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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Breakfast

FOOD FUN: A New Take On French Toast

French Toast Nuggets

Not the same old French Toast. Photo courtesy Fabrick | NYC.


November 28th is National French Toast Day, so have fun with it.

At Fabrick, a fine restaurant restaurant in New York City, part of the culinary journey is food fun. Almost everything on the menu offers a new take on the traditional.

For French Toast, it’s nuggets.

The French Toast is cooked and cut into squares, which are:

  • Served with maple caramel (plain maple syrup is not fun)
  • In a bamboo steamer, usually used to steam and serve Chinese dumplings (a plain plate is no fun)
  • With fresh berries (little bites of fun?)
    How would you turn French Toast into fun?

  • The history of French Toast.
  • Savory French Toast recipes: It’s not all maple syrup and berries.



    RECIPE: Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies From Quaker Oats

    Original Quaker Canister

    Quaker Old Fashioned Oats Canister

    TOP PHOTO: What Great-Great Grandmother
    would have purchased. BOTTOM PHOTO:
    Today’s canister reminds us that oatmeal is a
    heart-healthy food. Photos courtesy Quaker


    One hundred years ago, Quaker introduced the now-iconic cylinder package for Old Fashioned Quaker Oats. The cylindrical package was a first in the industry. While the packaging design has been updated, the round canister can still be found on store shelves today.

    The Quaker Mill Company of Ravenna, Ohio, was founded in 1877 by Henry Parsons Crowell, who purchased the bankrupt Quaker Oat Mill Company there.

    Canned foods were a hot new trend in 1915, and Crowell noticed the public’s growing appetite for colorful, conveniently sized packaging. He began to sell his oats in distinctive round cardboard cartons. At the time, many groceries, including cereal grains, were sold in bulk from barrels.

    Today the The Quaker Oats Company sells more than 350 million pounds of oatmeal annually, and some 120 million canisters are produced at its Cedar Rapids plant.

    Quaker also lays claim as the first to feature a recipe on packaging: Oatmeal Bread, in 1891. In 1908, the brand introduced the first cookie recipe on a package: Oat Cakes.

    In 1922, the company introduced Quaker Quick Oats, one of America’s first convenience products. It can be swapped for Quaker Old Fashioned Oats in baking recipes.

    In 1966, Quaker Instant Oatmeal pouches debuted to help people keep pace with a busy, on-the-go lifestyle. Cup packaging debuted in 2000, to portable eating even easier. Earlier this year, Quaker launched Quick 3-Minute Steel Cut Oats.

    Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies recipe remains a consumer favorite. As of 2015, it’s been on the Old Fashioned Oats canister for 20 years. The recipe is below.

    A food conglomerate headquartered in Chicago, it has been owned by PepsiCo since 2001.


    Prep time is 20 minutes, cook time is 8 minutes.

    Ingredients For 4 Dozen Cookies

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) plus 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Optional: 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups Quaker Oats (Old Fashioned or Quick Oats, uncooked)
  • 1 cup raisins
  • Optional: 1 cup chopped nuts
  • Raisins substitute: 1 cup dried cherries, cranberries or diced mixed fruit
  • Raisins substitute: 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips; omit the cinnamon


    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. In large bowl, beat the butter and sugars with an electric mixer on medium speed until creamy. Add the eggs and vanilla; beat well. Add the combined flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt; mix well. Add the oats and raisins; mix well.

    2. DROP the dough by rounded tablespoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until light golden brown. Cool 1 minute on cookie sheets; remove to a wire rack. Cool completely. Store tightly covered.

    3. HIGH ALTITUDE ADJUSTMENT: Increase the flour to 1-3/4 cups and bake as directed.
    For Bar Cookies

    1. PRESS the dough onto bottom of an ungreased 13 x 9-inch baking pan. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until light golden brown. Cool completely in the pan on a wire rack.


    Quaker Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

    For 20 years, the recipe for these Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies has been on the box of Quaker Old Fashioned Oats. Photo courtesy Quaker.

