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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Cocktails & Spirits

TIP OF THE DAY: Gazpacho & Beer

This gazpacho has a surprise ingredient:
beer! Photo courtesy Frontera Foods.

 

Here’s a fun idea that can be a soup course, a main course or pass-around party fare, served in small glasses.

This idea was developed at Frontera Foods, a Chicago-based Mexican foods company headed by Chef Rick Bayless, in partnership with Bohemia Beer. You can serve “beer gazpacho” or turn it into a Martini.

The tip isn’t just to add beer to gazpacho, but that you can season gazpacho with the addition of prepared salsa.

The soup can be made ahead and even tastes better when allowed to sit overnight. The recipe makes about 3 quarts.

To serve gazpacho as a light main course, consider adding:

  • A large salad
  • Crostini, perhaps with olive tapenade
  • Tapas
  • Platters of Spanish sausages, Serrano ham, tortilla Española (Spanish omelet, served at room temperature), Spanish cheeses (look for Cabrales, Idiazabal, Mahon, Manchego and Murcia al Vino), and rustic bread
  • Instead of wine, chilled dry sherry
  •  

    RECIPE: FRONTERA’S SALSA GAZPACHO

    Ingredients For 6-8 Main Course Servings

  • 5 pounds ripe red tomatoes (16 to 20 medium-sized plum or 12 medium-small round)
  • 2 seedless cucumbers, peeled
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 bottle (16 ounces) Frontera Habanero Salsa or substitute
  • 1/2 cup Bohemia beer (or substitute)
  • 2 cups torn (½-inch inch pieces) white bread
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • Salt to taste, about 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons
  • 1½ cups home-style croutons
  •  

    Preparation

    1. CHOP enough of the tomatoes into a ¼-inch dice to a generous 1½ cups. Chop enough of the cucumber into ¼-inch dice to yield a generous 1 cup. Stir in the cilantro. Cover and refrigerate for garnish.

    2. ROUGHLY CHOP the remaining tomatoes and cucumber. Mix with the salsa, beer, bread, olive oil and vinegar. In a blender, purée the mixture in 2 batches until smooth.

    3. TRANSFER to a large bowl. Stir in just enough water to give the soup the consistency of a light cream soup, about ½ to 1 cup. Taste and season with salt. Chill thoroughly.

    4. SERVE: Set out the tomato-cucumber garnish mixture and croutons. Ladle the soup into chilled soup bowls. Pass the garnishes.

     

    spanish-cheeses-artisanal-230

    Serve a green salad and plate of Spanish cheeses after the gazpacho. Photo courtesy Artisanal Cheese.

     

      

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    FOOD HOLIDAY: Creamsicle Cocktail For National Creamsicle Day

    orange-cream-pop-dream-svedka-230

    A Creamsicle cocktail! Photo courtesy
    Svedka Vodka.

     

    August 14th is National Creamsicle Day, a classic ice cream novelty on a stick that combines orange sherbet and vanilla ice cream.

    You can buy a Creamsicle, have a scoop of orange sherbet and vanilla ice cream in a dish, or enjoy this cocktail version from Svedka Vodka. It uses Svedka’s Orange cream Pop vodka, a “nostalgia flavor” and one of the company’s 11 flavored vodkas.

    RECIPE: CREAMSICLE COCKTAIL

    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • 1 part Svedka Orange Cream Pop vodka
  • 1 part orange juice
  • 1 scoop vanilla ice cream
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE all ingredients in a blender, adding 1/2 cup of crushed ice last. Blend until smooth and pour into a hurricane glass.

    2. GARNISH with an orange wedge and a scoop of ice cream.

     
    CREAMSICLE HISTORY

    In 1923, Frank Epperson, a 29-year-old husband and father working in the real estate industry, made what he called Epsicles for a fireman’s ball.

