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Archive for Cocktails & Spirits

RECIPES: Favorite Gin Cocktails


The Piccadilly cocktail, above, substitutes
gin for Tequila in the popular Tequila
Sunrise. Gin is a versatile spirit that can
be enjoyed in cocktails far beyond the
Gin and Tonic or Martini.
  The Gin & Tonic is the archetypal British cocktail, but gin is as adaptable to different recipes as any other spirit. For your next cocktail party, offer guests a menu of gin cocktails. Here are some favorites from Beefeater Gin.

Beefeater, named after a slang term for the Yeomen Warders who guard the Tower of London (shown on Beefeater Gin’s bottle label, below), is the only international gin still distilled in London. Its recipe, developed in the early 1860s, includes botanicals such as juniper, angelica roots and seeds, coriander seeds, licorice, almonds, orris root, Seville oranges and lemon peel. Each gin has its own recipe and distinctive flavor. Beefeater has a floral palate with hints of citrus. Learn how each botanical contributes to the blend at BeefeaterGin.com.

Classic Gin & Tonic

Beefeater Basil-Berry Gimlet

London Lemonade

The Piccadilly

Royal Garden

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RECIPES: Presidential Candidate Cocktails


Call it “True Blue” if you wish, but the
official name for this cocktail is Barack
Rocks.
  What are you planning to serve guests when you watch the Democratic and Republic National Conventions? Raise a glass to your favorite with these two recipes. Better yet, be bipartisan and enjoy both cocktails!

Regardless of your choice of commander-in-chief, you can vote for the cocktail of your choice with these Presidential Candidate Cocktails from SKYY Spirits.

Celebrate the 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential nominees thanks to SKYY, as you sip on a Barack Rocks or a McCain Straight Up, from now through November. If the candidate of your choice wins, you’ve got a drink going for at least four years.

– Read the full Presidential Cocktails recipes.

– Find more seasonal cocktails in the Cocktails Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

 

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TIP OF THE DAY: Whozu? Yuzu! Daiquiri! Recipe!

Add tangy yuzu juice to your next
daiquirí for an new twist on a classic. You’ll
need to garnish with lime, though: It’s
tough to find fresh yuzu.

 

July 19th is National Daiquirí Day. While we have a traditional Daiquirí recipe below, the Yuzu Daiquirí is poised to be a new favorite. Buy yuzu juice (an Asian citrus) at your specialty food store and make this recipe, courtesy of Riingo restaurant in New York City.

If you don’t know yuzu, read our article. It’s one of our favorite flavors.

YUZU DAIQUIRI RECIPE

Ingredients

  • 4 sprigs of mint
  • 4 raspberries
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Dash of simple syrup (recipe)
  • 1/2 ounce yuzu juice
  • 2.5 ounces light rum (such as Bacardi)
  • Ice and mixing glass
  • Optional: lime wheel or curl for garnish
  •  

     

    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE the mint, raspberries, sugar, simple syrup and yuzu juice in a mixing glass.

    2. ADD ice and rum and shake vigorously.

    3. STRAIN into a martini glass. Garnish with a sprig of mint and serve.

    CLASSIC DAIQUIRÍ RECIPE

    To make a classic Daiquirí, mix 1-1/2 ounces light rum, 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice and 1 teaspoon powdered or granulated sugar. Shake with ice and strain into a martini glass, or pour into an ice-filled collins glass.

    There are many variations on the Daiquirí recipe which incorporate fruit, fruit juice or liqueur. One of our favorites uses 2 tablespoons of Triple Sec or other orange liqueur instead of the sugar.
     
    DAIQUIRí HISTORY

    A Daiquirí (pronounced DAK-uh-ree in English, but die-kee-REE in the native Taíno language) is a combination of rum, lime juice and sugar or other sweetener (we use agave nectar). It was invented around 1900 at the El Floridita bar in Havana, Cuba, by a group of American mining engineers. Rum, lime and sugar were plentiful. The original cocktail was served in a collins glass with cracked ice, with each of the ingredients poured over the ice. It later evolved into a shaker drink.

    The name came from an iron mine in near Santiago, Cuba (there’s also a beach there called Daiquirí).

    There are numerous Daiquirí variations, including the Yuzu Daiquirí above. The popular Caipirinha is a daquirí made using cachaça instead of rum. Cachaça, a Brazilian “cousin” to rum, is made from sugar cane juice. Rum is distilled from molasses, a by-product of the sugar refining process.

    Find more cocktail recipes in our Cocktails & Spirits Section.

      

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    RECIPES: Classic Summer Cocktails


    The ever-popular Margarita seems to be a classic with every generation.
      Modern mixology, like today’s fine cuisine, has become a throw-down to see who can create the most complex, fascinating drinks with new flavors and nifty ingredients. In the process of entertaining cocktail customers with new wow factors, many of the classic drinks have fallen by the wayside. While some, like the Martini, are enjoying a renaissance (including hundreds of variations on the theme that make the drink unrecognizable, as in the Plum Sakétini), when was the last time anyone ordered a Tom Collins—even though a bar glass is named after it?

    This summer, treat guests to a retro cocktail hour. Here are cocktail recipes for some oldies but goodies that haven’t been seen for a while, along with some classics that seem to be high on the list of the cocktail menu top hits:

    Bellini Recipe

    Grand Margarita Recipe

    Mojito Recipe

    Scotch & Ginger Recipe

    Tom Collins Recipe

     

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    Sophisticated Cherry Cocktails: Red For Independence Day


    Tart cherry juice is a flavor-rich ingredient for cocktails.
    Photo by Liv Friis-Larsen | IST.
      One of the healthiest juices you can drink is tart cherry juice. Sometimes called a superfruit,* tart cherries (also called sour cherries and Morello cherries) have among the highest levels of disease-fighting antioxidants, as compared to other fruits. They also contain other important nutrients such as beta carotene (19 times more than blueberries or strawberries), fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, potassium and vitamins C and E. A growing body of scientific research links cherries to health benefits, from helping to ease the pain of arthritis and gout, to reducing risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers. Cherries also have been found to help regulate the body’s circadian rhythm, prevent memory loss and delay the aging process. You can read more about the fruit at the website of the Cherry Marketing Institute, ChooseCherries.com.

    *A superfruit is one that has a high antioxidant level as well as nutritional density. Others include açaí, blueberry, cranberry, grape, guarana, mangosteen, noni and pomegranate.

    Most of us are acquainted with the fun side of cherries: cherry pie, ice cream, yogurt and other delights. Now consider the cherry cocktail. These bright red cocktails are also perfect for red-themed holidays like Independence Day, Christmas and Valentine’s Day. Find recipes for a Cherry Red Eye Mojito and Red Alert Cherry-Coconut Fusion on TheNibble.com.

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