Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed
THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Breakfast

RECIPE: Fried Eggs On Rice

Who needs toast? Serve this brunch idea from Gardenia restaurant in New York City.

A fried or poached egg is served atop a bed of rice with roasted vegetables. It’s a yummy way to use up leftovers.

  • Use brown rice or other whole grain for more nutrition.
  • You can also use polenta or mashed potatoes for the bed.
  • If you don’t have any roasted vegetables—Gardenia used a mélange of beets, butternut squash, carrots and onions—do a quick microwave cook to soften, then sauté, what you do have.
  • A garnish of microgreens finishes the dish at Gardenia, but you can use chives, basil…or perhaps a crumbled bacon garnish?
  •  

    /home/content/71/6181571/html/wp content/uploads/fried egg on rice gardeniaNYC 230

    A new way to enjoy fried eggs! Photo courtesy Gardenia Restaurant | NYC.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Make A Frittata

    Making an omelet requires a bit of technique. If your omelets don’t look as lovely as you’d like, there’s an easy solution: Make a frittata!

    With an omelet, the filling ingredients are placed on the beaten eggs that are setting in the pan. As the omelet continues to cook, it is folded with a spatula to envelop the ingredients (that’s the part that requires practice, practice, practice).

    With a frittata—the name comes from the Italian friggere, to fry—the eggs and other ingredients are mixed together, then cooked more slowly than an omelet. The egg mixture completely fills a round skillet: no folding. The result looks like a crustless quiche. As with a quiche, a frittata can also be enjoyed at room temperature.

    Frittatas can be packed with vegetables, a sneaky way to get people to eat more of them. You can use the cookware you have, or consider a frittata pan (see photo below), ideal for stovetop cooking when you have to flip the frittata. Alternatively, you can bake it in the oven—no flipping needed.

       

    /home/content/71/6181571/html/wp content/uploads/summer frittata crostini labreabakery 230 copy

    Wouldn’t you like to wake up to a weekend brunch like this? It’s easy to make a frittata, watermelon and feta salad, and luscious summer tomatoes on goat cheese-topped toast.

    WHAT TO ADD TO YOUR FRITTATA

    Check the fridge: You may not have to buy anything else! Frittatas are a great receptacle for leftovers—even cooked pasta and grains.

    Vegetables: You can add almost any vegetable* to the beaten eggs, but take advantage of the summer’s specialties: bell pepper, chanterelle mushrooms, corn, eggplant, lima beans, okra, peas, sweet onion, tomatillo, tomato, yellow squash, Yukon Gold potatoes, zucchini.

    Cheese: melting cheeses like Emmenthal/“Swiss cheese,” mozzarella and Provolone; grating cheeses such as Asiago, Grana Padano, Parmigiano Reggiano/Parmesan and Pecorino Romano; and soft cheeses including feta and goat cheese/chèvre.

    Fish/Seafood: clams, mussels, shrimp, smoked salmon.

    Meat: ham/prosciutto, roast chicken/turkey, salame, sausage. When you make chicken or ham, set some aside for the next night’s frittata.

    Accents: capers, chiles (fresh or dried), herbs, olives, red pepper flakes.

     
    *For starters, consider artichoke, asparagus, bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, chard, eggplant, kale, mushrooms, onion/leek/green onion, potatoes (boiled/roasted), spinach, zucchini.

     

    /home/content/71/6181571/html/wp content/uploads/frittata pan cuisinart amz 230

    A frittata pan is actually two frying pans that hook together for easy flipping, and can be easily detached for regular use. This one is a Cuisinart Frittata Pan.

     

    RECIPE: OVEN FRITTATA

    With this recipe, you can go heavy on the vegetables—2 cups instead of one. Or, you can make a cheesy frittata by adding a cup of shredded cheese instead of the second cup of vegetables.

    Some cooks start the frittata in a fry pan on the stove, then finish it in the oven. Fritattas can be cooked only on the stove top, but this means they have to be flipped—not easy for some people. Some frittatas can be cooked entirely in the oven, like this one.

    Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetables, diced or sliced
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt and freshly-ground black pepper to taste
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (cheddar, mozzarella or other
    favorite)—or 1 additional cup vegetables
  • One tablespoon chopped fresh herbs (basil, dill, chives,
    oregano, parsley, rosemary, etc.)
  • Olive oil
  • Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. While the oven heats, cook the vegetables: sauté in olive oil until tender or steam in the microwave.

    2. BEAT the eggs, herbs, pepper, salt, and Parmesan cheese together. Put a tablespoon of oil in a heavy, oven-proof skillet. Pour the egg mixture into the pan and scatter the vegetables on top.

    3. BAKE for 15 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese, which will melt.

    4. SLIDE the frittata onto a serving plate. It can be served hot or at room temperature.
     
    ANOTHER TIP

    There are thousands of frittata recipes online, with the oven, stove top or stove top/broiler cooking techniques. Try them all, and see which works best for you.

      

    Comments

    JULY 4TH BREAKFAST: Yogurt Parfait With Star-Shaped Toast

    breakfast-parfait-star-toast-smuckersFB-230

    A spectacular breakfast parfait. Photo courtesy Smucker’s.

     

    What better way to celebrate July 4th, than to wake up to a red, white and blue yogurt parfait and star-shaped toast.

    Smucker’s uses its Natural Orange Marmalade Fruit Spread, Seedless Strawberry Jam and Blueberry Preserves to make the parfait. Prep time is 20 minute, cook time is 5 minutes.

    RECIPE: RED, WHITE & BLUE PARFAIT

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1 cup sliced fresh strawberries or fresh red raspberries
  • 1 medium ripe banana, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1/2 cup fresh blueberries
  • 1-1/4 cups plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup orange marmalade
  • 1 loaf (16 ounces) presliced cinnamon swirl bread, frozen until firm
  • Blueberry or strawberry jam or preserves for the toast
  • Preparation

    1. HEAT the broiler to HIGH. Combine the strawberries, banana and blueberries in medium bowl. Combine the yogurt and marmalade in separate small bowl.

    2. DIVIDE half of the fruit mixture into 4 parfait glasses. Top each with half of the yogurt mixture. Repeat the layers.

    3. CUT out 4 (1-inch) and 8 (3-inch) star shapes from frozen sliced bread using 1-inch and 3-inch cookie cutters. Place on a baking sheet. Broil five inches from the heat for 1 to 1-1/2 minutes, turning when lightly toasted.

    4. PLACE one small toasted star on top of each parfait. Spread the remaining toasted stars with jam and serve with the parfaits.

     
      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Artisan Bistro Beyond Breakfast

    Artisan Bistro wants to make it easy for everyone to eat delicious, nutrition-rich meals. The company makes lunch/dinner entrees, burritos and breakfasts—single-serving frozen meals made with the best lean proteins, whole grains, vegetables and healthy fats.

    We received samples of their Beyond Breakfast line, and it was eye-opening: delicious and only 170 to 200 calories per satisfying serving. And, the entrees are microwave-cooked in just four minutes. It will cook while you’re making a cup of coffee with a single-serve machine.

    The vegetarian breakfasts use egg whites only, but you’ll never notice the absence of the yolk because each preparation is so well seasoned and the egg whites are patties shaped like a poached egg.

    In five varieties, the Beyond Breakfast options include:

  • Country-Style Potatoes & Egg, a modern twist on a classic favorite made with an egg white patty, all-natural turkey, organic kale and red potatoes finished with spicy white pepper.
  •  

    Artisan-Bistro-italian-hash-230

    Breakfast in a box: satisfying, nutritious, calorie-friendly. Photo courtesy Artisan Bistro.

  • Huevos Rancheros Verde, a south-of-the-border-inspired mix of an egg white patty, organic black beans, bell peppers and creamy jack cheese.
  • Italian-Style Hash & Egg, a savory blend of an egg white patty, all-natural turkey, organic asparagus, white beans and bell peppers.
  • Mediterranean Breakfast Stack, a zesty offering with an egg white patty, organic polenta, eggplant and sharp romano cheese.
  • Veggie Chorizo Huevos Rancheros, all the flavor of traditional meat chorizo in a vegetarian version, with an egg whites patty, bell peppers and jack cheese.
  •  
    All varieties are contain 70% or more organic ingredients, no GMOs and are gluten free.

