMEMADE PONZU SAUCE

    This recipe is adapted from Mark Bittman. It presumes you won’t have access to yuzu juice and uses commonly-available citrus. But in many cities, bottled yuzu juice (another of our favorite condiments) is readily available at specialty food stores and Asian markets.

    Ingredients For 2-1/2 Cups

  • 2/3 cup fresh lemon juice, more to taste
  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice, more to taste
  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1 cup quality soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup mirin (or 1/4 cup saké and 1 tablespoon sugar)
  • 1 3-inch piece kelp (konbu)
  • 1/2 cup (about 1/4 ounce) dried bonito flakes
  • Pinch cayenne

     
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE all ingredients in a bowl. Let sit for 2 hours or overnight to let flavors meld.

    2. STRAIN before using. Refrigerated in an airtight container, ponzu will keep for at several days.

  •  

    ponzu-bottle-yakamiorchard-230

    Yakami Orchard makes very high quality Ponzu. Nicely packaged, it makes a fine gift for a good cook. You can buy it online. Photo courtesy Yakami Orchard.

     

    PONZU VS. CHIRIZU SAUCE

    Chirizu is a spicier variation of ponzu, made with daikon, lemon juice, saké, scallions, soy sauce and shichimi togarashi, a table spice made of seven ingredients, including red pepper (togarishi) and sansho pepper pods (which provide heat).

    It can be served with stronger-flavored sashimi that hold up to the heat (mackerel instead of fluke, for example); as well as with fried fish.

    Here’s a recipe if you’d like to make your own.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Vegan Pesto From Sauces ‘n Love

    Sauces-n-Love_Vegan-Pesto-230

    Vegan, lactose free and cholesterol free
    pesto. Photo courtesy Sauces ‘n Love.

     

    Keeping a good jar of pre-made pesto at hand can make any dish extraordinary in only a matter of minutes.

    Pesto sauce, traditionally consists of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, Parmesan and Pecorino cheeses and salt for seasoning. Add a dollop to dinner and suddenly you’re a fancy cook who understands how to dazzle with delicate herbs. Pesto is vegetarian, low in carbs and packed with fresh ingredients: a bright, healthy addition to your meals.

    Pesto originated in the Italian province of Liguria, 220 miles of crescent-shaped Mediterranean coastline that is sometimes called the Italian Riviera. Liguria, the capital of which is Genoa, is home to superb produce, most notably the sweetest, mildest basil. Its people enjoy one of the freshest, healthiest cuisines in all of Italy.

    Just as pesto can be made with different nuts (hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts) and greens (arugula, spinach)—or even non-greens, like red pepper pesto—it can be made vegan instead of vegetarian. One way to do this is to substitute vegan Parmesan.

     

    But Sauces ‘n Love has creating a pesto condiment, dip and sauce that eliminates the cheese or cheese substitute. Using only extra virgin olive oil, sunflower oil, basil, pine nuts, garlic, salt and black pepper still creates a delicious pesto.

     

    Why vegan pesto? Aside from accommodating the growing number of vegans, it’s a boon for non-vegans who are lactose intolerant, those cutting back on cholesterol, and kosher consumers who want to serve pesto with meat-based meals.

    Sauces ‘n Love, a NIBBLE Top Pick of The Week is one of our favorite lines of Italian-style sauces, sold fresh in the refrigerator case. A sister line, Scarpetta, is shelf-stable and will stay fresh without refrigeration for nine months. Learn more at SaucesNLove.com.
     
    MORE ABOUT PESTO

  • Pesto Overview
  • The History Of Pesto
  • Pesto Serving Suggestions
  • Homemade Pesto Recipe and Pesto Prep Tips
  • More Favorite Pestos
  •  

    Pesto-SalmonCakes-230

    Beyond pasta: Pesto can be used to enhance most savory dishes. Photo by Guyer Wood | IST.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Giardiniera

    Giardiniera (jar-dih-NYAIR-uh) is an Italian word that means “from the garden.” Veggies from the garden (or these days, from the store) are pickled in vinegar, herbs and spices (sometimes oil is added).

    The result is a pickled condiment used like other pickles on burgers, eggs and sandwiches, from the classic muffaletta of New Orleans to the Italian beef sandwich in Chicago to an everyday ham and cheese. (See more uses below.)

    Giardiniera adds crunch, tang, spice and often, heat, to perk up anything it touches. Low in calories and high in veggie nutrition, it’s a guilt-free addition.

