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Archive for Condiments

TIP OF THE DAY: Harissa & How To Use It

Homemade Harissa Paste
[1] Homemade harissa paste. Here’s a template to make your signature recipe, from Slow Burning Passion.

Shakshouka With Feta
[2] A classic Tunisian dish, shakshouka, punches up the tomato sauce with harissa.

Butternut Squash With Harissa
[3] Hot harissa ports easily to American cuisine, such as this baked squash with maple syrup and pomegranate arils (photo courtesy Cava).

Cheddar With Harissa

[4] How popular is harissa? In England, it’s become a flavoring for English Cheddar (photo courtesy iGourmet).

 

Like hot and spicy foods? Try harissa.

This “unofficial condiment of Tunisia” is extremely versatile. In Tunisia, Morocco and across North Africa, harissa flavors almost all of the local cuisine:

  • Couscous of rice
  • Grilled meat or fish
  • Roasted vegetables
  • Soups, stews and stocks
  •  
    It’s also served with bread. Harissa is both a flavor enhancer and a condiment used for dipping and spreading.

    While you can purchase harissa in jars, it’s easy to make at home (recipe below), where you can adjust the amount of heat with the type or the number of chiles.

    We use smoky chiles: chipotle (dried, smoked red jalapeño) and/or the mild ancho (dried, smoked poblano).

    For serious smoky heat, look for smoky bhut jolokia chiles, a.k.a. ghost chiles (the different types of chiles). Harissa is meant to be hot.

    Beyond heat, harissa delivers a depth of flavor not provided by hot sauces, including sriracha.

    Don’t like a lot of heat? Make red bell pepper sauce instead, and add a pinch of heat: chile flakes or hot sauce to taste.

    USES FOR HARISSA PASTE

    Harissa has a place in every meal, from breakfast to dinner. You can even add a bit in a fruit salad for dessert.

  • Beverages, from vegetable juices to Bloody Marys.
  • Breakfast eggs, from a condiment with simple egg preparations or steak and eggs, to a toast spread, to the sauce for shakshouska.
  • Burgers and meatloaf, mixed into the ground meat or the sauce or ketchup.
  • Cheeses, from mild, like ricotta, to tangy, like feta; as a condiment with stronger cheeses on a cheese plate.
  • Chicken wings: mix the harissa with some honey.
  • Dip with crudités.
  • Grilled fish especially hearty fish likesalmon.
  • Hummus, mixed in or used as a garnish on top of the bowl; or as a condiment on a hummus and roasted vegetable sandwich.
  • Pasta and pizza: add harissa to the sauce.
  • Roast chicken, baked ham, as a rub or condiment.
  • Roasted vegetables, especially carrots, fennel, potatoes and squash (toss with the vegetables before roasting).
  • Rubs and marinades: rub directly onto a pork roast, leg of lamb or chicken.
  • Tomato sauce and other vegetable sauces.
  • Vinaigrettes with lemon juice, and creamy salad dressings.
  • Yogurt, plus yogurt sauce for grilled meats and vegetables.
  •  
     
    RECIPE: HARISSA PASTE

    Seasonings vary widely, but caraway, coriander and cumin are cornerstones.

    Dried chiles are a key ingredient in harissa. You can use any combination you like.

    Ingredients

  • 1 whole roasted red pepper, seeds removed
  • 4 ounces dried red chiles of choice
  • 3-5 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed
  • Optional: fresh cilantro or mint, maple syrup, orange juice, roasted carrots, sundried tomatoes, tomato paste
  • Preparation

    1. REMOVE the stems and seeds from the chiles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil, remove from the heat and add the chiles. Cover the pot and let the chiles steep until soft, about 20-30 minutes. Drain (you can reserve the water to add flavor to other dishes, from boiled potatoes to poached eggs).

    2. TOAST the spices in a dry skillet on the stove top, until fragrant. Grind them in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle. Add to a blender or food processor along with the chiles and the remaining ingredients, and purée. You want a thick paste, but can add additional oil to achieve the desired consistency.

    3. STORE in a sterile jar, for six months or longer in the fridge. Cover the surface with a thin layer of olive oil to keep the color from oxidizing. Each time you use some paste, add another layer of olive oil before returning to the fridge.

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Ways To Use Mustard

    August 5th is National Mustard Day, but since this is a big holiday weekend with lots of mustard in play, we’re jumping the gun.