    After a week of Artisan Bistro breakfasts, We’re hooked on the flavor, ease, better nutrition and lower calories than what we usually make.

    Learn more at TheArtisanBistro.com, including a store locator.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Burger Eggs Benedict

    Another good idea for Father’s Day brunch: this mashup of Eggs Benedict and a burger. that’s filling enough for lunch or dinner as well.

    The recipe is courtesy Gina of Running to the Kitchen, via Safest Choice pasteurized eggs. Gina used pasteurized eggs for the blender hollandaise sauce, which is not cooked. Pasteurized eggs ensure that there are no dangerous pathogens in the raw eggs.

    Gina serves the recipe open face; but we toasted both halves of the English muffins and served the top on the side. Alternatively, you can use the muffin tops for another meal.

    Prep and cook time is 20 minutes.

    Here’s the history of Eggs Benedict.

    Here’s a Surf & Turf Eggs Benedict Recipe with filet mignon and lobster.

    Here are substitutes for the English muffin.

    RECIPE: BURGER EGGS BENEDICT

    Ingredients For 4 Burgers

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 ounces baby spinach
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 English muffin bottoms
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Optional garnish: chives, chopped
  •    

    open-faced-burger-eggs-benedict

    This Eggs Benedict variation substitutes a burger for the Canadian bacon! Photo courtesy SafeEggs.com.

     

    Ingredients For The Hollandaise Sauce

  • 2 pasteurized egg yolk(s)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
  •  

    open-faced-burger-eggs-benedict-safeggs230

    Are you hungry yet? Photo courtesy SafeEggs.com.

     

    Preparation

    1. HEAT a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil, spinach, garlic and lemon juice; cook until wilted. Transfer the spinach to a small dish and set aside.

    2. COMBINE the beef, salt and pepper in a bowl. Mix together until incorporated and form into 4 patties. Cook the burgers in the same skillet used for spinach on medium-high heat for about 4-5 minutes per side until desired doneness. Set the burgers aside.

    3. TOAST the English muffins.

    4. MAKE the hollandaise sauce: Combine the egg yolks, lemon juice, butter and cayenne in a blender. Blend until smooth and well combined. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    5. ASSEMBLE: Place the burger on top of the English muffin. Place the spinach on top of the burger and a poached egg on top of the spinach. Spoon the hollandaise sauce over the top, sprinkle on the optional chives and serve while warm.

     
    WHY IT’S FATHER’S DAY, NOT FATHERS’ OR FATHERS DAY

    While Mother’s Day became an official holiday in 1914, Father’s Day wasn’t declared an official holiday until 1972. President Richard Nixon signed a proclamation making Father’s Day a federal holiday that falls on the third Sunday in June.

    At the state level, though, the tradition began much earlier. In Washington State, Sondra Smart Dodd, inspired by a Mother’s Day sermon she attended in 1909, believed there should be a corresponding holiday to celebrate fathers. She gained support for her idea, and the first Father’s Day was celebrated by Washington State in 1910 in June, the month of her father’s birthday.

    Some people wonder why Father’s Day has an apostrophe before the “s.” The quick answer is that Mother’s Day set a precedent. The apostrophe before the “s,” a singular plural, means that Father’s Day (and Mother’s Day) “belongs” to each individual father (and mother).

    If the apostrophe fell after the “s,” the possessive plural, it would be a holiday “belonging” to all fathers as a collective.

    So why does April Fools’ Day take the possessive plural rather than the singular plural? Perhaps because the individual fool doesn’t matter in the same way that each individual parent matters to his/her children.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Spiced Stout Waffles For Father’s Day

    Go back a couple of centuries and you’ll find that many people in Europe and America, including children, drank beer for breakfast because local water supplies were frequently contaminated.

    While your municipality takes care that no disease-producing microbes are in your tap water, you can still have beer for breakfast. Put it in your waffles!

    Here’s one of the delicious beer-infused recipes we received from the Craft Brewers Association at CraftBeer.com, contributed by Nicole, author of Dula Notes.

    Nicole uses Bell’s Double Cream Stout, one of her favorite local Michigan beers, to add spice and character to homemade waffles.

    Try it now: It might be just what you’re looking for for Father’s Day.