     
    TYPES OF GIARDINIERA

    Bell peppers, carrots, cauliflower, celery, hot chiles and pitted olives are common, but you can add whatever appeals to you, including non-traditional ingredients like mushrooms and okra.

    In Italy, giardiniera is also called “sotto aceti,” which means “under vinegar,” a common term for pickled foods. It is often made with carrots, cauliflower, celery, onions and zucchini in red or white wine vinegar.

    There are mild and hot versions, the latter employing hot chile peppers.

     

    muffaletta-bettycrocker-230

    A muffaletta sandwich with giardiniera. Here’s the recipe. Photo courtesy Pillsbury.

     

    USES FOR GIARDINIERA

  • Appetizer: Time to revive the antipasto plate and relish tray.
  • Bloody Mary: Stir some in and provide a cocktail pick to spear the veggies.
  • Condiment: Place a bowl on the table with the main course. Giardiniera is especially delicious with grilled foods and casual foods (burgers, franks, sandwiches).
  • Eggs: Fold into scrambled eggs and omelets; serve as a condiment with other egg dishes.
  • Pasta: Toss giardiniera with any cooked pasta; add to oven-bound stuffed shells or other baked pasta recipes, including lasagna.
  • Pizza: Spoon it on! If making a frozen pizza, spread giardiniera over the top before placing it in the oven so it bakes right.
  • Salads: Add giardiniera into a tossed salad, tuna or chicken salad, pasta salad or potato salad for instant punch and color.
  • Sandwiches: grilled cheese, meatball, muffaletta, submarine or any basic sandwich
  • Side: make “Italian cole slaw” by mixing with shredded red cabbage
  • Snack: Tangy and crunchy!
  •  

    italian_Mix_Giardiniera_mezzetta-230

    You can buy giardiniera in almost any food
    market. Photo courtesy Mezzetta.

     

    RECIPE: MAKE YOUR OWN GIARDINIERA

    Enjoy it at home and bring a jar full as a house gift. After you make the first batch, you’ll be able to adjust the ingredients to create your ideal “signature” blend.

    You can cut the vegetables as you like, from chunky to a more finely diced relish.

    Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup table salt
  • 1 cup small-diced carrots
  • 1 cup cauliflower florets
  • 4 to 8 serrano chiles, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced small
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced small
  • 2 cups wine vinegar (red or white)
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  •  
    *Use good vinegar, and never distilled white vinegar.

     
    Plus your choice of these optional ingredients:

  • Fennel
  • Gherkins
  • Jalapeño chiles, sliced
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Olives, green and/or black olives, pitted and halved
  • Oil: canola, olive, soybean or vegetable
  • Pimiento (roasted red bell pepper)
  • Spices: parsley, red pepper flakes
  • Pepperoncini
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE water and salt in a non-reactive bowl; mix to dissolve. Add the vegetables and garlic. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

    2. DRAIN and rinse the vegetables. In a clean bowl, mix together the vinegar with the oregano and pepper. Add the vegetables and mix to combine. Allow to marinate overnight in the fridge, or up to two days.

    3. MOVE to an airtight container. Giardiniera improves over time, and will keep in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks or longer.
     
    THE QUESTION OF OIL

    Classic giardiniera does not contain oil, but some people enjoy the extra richness it provides.

    Note that if you use oil in your marinade, it will cloud up in the fridge. But will become clear again at room temperature.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Spray-On Garlic

    It’s National Garlic Day, so our tip is: Try this wonderful spray-on garlic juice from Garlic Valley Farms.

    It brings the flavor of fresh or roasted garlic to anything from salads and pasta to veggies, fish and meats. Spritz away!

    You might be suspicious of garlic in spray form, but this product rocks.

    There are actually two varieties of garlic juice, Cold Pressed and Roasted. The flavor difference between the two is quite distinct.

  • Cold Pressed Garlic Juice tastes like fresh garlic. It’s highly fragrant and reminds us of the simple pleasure of raw garlic cloves rubbed across a hot toasted baguette.
  • Roasted Garlic Juice is a real marvel: It tastes just like roasted garlic, but you don’t have to turn on the oven! It’s wonderful on everything from steaks to popcorn.
  •  

    roasted-garlic-juice-spraywww.healthysupplies.co.uk-230sq

    Spray on the garlic! Photo courtesy HealthySupplies.co.uk.

     
    The products are all-natural and certified kosher by OU. And they’re virtually calorie-free.

