Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Breakfast

RECIPE: Nutella French Toast

nutella-jam-french-toast-bauli-230

Nutella, jam and panettone French toast.
Photo courtesy Bauli.

 

Panettone (pah-neh-TOE-nay) began in medieval Italy as a Christmas bread; but today, the fluffy yellow yeast bread variously filled with raisins, other dried fruit and orange peel, is available year-round. There’s also a version with chocolate bits—an ingredient not available until the latter half of the 19th century.

Bauli, whose panettone are imported into the U.S., creates year-round recipes Raspberry Jam & Hazelnut Spread Stuffed Panettone French Toast.

We have more panettone recipes, too: Panettone Bread Puddin, Panettone Classic French Toast and a Panettone Nutella Sandwich.

RECIPE: PANETTONE FRENCH TOAST WITH NUTELLA & JAM

Think of this as the most indulgent peanut butter and jelly sandwich you’ve ever had—except that it’s chocolate hazelnut spread instead of peanut spread.

You can make it for breakfast, but also eat it for dessert.

 
Ingredients For 2 French Toast Sandwiches

For The Whipped Cream

  • ½ cup heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  •  
    For The French Toast

  • ½ cup milk or cream
  • 2 eggs
  • Pinch of cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 slices Bauli Panettone, left out overnight if possible
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  •  
    For The Filling

  • ¼ cup hazelnut spread
  • ¼ cup raspberry jam or preserves
  •  

    Preparation

    1. WHIP the cream and vanilla with a hand mixer until soft peaks form. Add powdered sugar and mix until incorporated.

    2. WHISK together the milk, eggs, cinnamon and vanilla. Melt butter in a pan over medium heat. Soak Panettone slices in mixture for 30 seconds on each side. Place bread into the pan and cook until bottom is golden and crisp. Turn, and repeat with other side. Repeat with all of the bread, keeping it warm in a 200° oven.

    3. SPREAD 2 tablespoons of hazelnut spread and 2 tablespoons of jam on two of the bread slices. Top with remaining slices and a dollop of fresh whipped cream. Serve warm.
     

    ABOUT PANETTONE

    Panettone is a medieval Italian Christmas yeast bread, filled with candied fruits and raisins. The Milanese specialty, is tall, dome-shaped and airy, in contrast to the other famous Christmas bread, panforte, which is is short and dense (although there is a less common, flat version of panettone).

     

    bauli-panettone-box-230

    Panettone: It’s not just for the holidays! Photo courtesy Bauli.

     
    Panettone means “large loaf” in Italian. While the origins of a sweet leavened bread date back to Roman times, and a tall, leavened fruitcake can be seen in a 16th century painting by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, the first known mention of panettone with Christmas is found in the 18th century writings of Pietro Verri, who refers to it as “pane di tono.”

    The dough is cured for several days (like sourdough), giving the cake its distinctive fluffiness. Raisins, candied orange peel, citron and lemon zest, are added dry; some modern versions add chocolate (which was not available when the recipe originated); others are plain.

    The classic Panettone accompaniment is a sweet hot beverage or a sweet wine such as spumante or moscato; but any dessert wine will do. Some Italians add a side of crema di mascarpone, a cream made from mascarpone cheese, eggs, and amaretto (or you can substitute zabaglione).
     
    SEE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BREAD IN OUR BREAD GLOSSARY.

      

    Comments

    TIP: Check The Sugar Grams

    It’s National Breakfast Month and we have a “public service announcement” on healthy breakfasts. You’ve heard it before, but if you’re not convinced that you’re eating the best breakfast you can, read on.

    More than 100 studies have linked eating breakfast with a reduced risk of obesity (and other health benefits, including diabetes and heart disease) and a mental edge—enhanced memory, attention, the speed of processing information, reasoning, creativity, learning, and verbal abilities.

    Just be sure that you don’t blow your entire daily quota of added sugar on breakfast (more about this in a minute).