    They were a sensation, and Frank obtained a patent for “a handled, frozen confection or ice lollipop.” His kids called the treat a Popsicle, after their Pop. So Frank created Popsicle Corporation and collaborated with the Loew Movie Company for the nationwide marketing and sales of the product in movie theaters.

    By 1928, Epperson had earned royalties on more than 60 million Popsicles. But his happy days ended with the Great Depression. In 1929, flat broke, Frank had to liquidate his assets and sold the patent to, and his rights in, Popsicle Corporation.

    Over the years, the Popsicle Corporation created other frozen treats on a stick: the Fudgsicle (a chocolate-flavored pop with a texture somewhat similar to ice cream), the Creamsicle (vanilla ice cream and orange sherbet) and the Dreamsicle (a Creamsicle filled with ice milk instead of ice cream).

    Today, Creamsicle is the trademarked property of the Good Humor Company, owned by Unilever.

    Here’s more on the history of the Creamsicle, and a recipe for Creamsicle Cake.

     
      

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    PRODUCT: Grey Goose Le Melon Vodka

    GREY GOOSE GREY GOOSE LE MELON

    The new infused vodka from Grey Goose: Le
    Melon. Photo courtesy Grey Goose.

     

    News for melon lovers or the many fans of Grey Goose Le Poire vodka: It now has a fruity little sister, Le Melon.

    Grey Goose Le Melon showcases the Cavaillon melon from the South of France, a variety of cantaloupe with pale, greenish skin and distinctive green vertical markings.

    Cavaillon is a commune in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region in southeastern France. For centuries, the rich soil and concentrated sunshine have produced melons with high sugar content, that are celebrated for their signature flavor of wildflower honey.

    The melons are picked in July and August (see more about the variety below). The flavor is concentrated and extracted through maceration of the flesh in Grey Goose vodka. Learn more at GreyGoose.com.

    For the purest expression of the vodka flavor, just add ice!

    RECIPE: MELON ON THE ROCKS

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1½ parts Le Melon
  • Ice
  • Garnish: cantaloupe slice or cubes on a pick
  • Preparation

    1. FILL a shaker with ice and add Le Melon. Shake well and strain into a rocks glass filled with ice.

    2. GARNISH with fresh melon.
     
    TIP: Use this preparation for all rocks drinks. To really chill the spirit, don’t just pour it into an ice-filled glass. First shake it with ice; then strain it into a rocks glass over more ice.

     

    Prefer something fizzy? Simply add 1/2 ounce (half a shot glass) of Le Melon to a glass and top with sparkling wine. Or, try this cocktail:

    RECIPE: MELON ROYALE

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1½ parts Le Melon
  • 3 parts lemon-lime soda (e.g. 7 Up)
  • Ice cubes
  • Garnish: cucumber slice
  •  
    Preparation

    1. FILL a rocks glass with ice. Add Le Melon

    2. TOP with lemon-lime soda. Garnish and serve.
     
    RECIPE: MELON MULE

    This twist on the classic Moscow Mule replaces plain vodka with Le Melon.

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1½ parts Le Melon
  • 3 parts ginger beer
  • 3 lime wedges plus 1 for garnish
  • Ice cubes, crushed ice
  •  

    melon-le-fizz-230

    Le Melon is delicious with sparkling wine. Photo courtesy Grey Goose.

     

    Preparation

    1. FILL a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and add Le Melon and the juice from three lime wedges.

    2. SHAKE will and strain into a copper mug filled with crushed ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with a lime wedge.
     

    MORE ABOUT THE CAVAILLON MELON

    The Cavaillon melon was first cultivated in France in the 14th century, from seeds brought from Cantalupo, Italy to Provence. The melon is now grown in North America and elsewhere.

    Ripe Cavaillon melons have a lime green skin with pale green vertical striping, a bright orange flesh and a floral-sweet aroma. It also has a lovely fragrance, even before it is cut.