    We have two favorite mustard brands: Maille, the venerable mustard house of Dijon, France, which makes Dijon in dozens of flavors; and Colman’s, the fiercely hot, Chinese-style mustard (the different types of mustard).

    We love mustard—great flavor, virtually no calories—and have written it into many recipes and our 10 favorite ways to use mustard.

    Even if you don’t want mustard flavor, it can work in the background to perk up so many recipes. Our favorite uses:

  • Barbecue sauce (in South Carolina, the BBQ sauce is simply yellow mustard, vinegar, spices and sugar.
  • Burgers, chops, franks, steaks.
  • Cheese plates and charcuterie platters.
  • Condiment: mix with mayo or yogurt for creamy mustard, with honey for sweet-and-spicy mustard
  • Crudités.
  • Glaze or condiment for beef, chicken, fish, ham, lamb, pork (mustard makes a nice crust).
  • Glaze or condiment for vegetables, especially other cruciferous members (see below).
  • Marinades.
  • Pan sauce (deglaze the pan).
  • Potatoes: a dip for fries, a bit into mashed, or toss baby potatoes with Dijon and rosemary.
  • Pretzels.
  • Sandwiches, including grilled cheese.
  • Seasoning, in dips, meat loaf, salads (egg, chicken, potato, macaroni, tuna, etc.), stews, stuffings, vinaigrettes.
  •  
    As a recipe helper, just a spoonful of mustard helps to:

  • Add tang.
  • Emulsify vinaigrettes.
  • Make breading adhere (brush with mustard before dipping in crumbs.
  • Thicken casseroles and stews.
  •  
    And when we’re stuck for a sauce: Dijon mustard, plain Greek yogurt and some seasonings.
     
    MUSTARD RECIPES

    You can find lots of recipes on Maille.com.

    Although we haven’t tried it, there’s a recipe for carrot cake and a mango cocktail, both of which use Dijon mustard.

    For some real heat, look at this collection of recipes from Colman’s. Add some heat to mac and cheese, soup, even gingerbread.
     
     
    THE CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES FAMILY

    Your healthcare providers want you to eat more cruciferous veggies.

    Cruciferous vegetables—also known as brassicas—are superfoods that comprise the Brassicaceae family of vegetables. These nutritional powerhouses are also packed with cancer-fighting* phytonutrients, powerful antioxidants.

    The family includes

  • Arugula
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Collard greens
  • Horseradish
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Mizuna
  • Mustard greens
  • Radish
  • Rapeseed/canola
  • Rapini (broccoli rabe)
  • Rutabaga
  • Tatsoi
  • Turnips
  • Watercress
  •    

    Steak and Mustard
    [1] Mustard is a spicy-savory condiment, that can be softened with honey, mayonnaise, yogurt (photo courtesy Maille).

    Gravlax With Mustard Sauce
    [2] Use mustard to make a crust on salmon or other proteins. Mix it with yogurt and herbs for a mustard sauce (photo courtesy Kitchen Galanter).

    Mustard WIth Pretzel
    [3] A match made in heaven: soft pretzels and spicy mustard (photo courtesy Ringhand’s Mustard).

    Chicken Nuggets With Mustard
    [4] Anything fried can be paired with mustard or mustard sauce (photo courtesy Betty Crocker).

    Fries With Mustard

    [5] Want fries with that? Mustards and other sauces at Le District | NYC.

     

    Cruciferous Vegetables

    [6] Cruciferous cousins, clockwise from top: turnip greens, cauliflower, tatsoi, Brussels sprouts, red cabbage, broccoli (photo courtesy PinsDaddy).

     

    Eat up: Cruciferous vegetables are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins and minerals. Consume them raw or lightly steamed to get the maximum amount of antioxidants.

    Just don’t overcook them! You can eat overcooked carrots or potatoes, but overcooked broccoli and Brussels sprouts are not so pleasant.

    “Cruciferous” derives from cruciferae, New Latin for “cross-bearing.” It is so named because the flowers of these vegetables consist of four petals in the shape of a cross.

    Here’s a book you may enjoy: Brassicas: Cooking the World’s Healthiest Vegetables: Kale, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts and More.
     
    _____________
    *Studies have shown the ability of cruciferous vegetables to stop the growth of cancer cells in the breast, cervix, colon, uterus, liver, lung and prostate.

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Easy Tomato Chutney

    Heirloom Tomatoes
    [1] Turn summer tomatoes, ripe off the vine, into…

    Tomato Chutney
    [2] Tomato chutney! (Photo 1 courtesy Okonomi | Brooklyn, photo #2 courtesy Jamie Oliver).

