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Archive for Breakfast

TIP OF THE DAY: Brown Rice Pudding For Breakfast

Yesterday we popped into our local Le Pain Quotidien to meet a colleague for coffee. On the breakfast menu was brown rice pudding, topped with mixed nuts and raisins.

We love rice pudding, so of course we ordered it: our first “breakfast” rice pudding. It had much less sugar than dessert rice pudding, and, though served at room temperature, was not far removed from other porridge, like Cream Of Rice or oatmeal.

We went online and found a breakfast rice pudding recipe from Tiffany at LiveLearnLoveEat.com.

We also found the recipe below from the folks at Lundberg, the California-based premium rice producer, which uses just 1/2 cup of brown sugar in the entire recipe.

Both recipes are made with cooked rice, and are a great way to use leftover rice. Add nuts for protein!

RECIPE: RICE PUDDING WITH BROWN RICE

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups cooked short grain brown rice
  • 3 eggs
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  •    

    livelearnloveeat.com-230

    You can justify brown rice pudding: It’s whole grain! Photo courtesy LiveLearnLoveEat.com.

  • Optional mix-ins: ½ cup raisins, chopped dates or other dried fruit—blueberries, cherries, cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • Nutmeg
  • Optional garnish: nuts (try a mix), shredded coconut
  • Optional: half and half, heavy cream, whipped cream
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BEAT the eggs; add the sugar and beat until smooth. Add the milk, salt and vanilla and blend.

    2. ADD the rice and the raisins or other dried fruit. Pour into a greased shallow baking dish and sprinkle with nutmeg.

    3. SET the baking dish in pan of hot water and bake at 350°F. After baking for approximately 30 minutes, gently stir the custard to suspend the rice. Continue baking for 60 minutes or until the custard is set (a total of 90 minutes).

    4. SERVE warm or cold, with cream as desired. To serve as dessert, you can use whipped cream.

     

    shrimp-miso-grits-silkroadtavern-230

    Shrimp and grits. Grits, ground from corn, are also porridge. Photo courtesy Silk Road Tavern.

     

    WHAT IS PORRIGE?

    Porridge is a dish made by boiling ground, crushed or chopped cereal in water, milk, or a combination of both. It is usually served hot, often sweetened, sometimes savory (the beloved cheese grits are porrige).

    Any cereal grain can be made into porrige. Some of the most common in the U.S.:

  • Buckwheat: kasha
  • Corn: cornmeal mush, grits, Indian pudding, polenta
  • Oats: oatmeal
  • Rice: congee, Cream of Rice
  • Wheat: Cream of Wheat, farina, Wheatena
  •  
    Other cereals—flax, millet, quinoa, rye, sorghum and spelt, for example—are also made into porridge; as are non-cereals like legumes and potatoes. Pease porridge, from the old English nursery rhyme, is made from dried peas.

     

    WHAT IS GRUEL?

    Gruel is a thinner version of porridge—so thin that it can be drunk, rather than spooned. Historically, gruel has been a staple of the Western peasant diet.

    Gruel is often made from barley, hemp and millet. In hard times, chestnuts and even the less tannic acorns of some oaks were ground into flour and made into gruel.

    Gruel was a cheap way for officials to feed the poor—most famously described by Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, a ward of the parrish, who couldn’t even get a second helping of it in the orphanage.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Berry Croissants

    croissant-fruit-cheese-castelloUSA-230

    Berry croissants: a yummy idea. Photo courtesy Castello Cheese.

     

    For Sunday brunch or afternoon tea*, here’s a fun alternative to a chocolate croissant that provides another reason to enjoy seasonal berries.

    RECIPE: BERRY CROISSANTS

    Ingredients

  • Croissants
  • Berries: blackberries, raspberries, strawberries or a mix
  • Mascarpone, fresh chèvre (goat cheese—look especially for the honey chèvre at Trader Joe’s), cream cheese or other spreadable cheese
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SPLIT the croissant and spread the bottom half with cheese.