    Serve it with prosciutto, or turn it into:

  • Cantaloupe and yogurt soup with ginger, lime and mint.
  • An appetizer or dessert skewers of Cavaillon melon, slices of prosciutto and bocconcini mozzarella balls on a skewer, then top with pesto or a basil oil.
  •   

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    FOOD FUN: Prosecco & Alcohol-Infused Ice Pops

    prosecco-ice-pops-conradhotel-230

    New, fun, delicious: Prosecco and boozy ice
    pops. Photo courtesy Conrad Hotel | NYC.

     

    Too bad “Sex And The City” is off the air. The girls could have spent an afternoon or evening at an elegant rooftop bar in Battery Park City at the foot of Manhattan, enjoying the stunning views of Lady Liberty and the Hudson River…

    …and enjoying glasses of Prosecco, the Italian sparkler, garnished with boozy ice pops.

    The Conrad Hotel in New York City, part of the Hilton empire, offers a tempting lineup of boozy pops at Loopy Doopy, its rooftop bar. (It looks neither loopy nor doopy, but Hamptons-inspired).

    The ice pops are made from fruit purée and spirits, and served in a goblet of Prosecco. Ice pop flavors include:

  • Appletini with gin, vermouth, lemon juice
  • Blueberry Plum with Irish Whiskey
  • Raspberry Apricot with Grand Marnier
  • Spiced Peach with añejo rum
  • Strawberry Margarita with lime juice & tequila
  •  

     

    Loopy Doopy partnered with People’s Pops, a local artisan ice pop maker, which makes the boozy ice pops exclusively for them.

    And there’s more fun: Throughout the 2014 summer season, those enjoying Prosecco & Ice Pop cocktails will discover various prizes revealed on their ice pop sticks. Prizes range from something as small as an appetizer, or to a complimentary weekend stay for two in the hotel’s 1,500-square-foot Conrad Suite.

    Waiter, we’ll have another, please!

    You can make your own alcohol-infused ice pops. Alcohol doesn’t freeze well, so add just a teaspoonful into each individual pop mold.

    ABOUT PROSECCO

    Hailing from northeast Italy’s Veneto region, Prosecco is the name of the village where the where the Prosecco grape—now known as the Glera grape—originated. Other local white grape varieties, such as Bianchetta Trevigiana, can be included in the blend.

    The wine can be frizzante—just slightly fizzy, sometimes bottled with a regular cork to be opened with a corkscrew—or spumante—very fizzy, bottled with the mushroom-style cork and cage or something similar.

    The wine is often labeled Prosecco di Conegliano Valdobbiadene, after its appellation.

     

    mionetto-bottle-2-230

    Prosecco in its traditional bottle shape. Photo courtesy Mionetto Prosecco.

     

    Prosecco is affordable, light-bodied for hot summer days, and something you should be sipping now.

      

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    RECIPE: Spiked Iced Coffee & Iced Espresso

    russian-iced-coffee-delonghi-230

    Iced Russian Coffee. Photo courtesy
    DeLonghi.

     

    Iced coffee with a shot of vodka: Now there’s an idea for chillaxing on a summer day. You can have an old school Black Russian or a White Russian (recipes).

    Or, you can add vodka, tequila or rum to iced coffee.

    De’Longhi, maker of premium espresso machines, sent us recipes for these two iced espresso drinks.

    If you don’t normally sweeten your coffee, leave out the sugar. Adjust the proportions based on the size of the glass you are using.

    RECIPE: RUSSIAN ICED COFFEE

    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • Chilled or room temperature espresso
  • Sugar to taste
  • 1 shot of vodka
  • Light cream or half and half to taste
  • Crushed ice
  • Optional garnish: whipped cream
  • Preparation

    1. BREW the espresso coffee. Let cool. Add the sugar and the vodka.

    2. POUR into a glass and top with cream. Add crushed ice, stir and serve.

     

    COLD COFFEE CREAM

    This recipe requires some pre-freezing, but the result is thick and rich.