    Tomato Chutney

    [3] This authentic Indian version has chili powder, garlic, garam masala and ginger. Here’s the recipe from Smart Cooky.

     

    August is the best “tomato month” of the year. Aside from eating them raw with just about anything, what else to do with the crop of summer tomatoes?

    Among your many options, make some tomato chutney. It’s a delicious summery treat to:

  • Spread on breakfast toast, or as a condiment with eggs.
  • As a condiment on burgers, grilled cheese and other sandwiches.
  • Instead of ketchup, anywhere.
  • On grains, potatoes and vegetables.
  • With a cheese plate.
  •  
    It’s also a welcome house gift, and keeps for up to 4 weeks in the fridge.

    In the following recipe, one pound of tomatoes doesn’t make a whole lot of chutney. Do a test batch—it’s an easy recipe—to decide how much you want to make.

    Since the chutney cooks up into a jam-like consistency, you can also use very ripe tomatoes that are often better priced. You can use one variety, or a combination of assorted tomatoes (including different colors).
     
     
    RECIPE: EASY TOMATO CHUTNEY

    Ingredients Per Pound Of Tomatoes

  • 8 ounces red onions
  • 1 pound local tomatoes
  • 1 fresh red jalapeño (1-2 tablespoons) or equivalent milder* chile
  • 5 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro‡
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PEEL and finely slice the onions; roughly chop the tomatoes; and de-seed and finely slice the chile.

    2. PLACE all ingredients in a pot, season to taste and stir well to combine. Simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or until jammy.

    3. POUR into a clean† jar and let cool.

    ________________

    *If you want no heat at all, use red bell pepper.

    †Since this is not a recipe for canning, the jar doesn’t have to be sterilized. However, to ensure cleanliness, use one that has been run through the dishwasher.

    ‡You can play with accents such as basil, garlic, lemon or lime zest and other favorite flavors.
    ________________

    WHAT IS CHUTNEY?

    Chutney is a spiced condiment, served as a side dish, that originated in India. Chatni is the Hindi word for strongly spiced. It is made of fruits or vegetables; and is typically served as an accompaniment to food (i.e., not as a spread).

     
    Fruit chutney consists of chopped fruit (tomato is a fruit), vinegar, spices and sugar cooked into a chunky sweet-tart-spicy mix. According to one explanation, it “blurs the Western distinction between preserves and pickles” [source].

    Some of the most common Indian chutneys are made with coconut, mango, peanut, sesame or the ground herbs, such as coriander or mint. The spice level of chutney can range from mild to hot, and the consistency from a fine relish to a preserve or conserve.
     
    A QUICK HISTORY OF CHUTNEY

    Historically, chutneys were only served by everyday folk on special occasions such as weddings. It was more of a staple for the wealthy. That’s because in the era before stoves, it was a time-consuming undertaking: The chutney was slowly cooked under the hot Indian sun over a period of several days, until it was deemed to have attained the right flavor and consistency.

    This method is still employed in modern India, in homes which do not have stoves. “Solar cooking” is even specified in recipes for those who do have them.

    Each region has its own recipes, using local ingredients.

    Simple spiced chutneys, similar in preparation to pickles, have been dated to 500 B.C.E. This method of preserving food was subsequently adopted by the Romans.

    Beginning in the late 17th century, fruit chutneys from India were shipped to European countries like England and France as luxury goods. These were largely mango chutneys in sticky syrups, packed into ceramic pots.

    European cooks made their own [affordable] versions, substituting peaches or melons for pricey imported mangoes.

    By the 18th century, chutneys made in England were exported to to colonies in colonies Australia and North America.

    By the 19th century, many chutneys were manufactured in India specifically for export to Europe—including Major Grey’s, perhaps the best-known brand in the U.S.

    The recipes of these exports conformed to British tastes rather than to Indian authenticity; that is to say, they were generally sweet and lacked the intense flavors, saltiness, or peppery heat preferred in India).

    Today, thanks to the growth of Americans of Indian ancestry, a wide variety of chutney is available in the U.S. Do try the savory varieties, such as cilantro and mint. They’re delicious—and sugar-free.

    Here’s more of the history of chutney.

