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THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Bread, Crackers, Muffins, Sandwiches

RECIPE: Meatloaf Hero Sandwich

cheesy-meatball-hero-wmmb-230r

A hearty meatloaf sub for Oscar watchers. EatWisconsin Cheese.com.

 

Here’s a suggestion from From Eat Wisconsin Cheese.com: Switch the popular meatball submarine sandwich for a meatball hero, sub or hero whatever you call it in your neck of the woods (see the note below).

It’s an easy way to feed a crowd during events like the Academy Awards. If you serve half a hero to everyone, along with other nibbles, this recipe feeds 12.

RECIPE: MEATLOAF HERO SANDWICH

Ingredients For 6 Sandwiches

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 8 ounces ground pork
  • 1 cup (9 ounces) Asiago cheese, grated
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup dry breadcrumbs
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
  • 3/4 teaspoon cracked pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons whole-grain Dijon-style mustard
  • 6 sub/hero/French rolls
  • 6 leaves of lettuce
  • 12 tomato slices
  • 12 slices provolone cheese
  • Plus

  • Cole slaw, potato salad or French fries
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MAKE the meatloaf; Preheat oven to 375°F (conventional; if using a convection oven, preheat to 325°F).

    2. COMBINE the meats, Asiago, egg, breadcrumbs, parsley, Dijon mustard, pepper and salt in a bowl. Mix well and pack into a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan. Bake the loaf until cooked through and browned, 55 to 60 minutes.

    3. REMOVE the meatloaf from the oven and drain the fat. Cool completely before slicing into 12 slices.

    4. BLEND the mayonnaise and mustard. Split the rolls and top each bottom bun with 1 tablespoon of the spread plus lettuce, 2 tomato slices, 2 meatloaf slices and 2 provolone slices. Top with the roll tops, and serve the sandwiches with potato salad or French fries.
     

    ONE SANDWICH, SO MANY NAMES

    Hero is the New York term for the sandwich also called the grinder, hoagie, po’ boy, torpedo, submarine, zeppelin and other names, depending on region.

    The term “hero” originated in the late 19th century when the sandwich was created to serve Italian laborers, who wanted the convenient lunch they had enjoyed in Italy. The name is credited to New York Herald Tribune food writer Clementine Paddleford, who wrote that “you needed to be a hero to finish the gigantic Italian sandwich.”

    The original hero sandwich, on an oblong roll, piled on Italian cold cuts, cheese, seasonings, oil and vinegar. Varieties evolved to include the meatball hero, eggplant parmigiana and chicken parmigiana heroes.

    These days, basically, anything served on a large, oblong roll is a hero.

    The other sandwiches—grinders, hoagies, etc.—developed with regional ingredients and preferences, but also evolved to include anything served on a large, oblong roll.

    FOOD TRIVIA: The sandwich is the #1 homemade dish.
     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Valentine Toast

    Get out your heart-shaped cookie cutter and think about your menu for tomorrow.

    You can start Valentine’s Day with with heart-shaped toast and red fruit jam.

    Then, make extra toast hearts:

  • For lunch with soup, spread with herb butter
  • For lunch or dinner as croutons with a salad, spread with goat cheese
  • For cocktails (make it Champagne!), spread with sour cream or crème fraîche and topped with salmon caviar
  • For dinner as garlic toasts, spread with garlic butter; or plain with a cheese course
  •  
    WHAT TO DO WITH THE LEFTOVER TOAST TRIMMINGS

    Cut them into a small dice and store in an airtight container. The next day, use them:

  • As salad croutons
  • As omelet filling
  • As soup garnish
  • In a hash or skillet stuffing
  • Mixed into custard or pudding—a kind of reverse bread pudding
  •  

    valentine-toast-nar-gourmetFB-230

    Love toast for Valentine’s Day. Photo courtesy Nar Gourmet.

     
    You can first pop the croutons into a hot skillet with a bit of butter or oil to crisp them.

    Other ideas? Let us know!

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Get Some Gourmet Crackers

    Dr-Kracker-melodylan-230

    Dr. Kracker is packed with different types of
    seeds: good looking and good for you! Photo
    by Melody Lan | THE NIBBLE.

     

    Soup and crackers was a popular dish at my mother’s table: animal crackers, oyster crackers, Royal Lunch Milk Crackers*, saltines, Uneeda Biscuits* (water biscuits) and Ritz crackers made frequent appearances. Our favorites were Nabisco’s Triscuits and Stoned Wheat Thins, imported from Canada.