    Ingredients For 2 Drinks

  • 10 ounces/300 ml light cream or half and half
  • 8 ounces/250 ml espresso
  • Vanilla extract
  • Splash of rum
  • Optional garnish: cocoa mix
  •  

    Preparation

    1. POUR the cream into a container and freeze; mix together the coffee and rum and freeze in a separate container.

    2. CUT the frozen cream cut into cubes and place in the blender with the vanilla extract. Pulse.

    3. ADD the frozen coffee cut into cubes and blend for a few seconds, until combined.

    4. POUR into glasses and garnish with cocoa.

     

    thai-iced-coffee-nescafe-230

    You can also add a splash of rum to Thai Iced Coffee (recipe). Photo courtesy Nescafe.

     
    Sit back, sip and relax.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Parmesan Zucchini Crisps

    When we look at zucchini prices in the winter months, we think ahead to the summer months and all the zucchini dishes we’re going to make.

    This weekend, we’re serve these zucchini crisps with Prosecco, although they go with any wine, beer or cocktail and make a fine side dish or snack-in-front-of-the-TV.

    They’re baked, not fried; and combine the best aspects of cheese and salty snacks in the form of a serving of green vegetables. Yes, it’s another way to trick the veg-resistant into eating more veggies!

    The zucchini crisps (chips) are also easy to make. Thanks to XBar at the Hyatt Regency, Los Angeles, for the recipe.

    The better the Parmesan cheese you use, the tastier the crisps. If you’re a fan of panko, Japanese bread crumbs, you can use them to amp up the dish.

    RECIPE: PARMESAN ZUCCHINI CRISPS

    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • Cooking spray
  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup plain dry bread crumbs
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  •  

    zucchini-parmesan-crisps-xbarhyattregencyLA-230

    This salty snack includes a serving of vegetables! Photo courtesy Hyatt Regency | LA.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 450°F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

    2. SLICE zucchini into 1/4-inch thick rounds. Toss the zucchini with olive oil in a medium bowl.

    3. COMBINE the cheese, bread crumbs, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Dip the zucchini rounds into the cheese mixture, coating each side. Place the rounds in a single layer on the baking sheet.

    4. BAKE the rounds until browned, about 25 to 30 minutes. Enjoy them warm or at room temperature.

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: National Tequila Day

    No Margaritas today: Celebrate July 24th, National Tequila Day, with a different tequila cocktail.

    Perhaps you’d prefer some tequila ice pops, too.

    Here’s a cocktail suggestion from Tequila Avión, incorporating ripe summer papaya.

    RECIPE: PAPAYA SMASH

    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • 1¼ ounces añejo tequila
  • Slice of fresh papaya
  • ¼ ounce agave nectar
  • ½ ounce Aperol or Campari (see note below)
  • ½ ounce orange juice
  • ¾ ounce fresh lime juice
  • Fresh papaya slice for garnish
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE a slice of fresh papaya and agave nectar in a mixing glass. Add the tequila Aperol and orange juice. Top off with fresh lime juice. Add ice and give it a good shake.

    2. STRAIN into an ice-filled glass and garnish with a fresh slice of papaya.

       

    papaya-smash-avion-tequila-230

    Papaya and tequila: an inspired combination. Photo courtesy Tequila Avión.

     

     

    avion-anejo-bottle-230

    Anejo tequila is aged for two years, adding
    complex flavors. Photo courtesy Tequila
    Avión.

     

    TEQUILA & COKE

    Those who enjoy a rum and Coke can celebrate with the tequila version. Coffee lovers can buy Avion’s Espresso Tequila and make this cocktail, “The Rally,” with 1 part Avión Espresso Tequila and 2 parts cola.

    Find more recipes at TequilaAvion.com.
     

    APEROL VS. CAMPARI

    Like the better-known Campari, Aperol is an Italian apéritif, a dry alcoholic beverage usually served before a meal to stimulate the appetite. Other apéritif examples include champagne, gin, pastis, dry sherry (fino or amontillado), vermouth, and any still, dry, light white wine.