    Healthcare professionals recommend a breakfast that combines good carbs and fiber with some protein. On the list:

  • Cottage cheese: Enjoy it plain (try some cinnamon or cracked pepper), with fruit, yogurt, or as a bread spread.
  • Eggs: A good source of protein, research has shown that the cholesterol in the yolks has less of an impact on blood cholesterol than previously thought. You can buy peeled, hard-boiled eggs for grab-and-go, or make your own. We poach eggs in the microwave in under a minute (the technique is below).
  • Cold cereal: Bran or whole-grain cereals (such as shredded wheat) are your best bet. Look for a product with less than 5 grams of sugar and at least 5 grams of fiber.
  • Fruit: Add bananas, berries, dried fruit, grapefruit, melon or other favorite. Enjoy it with cottage cheese and/or plain yogurt.
  •    

    oatmeal-fruit-beauty-zulka-230

    Don’t buy pre-sweetened cereals. Add your own sugar, honey or noncaloric sweetener, so you can control the amount. Photo courtesy Zulka.

  • Greek yogurt: It has nearly twice as much protein as regular yogurt. Instead of sugar-laden flavors, add fruit and a light sprinkling of sugar, honey or noncaloric sweetener to plain, nonfat yogurt.
  • Oatmeal: Ideally, make steel-cut oats, which contain more fiber than rolled or instant oats. They take longer, but you can prepare a large batch and reheat individual portions each morning. Any type of oatmeal except the flavored ones is a better-for-you choice. Avoid flavored varieties, which are packed with sugar. Instead, sprinkle a teaspoon of sugar or a bit of honey on plain oatmeal, and add fruit for natural sweetness (plus nuts for added protein).
  • Peanut Butter or almond butter: These are excellent sources of protein. Spread them on whole grain bread.
  • Spreads: Butter and jam just add empty fat and calories. If you need a bread spread, consider almond butter, peanut butter, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt.
  • Whole grain bread: This is an easy switch. Whole grains products—in bagels, bread, crackers, English muffins, whatever—contain more fiber and nutrients than refined, white flour products.
  •  

    Healthful add ons:

  • Sprinkle your cereal, cottage cheese or yogurt with wheat germ or ground flaxseed.
  • Add a banana—a healthful carbohydrate that keeps you feeling fuller longer.
  •  

    granulated-sugar-beauty-zulka-230

    Too much sugar is hidden in processed foods.
    Read the nutrition label! Photo courtesy
    Zulka.

     

    SUGAR GUIDELINES

    Many people don’t realize how much sugar is hidden in processed foods. The nutrition labels can be eye opening. A can of soda may contain up to 10 teaspoons or 40 grams of sugar—more than your entire daily recommended discretionary sugar intake! A tablespoon of ketchup has 1 teaspoon of sugar.

    “Sugar” includes all caloric sweeteners: brown sugar, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, fruit juice concentrate, honey, molasses, syrup, table sugar, etc. (here are the different types of sugar).

    The American Heart Association, the World Health Organization and other bodies recommend limiting sugar intake to no more than half of your daily discretionary calorie allowance:

  • Women: no more than 100 calories per day—about 6 teaspoons, or 25 grams
  • Men: no more than 150 calories per day—about 9 teaspoons, or 36 grams
  •  
    The shocker: You can ingest that amount of sugar in one bowl of sweetened breakfast cereal!

     
    These guidelines are from Consumer Reports, which profiles healthy breakfast foods in its October issue.

    What To Look For In A Cereal

  • Few ingredients
  • 5 grams or more of fiber
  • No more than 3 grams of fat
  • No more than 8 grams of sugar
  • No more than 140 milligrams of sodium
  •  
    What To Look For In A Yogurt

  • 20 grams or less of sugar per serving
  • Those that supply at least 15 percent of the daily value of calcium
  • If fat intake is a concern, low- or nonfat product when possible
  •  
     

    HOW TO MAKE POACHED EGGS IN THE MICROWAVE

    You can use a microwave egg poacher or simply a bowl of water:

  • Fill a 1-cup microwaveable bowl or teacup with 1/2 cup water. Add the cracked egg.
  • Cover with a saucer and microwave on high for about 1 minute, or until the white is set but the yolk is still runny.
  • Remove with a slotted spoon.
  •   

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: “Brinner,” Pancakes For Dinner

    September is National Breakfast Month, and Krusteaz, makers of quality pancake, waffle and baking mixes, reminds us that breakfast food is not just for breakfast.

    It’s also for dinner. According to a recent Krusteaz survey, having breakfast food for dinner, or “brinner,” is a growing trend. A whopping 91% of Americans say they have eaten breakfast foods for dinner—and we count ourselves among them.

    Krusteaz suggests pancakes as part of your brinner.