    The gourmet cracker market didn’t exist then. Sesame seed breadsticks were a rare specialty that we had to seek out in Italian markets in Little Italy. The handful of gourmet food stores and cheese stores sold the bland yet purportedly elegant Carr’s Water Biscuits, imported from England, and long flat rectangles of Middle Eastern lavasch.

    But today, there are more fancy crackers than we could desire, serving up interesting flavor profiles and alluring appearances. You can find some in supermarkets, some at natural grocers like Whole Foods and some at specialty food stores. Look for:

  • Asian rice crackers in many flavors, which happen to be gluten free (we especially like San-J’s Black Sesame Crackers).
  • Super-seeded crackers, like those from Crunchmaster, Dr. Kracker and Mary’s Gone Crackers.
  • Olive oil crackers like taralli from Italy, available plain or flavored.
  • Gourmet flatbreads like Lesley Stowe’s Raincoast Crisps and assorted gems from Rustic Bakery, pricey but worth it.
  • Flatbreads/crispbreads like La Panzanella’s Croccantini and Primizie, delicious and more affordable.
  • Fricco, an Italian cheese cracker now baked in the U.S. by Kitchen Table Bakers, made 100% from cheese so gluten-free and carb-free.
  •  
    We could go on and on, but the tip of the day is to go on a cracker hunt and find some new and exciting varieties. Look for Daelia’s, Effie’s and 34 Degrees, among others.

    Then, enjoy them with a bowl of soup, a plate of cheese or a craft beer, with or without an accompanying spread.

    *Uneeda Biscuits and Royal Lunch crackers were Nabisco products that were discontinued after Kraft Foods acquired Nabisco.

     
      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Rethink Your Sandwiches

    PBJSliderTheShedatGlenwood-NatlPeanutBoard-230

    The new PB&J, battered and fried. Elvis
    would approve. Photo courtesy National
    Peanut Board.

     

    As reported in Restaurant-Hospitality.com, chefs nationwide are adding new life to sandwiches with simple ingredients switches. Some of them are fusion (adding an ingredient from a different culture’s cuisine), others are simply new interpretations of classics.

    Check out what they’re up to, and adapt the ideas to your own sandwiches.

    PB&J. At South Water Kitchen in Chicago, the PB&J stands for Pears, Brie and Jam. The sandwich is composed of sliced pear, Brie and blueberry jam on whole wheat bread. If you want a “real” PB&J, Chef Todd Richards of The Shed at Glenwood, Atlanta, batters and fries a conventional PB&J sandwich (see the photo).

    Grilled Cheese. At Cannery Brewing Company in Monterey, California, the Short Rib Grilled Cheese combines braised short rib, oven-roasted tomatoes, goat cheese and Provolone, along with balsamic onions and pickled peppers on sourdough bread.

    Dagwood. How about a piled-high Dagwood with lamb instead of cold cuts? Chef Rodney Scruggs of The Occidental in Washington, D.C. combines thinly sliced lamb shoulder with goat cheese, arugula, pickled ramps and strawberry jam. (That sounds awfully gourmet for a Dagwood!)

     
    Steak Sandwich. Chef John Tesar of Knife in Dallas reinterprets the steak sandwich with braised beef cheeks. Or go for a bulgogi steak sandwich, Korean grilled beef, topped with pickled red onions and kimchi.

    Panini. Italian grilled sandwiches—panini—go fusion filled with Middle Eastern and Asian ingredients such as grilled tofu. The Peanut Panini from Parish in Atlanta combines green peanut “hummus,” tomato jelly and prosciutto on ciabatta bread.

    Pulled Pork. Chef Allison Leono of Goodyear, Arizona transfers classic Carolina pulled pork in mustard sauce from its classic bun into Thai rice paper wraps—with fresh mango!

     

    You don’t have to travel the country to try these sandwiches. Here are the latest hot recipes described above:

  • Beef Cheek Sandwich Recipe
  • Bulgogi Steak Sandwich Recipe
  • Fileo Fish Sandwich Recipe
  • Green Peanut Panini Recipe
  • Honey and Garlic Grilled Tofu Panini Recipe
  • Lamb Dagwood Sandwich Recipe
  • PB&J (Pears, Brie and Jam) Grilled Cheese Sandwich Recipe
  • PB&J Slider Recipe
  • Potato-Stuffed 1-Pound Burger Recipe
  • Pulled Pork and Mango Rolls with Carolina Mustard Sauce Recipe
  • Short Rib Grilled Cheese Recipe
  •  

    pulled-pork-mango-rolls-natlmangobd-230

    Carolina pulled pork in a Thai fusion recipe. Photo courtesy National Mango Board.