    2. ADD the berries, whole or sliced, depending on size.

     
    Thanks to Castello USA for the idea (they used blue cheese).

     
    *Who has afternoon tea, you say? Well, THE NIBBLE is a far cry from Downtown Abbey, but we serve afternoon tea daily. Not everyone drinks tea, but it’s our chance to sample some of the many foods that arrive at our doorstep—baked goods, candy, jam, crackers, cheese, pâté and so forth—including coffee, tea and other beverages. If you want to serve a proper afternoon tea, here’s how.

     
      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Organic Stoneground Flakes

    We first learned of Back To The Roots, an environmentally-focused start-up founded in Oakland, California by two Berkeley grads, when they sent us a Mushroom Farm two years ago. It’s a kit to grow mushrooms indoors that utilizes recycled coffee grounds.

    The company has since created Water Garden, a device that sits over a fish tank and grows herbs; and Garden In A Can, their own version of herbs-in-a-can.

    These are specialty products. But recently, the company launched another product that has a place in every kitchen.

    It’s a delicious, whole-grain breakfast cereal, with the curiously generic name of Organic Stoneground Flakes.

    They’re not exactly flakes, but shaped like tiny bowls. That adds to their charm; but whatever the shape, we love their flavor and the wholesome nutrition.

    Organic Stoneground Flakes are our new favorite cereal!

     

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    Our new favorite cereal. Photo courtesy Back To The Roots.

     
    WHAT’S IN THEM

    Just three ingredients: organic wheat, a bit of sugar and a dash of salt.

    The U.S.-grown, hard red spring wheat is 100% stoneground, the ancient milling process that preserves all the protein, fiber and flavor of the whole grain.

    The cereal is non-GMO and has a whopping 40g of whole grain per serving, almost your daily requirement of 48g; along with 6g protein and 5g fiber. There’s just a pinch of salt, and a small amount of sugar that balances the flavors without tasting sweet.
     
    MORE GOOD NEWS

    Packaged in an easily recyclable milk carton, the “flakes” are a crunchy snack from the box, a dry cereal to top with milk or yogurt, a crunchy topping for fruit salad, an ingredient for trail mix.

    An order of two 11-ounce boxes is $9.99 plus $2 shipping on the company website.

    The product’s mission is to “pour it forward”: Every photo posted to Facebook.com/backtotheroots generates a donated box of Stoneground Flakes to an elementary school cafeteria.

    WHY YOU NEED WHOLE GRAINS.

      

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    RECIPE: Torta Española, Spanish Omelet

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    A torta española. The omelet can be customized in endless ways. Photo courtesy PaperChef.

     

    Our review of Diestel Ranch turkey chorizo inspired us to whip up a torta española for breakfast.

    One of the most popular uses for crumbled chorizo is in a torta española, or Spanish omelet. Made with eggs, potatoes and onions, the recipe is customized with whatever ingredients you have on hand: cooked meats, sausage, other vegetables and herbs.

    In Spain, it is served at any time of the day: for breakfast, lunch or dinner, or as tapas with a glass of wine. We sometimes serve a slice with a green salad as a first course.

    To Americans, a torta will resemble a crustless quiche; but it’s made without cream or milk, and is cooked in a skillet rather than baked.

    It’s an easy recipe, the most taxing part of which is flipping the half-cooked omelet onto a plate and then back into the pan. But you’ll have fun doing it.

    Prep time 15 minutes, cook time 30 minutes. If you happen to have leftover boiled potatoes, you can use them and save 20 minutes of cooking the raw potatoes.