  • Think of pancakes as a substitute for potatoes, potato pancakes or Yorkshire Pudding. Serve them with grilled meat or poultry and a savory sauce instead of maple syrup. We served them last night with leftover pot roast: a hit!
  • Consider a gluten-free mix. There are quite a few good ones on the market, including from Krusteaz.
  •  
    You don’t have to make them sweet, covered with maple syrup. Here’s a savory recipe from Krusteaz.

    RECIPE: APPLE HAM PANCAKE STRATA

    You can use a gluten-free mix; you can substitute chicken for ham; you can add your own special touches. We added some dried cherries and cranberries, and next time will toss in a cup of grated Gruyère.

    Prep time is 15 minutes, total time is 1 hour 10 minutes.

    Ingredients For 8-9 Servings

  • 6 pancakes, prepared as directed and cut into 1-inch squares
  • 1 cup diced apples
  • 1 cup diced ham
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/4 cup half and half
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons melted butter
  •    

    apple_ham_pancake-strata-krusteaz-230r-s

    The “secret ingredient” in this strata: pancakes! Photo courtesy Krusteaz.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F. Lightly grease an 8x8x2-inch baking pan.

    2. PLACE the pancake pieces, apples and ham in the pan. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, half and half and maple syrup; pour over the apple, ham and pancake mixture.

    3. BAKE 40-45 minutes or longer if a firmer strata is preferred. Let stand about 10 minutes before serving. Brush with melted butter, if desired, and serve.

     

    peanut-butter-jam-pancakes-krusteaz-230

    We love PB&J just as much on pancakes as
    on bread. Photo courtesy Krusteaz.

     

    RECIPE: PEANUT BUTTER & JELLY PANCAKES

    If you like PB&J sandwiches, this is a recipe for you! Prep time is 10 minutes, total time is 15 minutes. The PB adds protein to the dish. Enjoy it with a tall glass of milk.

    Ingredients For 7-8 Pancakes

  • Buttermilk pancake mix
  • Peanut butter
  • Jelly or jam of choice
  • Optional garnish: chopped peanuts; dried cherries, cranberries or raisins; powdered sugar; sliced fruit
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREPARE buttermilk pancakes as directed on package, adding 3 tablespoons peanut butter for each cup of mix used.

    2. POUR pancake batter on griddle; add 1 tablespoon of jam per pancake and swirl with a spoon. Cook as directed. Immediately upon removing pancakes from griddle, swirl additional jam on top.

    3. GARNISH as desired and serve.

     

    PANCAKE MAKING TIPS

    Krusteaz wants you to make perfect pancakes. Their tips:

    1. Use cold tap water.
    Water at 55°F-60°F makes fluffier pancakes and more tender waffles.

    2. Use an ice cream scoop.
    Get the perfect size pancake every time by using an ice cream scoop to measure the batter.

    3. Keep the leftovers.
    Don’t toss leftover pancakes; store them in the fridge for 2-3 days, or freeze them for up to 3 months. Store them in an airtight container. Microwave them or reheat them in a hot pan on the stove top.
     
    There are more tips, recipes and a store locator on the Krusteaz website.

      

    Comments

    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Lärabar’s Renula “Granola”

    The Lärabar brand of healthy, gluten free energy bars (now owned by General Mills) has reinvented granola. They call their new product Renola.

    The reinvention substitutes nuts for the traditional oats in granola. As a result, Renola is grain free, gluten free, soy-free and dairy-free. It is certified kosher by OU.

    It’s also crunchy and complex, with 6g protein per serving.

    A blend of non-GMO fruits, nuts, seeds and spices, Renola debuts in three flavors:

  • Berry Renola: almonds, cashews, pecans, sunflower seeds, molasses, blueberries, dried apple, raspberry powder, lemon juice, cinnamon, sea salt, vanilla.
  • Cinnamon Nut: almonds, sunflower seeds, molasses, pumpkin seeds, pecans, raisins, cashews, tapioca syrup, cinnamon, vanilla.
  • Cocoa Coconut: almonds, pecans, cashews, cocoa nibs, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, toasted coconut, coconut oil, cocoa powder.
  •  
    They are purchased in 1.25-ounce single serve packets. We received samples from the manufacturer and are pleased to report: the Berry and Cinnamon Nut flavors are superb.

    And Cocoa Coconut? The sample we received was a disappointment, with marginal cocoa flavor and a bit of coconut too dessicated to be enjoyable.

