THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

Archive for Breakfast

RECIPE: Peanut Butter & Jelly Waffles

Peanut Butter & Jelly Waffle Sandwich

Smooth Operator Peanut Butter

Fancy Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich

[1] A different kind of peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Photo courtesy Cait’s Plate. [2] You can also celebrate with peanut butter and jelly thumbprint cookies. Here’s the recipe from Chef de Home. [3] Don’t want waffles? Here’s a special way to celebrate with a sandwich (photo courtesy Jif).

 

April 2nd is National Peanut Butter & Jelly sandwich. It’s easy to whip up a sandwich; but more special to make a waffle sandwich.

We’re making waffle sandwiches, inspired by a recipe from Cait’s Plate.

We used Peanut Butter & Co.’s Smooth Operator, but you can use any flavor of any brand you like.

Peanut Butter & Co.’s other peanut butter flavors include The Bee’s Knees (honey), Cinnamon Raisin Swirl, Crunch Time, Dark Chocolate Dreams, The Heat Is On, Mighty Maple, Old Fashioned Crunchy, Old Fashioned Smooth and White Chocolate Wonderful.

We used Smooth Operator and Smucker’s Fruit & Honey Spread in Strawberry. We made our own waffles from scratch. Frozen just doesn’t do it for us.

But if you use store-bought waffles, you’ll be ready to eat in five minutes.

RECIPE: PEANUT BUTTER & JELLY WAFFLES

Ingredients For 1 Serving

  • Waffles of choice
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter, or more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons jelly or jam of choice, or more to taste
  • Optional layer: sliced bananas
  • Optional garnish: berries or other fruit
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the waffles. Spread with peanut butter and jelly, add the optional bananas and stack into a “sandwich.”
     
    P.B. & J. IN THE U.S.A.

    Last year, Smucker’s conducted a study on America’s favorite comfort foods. The winner was PB&J.

    Comforting America through thick and thin, rich and poor, crunchy and creamy, the survey revealed that PB&J is beloved across all generations.

  • 30% of Americans say a PB&J sandwich is their number one choice for comfort food, followed by macaroni and cheese (21%) and grilled cheese (19%)
  • 30% of Americans are most likely to eat a PB&J sandwich when packing/making one for their child.
  • 60% of Moms say a PB&J sandwich is the easiest lunch to make.
  • 57% of Dads say a PB&J sandwich is the easiest lunch to make.
  • 48% of millennials say a PB&J sandwich is their go-to lunch item.
  • 37% of millennials eat a PB&J sandwich about two or more times per week.
  •  
    HOW PEANUT BUTTER & JELLY CAME TO BE

    Jelled, crushed fruits have been around since ancient times. It took a couple of additional millennia for peanut butter to appear.

    Peanut butter was developed in 1880 by a St. Louis doctor, to provide a protein food for people who had lost their chewing teeth. In those days, peanut butter was scooped out of barrels by the corner grocer.

     
    Thanks to the proselytizing of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, who owned a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, peanut butter became popular at health spas (sanitariums).

    It was lapped up by the rich and famous who populated the spas, and the recipe returned home with them. Peanut butter was the fad food of the elite. It moved into the mainstream only after the elite market was saturated.

    According to Peanuts: The Illustrious History of the Goober Pea by Andrew F. Smith

    Peanut butter became a trend (in the old days, a “fad”). According to sources in The Story Behind The Dish, peanut butter was originally paired [on crackers or tea sandwiches] with celery, cheese, nasturtium, pimento and watercress.

    Here’s more on the history of peanut butter.

    In a Good Housekeeping article published in May 1896, a recipe “urged homemakers to use a meat grinder to make peanut butter and spread the result on bread.” The following month, the culinary magazine Table Talk published a “peanut butter sandwich recipe.”

    The History Of The Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich

    According to The Story Behind The Dish: Classic American Foods by Mark McWilliams, the first published recipe for peanut butter and jelly on bread was from Julia Davis Chandler in 1901.