     
    RECIPE: TORTA ESPAÑOLA (SPANISH OMELET)

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 4 potatoes, thinly sliced
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 4 eggs, scrambled in a large bowl
  • 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro or parsley, or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Customize: diced bell pepper (green, orange, yellow and/or red), grated cheese, ham or chorizo, diced tomato (fresh/sundried), etc.
  • Garnish: chopped green onions or extra cilantro or parsley*
  •  

    Preparation

    1. ADD the vegetable oil to a large skillet until the pan is filled halfway. Heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, add the potato slices and onion, making sure they are well-covered by the oil; add more oil if necessary. Cook for 20 minutes until the potatoes and onions are soft. Drain the oil and combine the potato mixture with the eggs and herbs. Add the salt and mix well.

    2. ADD the olive oil to a separate, nonstick, skillet, 10 inches by 2-1/2 inches deep. Heat over medium-high heat and add the potato, egg, and onion mixture. Lower the heat to medium-low and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, until the bottom of the omelet is very light brown.

    3. USING a flat ceramic plate, cover the frying pan and flip the omelet over onto the plate. Immediately slip the uncooked side back into the pan. Cook for another 4 to 5 minutes, until the other side is a very light brown.

    4. REMOVE the omelet to a plate and cut into 4 wedges for breakfast, smaller slices for a first course.

     
      

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    FOOD HOLIDAY: Surf & Turf Eggs Benedict

    Eggs Benedict is a popular Mother’s Day or Father’s Day brunch entree. The classic recipe combines a poached egg and ham or Canadian bacon atop a toasted English muffin slice, topped with hollandaise sauce.

    There are many variations to the original recipe, including portabella mushrooms for vegetarians (recipe) and corned beef hash (recipe).

    Since today is National Eggs Benedict Day, here’s a festive recipe to try in advance of upcoming celebrations. You can serve it for lunch or everyday dinner as well.

    RECIPE: SURF & TURF EGGS BENEDICT

    Ingredients For One Serving

  • 1 poached egg
  • 1/4 cup poached crab or lobster
  • 1/4 cup sliced, cooked filet mignon
  • Hollandaise sauce (recipe)
  • 1/2 English muffin, toasted
  • Optional: poached/steamed asparagus or other vegetable
  •  

    surf-turf-eggs-benedict-filet-lobster-bonefishgrill-230

    Surf & turf Eggs Benedict. Photo courtesy Bonefish Grill.

  • Optional garnish: minced fresh chives or parsley or chiffonade of tarragon
  •  
    Preparation
     

    1. PREPARE or heat the hollandaise sauce; cook the Canadian bacon or heat the ham.

    2. POACH the egg and toast the muffin half. Place the beef atop the muffin, followed by the seafood and the egg. Spoon the hollandaise sauce on top.

    3. GARNISH with fresh herbs and serve with an optional side of asparagus or other vegetable.
     
    THE HISTORY OF EGGS BENEDICT

    Credit for this recipe is given to Chef Charles Ranhofer of Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City—which also happened to be the first restaurant opened in the U.S., starting with a small pastry café in 1827 and expanding into a restaurant two years later.

    At that time there were no public dining rooms or restaurants. Men could stop into a tavern for a beverage and what amounted to “bar food.” People ate all their meals at home or, if traveling, at the inn or hotel. Otherwise, hungry people got food from street vendors.

    In the 1860s, a regular patron of Delmonico’s, Mrs. LeGrand Benedict, arrived for lunch and found nothing appealing on the menu. She discussed her tastes with the chef, who created on the spot what would become an iconic recipe. In his cookbook, The Epicurean, published in 1894, he called the recipe called Eggs à la Benedick, inadvertently misspelling her name.

    The recipe is relatively easy: toasted English muffins topped with a round of cooked ham “an eighth of an inch thick and of the same diameter as the muffins one each half.” A poached egg is placed atop each each muffin half, and the whole is covered with Hollandaise sauce.

    The dish became very popular, and April 16th was established as National Eggs Benedict Day.

    You can vary the ingredients to make your own signature Eggs Benedict recipe. Here are some substitutions.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Breakfast Salad & Dip

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    For breakfast, bacon and egg top a salad.
    Photo courtesy Amanda Paa |
    HeartbeetKitchen.com.