     

    Read the full article.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Sundried Tomato Scones

    A cold day like today is a good reason to heat up the oven and bake something to enjoy warm. Thanks to Archana Ramesh of the blog Svaad for this recipe.

    Castelvetrano olives are not only delicious and one of our favorite varieties; they’re the brightest green olives. So these “red and green” scones are a nice recipe to remember for the holiday season. If you prefer black olives (or no olives), substitute accordingly.

    Prep time is 10 minutes, cook time is 15 minutes. Find more of Archana’s recipes at Svaad.Wordpress.com.

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat or multigrain flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 small clove garlic
  •    

    SONY DSC

    Warm from the oven: sundried tomato and olive scones. Photo ©Archana Ramesh.

  • 2 tablespoons milk (plus more if needed for consistency)
  • 1 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped Castelvetrano olives, pitted
  •  

     

    bellasunluci-julienne-bag-230

    Keep a bag of julienned Bella Sun Luci tomatoes in the pantry to add to any number of dishes. Photo courtesy Mooney Farms.

     

    Preparation

    1. MIX the flour with the salt, sundried tomatoes and garlic. Chop the olives and put add them to the mix.

    2. CUT the cold butter into this flour mixture with a pastry cutter or two knives, until its all crumbly.

    3. ADD the milk slowly, mixing until the dry mix turns into a dough. If the dough is too sticky, add some olive oil.

    4. SPREAD the dough onto a baking sheet. Using a pizza cutter, cut into triangles. (You can also make specialty shapes with cookie cutter.)

    5. BAKE at 425°F for 10 to 15 minutes, until the tops turn amber. Serve hot, plain or with butter or other spread.

     

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Switch Up That Sandwich With Fusion Condiments

    You may love ham and Swiss cheese on rye with mustard, or a chicken sandwich with mayo on whole wheat toast. These sandwich and condiment pairings descend from the venerable English tradition of the sandwich (here’s the history of sandwiches).

    But it’s a new year, so how about a new approach? How about a chicken katsu sandwich served with pickled daikon, arugula and tonkatsu aïoli (garlic mayo mixed with tonkatsu sauce, also delicious with fries). It was on the menu at Sushi Samba’s Coral Gables, Florida location.

    Or, make a ham or chicken sandwich with spicy Asian peanut sauce, satay-style. Or a turkey sandwich with hoisin sauce and green onions, Peking Duck-style.

    Curried tuna and egg salads seem like something from your grandmother’s generation, and they were early fusion. Punch it up by adding chutney, as well.

    Today’s tip: Look at the ingredients you have in your fridge and pantry for:

  • Chutney
  • Hoisin sauce
  •    

    beef-grilled-tri-tip-doubleRranch-230

    Instead of mustard on a steak sandwich, go fusion with wasabi mayonnaise or green sriracha sauce. Photo courtesy Double Ranch.

  • Sriracha, including the splendid new green sriracha we reviewed recently
  • Wasabi
  •  
    Mix them into conventional spreads—mayonnaise, mustard, sour cream, Greek yogurt—or directly spread them onto sandwiches with conventional fillings.

    Don’t forget the kimchi or pickled jalapeños!

    Get inspiration from the many types of sandwiches in our delicious Sandwich Glossary. And tell us what your favorite new combination is.

     

    chicken-katsu-sandwich-sushisasmbaFB-230

    It looks like a regular chicken sandwich and fries. Look more closely! Photo courtesy SushiSamba | Coral Gables.

     

    WHAT IS FUSION CUISINE?

    According to an article in Nation’s Restaurant News, Florida chef Norman Van Aken claims to have coined the term in the late 1980s, writing a treatise on the subject in late 1988 or early 1989. In it, he described how he incorporated the flavors and dishes of the Caribbean with European cooking techniques and traditions.

    He wanted to salvage the vibrant Caribbean flavors of old Key West by fusing them—his words—with contemporary American cuisine. The idea was a cornerstone of the “Floribbean” cuisine that emerged in South Florida, developed by Van Aken, Allen Susser, Mark Militello and Douglas Rodriguez, among others. Even before then, we remember a French restaurant that used Japanese ingredients in New York City (alas, long closed).