    Look for them in natural food stores/health food stores, or buy it online:

  • Cold Pressed Garlic Juice
  • Roasted Garlic Juice
  •  

    Read our full review of Garlic Valley Farms, plus the health benefits of garlic.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Try Arrope

    arrope-beauty-mieldepalma.com-230

    Arrope syrup. There’s also an arrope
    preserve with pumpkin (see photo below).
    Photo courtesy Miel de Palma.

     

    Arrope (ah-ROE-pay), a cooking and condiment syrup, is a product that few of us have in our kitchens. Yet, if you’re a serious cook (or eater), it’s an ingredient you should know about.

    If your parents are serious cooks/eaters, it’s an idea for a Mother’s Day or Father’s Day gift—so much tastier than another scarf or tie.

    And if no one cooks, there’s a delicious arrope pumpkin preserve, a recipe that derives from the ancient use of arrope to preserve or stew fruits. The pumpkin is cooked in the arrope until it is candied. It’s delicious as a sweet-and-earthy bread spread or a condiment with creamy goat’s or sheep’s milk cheeses (see photo below).

    In fact, when you go to purchase arrope, you need to be specific. Otherwise, you can easily be sold the preserve instead of the syrup, or vice versa. Tip: If the word “pumpkin” appears, it’s the preserve.

    WHAT IS ARROPE

    A reduction of grape must, arrope is a condiment that dates to ancient Rome, where it was called defrutum or sapa. It survives as a gourmet Spanish condiment. The name comes from the Arabic word rubb, syrup.

     
    Arrope is closely related to saba (also called sapa, mosto d’uva cotto and vin cotto). This group comprises ancient precursors to “modern” balsamic vinegar, which appeared in the 11th century.

    So if you’re a balsamic vinegar fan, chances are good that you’ll be happy to discover arrope.

     

    Like honey* and saba, in the days before sugar was widely available arrope was used to add sweetness. Today it is used in everything from drinks to salad dressings to sauces to desserts (try it with fruit salad or drizzled over ice cream). We use it as a glaze for roast poultry and meats. It easily substitutes in cooking for sweet wines such as sherry and marsala.

    As civilization embraced massed-produced foods over artisan products in the latter half of the 20th century, the craft of making arrope—which involves carefully cooking down the must into a syrup over a period of weeks—has almost disappeared. It survives among a handful of artisan producers, carrying on family traditions. (Before modern times, arrope was made by the cook of the family.)

    In Spain, the few remaining artisans produce arrope syrup (grape must reduction) and preserved pumpkin.

    While it’s no leap to combine arrope in Spanish recipes, you can port it over to any cuisine—just as with Italy’s saba and France’s verjus.

     

    arrope-jam-forevercheese-230

    A Spanish cheese plate with typical condiments: fig cake, fresh figs, and in the back, a bowl of arrope preserve with candied pumpkin.

     
    *Honey is sweet and syrupy straight from the hive (or straight from the hive and pasteurized). Arrope and saba are cooked to develop sweet-and-sour flavors including notes of cooked caramel.
     
    HOW ARROPE IS MADE

    It starts with a large quantity of grape must, freshly pressed grape juice that still contains all of the skins and seeds and stems. The must is very flavorful with high levels of sugar.

  • The fresh-pressed grape juice can be strained and sold as verjus, where it is used instead of citrus juice or vinegar.
  • Or, it can be cooked down into arrope or saba.
  • To make arrope, the must is boiled until the volume is reduced by at least 50%, and its viscosity is reduced to a thick syrup. There is no added sugar or pectin.
  • Saba is similarly boiled down into a syrup.
  •  
    Ready to try it? Check at your local specialty food market or order it online:

  • Arrope syrup (grape must reduction)
  • Arrope with pumpkin (preserve)
  •   

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Ballymaloe Irish Ketchup

    ballymaloe-in-bowl-230

    A ketchup so rich and complex, it can be
    used as a dip. Photo courtesy Ballymaloe.

     

    In Ireland, it’s called Ballymaloe Country Relish: a tomato-based condiment served with burgers, fries, cold meats, cheese, sausage rolls, salads and sandwiches.

    Its ingredients include tomatoes (41%), tomato purée (5%), vinegar, sugar, onions, sultanas, sea salt, mustard seed and spices.

    In the U.S. it’s called…ketchup.

    But what a ketchup!

    The layering of flavors is magnificent: fruity from the tomatoes and the sultanas, pungent from the vinegar and mustard seed, oniony from the onions. It’s sweet enough for American palates used to Heinz.