    2. CUT into bars. Store tightly covered. Yield: 24 bars.

  • Use an empty Quaker Oats canister as the “gift box” for cookie gifting.
  • For the holidays, consider Oatmeal Gingerbread Cookies.


    BEST BRUNCH: UrbanSpace Vanderbilt

    Head to UrbanSpace Vanderbilt at Vanderbilt Avenue and 45th Street in Manhattan. It’s the block north of Grand Central Terminal, and our new favorite food hall.

    Its parent company, Urbanspace, “cultivates creatively rich environments, places where local makers collaborate, exchange ideas, and showcase their wares.”

    Why run all over New York City to find what’s hot and trending when here, in one space, some 20 food artisans sell their wares?

    We were one of a group of lucky food writers who were invited to taste a sample from every boutique for weekend brunch.

    And what a brunch it was: a memorable buffet of delicious, modern casual fare that can accommodate almost anyone’s diet (mainstream, Paleo, vegan and vegetarian).

    In fact, if we were planning a wedding or other big party, we’d rent out the entire space and let our guests go from bay to bay, assembling their ideal feast.

    Here’s what we had. We’re leaving out the adjectives because everything listed would get a superlative. Alas, we filled up to bursting before we could taste everything that was served, so apologies to those we didn’t get to. We shall return.

  • Asia Dog, hot dogs with Asian-inspired toppings, which also has stands at Brooklyn Flea, Madison Square Eats and Smorgasburg. For breakfast, though, they substituted banana yogurt with fresh fruit, gluten-free granola and almonds for a kimchi-topped dog.
  • Hong Kong Street Cart: assorted dumplings. These are a nice warm-up (no pun intended) to anything else you have.
  • La Palapa Taco, an outpost of a Mexican restaurant in the West Village. Hibiscus Rose Sangria Slushy and a Chilquiles Verdes Taco with grilled steak, tomatillo salsa, queso fresco and crema.
  • Maiden Lane from the East Village, specializing in creative casual fare with fine European tinned seafood. For breakfast/brunch we had the Lower Eastsider: cured salmon, cream cheese, pickled red onion and fresh dill on an “everything” bagel. We can’t wait to go back for the whitefish salad and the rest.


    Currant Rosemary Scones From Ovenly

    Tomato, Sausage & Sage Pizza

    TOP PHOTO: Scones from Ovenly. BOTTOM PHOTO: Tomato, Sausage & Sage Pizza from Roberta’s. Photo by Deirdre Schoo.

  • Mayhem & Stout, a sandwich spot in Murray Hill that specializes in creative braised meat combinations with house-made condiments. We had the Apple Cider Mimosa and the Featured Mashup (see below).
  • Ovenly, a coffee shop and bakery in Greenpoint, Brooklyn that we’ve always wanted to go to. We had Currant-Rosemary and Cheddar-Mustard Scones with butter and jam; and gluten-free honey granola with local-made yogurt. We bought a piece of Blackout Cake to take home.
  • Red Hook Lobster Pound, a casual seafood restaurant in the Red Hook area of Brooklyn, with other locations plus food truck. We downed the Lobster Bloody Mary, garnished with a ready-to-eat lobster claw; but by the time the Lobster Cheese Fries arrived, we couldn’t eat another bite of anything. We’ll go back for them, along with a lobster roll.
  • Roberta’s Pizza, headquartered in East Williamsburg, served a Speck & Egg Pizza with mozzarella, mushrooms, speck (a type of prosciutto), onions and oregano; the egg was baked on top. We’ll be back for the L’il Stinker and the Cheeses Christ pizzas.
  • Sips & Bites, a Brooklyn café that serves American favorites with flare, dished up a Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwich with fresh ricotta, truffle honey, bacon and pink peppercorns.
  • Takumi Taco, Japanese-inspired Mexican food in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, served a breakfast burrito: scrambled eggs, black and pinto beans, chorizo, avocado, cheese and tomatillo salsa. We can’t wait to go back for the spicy tuna tacos.
  • Toby’s Estate, a coffee boutique in the West Village and Brooklyn, served up the best cup of coffee I’ve had in a long time: Single Origin Kenya Chania, brewed to order. Other single origins and blends are available, including decaf.
  • Two Tbsp, a vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free street food vendor currently in the midst of a Kickstarter campaign to fund its first permanent location.
    There’s also a Featured Mashup, when two vendors collaborate on a dish. This month, Dough Donuts and Mayhem & Stout created a Pulled Pork Glazed Doughnut, the hefty glazed donut generously topped with pulled pork and served with a house-made barbecue sauce and maple brown sugar hot sauce.