    Aperol is milder, less bitter and much lighter in color. Its ingredients include, among others, bitter orange, gentian, rhubarb, and cinchona. Although it tastes and smells much like Campari, Aperol has an alcohol content that is less than half of Campari (Aperol is 11% A.B.V.), with the same sugar content.

    The opposite of an apéritif, a digestif is an alcoholic beverage served after a meal, in theory to aid digestion. Examples include brandy, eaux de vie (fruit brandies), grappa (pomace brandy), liqueurs, and fortified wines such as cream sherry, sweet vermouth, Port, and Madeira.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Cucumber Drink Garnish & Types Of Cucumbers

    cucumber-lemonade-hendricks-230

    Cool as a cucumber lemonade. Photo
    courtesy Hendricks Gin.

     

    Hendrick’s Gin sent us a cocktail recipe called Cucumber Lemonade. We enjoyed both the drink and the garnish and thought: Why don’t we use more cucumber garnishes?

    The Cucumber Lemonade recipe is below, but you can also use a cucumber garnish with:

  • Club soda
  • Citrus sodas: Fresca, 7-Up, Sprite
  • Savory cocktails: Bloody Mary, Martini
  • Fruit or vegetable juices and ades
  • Tonic Water
  •  
    Try adding a cucumber spear to these drinks, and you’ll have a crunchy snack to enjoy with the drink.

    RECIPE: HENDRICK’S CUCUMBER LEMONADE

    Ingredients For 1 Drink

  • 3 parts Hendrick’s Gin
  • 2 parts fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 parts simple syrup
  • Ice
  • Sparkling water
  • Garnish: cucumber spear
  • Preparation

    1. COMBINE the first three ingredients in a tall glass. Add ice.

    2. TOP with sparkling water, stir gently and garnish with a cucumber spear or wedge.

     

    CUCUMBER TYPES

    You can garnish with any supermarket cucumber, but why not have fun and look for specialty varieties?

    Growers define cucumbers in five categories: slicing, pickling, burpless, space savers and specialty.

  • Slicing cucumbers include the typical supermarket variety: long and straight with thin, non-bitter skins and seeds. They are bred for slicing and eating. The skin of younger cucumbers is tender enough to be eaten. As the fruit* grows, the skins thicken and more seeds develop. If left on the vine too long, the flesh may become bitter.
  • Pickling cucumbers are shorter and stouter. They are bred to have drier flesh, which allows them to soak up more of the pickling brine.
  • Burpless cucumbers are slicing cucumbers that have been bred to produce less of the bitter chemical that releases gas in the stomach. They were developed because enough Americans had this sensitivity.
  • Space saver cucumbers, also called container cucumbers, are bred to create compact vines that fit into small gardens and deck planters.
  •  

    armenian-cucumber-burpee-230

    You know what conventional cucumbers look like. Check farmers markets for specialty varieties like crystal apple cucumbers, lemon cucumbers and the Armenian cucumber, shown here. Photo courtesy Burpee.

  • Specialty cucumbers are heirloom cucumbers that have less developed disease resistance than modern hybrids, but are appreciated for their different flavors, shapes and/or colors. Long, light green Armenian cucumbers (see photo above) are heavily ribbed—decorative and ornamental—and taste like a melon without the sweetness. Their ribbed shape makes interesting cross-sections when sliced. Lemon cucumbers look like round lemons. White cucumbers Look for them in farmers markets. Crystal Apple cucumbers, heirlooms from New Zealand, have pale green, roundish fruits resembling Granny Smith apples. Suyo Long is a traditional variety from China that delivers burpless, sweet ribbed fruits that can be used for slicing or pickling. Hybrids like Palace King have a ripples of yellow on emerald green skins.
  •  
    Your homework: Go to the farmers market and look for specialty cucumbers. If you have a garden, check out the options and plan to plant at least one variety next year.