    The recipe also appeared in the 1901 Boston Cooking-School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics, edited by Fanny Farmer.

    It helped that peanut butter became popular around the time that sandwiches were becoming common lunch food in the U.S. According to McWilliams, they really “burst onto the scene in 1920s.”

    Check out the history of peanut butter and the history of jelly

    For the rest of PB&J sandwich, here are the history of bread, and the history of waffles.

     
      

    Comments off

    FOOD FUN: Easter Toast

    Easter Toast

    Arla Blueberry Cream Cheese

    Easter egg toast. Use the same concept for Christmas, St. Patrick’s Day, Valentine and other “holiday toast” (photos courtesy Arla USA).

     

    Make Easter egg toast as a holiday treat.

    These were made with blueberry cream cheese from Arla USA, maker of cream cheese spreads in blueberry, herbs & spices, peppercorn, original and lite.

    You can bring these toasts ready-made to the table, or bring the individual ingredients for an assemble-your-own activity.

    Use the same concept for Christmas toast, Independence Day Toast, St. Patrick’s Day toast, Valentine toast, and so on.
     
    RECIPE: EASTER TOAST

    Ingredients

  • Toasted bread of choice*
  • Cream cheese(s) of choice, e.g. plain and flavored, room temperature
  • Fruits of choice, e.g. apple slices, blueberries, grapes, raspberries
  • Vegetables of choice, e.g. bell pepper strips, chives/scallions, grape tomatoes
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SLICE the fruits and vegetables into halves, coins or matchsticks, as desired.

    2. CUT the toast into ovals using a large, sharp scissors. You can buy oval cookie cutters, but we printed out an oval template, cut out and placed over the toast as a guideline.

    3. ASSEMBLE and serve.

     
    USES FOR THE TOAST TRIMMINGS

    Don’t toss the toast trimmings. If you’re not the type to nibble as you cook, then:

  • Pulse them into breadcrumbs.
  • Use as croutons to top soups and salads.
  • Toss into omelets or garnish scrambles.
  • Make a savory parfait: cottage cheese and/or plain yogurt layered with toast bits and herbs.
  • Top an open-face sandwich.
  • Feed birds.
  •  

    ________________

    *Avoid thick slices or dense breads stuffed with dried fruits and nuts. They’re not as easy to cut into neat ovals.

     
      

    Comments off

    TIP OF THE DAY: Customize Your St. Patrick’s Day Bagel

    Green bagels are a novelty on St. Patrick’s Day. But here’s a more elegant way to enjoy your bagel, with green fruits and vegetables.

    The concept can be applied to any holiday or occasion with theme colors (see the lists below), and can be part of a bagel buffet for brunch. Bonus: It’s a way to add an extra helping of produce to your daily intake.

    On top of the cream cheese, arrange fruits and/or vegetables in your color theme, as demonstrated by Arla Foods, maker of the cream cheese spreads used on the bagel (photo #1 and photo #6 at the bottom).

    Fruit on bagels beyond a raisin bagel? See photo #5, below—and try it on English muffins, too.

    Pick some fruits and/or vegetables from your color list, and get started. The green group has the most options.

    (Note: Specialty colors, such as yellow watermelon or purple bell peppers, aren’t typically found at supermarkets. Head to a specialty produce store or a farmers market.)