     
      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Truffled Scrambled Eggs

    Truffled Scrambled Eggs

    Truffled Scrambled Eggs

    [1] If you have to ask, you can’t afford it: a bounty of white truffle shaved onto scrambled eggs (photo George Guarino | Eataly Chicago. [2] The affordable version (photo courtesy Saveur, along with their recipe to make perfect scrambled eggs).

     

    For the wealthy gourmet, there are truffled scrambled eggs that consist of the richest, butteriest, farm-fresh eggs scrambled and topped with pricey truffle shavings.

    You can pay a supplement of $100, $200 or more, depending on the amount of truffle. After all, for the 2016-2017 winter truffle harvest, white Alba truffles from Italy, considered the zenith of truffles, cost a small fortune:

  • The smallest size were $229.50/ounce, $3,672.00/pound.
  • Large truffles were $2,880 per ounce, $11,520 per pound.
  • Extra-large and colossal were even more!
  •  
    Black Périgord truffles, our personal favorite from France, are a bargain by comparison:

  • Small Périgord truffles were $100/ounce, $1600 per pound, and up.
  • Large Périgord truffles were $805/ounce, $3220 per pound, and up.
  •  
    If you’re drooling at the prospect but lacking in cash, you can feel better because fresh truffles won’t be back until November.

    TRUFFLES FOR REGULAR FOLKS

    We’ve gotten around our challenged purse for years with the following work-arounds. Delicious scrambled eggs can be made with:

  • Truffle butter. You can buy it for less than $12 for a three-ounce tub. It provides the aroma of fresh truffles, and some of the their flavor.
  • Truffle oil. If you don’t want to cook your eggs in butter (but in our opinion, there’s no substitute for butter with scrambled eggs), Urbani white truffle oil is about $30 for 8.4 ounces. Black truffle oil, by comparison, is $18.75 for the same size.
  • Truffle salt. Replace your regular salt with truffle salt. It isn’t a huge impact, but every little bit helps if you’re using the butter or oil. We use Casina Rossa’s Italian Truffled Sea Salt from Italy. It’s $36.75 for 3.4 ounces. That’s a lot, but since you use a pinch at a time, it lasts a long time. You can split the jar with a fellow cook.
  •  
    All prices are from Gourmet Food Store.

    And of course, each of these products has uses beyond scrambled eggs.
     
     
    GOT TRUFFLES?

    If you’ve been saving a jar or can of truffle shavings, it’s time to put them to good use.Another variation of truffled scrambled eggs follows, courtesy of Maille mustard.

    Ideally, you need to infuse the eggs the day before.

     

    RECIPE: TRUFFLED SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH MUSTARD

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 6 jumbo organic eggs
  • 2.5 teaspoons Maille Mustard with Chablis white wine and black truffles
  • 2 teaspoons black truffle shavings
  • 1/2 cup sweet almond oil
  • 2 teaspoons silvered almonds
  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • 3.5 tablespoon cream
  • Pinch salt
  • ¼ teaspoon espelette chile powder*
  • Bread of choice (we like brioche)
  • ________________

    *Espelette, a.k.a. piment d’Espelette, is from the Basque area of France and Spain. Substitute Aleppo pepper if you can find it: It has the smoky sweetness that epelette brings to the table. Otherwise use cayenne, but the heat and flavor profiles are quite different. Cayenne is much hotter (30,000 to 50,000 SHU) so use less. It is much more neutral in taste, without the smokiness.

    Preparation

    1. BREAK the eggs into a large bowl at least 1 hour in advance, or overnight. Add the truffle shavings and mix gently. Place in the fridge in a tightly sealed container to infuse. The next day…

    2. BEAT the eggs, seasoning them with a pinch of salt and the espelette, add the sweet almond oil and the mustard.

    3. ROAST the almonds in an anti-adhesive frying pan until golden, then chop them. Melt the butter in a casserole dish. Add the eggs and cook slowly with a wooden spatula or spoon, so that the eggs do not stick to the pan. When the eggs are scrambled…

    4. STOP the cooking with the liquid cream and add the slivered almonds.

    5. SLICE the bread into fingers and toast in a non-stick pan with a drizzle of almond oil. Coat slightly with some mustard and sprinkle with black truffle shavings. (Note: We simply made toast, understanding that a short cut means shorter flavor.)