    Here we have to use an adjective: memorable.


    Pulled Pork Glazed Donut

    Deconstructed Nicoise Salad

    TOP PHOTO: Pulled Pork Glazed Donut. Photo
    courtesy Mayhem & Stout. BOTTOM PHOTO:
    Deconstructed Niçoise Salad. Photo courtesy
    Maiden Lane.



    UrbanSpace Vanderbilt is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily:

  • 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday.
  • 11 a.m to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
    The address is 230 Park Avenue (the Helmsley Building), but don’t look for an entrance there. The entrance is on Vanderbilt Avenue between 45th and 46th Street.

    Go to 45th or 46th Street and head to Vanderbilt, which is east of Madison Avenue and west of Lexington Avenue. Lost? Call 212-529-9262.

    This is part of the annoying New York real estate developer habit of using the most prestigious address allowable by the Buildings Department, even though there’s no entrance at that address (it’s around the corner on a less-prestigiously-named street). You won’t find any door to the Helmsley Building on Park Avenue, either. The entrance is on East 45th Street.

    In a neighborhood where premium casual fare is hard to find, UrbanSpace Vanderbilt is a welcome addition:

  • For everyone who works in the area.
  • For people who need to meet around Grand Central.
  • For guests at all the local hotels.
  • For foodies looking for a cornucopia of riches.
    The place was packed!




    RECIPE: Pumpkin-Apple French Toast

    For seasonal brunching, we like this Pumpkin-Apple French Toast by Serena Wolf of the blog Domesticate-Me, sent to us by grocery delivery service

    Prep time is 10 minutes, cook time is 15 minutes.

    This recipe works best with slightly stale (day-old) bread.For a richer French toast, replace half of the milk with half-and-half. If you don’t want to use butter, substitute coconut milk.


    Ingredients For 4 Servings

    For The French Toast

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup pure pumpkin purée (unseasoned)
  • 1 cup milk (substitute unsweetened almond milk)
  • 2 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • 4 1¼-inch slices brioche or challah
  • Butter for frying

    Apple French Toast

    Pumpkin French toast topped with sautéed cinnamon apples. Photo courtesy Domesticate Me | Peapod.


    For The Apple Topping

  • 1 tablespoon or butter
  • 3 apples (Granny Smith, Honeycrisp or mix), peeled and diced into ½-inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup

    Honeycrisp Apple

    A Honeycrisp apple. Photo courtesy Rainier Fruit.



    1. COOK the apples. Heat the butter in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. When hot, add the apples, cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Cook for 5-6 minutes until tender, and then stir in the maple syrup. Cook for 1 minute. Cover and keep warm until ready to serve. (If you prefer very soft apples, cook them for 10-12 minutes before adding the maple syrup.)

    2. WHISK together the eggs, pumpkin purée, milk, brown sugar, vanilla extract and spices in a large baking dish (at least 9”x13”).

    3. PLACE the slices of bread in the custard mixture and let soak for 5 minutes, turning over the slices halfway through, until most of the liquid has been absorbed into the bread. Gently press on the bread a few times during the soaking process to help it absorb the custard. Meanwhile…


    4. HEAT a griddle or large skillet over medium heat. Add a butter to the griddle/skillet. When melted, carefully remove the bread from the custard and place on the griddle/skillet. You’ll probably need to do this in two batches. Cook for about 3 minutes until golden brown. Add another bit of butter, flip the French toast, and cook for another 3 minutes or until golden brown.