    And if Dad really likes stout, consider gifting him these stout glasses from Spielgau, or these from Libbey.
     
    RECIPE: WAFFLES WITH STOUT

    Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing the
    waffle maker
  • 1 cup buttermilk or milk
  • 1 cup stout
  •    

    stout-glass-spielgau-230

    A glass of stout. Photo courtesy Spielgau.

  • 2-1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1-1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon cardamom
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • Real maple syrup
  •  

    stout-waffles-dulanotes-230

    Mix stout into your waffles. Photo courtesy DulaNotes.com.

     

    Preparation

    1. MELT the butter in a medium pot over low heat. Add the buttermilk and stout, stir and heat until warm. Turn off the heat.

    2. COMBINE the flour, sea salt, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, cinnamon and cardamom in a large bowl. Whisk to blend.

    3. WHISK the eggs in another large bowl until well beaten. Add the vanilla and whisk to combine. Pour about one cup of the warm butter/buttermilk/beer mixture into the eggs and whisk vigorously to combine. Pour the rest of the mixture into the bowl, whisking constantly.

    4. ADD the liquid mixture to the dry mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until the flour disappears, but the batter is still a little lumpy. Take care not overmix, but make sure that the flour is incorporated. Let the batter sit as the waffle iron heats up.

     

    5. SPREAD a thin coat of butter on the preheated waffle iron to prevent the waffles from sticking. Pour the batter into the waffle iron and cook until the waffles are golden brown. Serve immediately with maple syrup.
     
    WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MAPLE SYRUP & PANCAKE SYRUP?

    Check it out. And only buy real maple syrup!
     
    TYPES OF BEER

    Check out the difference between stout and other types of beer in our Beer Glossary.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Savory French Toast

    Saturday was always “French Toast for breakfast day” in our family. It was always sweet, with real maple syrup and fresh fruit.

    So when we came across this recipe for savory French Toast from Castello Cheese (which used its Aged Havarti in the recipe), we picked the following Saturday (yesterday) to give it a try.

    The result: a nifty breakfast option for those who don’t particularly like syrup or other sweet toppings, and a change of pace for those who do. It evokes a breakfast grilled cheese sandwich on a soft, eggy base of pan-fried bread, rather than on crisp toasted bread.

    It’s a nice change of pace. Just as you can vary the toppings on French Toast, you can use different savory toppings.

    For those of you who remember Creamed Chipped Beef On Toast, you can make a French Toast version. Use leftover beef or jerky to replace the tomato and cheese in the recipe below. No beef? Check the fridge: You can adapt just about any savory leftovers.

     

    savory-french-toast-castello-230

    Savory French Toast with cheese and tomatoes. Photo courtesy Castello Cheese.

     
    Test out the recipe now: It may be just what you’re looking for for Father’s Day.

    Prep time is 40 minutes. For prettier color, look for heirloom cherry tomatoes or a mix of red, orange and yellow varieties.

    As you can see in the photo, the Castello chef used a three-inch round cookie cutter to cut the bread in circles after it comes out of the pan. We’re not so elegant; and besides, we don’t want to give up that cut-away French toast.
     
    RECIPE: SAVORY FRENCH TOAST

    Ingredients For 6 Servings
     
    For The Tomato Topping

  • 3 cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  •  
    For The French Toast

  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese (substitute Asiago or Pecorino Romano)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 6 1½-inch thick slices brioche, egg bread or jalapeño Italian bread
  • 2 ounces aged Havarti, shaved (substitute Jack, aged Gouda, Tilsit or other shaveable cheese)
  •  

    monte-cristo-kikkoman-panko230

    A Monte Cristo sandwich is ham and Gruyère on French Toast. Photo courtesy Kikkoman.

     

    Variations

  • Blue cheese and sliced apples
  • Feta and kalamata olives with dill or oregano
  • Smoked salmon, caviar and crème fraîche
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREPARE the tomatoes: Sauté the tomatoes in the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the oregano and vinegar and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Season the mixture with salt and pepper and set aside, keeping warm until ready to serve.

    2. MAKE the French Toast: Whisk the milk, egg, Parmesan, salt and pepper in a shallow pan. Dip the bread into the milk mixture and pan fry it in a hot non-stick pan for 3 minutes per side.