    (By contrast, Heinz ketchup ingredients are tomato concentrate, vinegar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, salt, spice, onion powder, natural flavoring and Tabasco.)

     

    The texture, the rich fruity taste and the impeccable seasoning make Ballymaloe a ketchup you can eat from the spoon (if you’re so inclined).

    It’s ketchup the way it used to be, when it was a homemade condiment—before it got “blandified” by big American brands into tomato paste blended with high fructose corn syrup.

    Ballymaloe ketchup is the house recipe from the Ballymaloe Country House in Cork, Ireland. The Country House is a former private home, renovated into a hotel and restaurant (and it looks absolutely charming).

    You can buy the ketchup online at the BallymaloeUSA.com website; $5.29 per 8.5-ounce bottle.

    It is also available at select retailers, including A&P, Dean & DeLuca, Fairway, Food Emporium and King’s.

    Learn more about Ballymaloe on the company website.

     

    ballymaloe-ketchup-kalviste-230

    Bring a bottle as a house gift, or give them as stocking stuffers. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    MORE KETCHUP
    The history of ketchup, how ketchup is made and reviews of our favorite ketchup brands.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Spicy Peanut Sauce Marinade & Sauce

    If you like sesame noodles or satay with peanut sauce, here’s another delicious use for it: in a marinade.

    Marinating beef, chicken, lamb, pork or tofu in a peanut sauce-based marinade adds dimensions of flavor.

    Just create a marinade from chicken or other stock, peanut butter, soy sauce, oil, ginger, chili flakes and garlic (see the recipe below). You can also add sherry and honey.

    And certainly, serve a side of peanut sauce for dipping. See the recipe below.

    WHAT IS “SATAY SAUCE?”

    Satay is actually the grilled meat with which the spicy peanut sauce is served. The sauce is based on ground roasted peanuts; peanut butter can be substituted.

    Spicy peanut sauce is popular in the cuisines of some African countries, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. The term for the sauce in Indonesia is bumbu kacang; elsewhere it is called pecel or sambal kacang.

     

    Grilled pork skewers, marinated in peanut
    sauce marinade and served with a side
    of peanut dipping sauce (not shown). Photo courtesy National Pork Board.

     

    Peanuts were introduced to Southeast Asia in the 16th century by Portuguese and Spanish merchants. The peanuts came from Mexico, and thrived in the tropical climate.

    They soon were turned into a sauce in Indonesian cuisine and other countries followed. Indonesian peanut sauces are considered to be the most sophisticated (layered with ingredients).

     

    Grilled chicken breasts marinated in peanut
    sauce and served with more sauce on the
    side. Photo courtesy Swanson’s.

     

    RECIPE: PEANUT MARINADE

    This recipe is courtesy Swanson, maker of both conventional and low-sodium broth and stock.

    Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons soy sauce†
  • 1/3 cup plus 4 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper or pepper flakes
  • 2 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger root
  • 1/2 cup Swanson chicken broth or chicken stock†
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Garnish: chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE marinade. Stir 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 2 tablespoons peanut butter, the oil, 1/2 cup soy sauce, 1/3 cup lime juice, half the garlic and 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or chili flakes in a shallow, nonmetallic dish or a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add the chicken and turn to coat. Cover the dish or seal the bag and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight. Remove the chicken from the marinade and discard the marinade.

    2. LIGHTLY OIL the grill rack and heat the grill to medium. Grill the chicken for 15 minutes or until cooked through, turning the chicken over once halfway through the grilling time.

    3. MAKE the sauce. Stir together the remaining brown sugar, peanut butter, soy sauce, lime juice, garlic, cayenne pepper, coconut milk and ginger root in a 3-quart saucepan. Cook and stir over medium heat for 15 minutes or until the mixture is thickened. Stir in the broth and heavy cream.

    4. SPRINKLE the chicken with cilantro and serve the sauce with the chicken.

    RECIPE: SPICY PEANUT SAUCE

    Here’s an alternative recipe for spicy peanut sauce. The sauce can be made a day ahead of time, and will keep 3 to 4 days in the fridge.

    Ingredients For 1-1/4 Cups

  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth†
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce†
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 teaspoon red curry paste*
  • 1 shallot, peeled and roughly chopped
  •  
    Preparation

    1. ADD all ingredients to a blender or food processor and process until smooth.
     
    *You can use low-sodium ingredients because the other ingredients add more than enough flavor. But if you have full-sodium products on hand, feel free to use them.

    †Find red curry paste in the Asian products section of your market.

      

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