     

    The world over, what people eat for breakfast varies widely.

  • In eastern China it can include dumplings and vegetable soup with rice.
  • In Guyana it’s whitefish preserved in salt, served with fried bread dough.
  • A traditional breakfast in Japan has rice, fish, miso soup, sticky soy beans and nori (dried seaweed).
  • In South India it’s vegetable stew, served with steamed lentil-and-rice bread.
  • In Columbia it could be leftovers from the night before.
  •  
    So what’s wrong with a breakfast salad? Why not tortilla chips instead of bread?

    This recipe, from Amanda Paa of HeartbeetKitchen.com, is a salad with bacon and eggs. Food Should Taste Good’s “The Works” tortilla chips standn in for a bagel.

    If you don’t want a salad, there’s a breakfast sausage and cheese dip to enjoy with tortilla chips (scroll down).

     

    RECIPE: BREAKFAST BACON & EGG SALAD WITH “BAGEL CROUTONS”

    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 4 cups mixed salad greens
  • 4 slices cooked bacon (crumble 2 slices and keep 2 whole)
  • 1/2 cup chopped cherry tomatoes
  • 3 tablespoons chopped kalamata olives
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1/4 cup of your favorite salad dressing
  • 1 handful Food Should Taste Good “The Works” tortilla chips (or substitute, including bagel chips)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. EQUALLY DIVIDE the salad greens, bacon (1 slice crumbled and 1 slice whole per plate) tomatoes and olives between two plates.

    2. POACH the eggs: Fill a medium saucepan 2 inches deep with water and set over medium-high heat. When the water boils, turn the heat down so that the water is just simmering. Crack one egg into a small dish and slide it into the water. Quickly do the same with the second egg. Set the timer for 3-1/2 minutes (if you like a firmer yolk, cook for 4-1/2 minutes). Make sure the water stays at a simmer. When the timer goes off…

    3. USE a slotted spoon to scoop one egg out of the water. Tilt the spoon so the liquid drains completely, then place the egg on top of one of the salads. Repeat with the second egg.

    4. TOP the eggs with a sprinkle of salt and a few grinds of black pepper, then drizzle each salad with dressing (we made a balsamic vinaigrette but some people may prefer a creamy dressing).

     

    RECIPE: ROSEMARY & CHEDDAR BREAKFAST SAUSAGE DIP

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 8 ounces breakfast sausage
  • 1/4 cup minced onion
  • 1-1/2 cups milk
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 3 cups (9 ounces) grated cheddar cheese
  • 2-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Food Should Taste Good Multigrain Chips (or substitute dipper)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK the sausage in a medium skillet over medium-high heat, stirring frequently and breaking it up into crumbles. When sausage has just a little pink remaining, add the onion and continue cooking until the meat is no longer pink and the onions are translucent. Using a colander, drain the meat and set it aside.

     

    Breakfast_Sausage_Dip_heartbeetkitchen-FSTG-230

    Recipe and photography courtesy of Amanda Paa | HeartbeetKitchen.com..

     

    2. POUR the milk and maple syrup into a medium sized saucepan and turn the heat to medium. Let the mixture warm until steaming, but not boiling.

    3. TOSS together the cheese, cornstarch and rosemary in a bowl. Add this to warm milk and turn the heat up slightly, constantly stirring to melt the cheese evenly.

    4. COOK for about 5 minutes, until the cheese is melted and smooth. Stir in the salt and garlic powder, then add the sausage. Mix well and serve immediately.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Easter Yogurt Parfait

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    A basic Easter parfait. Make yours more Easter-like with pastel-colored yogurt layers. Photo courtesy Yoplait.

     

    Here’s an Easter weekend breakfast suggestion from Yoplait:

    A yogurt parfait with Annie’s Honey Bunny Grahams.

    Just layer yogurt with colorful fruit and top the parfait with the bunny-shaped graham cracker bites.