    3. TRANSFER the bread onto serving plates and top with the tomato mixture. Shave the cheese over the tomatoes. Serve immediately.

     
    THE HISTORY OF FRENCH TOAST

    The dish known in America as French toast has roots at least as far back as ancient Rome, where it was a sweet dish. In fact, pain perdu (lost bread), the current French name for the dish, was once called pain à la romaine, or Roman bread.

    While the story evolved that French Toast was a food of the poor, trying to scrape together a meal from stale bread, recipes from ancient and medieval times denote that it was fare for wealthy people.

  • Recipes used white bread, a luxury, with the crusts cut off. Poor people ate brown bread, much cheaper because the wheat endosperm did not have to be milled and painstakingly hand-sifted through screens to create white flour.
  • Costly ingredients such as spices (cinnamon, cloves, mace and nutmeg), sugar and almond milk are found in numerous recipes.
  • The cooked bread was topped with costly honey or sugar.
  • And cookbooks themselves were the province of the privileged: Only wealthy people and clergy learned to read.
  •  
    THE MONTE CRISTO SANDWICH

    More recently, French toast has evolved into a savory sandwich, the Monte Cristo. It is an evolution of the croque-monsieur, a crustless sandwich of ham and Gruyère cheese, buttered and lightly browned on both sides in a skillet or under a broiler.

    The croque-monsieur was invented in Paris in 1910. A variation with a baked egg on top is called a croque-madame. Neither sandwich was battered, like French toast.

    The Monte Cristo sandwich, a triple-decker sandwich, battered and pan-fried, was invented at the Hotel del Coronado in San Diego. According to the L.A. Times, the first recipe in print is in the Brown Derby Cookbook, published in 1949.

    Here’s the recipe so you can try it for lunch—although probably not on the same day you have French Toast for breakfast.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Brown Rice Pudding For Breakfast

    Yesterday we popped into our local Le Pain Quotidien to meet a colleague for coffee. On the breakfast menu was brown rice pudding, topped with mixed nuts and raisins.

    We love rice pudding, so of course we ordered it: our first “breakfast” rice pudding. It had much less sugar than dessert rice pudding, and, though served at room temperature, was not far removed from other porridge, like Cream Of Rice or oatmeal.

    We went online and found a breakfast rice pudding recipe from Tiffany at LiveLearnLoveEat.com.

    We also found the recipe below from the folks at Lundberg, the California-based premium rice producer, which uses just 1/2 cup of brown sugar in the entire recipe.

    Both recipes are made with cooked rice, and are a great way to use leftover rice. Add nuts for protein!

    RECIPE: RICE PUDDING WITH BROWN RICE

    Ingredients

  • 1½ cups cooked short grain brown rice
  • 3 eggs
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  •    

    livelearnloveeat.com-230

    You can justify brown rice pudding: It’s whole grain! Photo courtesy LiveLearnLoveEat.com.

  • Optional mix-ins: ½ cup raisins, chopped dates or other dried fruit—blueberries, cherries, cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • Nutmeg
  • Optional garnish: nuts (try a mix), shredded coconut
  • Optional: half and half, heavy cream, whipped cream
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BEAT the eggs; add the sugar and beat until smooth. Add the milk, salt and vanilla and blend.

    2. ADD the rice and the raisins or other dried fruit. Pour into a greased shallow baking dish and sprinkle with nutmeg.

    3. SET the baking dish in pan of hot water and bake at 350°F. After baking for approximately 30 minutes, gently stir the custard to suspend the rice. Continue baking for 60 minutes or until the custard is set (a total of 90 minutes).

    4. SERVE warm or cold, with cream as desired. To serve as dessert, you can use whipped cream.

     

    shrimp-miso-grits-silkroadtavern-230

    Shrimp and grits. Grits, ground from corn, are also porridge. Photo courtesy Silk Road Tavern.

     

    WHAT IS PORRIGE?

    Porridge is a dish made by boiling ground, crushed or chopped cereal in water, milk, or a combination of both. It is usually served hot, often sweetened, sometimes savory (the beloved cheese grits are porrige).