    But that doesn’t diminish the excitement of the other two flavors. They are wonderful, and thus, our Top Pick Of The Week.
     
    WAYS TO ENJOY RENOLA

  • On yogurt or cottage cheese
  • On oatmeal or other hot cereal
  • As a snack from the pack
  • In baking (add to cookie dough, for example)
  • As a dessert or salad garnish
  •  

    berry-renola-230

    Berry Renola, a nut-based replacement for conventional granola. Photo courtesy General Mills.

     

    Renola is currently available at select Target stores nationwide, as well as a variety of grocery chains including Kroger, Meijer, Ahold, Safeway and Shaws, with others to come. The suggested retail price is $1.79 per package.

    For more information about Lärabar and Renola, visit Larabar.com.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Rethink Your Breakfast Cereal

    assorted-bowls-kelloggs-230

    What’s missing from these bowls of cereal?
    Check the list below! Photo courtesy
    Kellogg’s.

     

    A recent survey revealed that when hearing the term “protein and grains,” only 20% of Americans think of cereal and milk. We’d be in that group.

    So Kellogg’s, America’s cereal powerhouse, created a pop-up restaurant, Recharge Bar, to educate families about the power of protein and grains found in a serving of dry breakfast cereal and one cup of skim milk. It popped up in our neighborhood at the end of June.

    Visitors were treated to a menu of “cereal, milk, fruit and more” recipes developed by Christina Tosi, owner of Momofuku Milk Bar in Brooklyn, New York. The idea is, if you rethink breakfast cereal, you can invent more tasty options, good-for-you options to enjoy not just for breakfast, but for snacks and other meals. (We’re part of the contingent that can happily have a bowl of cereal for dinner.)

    Beyond cereal, milk and fruit, Tosi added some “flavor boosts,” including nut butter, nuts, spices, herbs, and even fresh-ground coffee. Her menu:

  • Banana Nut: Special K Original Cereal, skim milk, almond butter drizzle, fresh banana slices.
  • Berry Au-Lait: Kellogg’s Frosted Mini Wheats, Milk Bar Cereal Milk (recipe below), ground coffee, fresh raspberries.
  •  

  • Cinnamon-Apple: Special K Protein Cereal, plain yogurt, ground cinnamon, fresh apple slices.
  • Pistachio Lemon: Special K Original Cereal and Frosted Flakes, 2% milk, pistachio nuts, thyme.
  • The King: Kellogg’s Raisin Bran, skim milk, toasted peanuts, banana chips.
  • Tropical Mermaid: Kellogg’s Frosted Mini Wheats and Rice Krispies, skim milk, toasted coconut flakes, sesame seeds, fresh pineapple slices.
  •  
    Inspired? The next time you open your kitchen cupboards, scan the shelves to see what might belong in tomorrow’s bowl of cereal. Lemon zest? Nutella? Stone fruit?

    Learn more at Kellogg’s microsite, Cereal And Milk.
     
    BEYOND MILK

    Not everyone loves cow’s milk. Consider replacing it with almond milk, soy milk or yogurt. Don’t restrict yourself to the plain flavors, either. Chocolate lover? Try chocolate almond or soy milk.

    Go global with kefir, which originated in the North Caucasus Mountains of Russia lassi from India, yogurt-like drinks.

    Or, try Christina Tosi’s “Cereal Milk.”

    This recipe is served at Momofuku Milk Bar, where it is served as a beverage and used in recipes like panna cotta. The restaurant says that “it tastes like the milk at the bottom of a bowl of Corn Flakes.”

    To us, it tastes like whole milk infused with a substantial amount of malted milk. It’s heady stuff. Frankly, we’d rather have plain milk with our cereal. But for the many fans, here’s the recipe:

     

    RECIPE: CEREAL MILK™

    Ingredients For 2-1/2 Cups/4 Servings

  • 2-3/4 cups Corn Flakes
  • 3-3/4 cups cold milk
  • 2 tablespoons tightly packed) light brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 300°F.

    2. SPREAD the Corn Flakes on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly toasted. Cool completely. Toasting the cornflakes before steeping them deepens the flavor of the milk.

    3. TRANSFER the cooled cornflakes to a large pitcher. Pour the milk into the pitcher and stir vigorously. Let steep for 20 minutes at room temperature.