    6. ASSEMBLE in the dishes of choice, with the toasted bread fingers.
     
     
    MORE TRUFFLES

    What Are Truffles

    Types Of Truffles

    D’Artagnan Truffle Butter

     

    Truffled Scrambled Eggs

    Maille Truffle Mustard

    Espelette Pepper

    [3] The dyed black eggshell is dramatic, but we’re happy serving our truffled eggs on a plate, in a ramekin, or for fun, in a champagne coupe (photo courtesy Maille). [4] Maille Chablis Mustard With Truffle (photo courtesy Not Quite Nigella). [5] Espelette pepper from a chile grown in the Basque region (photo courtesy Pepperscale).

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Mostarda, A Sweet-Hot Italian Condiment

    Mostarda di Cremona

    Mostarda di Cremona

    Mostarda

    Mostarda Bolognese

    Mostarda di Mantova

    [1] The classic: mostarda di cremona. Here’s a recipe to make your own from The Spruce). [2] A cremona close-up (photo courtesy Cucina Corriere. [3] Mostarda vicentina has a jam-like consistency, losing the physical beauty of other mostardas (photo courtesy Buonissimo). [4] Mostarda di mantova, made from apples, pears and quince (photo courtesy Murray’s Cheese).

     

    Years ago, on a trip to Italy, we first came across mostarda di frutta, mostarda for short.

    A sweet-and-hot, fruit-and-mustard condiment from the north of Italy, it’s our go-to condiment with Italian cheeses, and some other nationalities on the cheese board. We offer more uses below.

    Think of mostarda as a mustardy fruit chutney—although mostarda uses mostly candied fruits. (The Italian word for mustard in the English-language issenape).

    Candied whole small fruits or larger pieces of fruit are beautifully suspended in a clear syrup flavored with mustard oil. It’s clear and doesn’t cloud the syrup. Home recipes often use mustard powder mixed into white wine.

    Some mostarda is lovely to look at, like part of a still life painting. It is cooked slowly (often over three days) to maintain the natural bright colors of the fruit, and the perfect texture.

    Buy jars as gifts for your foodie friends.

     
    The origin of the word comes from a Latin term of the Middle Ages, mustum ardens, “grape juice [must] that burns,” a term first used in the Middle Ages by French monks, for the mustard they made (the history of mustard).

    It burns because of the addition of crushed mustard seeds. Once crushed, the seeds release the fiery mustard oil that gives the mustard condiment its flavor.

    THE HISTORY OF MOSTARDA

    From the Middle Ages forward, man has sought ways to enjoy the fruits that are scarce in winter, at least through the celebrations of Christmas.

    Mostarda is a food born from the need to preserve fruits for the off-season. Originally, the fruits were preserved in mosto (grape must*), unfermented grape juice that has been reduced to a syrup.

    Mostarda’s origins date back to the honey and mustard condiments of ancient Rome. Grape must (freshly pressed grape juice) was mixed with ground mustard seeds and honey to create a sweet mustard. Later, fruit was added.

    Recipes for “modern” mostarda, dating from the 13th century, call for the use of grape must. The first written document “Fruit Mostarda for festive season” dates to 1393 and is attributed to Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan [source].

  • Grape must, called must for short, is the young, unfermented juice of wine grapes. Among other uses (in saba and vin cotto, for starters), it is mixed with ground mustard seeds to make mustard.
  • Subsequently, the condiment mostarda was made by candying the fruits and adding mustard oil to create sweet heat. Both the sugar to candy the fruits and the mustard oil were preservatives.
  • And by the way, mostarda became a Christmas tradition, traditionally eaten with creamy, slightly sweet mascarpone cheese.
  •  
    Beginning in the 16th century, newly-affordable sugar replaced the must to candy the fruits, then mustard was added [source]. The oldest known recipe prepared with fruit, mustard and sugar, without the grape must, was found in 17th century Belgium.

    From that point on, cookbooks began to include mostarda as a main ingredient. By the 19th century there were some 93 different varieties.

    The sweet heat went really well with boiled meats. Initially, mostarda was the served with bollito misto, a plate of mixed boiled meats that’s a specialty of northern Italian cuisine (there’s more below about uses for mostarda).

    TYPES OF MOSTARDA

    According to legend, mostarda was invented by chance in medieval times. In an apothecary shop, a piece of melon fell unnoticed into a barrel filled with honey.

    When it was later discovered, the melon was still as delicious as if it had been freshly picked (honey, which is virtually moisture-free, is an excellent preservative) [source].

    Mostarda itself takes on different ingredients in different regions, incorporating local fruits—whatever is plentiful in the region. Raisins, nuts and other ingredients can be added.