    5. TRANSFER the French toast to plates and top with the warm apples. Serve with a pitcher of maple syrup on the side.



    RECIPE: Baked Pumpkin Doughnuts

    With their seasonal orange color, moist texture and delightful pumpkin flavor, these baked doughnuts are better-for-you, with less sugar and no hot-oil frying. Make them for breakfast, snacking or dessert, with a scoop of ice cream.

    They also freeze nicely. The batter also keeps well in the fridge, in case you want to make a double batch, or prepare the day before to bake in the morning. They are not too pumpkiny—more pumpkin latte than pumpkin pie—so people who don’t like pumpkin can enjoy them, too.

    All you need besides the recipe ingredients are doughnut baking pans. Or, you can make pumpkin muffins in your muffin pan.

  • Wilton Nonstick 12-Cavity Doughnut Pan
  • Fox Run Mini Doughnut Pan (buy 2)
  • Prep time is 15 to 20 minutes, baking time is 30 to 38 minutes.

    For step by step photos, check out the King Arthur Blog.


    Ingredients For 12 Doughnuts, 24 Mini Doughnuts Or
    15 Muffins

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup granulated sugar*
  • 1-1/2 cups pumpkin purée (plain canned pumpkin)

    Baked Pumpkin Doughnuts

    Make the batter the night before, then serve warm muffins at breakfast or brunch. Photo courtesy King Arthur Flour.

  • 1-1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice, or 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus a heaping 1/4 teaspoon each ground nutmeg and ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1-3/4 cups + 2 tablespoons King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour†
    For The Topping

  • 3 tablespoons cinnamon sugar or pumpkin-spice sugar

  • For spicier doughnuts, add more pumpkin pie spice or allspice, cinnamon, ginger/or and cloves.

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease two 12-cavity doughnut pans or substitute (mini doughnut pans, muffin pans).

    2. BEAT together until smooth the oil, eggs, sugar, pumpkin, spices, salt, and baking powder. Add the flour, stirring just until smooth.

    3. FILL the wells of the doughnut pans about 3/4 full; use a scant 1/4 cup of batter in each well. If you’re making muffins, fill each well about 3/4 full; the recipe makes about 15 muffins, so you’ll need to use two muffin pans or bake them in two batches.


    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/pumpkin donuts kingarthur 230

    Baked pumpkin doughnuts, close up and delicious. Photo courtesy King Arthur Flour.


    4. BAKE the doughnuts for 15 to 18 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into the center of one comes out clean. If you’re making muffins, bake for 23 to 25 minutes. While the donuts are baking, make the cinnamon sugar or pumpkin spice sugar, by mixing half spice with half superfine sugar. (You can pulse table sugar in the food processor to a superfine consistency.)

    5. REMOVE the doughnuts from the oven. After about 5 minutes, loosen their edges with a knife or spatula and transfer them to a rack to cool. If you plan to eat them shortly: While the doughnuts are still warm, but no longer fragile…

    6. GENTLY SHAKE them in a bag with the cinnamon-sugar. If you’ve made muffins, sprinkle their tops heavily with cinnamon-sugar. NOTE that for the best appearance, it’s important to hold the cinnamon-sugar until you’re ready to serve the doughnuts. Store the rest without the cinnamon sugar (see the next step) and add it just before serving.

    7. COOL the doughnuts completely and store at room temperature for several days. Do not wrap them tightly or enclose them in a plastic bag: Because these doughnuts are so moist, they will become soggy. We put ours in a plastic storage container, which allows air to circulate. You can also use a cake dome or a plate with an upended bowl; or use a baking pan covered with wax paper.



    *The original recipe used 1-1/2 cups sugar, but cutting back to 1 cup is just as delicious (although slightly less tender—no big deal).