     

    cherrymktginst-ps-230

    No fresh fruit? Use dried. Raisins are popular, but we think dried cherries are even better. Add some pistachios and a sprinkle of cinnamon. Photo courtesy Cherry Marketing Institute.

     

    4. STRAIN the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve, collecting the milk in a medium bowl. The milk will drain off quickly at first, then become thicker and starchy toward the end of the straining process. Using the back of a ladle (or your hand), wring the milk out of the cornflakes, but do not force the mushy cornflakes through the sieve.

    5. WHISK the brown sugar and salt into the milk until fully dissolved. Taste the Cereal Milk. If you want it a little sweeter, add a little more brown sugar. If you want a more mellow flavor, add a splash of fresh milk and a pinch of salt.

    6. USE immediately or store in a covered pitcher or jar, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Fresh Fruit & Toast, a.k.a. Breakfast Tartines

    Many people spread jam on their toast. But in the summer season, why not use fresh berries instead?

    Pair those berries with your favorite dairy spread: cottage cheese, cream cheese, crème fraîche, fromage blanc, fromage frais/quark, goat cheese, mascarpone, sour cream, yogurt.

    In France, these would be called tartines: open-face sandwiches.

    You don’t have to toast the bread. Toast adds crunch and texture, but if fresh-baked bread is calling to you, enjoy it straight from the loaf.

    You can also enjoy these tartines as a snack. They’re just right for a mid-afternoon tea break.

    RECIPE: FRUIT TOAST / BREAKFAST TARTINES

    Ingredients

  • Fruit: berries, mango or other soft fruit
  • Bread of choice
  • Dairy spread
  • Optional garnish: fresh or dried herbs or other seasonings
  •    

    strawberry-toast-vermontcreamery-230

    Who needs jam when you have fresh fruit? Photo courtesy Vermont Creamery.

     

    radish-cheese-spread-latartinegourmande-c--230

    Not a fruit fan? Use vegetables; here, sliced
    radishes and fresh-snipped chives atop
    Greek yogurt. Photo courtesy La Tartine
    Gourmande
    .

      Preparation

    1. Choose some delicious bread: date nut bread, Irish soda bread, multigrain, peasant bread, pumpernickel, raisin bread, rye, sourdough, spelt, whole grain or other bread with great flavor and texture.

    You can also use crispbread, like Wasa. Mild breads like challah, English muffins and white bread are best left to another occasion. See the different types of bread.

    2. Pick your dairy product: cottage cheese, cream cheese, crème fraîche, goat cheese, Greek yogurt, mascarpone, sour cream, quark or other spreadable dairy.

    3. Pick your fruit: berries, dates, figs, mandarin or orange segments, mango and sliced stone fruits (apricots, nectarines, peaches, plums) are our favorites.

    4. Toast the bread (or not); spread with the dairy, top with the fresh fruit and enjoy. If you need more sweetness, drizzle with honey or cinnamon sugar.

     

    VARIATIONS

  • Herbs and spices. Sprinkle with a chiffonade of basil, chili flakes, cinnamon, ground black pepper or other favorite accents.
  • Veggies. Top with vegetables instead of fruit. We like grated carrots (and raisins!), tomatoes* with fresh herbs, radishes or shaved zucchini. With vegetable tartines, you can use other herbs such as cilantro, dill, oregano, parsley.
  •  
    *Yes, tomatoes are a fruit, but they are eaten a vegetable. Here’s why the tomato is fruit, not veggie.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Baked French Toast

    baked-french-toast-souffle-driscolls-230r

    You can bake French toast instead of frying it. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

     

    This recipe, from Driscoll’s, is called Baked French Toast Soufflé. Although the word does mean “to puff up” in French, and the slices of bread puff up very slightly, it’s not what Americans think of as soufflé.

    To manage expectations, we removed the “soufflé.” What remains is a festive and delicious special-occasion breakfast or brunch. Consider it for Father’s Day.

    The best part is that nearly all of the preparation can be done the day before. The only thing left to do in the morning is to put the pan in the oven and make the coffee.

    Prep time is 15 minutes, cook time is 40 minutes. Driscoll’s uses blackberries; but you can use any berry or other fruit, such as banana.