     
    *Yes, cucumbers, C. sativus, are fruits. They are members of the same binomial genus as cantaloupe, honeydew, Persian and other melons.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: The Classic Daiquiri

    daiquiri-no.2-ConstantinoRibailagua-bacardi-230

    No. 2 Daiquiri, the first variation of the
    original, created in 1920s Havana. Photo
    courtesy Bacardi Rum.

     

    July 19th is National Daiquiri Day. It well known as one of the favorite drinks of writer Ernest Hemingway, and less well known as a favorite of President John F. Kennedy.

    The cocktail was created in 1898, in the tropical heat of the Cuban town of Daiquirí. Jennings Cox, an American mining engineer working at the local iron mine, had the bartender shake Bacardi rum, sugar and lime with ice.

    A tall glass was packed with cracked ice; a teaspoon of sugar was sprinkled over the ice and the juice of one or two limes was squeezed over the sugar. Two or three ounces of white rum were added, and the mixture was stirred with a long-handled spoon. (Later versions used a shaker and other proportions*.)

    It was a hit: Word spread and the top bartenders in Havana were shaking it up in no time. It is also possible that William Astor Chanler, Sr., a U.S. congressman who purchased the Santiago Iron Mines in 1902, introduced the Daiquirí to clubs in New York at that time. In 1909, Rear Admiral Lucius W. Johnson, a U.S. Navy medical officer, introduced the to the Army and Navy Club in Washington, D.C. [source].

    The Daiquiri is one of the six classic cocktails highlighted in The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks, first published in 1948 and still in print (here’s the 2008 edition). The others included:

  • Jack Rose (applejack, lemon juice and grenadine)
  • Manhattan (whiskey, sweet vermouth and Agnostura bitters)
  • Martini (gin and dry vermouth)
  • Old Fashioned (whiskey, simple syrup and Angostura bitters, garnished with the lemon peel and a maraschino cherry
  • Sidecar (Cognac or Armagnac, lemon juice, Cointreau or triple sec)
  •  
    *For 1 drink: 1-1/2 ounces light/white rum, 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, 1 ounce of simple syrup. Place the sugar and lime juice into a cocktail shaker and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Add the rum and fill the shaker with ice: half of ice cubes, topped with half of crushed ice. Shake vigorously until thoroughly chilled; strain into a chilled coupette (cocktail glass).
     
    DAIQUIRI VARIATIONS

    As with just about any cocktail, many variations of the Daiquiri have proliferated.

    One of the easiest ways to enhance the flavor is by substituting the lime juice for another citrus. Grapefruit and yuzu are our two favorites. Try this delicious Yuzu Daiquiri Recipe, which includes more history of the cocktail.

    Another of our favorite substitutions uses 2 tablespoons of triple sec or other orange liqueur instead of the sugar.

    And, a with the Margarita, fruit purées can be introduced to create a Lychee Daiquiri, Pineapple Daiquiri, Strawberry Daiquiri, etc. Add pomegranate juice for a Pomegranate Daiquiri.

     

    THE ORIGINAL DAIQUIRI EVOLVES

    After the recipe traveled from Daiquiri to Havana, Constantino Ribailagua, a bartender at El Floridita bar and restaurant in OldHavana, created three variations. We got these recipes from Bacardi, whose rum was used. You’ll need a cocktail shaker and a strainer.

    NO. 2 DAIQUIRI

    Ingredients

  • 2 parts BACARDÍ Superior rum
  • 1/2 part orange Curaçao liqueur
  • 1/2 part freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 heaping tsp fine white sugar
  • 1/2 part freshly squeezed lime juice
  • Orange zest
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE all ingredients except zest in a cocktail shaker filled with ice cubes and crushed ice. Give it all a good, hard shake until the cocktail shaker is cold.

    2. STRAIN the mixture into a chilled glass. Garnish with orange zest.

     

    daiquiri-no.4-ConstantinoRibailagua-bacardi-230

    No. 4 Daiquiri, a classic from 1920s Havana. Photo courtesy Bacardi Rum.