    Any cereal grain can be made into porrige. Some of the most common in the U.S.:

  • Buckwheat: kasha
  • Corn: cornmeal mush, grits, Indian pudding, polenta
  • Oats: oatmeal
  • Rice: congee, Cream of Rice
  • Wheat: Cream of Wheat, farina, Wheatena
  •  
    Other cereals—flax, millet, quinoa, rye, sorghum and spelt, for example—are also made into porridge; as are non-cereals like legumes and potatoes. Pease porridge, from the old English nursery rhyme, is made from dried peas.

     

    WHAT IS GRUEL?

    Gruel is a thinner version of porridge—so thin that it can be drunk, rather than spooned. Historically, gruel has been a staple of the Western peasant diet.

    Gruel is often made from barley, hemp and millet. In hard times, chestnuts and even the less tannic acorns of some oaks were ground into flour and made into gruel.

    Gruel was a cheap way for officials to feed the poor—most famously described by Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, a ward of the parrish, who couldn’t even get a second helping of it in the orphanage.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Berry Croissants

    croissant-fruit-cheese-castelloUSA-230

    Berry croissants: a yummy idea. Photo courtesy Castello Cheese.

     

    For Sunday brunch or afternoon tea*, here’s a fun alternative to a chocolate croissant that provides another reason to enjoy seasonal berries.

    RECIPE: BERRY CROISSANTS

    Ingredients

  • Croissants
  • Berries: blackberries, raspberries, strawberries or a mix
  • Mascarpone, fresh chèvre (goat cheese—look especially for the honey chèvre at Trader Joe’s), cream cheese or other spreadable cheese
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SPLIT the croissant and spread the bottom half with cheese.

    2. ADD the berries, whole or sliced, depending on size.

     
    Thanks to Castello USA for the idea (they used blue cheese).

     
    *Who has afternoon tea, you say? Well, THE NIBBLE is a far cry from Downtown Abbey, but we serve afternoon tea daily. Not everyone drinks tea, but it’s our chance to sample some of the many foods that arrive at our doorstep—baked goods, candy, jam, crackers, cheese, pâté and so forth—including coffee, tea and other beverages. If you want to serve a proper afternoon tea, here’s how.

     
      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Organic Stoneground Flakes

    We first learned of Back To The Roots, an environmentally-focused start-up founded in Oakland, California by two Berkeley grads, when they sent us a Mushroom Farm two years ago. It’s a kit to grow mushrooms indoors that utilizes recycled coffee grounds.

    The company has since created Water Garden, a device that sits over a fish tank and grows herbs; and Garden In A Can, their own version of herbs-in-a-can.

    These are specialty products. But recently, the company launched another product that has a place in every kitchen.

    It’s a delicious, whole-grain breakfast cereal, with the curiously generic name of Organic Stoneground Flakes.

    They’re not exactly flakes, but shaped like tiny bowls. That adds to their charm; but whatever the shape, we love their flavor and the wholesome nutrition.

    Organic Stoneground Flakes are our new favorite cereal!

     

    box-bowl-230ps

    Our new favorite cereal. Photo courtesy Back To The Roots.

     
    WHAT’S IN THEM

    Just three ingredients: organic wheat, a bit of sugar and a dash of salt.

    The U.S.-grown, hard red spring wheat is 100% stoneground, the ancient milling process that preserves all the protein, fiber and flavor of the whole grain.

    The cereal is non-GMO and has a whopping 40g of whole grain per serving, almost your daily requirement of 48g; along with 6g protein and 5g fiber. There’s just a pinch of salt, and a small amount of sugar that balances the flavors without tasting sweet.
     
    MORE GOOD NEWS

    Packaged in an easily recyclable milk carton, the “flakes” are a crunchy snack from the box, a dry cereal to top with milk or yogurt, a crunchy topping for fruit salad, an ingredient for trail mix.

    An order of two 11-ounce boxes is $9.99 plus $2 shipping on the company website.

    The product’s mission is to “pour it forward”: Every photo posted to Facebook.com/backtotheroots generates a donated box of Stoneground Flakes to an elementary school cafeteria.

    WHY YOU NEED WHOLE GRAINS.

      

    Comments

    « Previous entries Next Page » Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact
    Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com