     

    RECIPE: BLACKBERRY GRAND MARNIER FRENCH TOAST

    Ingredients For 6 to 8 Servings

    For The French Toast

  • 1 pound loaf brioche or challah bread
  • 8 large eggs
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons Grand Marnier or other orange liqueur
  • 1/2 cups sugar
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  •  

    For The Blackberry Sauce

  • 2 packages (6 ounces or 1-1/3 cups each) blackberries, divided
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting
  •  
    Preparation

    1. SLICE bread into 1-inch slices and arrange in a buttered 9 x 13-inch baking dish, overlapping the slices in 2 rows.

    2. WHISK eggs, milk, heavy cream, Grand Marnier, sugar, orange zest, vanilla, nutmeg and salt until well blended. Pour mixture over bread slices soaking them evenly with the egg mixture. Cover and refrigerate overnight. In the morning…

    3. TAKE the baking dish out of the refrigerator and preheat oven to 350°F. Place the pan in the middle of the oven and bake until golden and lightly puffed, about 40 minutes. Meanwhile…

     

    http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-blackberries-basket-image26804436

    It’s blackberry season: Enjoy! Photo by Pretoperola | DRM.

     

    4. MAKE the blackberry sauce. Place 2 cups berries, sugar and lemon juice in a nonreactive pan over medium heat. Heat until the sugar dissolves and the berries give up some of their juice. Puree and press through a fine mesh strainer to remove the seeds. Return sauce to the pan and add remaining berries. Keep warm until serving.

    5. SERVE: Put a square of the French toast on a plate, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and top with remaining blackberries and sauce.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Stout Doughnut Holes With Bacon Jam

    doughnut-holes-bacon-jam-2-southwaterkitchen-chicago-230

    Doughnut holes filled with bacon jam. Photo courtesy South Water Kitchen | Chicago.

     

    June 6th is National Donut Day, commemorating the “donut lassies,” female Salvation Army volunteers who provided doughnuts—and also writing supplies, stamps, clothes-mending and home-cooked meals—for soldiers on the front lines.

    Approximately 250 Salvation Army volunteers provided assistance to American soldiers in France during World War I, starting in 1917.*

    The Salvation Army’s Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance cleverly thought of frying donuts in soldiers’ helmets. With limited resources, these treats were fried, only seven at a time.

     
    *In 2013, 30 million Americans received assistance from The Salvation Army’s 3,600 officers, 60,000 employees and 3.4 million volunteers.

     
    Here’s a treat for today, and for your consideration for Father’s Day breakfast or brunch: stout-accented doughnut holes stuffed with bacon jam. It’s gourmet “man food.”

    The sweet and savory doughnut creation comes from chef Roger Waysok of the South Water Kitchen in Chicago, which specializes in pairing craft beers with its cuisine. Not surprisingly, there’s beer in the recipe.

     
    RECIPE: STOUT DOUGHNUT HOLES WITH BACON JAM & SALTED CARAMEL GLAZE

    Ingredients For 13-16 Doughnut Holes

  • .5 ounce fresh yeast
  • 1 cup stout
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2¾ cups all-purpose flour
  •  

    Preparation

    1. DISSOLVE yeast in warm beer (make sure beer is 100°-120°F).

    2. ADD flour and sugar; mix in a stand mixer with dough hook attachment.

    3. ADD vanilla and egg yolks one at a time, allowing eggs to incorporate into dough.

    4. ADD cream and butter, mixing well, slowly increasing speed to high. When dough pulls away from the side it is ready.

    5. COVER dough in a bowl and keep in at room temperature; allow to rise and double in size.

    6. PORTION dough and roll into small balls about an ounce in weight. Place on a parchment lined cookie sheet and cover.

    7. REFRIGERATE for one hour, then deep fry at 350°F until golden brown. Set on paper towels to drain. Fill with bacon jam (recipe below).

     

    doughnut-holes-bacon-jam-southwaterkitchen-chicago-230

    Another view of doughnut holes with bacon jam. Photo courtesy South Water Kitchen | Chicago.

     

    RECIPE: BACON JAM

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound bacon
  • 2 cups balsamic vinegar
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup stout
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COOK bacon and onions together in a pot until slightly brown. Add beer, balsamic and sugar. Reduce heat to low and continue to cook until slightly thick, about 30 minutes.

    2. BLEND mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth and thick. Cool and mixture will thicken as it cools. Once cooled, fill doughnut holes with bacon jam using a piping bag.

     
    WHY STOUT?