    Variations:

  • Use yogurt in pastel “Easter colors,” like blueberry, peach and strawberry flavors.
  • Use different layers/flavors/colors of yogurt.
  • You can use a touch of food color to turn any flavor into a pastel; for example, turning Yoplait Key Lime Pie yogurt pastel green.
  • Consider other “Easter” toppings: green-tinted coconut for “grass,” and a few miniature jelly beans. (Hey, it’s Easter!)
  •  
    TO MAKE GREEN COCONUT “GRASS”

    1. PLACE shredded coconut in a plastic sandwich bag. Add a drop of green food color and shake. Add more food color as desired.

    2. SPREAD the coconut on a plate to dry.

     

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Homemade Chocolate Bacon Bunnies

    What are you giving your favorite bacon lover for Easter? Oscar Mayer created these foodcraft projects: bacon-stuffed chocolate bunnies and an Easter basket filled with “bacon grass” and hard-boiled eggs—fun for breakfast on Easter Sunday.

    Go buy lots of bacon and get started!

    RECIPE 1: BACON-STUFFED CHOCOLATE EASTER BUNNY

    Ingredients Per Small Bunny

  • 1 hollow chocolate bunny
  • 2 strips bacon
  •  
    Tools

  • Frying pan
  • Paper towels
  • Sharp knife
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK the bacon to desired crispness. Pat dry with paper towels and set aside.

    2. REMOVE and discard any wrapper on the bunny. Heat a knife by running the blade under very hot water; then quickly dry the knife completely. Using the dry, warm knife…

       

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    Hide bacon in a chocolate rabbit. Photo courtesy Oscar Mayer.

     

    3. GENTLY CUT the bottom off of the bunny; set it aside. Insert the bacon slices into the hollow bunny, breaking the bacon into smaller pieces as needed to completely fill the hollow cavity.

    4. REPLACE the bottom piece of chocolate on the base of the bunny. Heat the original knife or a smaller knife as in Step 2. Slowly run the flat side of the knife back and forth over the seam, melting the chocolate to reseal the bottom. Cover in plastic wrap and store in the fridge for up to five days.

     

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    Bacon “grass” for an Easter basket. Photo courtesy Oscar Mayer.

     

    RECIPE: BACON EASTER GRASS

    Depending on the size of the Easter basket, even a small basket can require a lot of bacon. We recommend having some Easter grass or shredded paper on hand to stuff the bottom of the basket, under the layer of bacon.

    Ingredients

  • Thick cut bacon (8 to 12 slices)
  •  
    Tools

  • Kitchen shears
  • Frying pan
  • Tongs
  • Paper towels
  • Easter basket and colored* hard-boiled eggs for serving
  •  
    *Here’s how to color Easter eggs.

     

    Preparation

    1. CUT each bacon strip lengthwise into three long and skinny strips, using kitchen shears. Cook them in a frying pan over medium heat. Use tongs to stir the bacon and fry them in squiggly shapes to the desired crispness.

    2. TRANSFER the cooked bacon strips to a paper towel-lined plate. Blot dry and let cool completely.

    3. FILL a small Easter basket with the fried bacon Easter grass and serve with hard-boiled, dyed Eater eggs nestled on top. If you’re not planning to eat your creation right away, cover it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge, for up to five days.

      

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    RECIPE: Hungarian Rice Pudding

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    Hungarian Rice Pudding. Photo and recipe courtesy Little Bucharest Bistro | Chicago.

     

    A bone-chilling day like today calls for extra helpings of comfort food. One of our favorites is rice pudding. We’ve made it every way, including conventional, with rum-soaked raisins, with dried cherries and cranberries replacing the raisins, and a Thai-inspired version with black rice and coconut milk.

    Today, it’s Hungarian rice pudding. This is the recipe made by the Hungarian grandmother of Branko Podrumedic, owner of Little Bucharest Bistro in Chicago. In Hungarian, the recipe is called budinca de orez.