    †To use self-rising flour instead of all-purpose flour (e.g. King Arthur Unbleached Self-Rising Flour), reduce the salt to 1/2 teaspoon; omit the baking powder, and substitute 2 cups (8 ounces) of self-rising flour. Bake the doughnuts for about 18 minutes.



    TRENDS: Breakfast For Dinner

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/peanut butter jam pancakes krusteaz 230

    This idea, from Krusteaz, adds peanut butter
    and jelly for a riff on the PB&J sandwich.
    Here’s the recipe. Photo courtesy Krusteaz.


    Can it be true that 9 out of 10 Americans enjoy Breakfast Night?

    After a long day of tasting foods for THE NIBBLE, we often welcome a simple dinner of cereal, eggs or French toast. But we are not alone; we’re part of the 90 percent!

    Krusteaz, maker of premium pancake, waffle and other baking mixes, has just released the results of its annual breakfast survey, a national poll conducted by an independent research firm*. Breakfast for Dinner continues to be a popular trend in the U.S.

  • More than half of the survey participants enjoy Breakfast Night dinners once a month or more, with nearly 25% eating Breakfast For Dinner once a week.
  • Those with children at home are somewhat more likely to eat breakfast for dinner (94% vs. 88% without kids in the house). For 30% of families, Breakfast Night is a weekly affair that’s either “very enjoyable” or their “absolute favorite.”
    In a shift from 2014, more kids are helping out in the kitchen. Thirty-nine percent of responders said that Breakfast Night preparation is a “joint effort,” compared to just 17% of last year’s survey participants.

    What makes Breakfast Night so popular?

  • Thirty-eight percent of survey participants noted that having all the ingredients on hand is the main appeal.
  • Thirty-five percent cite the “love” of breakfast food (the comfort food factor?).
  • Thirty-one percent like that it is easier and faster than preparing a traditional dinner.
    Families with children at home are more likely to use Breakfast Night as family night, when Dad’s in charge, and for celebratory occasions such as birthdays, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day.

    Krusteaz has selected Wednesday dinner to be Breakfast Night. Need recipes? Head to

    *The Breakfast for Dinner survey was conducted by ORC International on behalf of Krusteaz. Findings are based on an online survey of 2,033 U.S. adults ages 18 and older in August 2015.

    The history of meal times could fill a large book. The number of meals consumed per day differs greatly from culture to culture, by era and by socioeconomic status.

    In Europe alone, the name of the meal and time of day vary widely. Depending on the era, dinner could be in the morning or late afternoon. In the millennia before electricity, people lived differently than we do, typically retiring at nightfall. In the winter, that meant the last meal of the day was what we might call a late lunch.

    Thanks to for most of this information:

  • In ancient Greece meal times were variable, but a midday meal was usually called ariston lunch… and an evening meal deipnon, dinner. The latter was typically the biggest meal of the day, and for some of the poor, the only meal.
  • In medieval times, the very poor ate when they could (as was true since the beginning of mankind), but the slightly better-off peasants ate three times a day: breakfast at a very early hour, dinner at about 9 a.m. and supper before it got dark, which could be as early as 3 p.m. in the winter.

  • In Christian countries, the times and number of meals were originally derived from the hours of devotions of the Church. Monks ate their main meal after the celebration of nones, which was nine hours after daybreak—some time between midday and 3 p.m. The evening meal was after vespers, around sunset. For lay people, to break one’s fast after devotions was the general procedure.
  • Through the Renaissance, the larger meal was the prandium, or dinner, at ten or eleven in the morning. Supper, coena in Latin, was served around six in the evening. Most authors agreed that two meals a day were sufficient, although the English vehemently defended their custom of taking breakfast.
  • Breakfast was not a popular meal elsewhere. Writings suggest that it was only eaten by children and laborers. But by the 15th century it was commonly consumed by everyone. However, a 1478 household ordinance of Edward IV specified that only residents down to the rank of squires should be given breakfast, except by special order (sounds like budgeting).
  • At some point, there were four meals a day: breakfast, dinner, nuntions or nuncheons (eaten by workmen around noon) and late supper.
  • With the advent of oil lamps, the evening meal was served later in the day. In southern Europe, where the evening meal was the largest of the day, breakfast did not become important—merely coffee and perhaps a piece of bread or a pastry.