    As one source notes, almost every town in the Po valley has its own recipe.

    There are many, many mostarda recipes, from grape and fig (uva e ficchi) to vegetable mustards (also candied) modern recipes with non-Italian ingredients, from cardamom pods to pineapple and pumpkin.

    Here are some of the most famous, named for the areas where they originated.

  • Mostarda bolognese is made from apples, oranges, pears, plums and quince. In the area of Bologna, it is used to flavor the classic dish of boiled pork and cooked sausages, as well as to fill tarts and in other sweets.
  • Mostarda di carpi, from a town in the Emilia-Romagna region. It still uses red grape must in its recipe, along with oranges, pears, quince and sweet apples,
  • Mostarda di cremona also called mostarda cremonese, is the classic recipe, made with several different kinds of fruits (the makers choice among apricots, cherries, figs, peaches, pears, quinces and tangerines). It is the most commercially available style.
  • Mostarda di mantova, also called mostarda mantovana and mostarda di mele campanine, is made from tart= green apples called mele campanine (singular mela campanina) and pears or quince.
  •  

  • Mostarda veneziana, from the Venice region, is made with fresh quince pulp (a minimum of 36% pure pulp), and candied fruits (apricots, clementines, figs, white pears, yellow cherries). It is intentionally grainy/sugary.
  • Mostarda vicentina, from the town of Vicenza in the Veneto region, is characterized by a jam-like consistency and the use of quince (mele cotogne) as its main ingredient. During the Christmas holidays, it is eaten with spoonfuls with mascarpone.
  • Mostarda di voghera, in the Lombardy region of Italy, has documentation from 1397, when Duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti requested “mostarda de fructa cum la senavra.” The recipe can include apples, apricots, candied orange peel, cherries, clementines, figs, lemon, melon and pears.
  • Mostarda siciliana is made with orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, clove and often, toasted chopped almonds.
  • Dalmatian mostarda, made in Croatia across the Adriatic Sea from Venice, is a simpler recipe, made with quinces and honey.
  •  

    WAYS TO USE MOSTARDA

    Any discussion starts with bollito misto a fundamental part of Northern Italian cuisine. It’s a one-pot meal, Italian comfort food.

    The boiled meats vary by region, and a very elaborate presentation can include seven kinds of meat and fowl, seven vegetables and seven condiments.

    The meats can include beef brisket, beef cheeks, calf’s tongue, chicken or capon (or turkey), cotechino sausage, pork shank, sweet Italian sausage, veal shank—slowly boiled in a large pot with carrots, celery, onions and potatoes.

    The cooked cooked meats are sliced, placed on a platter and served with mostarda—or, for those seeking a different flavor profile, with a green herb sauce (salsa verde). The savory broth that remains in the pot can then be turned into soup.

    Why not plan a dinner party, with a multi-mostarda tasting?

    Over time, mostarda became a broad-purpose condiment.

    The heat of mostarda varies by producer. In general, however, it needs a hearty food that can show off both the sweet and the heat.

    Serve mostarda with:

  • Eggs: omelets, sliced egg sandwich on crusty toast.
  • Cheeses: as a condiment on a cheese board, or drizzled over individually plated slices or scoops of mascarpone or ricotta. In Italy, gorgonzola and stracchino are popular.
  • Meats: any boiled, braised, broiled, roasted or smoked, from chicken and turkey to ham, pork loin and beef brisket and sausages.
  • Up-condimenting: added to a dip base or mayonnaise for a more complex flavor.
  • Salume and other charcuterie).
  • Sandwiches: grilled vegetables, Italian cold cuts, porchetta, roast beef, strong cheeses.
  •  
    You can find many mostarda recipes online, and can purchase it in specialty food stores and Italian markets. You can also buy it online.

    Don’t be put off by the high price for a small jar. If you look at the ingredients in the recipe, you’ll see it as a bargain.

    Let us know how you like it.

    Discover the world of mustard in our Mustard Glossary.

    PHOTO CAPTIONS

    [5] Bollito misto, a dish often served with mustard (photo courtesy Cucina Italiana).

    [6] Add a ramekin of mostarda to a cheese and/or charcuterie board (photo courtesy Good Eggs).

    [7] A delicious appetizer or snack: bruschetta with prosciutto, burrata and pear mostarda (photo courtesy Davio’s Boston).

     

    Bollito Misto

    Cheese Board

    Prosciutto Burrata Bruschetta

     

      

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