    Rice pudding is usually served as a dessert, but Branko notes that it also makes a delicious breakfast. If you’d like an eggier pudding for breakfast, you can increase the eggs to four, and reduce the honey for a less dessert-like (sweet) dish.

    For a richer rice pudding, use half and half instead of regular milk. For a non-dairy version, use coconut milk.

     
    Whether for dessert or breakfast, you can serve it with fresh fruit or a spoonful jam (our own grandmother was partial to cherry preserves).
     
    RECIPE: HUNGARIAN RICE PUDDING

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 cup rice (uncooked)*
  • 2 eggs
  • 1½ cups milk
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • Optional garnishes: chopped toasted nuts, toasted coconut, fresh fruit, preserves or fruit sauce (purée)
  •  

    *We prefer white basmati rice, which makes a creamy rice pudding but holds its texture.

    Preparations

    1. COOK the rice. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

    2. BEAT the eggs in a large bowl. Add the milk, honey, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Beat very well with a whisk or electric beaters, ensuring that no honey remains at the bottom of the bowl. Add the rice and raisins to the liquid mixture. Stir until combined.

    3. GREASE a baking dish, and gently pour in the rice mixture.

    4. SPRINKLE nuts on top and dust top with cinnamon.

    5. PLACE the baking dish in a pan of warm water and bake for approximately 50 minutes or until a knife inserted comes out clean. Serve hot or cold with cream, fresh berries, fruit sauce and/or toasted coconut garnish.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Goat Cheese For Breakfast

    It’s the second day of the Year Of The Goat, and we’re focusing on goat cheese for breakfast.

    We love goat cheese so much, that a log or tomme of fresh goat cheese with toasted baguette (and fresh tomato and basil in the summer) is our kind of meal.

    But you can incorporate goat cheese into conventional breakfast recipes, as this tip attests.

    At the simplest, there are goat cheese crostini with jam or preserves. If you want to bake, there are goat cheese and mushroom tarts. You can make a breakfast sandwich, or your favorite egg dish.

    RECIPE: GOAT CHEESE & PRESERVES CROSTINI

    This recipe is from Smucker’s, which uses its Smucker’s Orchard’s Finest Northwest Triple Berry Preserves. You can use your favorite berry preserves or jam.

  • Here’s the difference between jam and preserves.
  • Here’s the difference between crostini and bruschetta.
  •  
    RECIPE: GOAT CHEESE & JAM BREAKFAST CROSTINI

    Prep time is 15 minutes, cook time is 6 minutes.

    Ingredients For 12 Slices

  • 1/4 cup berry preserves
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme*, plus additional for garnish
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 baguette (8 ounces), sliced
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 ounces goat cheese
  • Optional: fresh thyme leaves for garnish
  •  
    *You can substitute fresh basil, marjoram, oregano or savory for the thyme.

       

    goat-cheese-crostini-smuckers-230

    Crunchy, sweet and savory: These crostini are an alternative to toast with spreads. Photo courtesy Smucker’s.

     

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the preserves, shallots, balsamic vinegar, thyme, salt and pepper in small bowl.

    2. SLICE the baguette into 1/2-inch slices. Brush both sides of each slice lightly with olive oil. Heat a skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Grill baguette slices, four at a time, 2 to 3 minutes per side or until lightly browned. Place on serving platter.

    3. SPREAD about 2 teaspoons of goat cheese over each baguette slice. Top each slice with 1 teaspoon of the preserves mixture. Garnish with additional fresh thyme. Serve immediately.

    TIP: The preserves-vinegar-thyme spread can be prepared up to two days ahead and refrigerated, covered.

     

    crustless-breakfast-tarts-kalynskitchen-230

    These Crustless Breakfast Tarts with Mushrooms and Goat Cheese are elegant enough for a special occasion. Photo courtesy Kalyn’s Kitchen.