    English Breakfast

    This is just part of an English breakfast,
    which can also include porridge, fruit,
    baked beans and other favorites. The practice of eating a large breakfast emerged in the 19th century. Photo © Indigolotos | 123rf.

  • In England and northern Europe, by the 18th century breakfast was the norm, eaten around 9 or 10 a.m. In the 19th century breakfast emerged as a full and sumptuous meal with bacon, eggs and even steaks for those who could afford them. Afternoon tea, as a snack between lunch and dinner, was created in 1840 by Anna, Seventh Duchess of Bedford (here’s the history of afternoon tea).
  • Thus, the three-meals-a-day practice is a relatively recent phenomenon—and of course only relates to those who could afford three meals a day.


    FOOD FUN: Blueberry Yogurt Toast

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/yogurt blueberry toast 230sq

    Toast as modern art. Photo courtesy Martin’s Famous Pastry Shop.


    For Back To School or Back To Work, here’s a fun approach to morning toast from Martin’s Famous Pastry Shop, bakers of potato rolls and potato bread.

    Pick Your Bread

  • Crusty peasant bread
  • Potato bread
  • Raisin bread
  • Semolini bread
  • Whole grain bread (especially with seeds!)
    Pick Your Spread*

  • Greek yogurt with fruit
  • Labneh (yogurt cheese*)
  • Plain Greek yogurt
  • Seasoned Greek yogurt or tzatziki
  • Non-yogurt substitute: cream cheese, goat cheese
  • For The Topping

  • Fresh blueberries
  • Dried blueberries or other dried fruit (cherries, cranberries)

    *Labneh is a thick, creamy, tangy fresh cheese, often called “yogurt cheese” in the U.S. It’s a mainstay for breakfast and snacking in the Middle East, and is available in supermarkets here.


    RECIPE: Blueberry Smoothie With Almond Milk

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/blueberry almond milk ingridhoffmannFB 230

    A smoothie with our favorite fruits plus almond milk. Photo courtesy Chef Ingrid Hoffmann.


    Having just published an article on why we love almond milk, we hasten to follow it up with an easy recipe.

    Your nutritionist would approve of this smoothie, from Chef Ingrid Hoffmann. She adds flaxseed meal for extra nutrition and enjoys it for breakfast. We enjoyed ours for mid-morning and mid- afternoon snacks.

    If you don’t have all the ingredients, just use what you have in proportion. Powdered ginger isn’t celestial like fresh ginger, but it will do.


    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 1 banana, quartered and frozen
  • ½ cup frozen mango cubes
  • ½ cup blueberries, plus more for garnish
  • 1 cup nonfat plain kefir (drinkable yogurt)
  • 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 one-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 2 tablespoons flaxseed meal
  • 2 fresh mint sprigs for garnish
  • Preparation

    1. PLACE all ingredients except the mint in a blender and purée until smooth. Pour immediately into chilled tall glasses.

    2. GARNISH with a few berries and mint sprigs before serving.
    Find more delicious recipes at


    RECIPE: Fried Eggs On Rice

    Who needs toast? Serve this brunch idea from Gardenia restaurant in New York City.

    A fried or poached egg is served atop a bed of rice with roasted vegetables. It’s a yummy way to use up leftovers.

  • Use brown rice or other whole grain for more nutrition.
  • You can also use polenta or mashed potatoes for the bed.
  • If you don’t have any roasted vegetables—Gardenia used a mélange of beets, butternut squash, carrots and onions—do a quick microwave cook to soften, then sauté, what you do have.
  • A garnish of microgreens finishes the dish at Gardenia, but you can use chives, basil…or perhaps a crumbled bacon garnish?