    GREEN FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Asparagus
  • Avocado
  • Broccoli (including rabe and rapini)
  • Capers
  • Cucumber
  • Edamame
  • Green apples, figs, grapes, plums
  • Green beans
  • Green bell pepper
  • Green olives
  • Green onion (scallion) tops
  • Green peas
  • Herbs (basil, dill, parsley, etc.)
  • Jalapeño
  • Kiwi
  • Lettuces (everything from arugula to watercress)
  • Pickles/gherkins
  • Sprouts
  • Sugar snap peas, snow peas
  • Zucchini
  •  
    ORANGE FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Cantaloupe
  • Carrots
  • Chiles (aji amarillo, habanero, Thai yellow chile)
  • Dried apricots
  • Kumquats
  • Mango
  • Orange bell pepper
  • Orange cherry or heirloom tomatoes
  • Orange or mandarin segments
  • Orange watermelon
  • Papaya
  •  
    PURPLE/BLUE FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Berries: blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries
  • Dried blueberries
  • Eggplant (grilled)
  • Purple figs, grapes, plums
  • Purple olives
  • Red cabbage
  • Specialty varieties: purple bell peppers, carrots, cauliflower, corn, potatoes, string beans
  •  
    RED FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Dried cherries or cranberries
  • Jalapeño or other red chile
  • Pomegranate arils
  • Radicchio or red endive
  • Raspberries or strawberries
  • Red apples, grapes, plums
  • Red bell pepper
  • Red leaf lettuce
  • Red grapes
  • Red onion
  • Red tomatoes
  • Watermelon
  •  
    YELLOW FRUITS & VEGETABLES

  • Apples (golden delicious and others)
  • Chiles (aji, banana, golden cayenne, lemon, Hungarian yellow wax, pepperoncini, etc.)
  • Corn
  • Pineapple
  • Yellow bell pepper
  • Yellow tomatoes
  • Yellow watermelon
  •  

    Green Bagel Toppings

    Green Bagels

    Green Bagels

    Shamrock Bagels

    Bagel With Fruit Topping

    [1] and [6] The alternative solution from Arla Foods. [2] Conventional green bagels from Einstein Bros Bagels. [3] Fancy (and $6 each!) at the Wynn Las Vegas. [4] The creativity award goes to the shamrock bagels at Sunrise Bagels and Cafe in Wyckoff, New Jersey. [5] Fruit-topped bagel from Number 2 Pencil.

     
    Green Bagel Toppings

    [6] Bagels with a buffet of green fruits and vegetables (photo courtesy Arla Foods).
      

    Comments off

    HOLIDAY: Cereal Donuts For National Cereal Day

    Donuts With Cereal Toppinf

    Cereal Donut

    Lactaid Whole Milk

    Types Of Lactaid Milk

    [1] and [2] Cereal-topped donuts and milk from Show Me The Yummy. [3] and [4] Lactaid for everyone! (photo courtesy Lactaid).

     

    March 7th is National Cereal Day, and here’s the big question: Do you drink the leftover milk in your cereal bowl?

    According to a survey by Wakefield Research*, 74% of Americans frequently drink the leftover milk in the bowl after finishing their cereal; 79%* feel that dairy milk tastes best as leftover cereal milk

    We’re one of them. We even pour extra milk into the bowl, just so we’ll have enough left over.

    People love cereal milk so much, that pastry chef Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City whipped up cereal milk as a standalone drink.

    Quirky? Yes. Tasty? Yes. Here’s a recipe to make you own.

    As a lactose-intolerant American, we just can’t enjoy nondairy milks—almond, coconut and soy milk, for example, on our cereal.

    Thank goodness for Lactaid. We live on their milk, chocolate milk, ice cream and cottage cheese. All are real milk products, neutralized with the addition of lactase (like Lactaid pills), which provides the enzyme our system no longer produces.

    We can drink and eat all we want, no Lactaid pill required.

    Lactaid sent us this special Milk + Cereal Donut recipe from Show Me The Yummy.

    Those of you who have no lactose issues can use regular milk.

    Prep time is 45 minutes, cook time is 10 minutes. We ate three of them today, and they are delish!

    LACTOSE-FREE MILK + CEREAL DONUTS MADE WITH LACTAID

    Ingredients

    For The Donut Base

  • Cooking spray
  • 1 (15.25 oz) box cake mix, yellow or chocolate (most store-bought cake mixes are lactose-free)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 cup Lactaid whole milk
  • 1/2 cup cereal of choice
  • 1 cup crushed cereal of choice
  •  
    For The Vanilla Glaze

  • 1-1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-3 tablespoons Lactaid whole milk
  • Pinch salt
     
    For The Chocolate Glaze
  • 1-1/4 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-3 tablespoons Lactaid Whole Milk, more if necessary
  • Pinch salt
  •  
    Topping

  • Cereal(s) of choice
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the donut base. Combine the milk and 1/2 cup cereal of choice in a small bowl. Let sit for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F and spray a donut pan or mini muffin tin with cooking spray.