     

    Kalyn of Kalyn’s Kitchen was inspired by a new tart pan to make breakfast tarts, combining cream, eggs, goat cheese, green onions, mozzarella, mushrooms and Parmesan. You can also use a muffin pan or individual gratin dishes.

    There’s no pastry, so you can save the carbs for your toast or muffin.

    The tarts will keep in the fridge for at least a week and can be reheated in a microwave or hot toaster oven. It only takes a about 70 seconds in the microwave; don’t microwave too long or the eggs will get rubbery.

    RECIPE: CRUSTLESS BREAKFAST TARTS WITH GOAT
    CHEESE & MUSHROOMS

    Ingredients For 6 Breakfast Tarts

  • 4 ounces fresh goat cheese (e.g. from a log), crumbled and softened
  • 1/4 cup milk, half and half, or cream
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan
  • 12 ounces crimini (baby bella) mushrooms, washed and sliced
  • 2-3 teaspoons olive oil (depending on your pan)
  • 1 teaspoon Spike Seasoning (see below, or use any all-purpose seasoning blend that’s good with eggs)
  • Fresh-ground black pepper to taste
  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 6 tablespoons mozzarella cheese, crated
  •  
    Preparation

    1. REMOVE the goat cheese from the fridge, cut off 4 ounces, crumble and place in a bowl to start to soften. Preheat the oven to 375°F/190°C. Spray the tart pan (or other cookware) with olive oil or nonstick spray.

    2. USE a fork to mix the milk/cream into the softened goat cheese; then mix in the Parmesan. Beat the eggs in a different bowl and mix 1/3 at a time into the goat cheese mixture, stirring each time you add more egg. (The mixture doesn’t need to be completely smooth.)

    3. WASH and pat dry the mushrooms and slice about 3/8 inch thick. Heat the oil in a large nonstick frying pan to avoid crowding the mushrooms. Cook the mushrooms over medium-high heat until all the released liquid has evaporated and mushrooms are starting to brown, about 10 minutes. Divide the mushrooms between the wells in the tart pan.

    4. POUR the custard mixture over the mushrooms and gently stir to distribute the mushrooms evenly. Sprinkle a generous pinch of green onions on top of each tart, followed by one tablespoon of grated mozzarella.

    5. BAKE for 25-27 minutes (or slightly longer if you don’t have this tart pan and your tarts are a little thicker). Cook just until the tarts are starting to barely brown on the top; the custard mixture should be soft. Serve hot.
     
    SPIKE SEASONING

    Spike Seasoning was created by more than 50 years ago and still has a huge fan base; it gets a five-star review on Amazon. You can buy it online or at retailers nationwide. There’s also a salt-free, gluten-free version.

    Original Spike Seasoning a blend of 39 ingredients: Salt and sea salt, de-fatted nutri-soy granules, granular toasted onion, nutritional yeast, granular garlic, celery root granules, ground dill, horseradish granules, mustard powder, lemon peel, orange powder, parsley flakes, red bell peppers, green bell peppers, white pepper, rose hips powder, summer savory, mushroom powder, safflower, parsley powder, white onion powder, spinach powder, tomato powder, sweet Hungarian paprika, ground celery seed, cayenne pepper, ground turmeric, ground cumin, ground ginger, ground coriander, ground fenugreek, ground cloves, cinnamon powder, oregano, tarragon, sweet basil, marjoram, rosemary and thyme.

    If you don’t see it in the spice section, look near the health foods.
     
    MORE GOAT CHEESE BREAKFAST RECIPES

  • Breakfast tarts with mushrooms and goat cheese (recipe)
  • Goat cheese scrambled eggs (recipe)
  • Goat cheese and fresh herb omelet (recipe)
  • Goat cheese and prosciutto strata (recipe)
  • Grilled goat cheese sandwich with honey and figs (recipe)
  • Poached eggs on toasted baguette with goat cheese (recipe)
  •   

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