     

    NO. 3 DAIQUIRI

    This variation on the classic Daiquiri is often referred to as the Hemingway Daiquiri. Serve it in a rocks glass.

    Ingredients

  • 2 ounces white rum
  • 1 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 ounce simple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon maraschino liqueur
  • 1 teaspoon fresh grapefruit juice
  • Ice cubes
  • Crushed ice
  • Garnish: lime wedge, maraschino cherry
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE first five ingredients and shake vigorously with ice cubes, until the cocktail shaker is cold.

    2. STRAIN into a rocks glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish and serve.

    NO. 4 DAIQUIRI

    Ribailagua tweaked the No. 3 Daiquiri to achieve subtle variations: a more perfumed aroma and a slightly sweeter drink.

    Ingredients

  • 2 parts Bacardi Superior rum
  • 1/3 part maraschino liqueur
  • 1 heaping tsp fine white sugar
  • 1/3 part freshly squeezed lime juice
  • Garnish: maraschino cherry
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice cubes and crushed ice. Shake vigorously until the cocktail shaker is cold.

    2. DOUBLE STRAIN the mix into a chilled glass by passing it through a hawthorne strainer (bar strainer) and then through a tea strainer. If you don’t have a hawthorne strainer you can just pass it once through a tea strainer. Garnish with a maraschino cherry.
     
    How to celebrate National Daiquiri Day? Try all four—split with a friend, of course.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Blackberry Mojito

    Enhance the celebration of National Mojito Day, July 11th.

    There’s enough red, white and blue here for Independence Day; but take advantage of summer’s lush blackberries to whip them up all season long.

    The Mojito (pronounced moe-hee-toe) is Cuba’s most famous cocktail. This variation adds fresh fruit to the original recipe.

    It is important that the blackberries and mint are gently muddled—never crushed—to release their flavors but not release harsh or bitter tannins into the beverage. A wooden spoon or a firm silicone spatula can be used in place of a muddler.

    RECIPE: BLACKBERRY MOJITO

    Ingredients For 2 Drinks

  • 12 blackberries
  • 12 large mint leaves
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 cup seltzer water
  • 1/4 cups vodka or rum
  • 6 to 8 ice cubes
  • Garnish: fresh blackberry and lime wedge
  •    

    blackberry-mojito-driscolls-230

    Beautiful and delicious: a Blackberry Mojito. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

     

     

    http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-ripe-blackberries-bowl-food-close-up-image33432102

    A bodacious bowl of blackberries. Photo ©
    Olha Afanasieva | Dreamstime.

     

    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE blackberries, mint leaves, sugar, lemon juice and lime juice in a tall glass until berries are mostly crushed.

    2. ADD seltzer, vodka, and ice. Stir well and serve.

     
    WHAT’S A MOJITO?

    The mojito (mo-HEE-toe) is a quintessential Cuban cocktail. The name derives from the African voodoo term mojo, to cast a small spell.

    According to Bacardi Rum, the drink can be traced to 1586, when Sir Francis Drake and his pirates unsuccessfully attempted to sack Havana for its gold. His associate, Richard Drake, was said to have invented a Mojito-like cocktail known as El Draque that was made with aguardiente, a crude forerunner of rum, sugar, lime and mint.

    Around the mid-1800s, when the Bacardi Company was established, rum was substituted and the cocktail became known as a Mojito. Here’s the original Mojito recipe.

    Always popular in Cuba, the drink made a short journey to Key West, and then into American cocktail society. Under the radar for many years as wine apéritifs topped cocktails in popularity, the Mojito has enjoyed a renaissance in the last 20 years thanks to the growing popularity of Latin American cuisine.

     
    MORE MOJITO RECIPES

  • Beet Mojito Recipe
  • Cranberry Mojito Recipe
  • Pomegranate Mojito Recipe
  • Strawberry Mojito and Coconut Mojito Recipes
  •   

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