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/fried egg on rice gardeniaNYC 230

    A new way to enjoy fried eggs! Photo courtesy Gardenia Restaurant | NYC.




    TIP OF THE DAY: Make A Frittata

    Making an omelet requires a bit of technique. If your omelets don’t look as lovely as you’d like, there’s an easy solution: Make a frittata!

    With an omelet, the filling ingredients are placed on the beaten eggs that are setting in the pan. As the omelet continues to cook, it is folded with a spatula to envelop the ingredients (that’s the part that requires practice, practice, practice).

    With a frittata—the name comes from the Italian friggere, to fry—the eggs and other ingredients are mixed together, then cooked more slowly than an omelet. The egg mixture completely fills a round skillet: no folding. The result looks like a crustless quiche. As with a quiche, a frittata can also be enjoyed at room temperature.

    Frittatas can be packed with vegetables, a sneaky way to get people to eat more of them. You can use the cookware you have, or consider a frittata pan (see photo below), ideal for stovetop cooking when you have to flip the frittata. Alternatively, you can bake it in the oven—no flipping needed.


    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/summer frittata crostini labreabakery 230 copy

    Wouldn’t you like to wake up to a weekend brunch like this? It’s easy to make a frittata, watermelon and feta salad, and luscious summer tomatoes on goat cheese-topped toast.


    Check the fridge: You may not have to buy anything else! Frittatas are a great receptacle for leftovers—even cooked pasta and grains.

    Vegetables: You can add almost any vegetable* to the beaten eggs, but take advantage of the summer’s specialties: bell pepper, chanterelle mushrooms, corn, eggplant, lima beans, okra, peas, sweet onion, tomatillo, tomato, yellow squash, Yukon Gold potatoes, zucchini.

    Cheese: melting cheeses like Emmenthal/“Swiss cheese,” mozzarella and Provolone; grating cheeses such as Asiago, Grana Padano, Parmigiano Reggiano/Parmesan and Pecorino Romano; and soft cheeses including feta and goat cheese/chèvre.

    Fish/Seafood: clams, mussels, shrimp, smoked salmon.

    Meat: ham/prosciutto, roast chicken/turkey, salame, sausage. When you make chicken or ham, set some aside for the next night’s frittata.

    Accents: capers, chiles (fresh or dried), herbs, olives, red pepper flakes.

    *For starters, consider artichoke, asparagus, bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, chard, eggplant, kale, mushrooms, onion/leek/green onion, potatoes (boiled/roasted), spinach, zucchini.


    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01_data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/frittata pan cuisinart amz 230

    A frittata pan is actually two frying pans that hook together for easy flipping, and can be easily detached for regular use. This one is a Cuisinart Frittata Pan.



    With this recipe, you can go heavy on the vegetables—2 cups instead of one. Or, you can make a cheesy frittata by adding a cup of shredded cheese instead of the second cup of vegetables.

    Some cooks start the frittata in a fry pan on the stove, then finish it in the oven. Fritattas can be cooked only on the stove top, but this means they have to be flipped—not easy for some people. Some frittatas can be cooked entirely in the oven, like this one.


  • 1 cup vegetables, diced or sliced
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt and freshly-ground black pepper to taste
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (cheddar, mozzarella or other
    favorite)—or 1 additional cup vegetables
  • One tablespoon chopped fresh herbs (basil, dill, chives,
    oregano, parsley, rosemary, etc.)
  • Olive oil
  • Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. While the oven heats, cook the vegetables: sauté in olive oil until tender or steam in the microwave.

    2. BEAT the eggs, herbs, pepper, salt, and Parmesan cheese together. Put a tablespoon of oil in a heavy, oven-proof skillet. Pour the egg mixture into the pan and scatter the vegetables on top.

    3. BAKE for 15 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese, which will melt.

    4. SLIDE the frittata onto a serving plate. It can be served hot or at room temperature.

    There are thousands of frittata recipes online, with the oven, stove top or stove top/broiler cooking techniques. Try them all, and see which works best for you.



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