    2. WHISK together in a large bowl the cake mix, egg, oil, and milk-cereal mixture until well combined. Stir in the crushed cereal.

    3. ADD the batter to the pan. For a mini-muffin pan, use a 1 tablespoon cookie scoop to fill the prepared mini muffin pan. Bake for 10-12 minutes. For a standard muffin pan, make a small cut in the corner of a gallon sized Ziplock bag and fill with the batter. Pipe the batter into the prepared donut pan. Fill only halfway up or they’ll spill over. Bake for 10-12 minutes.

    4. REMOVE from the pan and let cool.

    5. MAKE the vanilla glaze and/or chocolate glaze. Whisk together glaze ingredients in a medium sized bowl until smooth.

    6. ASSEMBLE: Dunk the cooled donut into the glaze and roll into cereal of choice. Enjoy immediately!

    ________________

    *The Lactaid Survey was conducted by Wakefield Research among 1,009 nationally representative U.S. adults ages 18+, between February 6th and 10th, 2017, using an email invitation and an online survey. Quotas have been set to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the U.S. adult population 18 and older.

     
      

    Comments off

    RECIPE: Corned Beef Hash Patties With Eggs

    Our mom loved corned beef and cabbage, and made it year-round in addition to St. Patrick’s Day.

    There were corned beef sandwiches for lunch the next day, and corned beef hash for Saturday breakfasts (Sunday was always bagels and lox).

    But our younger brother, a fussy eater, refused to try it, claiming it looked like dog food.

    If only Mom had thought to turn the hash into patties, like the folks at Idaho Potatoes; or to shape it in a food ring mold, like they do at Murray’s Cheese Bar.

    The recipe for the patties follows. If you want to make the hash in a ring, here’s a recipe; you can follow the Eggs Benedict preparation or just make the hash.

     
    RECIPE: CORNED BEEF HASH PATTIES WITH EGGS

    Instead of cubed potatoes and corned beef, the potatoes are riced, and the corned beef cubes embedded within. The result: smooth patties. Edward, this recipe is dedicated to you.

    Ingredients For 8 Patties

  • 2 pounds Idaho potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 cups leftover corned beef, cubed
  • 2 scallions, chopped green and white parts (substitute onion)
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup whole milk
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1½ teaspoons black pepper
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Option: 1 tablespoon of minced fresh parsley leaves
  •  
    Plus

  • Eggs any style
  •  

    Corned Beef Hash Patties

    Elegant Corned Beef Hash

    [1] A new way to serve corned beef hash: in neat patties (photo and recipe courtesy Idaho Potatoes). [2] Classic corned beef hash shaped in a ring and topped with a poached egg, at Murray’s Cheese Bar.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 200°F. Place the potatoes in a large pot, add 2 tablespoons of salt, fill with cold water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook until the potatoes are fork tender about 20 minutes. Drain well and place the potatoes back into the pot to cool for 10 minutes.

    2. USE a potato ricer or grater to rice the potatoes into a large bowl (you should have about 4 cups of riced potatoes). Add the cubed corned beef, chopped scallions, milk, egg and optional parsley to the potatoes, and stir well to combine. Season with salt and pepper.

    3. HEAT a cast iron skillet skillet over medium heat with about ¼ cup of vegetable oil, and form ½ cup of potato mix into a round patty. Fry for 3-4 minutes per side or until it’s a nice medium gold color on each side. Make sure you place no more than 3-4 potato patties at a time in the frying pan.

    4. TRANSFER the cookie patties to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain any excess oil. Season with more salt as desired (or allow for salt and pepper seasoning at the table).

    5. KEEP the cooked patties warm in the oven as you cook the eggs. Serve the patties hot as soon as the eggs are ready.

      

    Comments off



    © Copyright 2005-2017 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.