    Fine dining pioneers like these began to evolve American cuisine 1990s, crossing their French culinary training with global ingredients. It led to fusion dishes like wasabi mashed potatoes, served at top restaurants, down to the barbecue chicken pizza, Thai pizza and numerous other fusions at California Pizza Kitchen.

    Fusion is alive and well in more recent creations like cronuts, Korean tacos, ramen burgers and Thanksgiving tortillas (turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce rolled in a tortilla). The younger generations may thing of fusion as culinary mash-ups.

     
    Whatever you cook this year, look to fusion for fresh new flavors.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Pita Tartine

    With the goal of eating lighter, we love this idea from Ozery Bakery: the pita tartine.

    Tartine is the French term for an open-face sandwich. In this version, Ozery piles on the healthful ingredients: black beans, radishes, grape tomatoes, red onions, greens and guacamole.

    You can add:

  • Fruit: thinly-sliced apples, figs, pears
  • Greens: arugula, baby spinach, fresh herbs, mesclun mix, shredded lettuce, watercress
  • Proteins: beans; flaked tuna; diced or shredded chicken, ham or prosciutto; seafood (use up your leftovers!), shredded cheese
  • Vegetables: grilled, sautéed and/or pickled
  •  
    For a spread, hummus adds protein; a slick of chipotle mayonnaise adds kick.
     
    You can slice the pita in half horizontally for even less bread, or use a wrap. Then, roll and enjoy!

    Family-owned Ozery Bakery started 15 years ago, its delicious products making their way to the U.S. in recent years. It was a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week, and continues to be a favorite here.

     

    pita-tartines-ozery-230r

    Fetchingly delicious: turn your sandwich into art. Photo courtesy Ozery.

     
    For more information, or to find a retailer near you, visit OzeryBakery.com.

    Here are more tartine sandwich ideas.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: New York Style Bagel Crisps

    bagel-chips-cream-cheese-230

    Tiny, crispy bagel chips hit the spot. Photo by
    Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    As someone who is overly fond of bagels and breakfast pastries—not a whole lot of nutrition in exchange for all of those calories—we’re glad we discovered New York Style Bagel Crisps. They come in regular and mini sizes

    The light and crispy chips are made from bagel-type dough, but cut into small, thin, crisp slices that can be enjoyed at breakfast or for snacking (they have half the fat and fewer calories than regular potato chips).

    The flavors are everything you’d expect in a bagel:

  • Cinnamon Raisin Bagel Crisps
  • Everything
  • Garlic Parmesan
  • Plain
  • Roasted Garlic
  • Sea Salt
  • Sea Salt + Black Pepper
  • Sesame
  •  
    The Mini Bagel Crisps are made in:

  • BBQ
  • Cheddar
  • Garlic
  • Sea Salt
  •  
    Bagel Crisps are great on their own or paired with toppings, dips and spreads—a delectable snack in a New York minute.

    But the company doesn’t rest on its bagel laurels. There are also:

     

    New York Style Pita Chips

    These baked pita chips have real pita pockets, all the better for dipping. They’re available in:

  • Garden Fresh Ranch
  • Parmesan Garlic Herb
  • Red Hot Chili Pepper
  • Sea Salt
  •  
    Enjoy them plain or with dips like hummus and guacamole. We like dipping them in plain Greek yogurt.
     
    Panetini

    We’d have called these crostini; but by any name, they’re crunchy, tasty and great with dips,spreads, soups and salads. Try them in:

  • Garlic
  • Garlic Parmesan
  • Original
  • Three Cheese
  •  

    cinnabon-chocolate-230

    Sweet bagel chip can take the place of breakfast pastry. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     
    New York Style Sweet Swirls

    Instead of a cookie, have a Cinnabon Swirl Crisp or a Chocolate Swirl Crisp. It satisfies that sweet craving with a cup of coffee or tea; and we turned them into little crispy ice cream/frozen yogurt sandwiches.

    Discover more at NewYorkStyle.com.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: Primizie Crispbreads ~ Great Snack Crackers

    primizie-classic-bag-230

    A great new line of snack crackers, worth checking out. Photo courtesy Primizie Snacks.

     

    Primizie snack crackers—called crispbread snacks by the manufacturer—were developed by a restauranteur/caterer couple who were looking for something better than what they were able to purchase.

    The thick, crunchy triangles were inspired on a culinary tour in Italy, originally as a dough for pizzas and paninis. In the process, the chef discovered that when the bread was “crisped,” it made a terrific cracker—for snacking, dipping and pairing with cheeses, salads and soups.

    Thick and flavorful, they stand on their own but pair beautifully with dips and spreads. When you’re pulling out all the stops for the holidays—or simply want something new and different—we heartily recommend them.

  • Classic is an Italian seven-herb blend, delightfully flavor-forward and a bit hot from Italian red chiles.
  • Cheese is provides a strong hit of smoked Gouda cheese and garlic.
  • Chile employs a rare chile pepper called the chimayo, after the town in north central New Mexico where it is grown. The chile delivers flavor that is sweet, rich and spicy but without the heat. Try it with guacamole instead of tortilla chips.
  • Simply Salted uses sel gris, French grey sea salt, a light, delicate, almost buttery salt. If these salted chips taste especially delightful, that’s why. (Check out the different types of sea salt.)
  •  

    The all natural snack crackers are made with high quality, pure ingredients with no preservatives, trans fat or cholesterol, non-GMO and rBST-free.

    Three flavors are vegan; Cheese is vegetarian.

    There’s a store locator on the website; the products are available online at Amazon and elsewhere.

    A 6.5-ounce bag has a suggested retail price of $3.99*, and is a nice contribution to a party or other get-together.

    Discover more at PrimizieSnacks.com.

    —Steven Gans
     
    *The products are pricier on Amazon, because Amazon takes a 30% cut of each purchase.

     
      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Broccoli Rabe Garlic Bread

    Here’s a way of getting nutrient-packed broccoli rabe into something everyone loves. Make garlic bread using the greens and garlic butter. Nothing could be easier—or harder to resist.

    If you keep a supply of broccoli rabe purée on hand, it takes no time at all to assemble. Make it peppery—or not; top the garlic butter with grated cheese—or not; and use a whole wheat loaf instead of white bread for greater nutritional value.

    This recipe is by Julia della Croce, Andy Boy’s Chef-in-Residence and one of America’s foremost authorities on Italian cooking. She is a James Beard Award winning author and has written more than 15 cookbooks.

    Prep time is 25 minutes, cook time is 5–10 minutes.

    RECIPE: BROCCOLI RABE GARLIC BREAD

    Ingredients For 8 Servings

  • 1 loaf good quality fresh ciabatta or baguette
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup broccoli rabe purée
  •    

    broccoli-rabe-garlic-bread-andyboy-230r

    Better than garlic bread: garlic bread with broccoli rabe. Photo courtesy Andy Boy.

  • Freshly ground black pepper or hot red pepper flakes, to taste
  • Fine sea salt to taste
  •  

    broccoli-rabe-andyboy-230

    Broccoli rabe, also called rapini. Photo courtesy Andy Boy.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 350°F.

    2. WARM the olive oil and garlic in a small saucepan over low heat until the garlic is softened and aromatic, about 4 minutes.

    3. BEAT the butter, broccoli rabe purée, garlic oil and salt until well blended.

    4. SLICE the loaf in half lengthwise, using a bread knife. Spread the broccoli rabe butter liberally on both sides of the cut surfaces. Reassemble the loaf and wrap it in aluminum foil. Bake until hot and aromatic, 10-15 minutes.

    5. CUT into 1-inch slices and serve hot or warm.

    Find more recipes at AndyBoy.com.

     
    WHAT IS BROCCOLI RABE

    Some 15 years ago, broccoli rabe began to appear in some restaurants. Also called broccoli rape, raab (pronounced rob), rapini, Chinese broccoli and Italian broccoli in the U.S., it then became available in produce markets. Now, it can be found at more and more quality supermarkets.

    Descended from a wild herb, like many of our greens, versions of broccoli rabe originated in the Mediterranean and in China.

    Broccoli rabe is not related to either broccoli or broccolini.

    Although it bears the name “broccoli,” tastes like a bitter and pungent form of broccoli (think broccoli crossed with mustard greens with some nuttiness) and looks like a relative of broccoli—it has broccoli-like buds and florets at the top of slender stalks—broccoli rabe is not related to broccoli but turnips.
    That’s why the leaves look like turnip greens and the vegetable is also called Italian turnip and turnip broccoli. Here’s more about broccoli rabe.

    Broccolini is not a young growth of broccoli, but a hybrid of broccoli and kai-lan, another cruciferous vegetable. The result looks broccoli but with smaller florets and longer, thin stalks.

      

    Comments

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