    The darkest and heartiest of beers, stout is differentiated from other ale by its brown-black color, chocolate-coffee flavors and fuller body. This is achieved by brewing with barley that has been dark-roasted to the point of charring (think of espresso beans, compared to a medium-roast coffee).

    Stout is thus both darker and maltier than porter, has a more pronounced hop aroma, and may reach an alcoholic content of 6% to 7%. Stout originated in Ireland, where most traditional stouts are very rich, yet sharp and slightly bitter.

     
    DOUGHNUT VS. DONUT

    An old word for ball was nut; a doughnut is literally a nut (ball) of dough. The name was first used in print in 1809 by American author Washington Irving (using the pen name Diedrich Knickerbocker). The pastry he described resembled what we call doughnut holes today, rather than the styles of fried dough that evolved into rings or filled pastries.

    The spelling “donut” appeared some 100 years later but did not immediately catch on. That impetus goes to Dunkin’ Donuts, founded in 1950.

    Donut is a easier to write, but we prefer the old-fashioned elegance of doughnut. Take your choice.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Lobster Poached Eggs

    lobster-poached-egg-ruschmeyers-montauk-230sq

    Lobster poached egg. Photo courtesy
    Ruschmeyer’s | Montauk.

     

    On the brunch menu at Ruschmeyer’s Hotel in Montauk, New York, is an egg sandwich.

    It’s not a humble egg sandwich. One side of the toasted English muffin contains a sunnyside-up egg over melted Emmental cheese; the other side has lightly dressed baby arugula topped with poached lobster.

    We’ll have two, please.

    Or more likely, we’ll be heading out to buy some s will making be making our own version for Father’s Day, along with a garnish of salmon caviar.

    The menu also features a seaside version of Eggs Benedict: poached egg, hollandaise, and chives, but replacing the Canadian bacon with blue-claw crab.

     

    If you’re nowhere near the hotel, consider making a special brunch by whipping up your own version of both dishes.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Try Baked Oatmeal

    If you love oatmeal—or if porridge isn’t your thing—here’s a new way to try it: baked oatmeal!

    Simple yet delicious, kids can help measure and stir ingredients. The recipe finishes in the oven while you’re brewing the coffee.

    Prep time is five minutes, cook time is 40 minutes.

    Thanks to Driscoll’s and recipe developer and blogger, Maria Lichty from Two Peas and Their Pod, for this delicious idea. Here are more berry recipes from Driscoll’s.

    RECIPE: STRAWBERRIES & CREAM BAKED OATMEAL

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 2 cups old fashioned oats/rolled oats (the different types of oats/oatmeal)
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  •  

    baked-oatmeal-driscolls-230sq

    For a treat, bake oatmeal like a casserole. Photo courtesy Driscoll’s.

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1-1/2 cups sliced hulled strawberries or other berries (we used a combination of blueberries, raspberries and strawberries)
  •  

    Nutritious rolled oats in a rustic setting.  Shallow dof

    Old-fashioned oats. Photo by Kelly Cline |
    IST.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F. Grease an 8 x 8-inch baking pan and set aside.

    2. STIR together oats, brown sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in a large bowl.

    3. WHISK together heavy cream, egg, butter and vanilla in a separate bowl. Pour heavy cream mixture over oat mixture and stir until combined. Add 1 cup sliced strawberries.

    4. POUR into prepared baking dish. Gently pound baking dish on the countertop to make sure cream moves through oats. Scatter remaining strawberries over top of the oatmeal.

    5. BAKE 40 minutes, or until top is golden brown and oat mixture has set. Remove from oven and let cool 5 minutes. Serve warm.
     
    WHY IS OATMEAL SO GOOD FOR YOU?

    Check out these oatmeal health benefits.

     
    WHAT IS PORRIDGE?

    Porridge is a dish made by boiling ground, crushed, or chopped cereal grains in water or milk. Optional flavorings can be added, from spices to fruits or cheese.

    Porridge is usually served hot in a bowl or dish. It may be sweetened with sugar or served as a savory dish (cheese grits is an example).

    Any cereal grain can be turned into porridge. Buckwheat, oats, wheat (Cream of Wheat, Wheatena) and rice (Cream of Rice) are most popular in the U.S. Worldwide, barley, fonio, maize, millet, rice, rye, sorghum, triticale and quinoa are also made into porridge.

      

    Comments

    « Previous entries Next Page » Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact