Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Beverages

TIP OF THE DAY: Coffee Milk

coffee-milk-davescoffeesyrup-230

Coffee milk is a simple and delicious union of milk and coffee syrup. Photo courtesy Dave’s Coffee Store.

 

Coffee lovers, and especially iced coffee lovers: Have you had coffee milk, the official* state drink of Rhode Island?

Like chocolate milk, coffee milk is made by adding coffee syrup to cold milk. If you like iced coffee with sugar and a lot of milk, coffee milk is the easy way to make it at home. There’s no brewing, no need to keep a container of iced coffee in the fridge. Just pour a glass of milk, add coffee syrup and stir.

It also works for people who prefer alternatives to cow’s milk.

Top quality coffee syrup is a sweetened coffee concentrate made from fresh-roasted coffee beans. It is produced by straining water and sugar through ground coffee. (Supermarket brands tend to be artificially flavored.)

While the precise origin of coffee milk is unclear, several sources trace it back to the turn of the 20th century in Providence’s immigrant Italian population.

The first coffee syrup was introduced by the Silmo Packing Company of New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1932. In 1938, Eclipse Food Products of Warwick, Rhode Island began to promote a coffee syrup product; Autocrat Coffee of Lincoln, Rhode Island came to market in the 1940s.

 
In addition to the syrup form, coffee milk can be found ready-to-drink in store dairy cases, at diners and in university dining halls. [Source: Wikipedia]

USES FOR COFFEE SYRUP

In addition to coffee milk, you can use the syrup for:

  • Baking
  • Cocktails and mocktails
  • Dessert sauce
  • Glazes (check out this list of recipes for fish, meat, poultry and veggies)
  • Granita
  • Hot coffee drink
  • Shakes and smoothies
  • Pancake/waffle syrup
  •  
    *Rhode Island named coffee milk its official state beverage in 1993, after a competition with Del’s Lemonade, another Rhode Island specialty.

     

    DAVE’S COFFEE SYRUP

    Dave’s Coffee is a certified organic coffee roaster that operates an espresso bar and bakery in Charlestown, Rhode Island. The coffee syrup is an all natural artisan product made:

  • With real sugar—no HFCS or artificial sweeteners
  • With only its natural color from the beans—no added caramel color
  • In Original, Mocha and Vanilla flavors
  •  
    By contrast Coffee Time, the best-known supermarket brand, is made with high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, coffee extract, caramel color and potassium sorbate.

    The syrup is made in small batches to ensure quality. Choice Brazilian coffee beans are roasted by hand in a small, gas fired roaster to bring out nutty, sweet, smooth, roasty and smokey flavors. The roasted beans rest for two days; they’re then ground and cold-brewed for 18 hours in a special stainless steel kettle.

    The brewed coffee is mixed with pure cane sugar, brought to a boil and simmered until the syrup reduces and the sugar begins to caramelize. It’s bottled in amber glass, which protects the syrup from light.

    Get yours at DavesCoffeeStore.com.

     

    bottles-duo-230

    Dave’s Coffee Syrup is available in three flavors. Photo courtesy Dave’s Coffee Store.

     

    It’s a great gift idea for coffee-loving moms and dads, and other deserving family and friends.

    If you need a kosher syrup, you can buy Autocrat on Amazon.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: The Difference Between Kefir & Buttermilk

    “Kefir tastes like buttermilk,” writes a reader. “What’s the difference?

    Both are cultured beverages—meaning that probiotic bacteria cultures are added to ferment fresh milk. But the “recipes” differ significantly. For starters, kefir may contain a dozen or more different bacterial strains and yeast cultures; buttermilk typically contains only one probiotic strain: lactic acid bacteria.

    Kefir (kuh-FEAR, not KEE-fur) is fermented from whole milk using special kefir grains (more about them in a minute). Buttermilk, more formally called cultured buttermilk, is made by fermenting skim milk with lactic acid bacteria, Streptococcus lactis.

    The probiotics enable both beverages to be digested more easily than milk. Both beverages have a yogurt-like tang.

    Modern kefir is made in the original (plain) plus fruit flavors, to capitalize on the popularity of yogurt, and some people think that kefir is “drinkable yogurt.” But the kefir grains and a different fermentation process make it a different recipe from yogurt.

    Both can be drunk straight and used instead of milk or buttermilk in cooking and baking. Some popular uses:

  • To tenderize meat
  • As a leavening agent
  • To make ice cream
  • In smoothies and shakes
  • On cereal
  • As a sourdough starter
  • In salad dressings and sauces
  •  

    buttermilk-cartons-230

    Buttermilk, a staple in great-grandma’s kitchen. Photo courtesy Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.

     

    Kefir and buttermilk have almost the same number of calories. An eight-ounce serving of kefir has 162 calories, while buttermilk has 150 calories.

     

    evolve-flavors-emilychang-230

    Kefir is available in flavors that make it
    resemble “drinkable yogurt.” Photo by Emily
    Chang | THE NIBBLE.

     

    MAKING KEFIR & BUTTERMILK

    Cultured buttermilk. Before universal pasteurization, butter was made by letting whole milk stand to allow the cream to separate, rising to the surface; the cream would be skimmed off, leaving “skim milk” below. Natural fermentation would occur, souring the milk slightly.

    Today, nonfat (skim) milk is acidified with lactic acid bacteria, which add tartness and cause the formation of more protein. This is why buttermilk is thicker than ordinary milk, and why modern buttermilk, made with added cultures, is called cultured buttermilk.

    Kefir. Kefir is made with kefir grains—colonies of bacteria, yeast, proteins and sugars that resemble tiny buds of cauliflower—that ferment the milk. These granules of active cultures are strained from the fermented milk before it is bottled. Here’s more on how kefir is made, and a photo of the grains.

    Homemade kefir continues to ferment as it ages. It’s a bit effervescent (bubbly) from the fermentation, where the cultures consume the sugars in the milk and release carbon dioxide. Commercial kefir cuts back on the effervescence.

    You can make both kefir and buttermilk at home; but as with many foods, it’s much more convenient to simply buy a bottle or carton. If you want to try your hand at it, here’s a resource.

     

    HEALTH BENEFITS

    Drinking buttermilk and kefir can be beneficial to one’s health. The bacteria aid in the digestion of food, and consistent consumption can help to resolve certain intestinal conditions.

    Some sources claim that the regular intake of either drink can reduce the risk of colon cancer.

    But if you like yogurt in general, and haven’t enjoyed a glass of buttermilk or kefir, pick up one of each and taste them side by side.

    And if you’re not going to drink all of it or whip up some smoothies, definitely bake or cook with it.

      

    Comments

    TIP: Flavored Water Enhancers For World Water Day

    peach-green-tea-water-bottle-kalviste-230

    Don’t buy flavored water: Make your own
    with this pocket-size squeeze bottle. Photo
    by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    It’s World Water Day, an observance begun in 1993 by a declaration of the United Nations General Assembly, to focus on the challenges of the world’s water supply.

    On previous World Water Days, we advocated buying a permanent water bottle to spare the earth the landfill of billions of plastic bottles a year.

  • More than 80% of empty water bottles end up in the nation’s landfills.
  • Fifty billion water bottles are used every year, about 30 billion of them in the U.S. This equates to 1,500 water bottles consumed per second! Amazingly, we utilize about 60% of the world’s water bottles, even though we represent just 4.5% of the world population and have safe municipal water everywhere.
  • Seventeen million barrels of oil are used each year to produce all of the water bottles—enough to keep one million cars fueled for an entire year.
  • Beyond oil, it takes three times the volume of water to manufacture one empty plastic water bottle. Because of the chemicals used in production, most of that water cannot be reused.*
  •  

    ENHANCE TAP WATER WITH WATER ENHANCERS

    This year, for folks who don’t like plain water from the tap, we’ve advocating portable water enhancers instead of iced tea, Vitamin Water and other options. These small squeeze bottles fit in your pocket and turn your [reusable] bottle of water—or a glass of water—into a zero-calorie flavored beverage.

    The process is simple: Take your water bottle or a glass of water, squeeze in a few drops of water enhancer and shake or stir. No refrigeration is required; the enhancers are caffeine-free and gluten-free.

    As an at-home or on-the-go product, water enhancers are environmentally friendly, leaving one small plastic bottle to recycle instead of up to 32 full size beverage bottles.

    We tried two brands: AriZona, which makes flavored iced tea, and Stur, which creates flavored water.

    ARIZONA WATER ENHANCERS

    From the folks who make AriZona bottled teas, these water enhancers let you recreate your own diet AriZona in seven of the company’s most popular flavors: Arnold Palmer Half & Half, Arnold Palmer Strawberry Fruit Punch, Golden Bear Strawberry Lemonade, Lemon Tea, Mucho Mango and Peach Green Tea.

    Made with real tea and flavored with real juice and honey without artificial† colors or flavors, there is added sweetness from sucralose (marketed to consumers as Splenda).

    How can the enhancer have zero calories when juice and honey are ingredients? They have just a pinch to add flavor while keeping the calorie count less than 1%. If it’s less than 1%, the FDA allows the claim of calorie-free. (And by the way, it’s the same with any ingredient, including trans fats.)

    As of now, AriZona Water Enhancers are being sold at Walmart and online. They are expected to roll out to other distributors nationwide.

    The line is certified kosher by OU. For more information, visit DrinkArizona.com.

     

    STUR WATER ENHANCERS

    Stur is a water enhancer that adds flavor and vitamins. Instead of making iced tea like AriZona, it turns plain water into vitamin water.

    Flavors include Freshly Fruit Punch, Lemon Tea, Only Orange Mango,Purely Pomegranate Cranberry and Simply Strawberry Watermelon.

    The line is made with kosher ingredients but has not yet been certified kosher.

    Stur is an all-natural† product that supplies 100% DV of Vitamin C per serving, along with a blend of essential vitamins, including A, D, E, B3, B5, B6, B12.

    The company’s goal is to encourage Americans drink more water, by giving those who don’t like to drink a lot of water a “delicious way to hit those 8 glasses of water a day.”

    You can do more than enhance water:

  • Add to seltzer water for a carbonated beverage.
  • Make flavored milk or smoothies.
  • Top yogurt or sugar-free ice cream.
  •  

    strawberry-glass-230

    Just squeeze a drop into a water bottle or glass of water. Photo courtesy Stur.

     

    You can buy a variety pack on Amazon, and individual flavors on SturDrinks.com, where you can buy any five flavors for $19.95 (which make 90 eight-ounce servings).

    Get some for yourself, and put them on your stocking stuffer list.

     
    *Source: Huffington Post.

    †Stevia, the sweetening agent, is a natural product made from the leaf of the stevia plant. While stevia can be a highly processed product like sucralose, sucralose detractors point out that it is created by the addition of chlorine atoms to sucrose molecules. Here’s more information from the anti-sucralose resource.

      

    Comments

    PRODUCT: R.W. Knudsen Nature’s Peak Juices

    One of our favorite juice producers, R.W. Knudsen, is offering another way to eat more veggies—or in this case, drink more veggies.

    The 100% juice blends are 50:50 fruit juice and vegetable juice from concentrate or purée. But the flavor profiles lean toward the sweet, so no veggie-hater need know.

    An eight-ounce glass contains 100 to 120 calories.

    The blends include:

  • Berry Veggie Blend, including apple, beet, blackberry, purple carrot, raspberry, strawberry and sweet potato
  • Orchard Veggie Blend, including apple, carrot, kiwi, pear, spinach and sweet potato
  • Tropical Veggie Blend, including banana, carrot, mango, pineapple and sweet potato
  •  
    HOW TO ENJOY THEM

  • Drink them straight.
  • Add them to smoothies or sparklers.
  •  

    knudsen-natures-peak

    Nature’s Peak juices are half fruit, half
    veggies. From left to right: Berry, Orchard and Tropical Veggie Blends. Photo courtesy R.W. Knudsen.

  • Make cocktails (add gin, tequila or vodka and an optional celery stick).
  • Use them as a base for fruit soup, salad dressing or sauces.
  • Make ice pops, yogurt pops or sorbet.
  •  
    And feel good that you’re sneaking more veggies into your diet.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Drink Your Kale!

    It’s the perfect smoothie for St. Patrick’s Day and a way to drink kale.

    This “Lean, Mean, Green Smoothie” is from chef David Venable at QVC. It’s a more healthful libation than green beer and Irish coffee.

    “This smoothie is packed with good-for-you fruits and vegetables, but tastes like a sweet treat,” says David. “The bright color is perfectly festive and would be a great way to start your St. Paddy’s Day. Be sure to serve this in clear glasses so that everyone can see your holiday spirit!”

    RECIPE: GREEN SMOOTHIE

    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 1-1/2 cups seedless green grapes
  • 1-1/2 cups honeydew chunks (1/2″ chunks)
  • 1 cup loosely packed chopped kale, stems removed
  • 1 cup loosely packed baby spinach, stems removed
  • 1 banana, peeled
  • 1/2 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and halved
  • 1 ripe pear, cored and quartered
  • 3/4 cup cold water
  • 1-2 cups ice
  •  

    green-smoothie-davidvenableQVC-230

    This “lean, mean, green smoothie” is ready for St. Patrick’s Day. Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE the grapes, honeydew, kale, spinach, banana, avocado, pear, water, and ice in a blender, in the order listed.

    2. BLEND on high speed until the mixture is smooth and pourable. Serve immediately.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: White Hot Chocolate For A White Christmas

    Tis’ the season for white hot chocolate. No matter what the weather is like where you live, you can have a white Christmas with a cup of it.

    Here are two recipes that give a gourmet twist to hot chocolate. The second recipe, for hot chocolate on a stick, can be given as party favors and stocking stuffers.

    The first recipe from the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel outside Chicago, which has been serving up the Christmastime concoction to guests in their fireside lounge. The blend of whole milk and half and half makes it very rich, indeed.

    RECIPE: WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE

    Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups half and half
  •  

    White hot chocolate is made with top quality white chocolate disks. Photo courtesy Schaumberg Renaissance Convention Center Hotel.

  • 10 ounces quality white chocolate (we use these Callebaut white chocolate disks)
  • 2 teaspoons of vanilla
  • Optional garnish: shaved chocolate, cocoa powder and/or whipped cream (try this candy cane whipped cream recipe)
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE milk and half and half; heat to a slight simmer.

    2. SLOWLY whisk in chocolate and vanilla until the chocolate has fully melted.

    3. GARNISH as desired and serve.

     

    Hot chocolate on a stick: fun party favors
    and stocking stuffers. Photo courtesy
    McCormick.

     

    Here’s a fun project: Make your own hot chocolate on a stick. This recipe from McCormick creates a fudgy square of peppermint-flavored white chocolate and a marshmallow on a lollipop stick. You swirl it into a cup of hot milk until it melts into rich, creamy and minty hot chocolate.

    You can wrap them in cellophane bags, tie with a ribbon and give them as gifts. The chocolate squares can be made up to two weeks in advance and assembled up to 2 days in advance.

    RECIPE: Peppermint White Hot Chocolate On A Stick

    Ingredients For 36 Pieces

  • 2 pounds white baking chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon pure peppermint extract
  • 4 drops red food color
  • 18 large marshmallows, halved crosswise
  • 36 lollipop sticks
  •  
    Preparation

    1. LINE a 9-inch square baking pan with foil. Spray foil with no stick cooking spray. Place chopped chocolate in large bowl. Set aside.

    2. BRING sweetened condensed milk and cream to simmer in medium saucepan on medium heat, stirring frequently with wire whisk. Pour over chopped chocolate. Let stand 1 minute. Whisk until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth.

    3. STIR in peppermint extract. Remove 3/4 cup chocolate mixture. Tint chocolate mixture pink with red food color.

    4. POUR remaining (plain) chocolate mixture into prepared pan. Drop tinted chocolate mixture by tablespoons over chocolate mixture in pan. Swirl with knife for marble effect. Refrigerate 4 hours or overnight until firm. Cut into 36 squares. (May be made ahead to this point. Store chocolate mixture, tightly covered, in pan in refrigerator up to 2 weeks. Bring to room temperature before cutting into squares.)

    5. ASSEMBLE: Thread a marshmallow half and a chocolate square onto each lollipop stick. Wrap each hot chocolate on a stick in plastic wrap or small cellophane bag.

    6. MAKE hot chocolate: Stir hot chocolate on a stick into 8 ounces hot milk.

    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COCOA AND HOT CHOCOLATE

    Most people use the terms interchangeably, but they’re actually different.

  • Cocoa is a drink made from cocoa powder, which has had a portion of the cocoa butter removed.
  • Hot chocolate is a drink made from actual chocolate, usually ground or shaved into small bits. Chocolate has more cocoa butter than cocoa powder, so it makes a richer drink, all things being equal (the same type of milk, e.g.).
  •   

    Comments

    RECIPE: Hot Chocolate Peppermint Bark Ice Cream Float

    Before those limited edition candy cane and peppermint ice creams disappear, have your last hurrah

    Pastry chef Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City created this treat with Häagen-Dazs Peppermint Bark Ice Cream Float

    “I do not mess around with my hot chocolate,” says Chef Tosi. “As a pastry chef, it’s practically required to have a killer hot chocolate recipe at the ready when the cold months come knocking….Häagen-Dazs Peppermint Bark Ice Cream just screamed out ‘dunk me in hot chocolate!’”

    The flavor, white chocolate ice cream blended with crunchy, chocolaty peppermint bark and peppermint candy pieces, is available through the end of the month.

    RECIPE: PEPPERMINT BARK ICE CREAM FLOAT

    Ingredients For 4-6 Servings

     

    A hot and cold holiday treat. Photo courtesy Häagen-Dazs.

  • ½ cup cocoa powder (Dutch-processed with alkali)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 carton (14 ounces) peppermint bark ice cream
  • Optional: peppermint schnapps
  • Optional garnish: candy canes/peppermint sticks
  •  

    Peppermint Bark Häagen-Dazs is here until
    the end of December. Photo courtesy
    Häagen-Dazs.

     

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE cocoa powder, sugar, chocolate and salt in a medium mixing bowl.

    2. BRING milk to a near scalding boil in a medium sized saucepan over medium heat. Pour milk immediately over the bowl of cocoa, sugar, chocolate and salt. Allow it to sit for 1 minute.

    3. WHISK slowly to combine. Continue whisking until mixture is evenly combined and silky smooth. You can always pass it through a fine mesh strainer if you’re concerned about lumps.

    4. POUR hot chocolate evenly into mugs and add optional schnapps; stir to mix. Scoop ice cream on top. Garnish with optional candy cane/peppermint stick.

     

    TIPS

  • For a crowd, make the hot chocolate in advance in a large batch, so all you have to do is heat and serve.
  • Invest in quality cocoa powder and chocolate: It will make a world of difference in the taste and texture of your hot chocolate.
  • You can use 0% or 2% milk in place of the whole milk.
  •   

    Comments

    GIFT: Gourmet Cocoa And Hot Chocolate

    Winter Hot Chocolate is a classic cocoa mix
    with a touch of vanilla. Photo courtesy Lake
    Champlain Chocolates.

     

    “Forget Christmas gifts this year,” said our friend Gerard, when he called to invite us to his annual party and gifting frenzy. “At this point in our lives, none of us needs another scarf, another basket of Kiehl’s products, another tzotchke, another random book.”

    “Can we bring some gourmet cocoa?” we suggested. “Sure,” he responded.

    That’s why we love food gifts. They can readily be consumed by the recipient, his guests or his family members.

    And you don’t have to go far to find something good. Any upscale supermarket has gourmet chocolate bars, fine olive oil and gourmet hot chocolate.

    We passed by all of them at Whole Foods yesterday, including these gifty hot chocolate canisters from Lake Champlain Chocolates (also available directly from Lake Champlain Chocolates). They’re just $10.50 for a festively-designed one-pound canister (one pound makes approximately 21 eight-ounce servings). You can package the gifts with some handmade marshmallows in the confections section.

     
    Lake Champlain’s hot chocolate is certified kosher by Star-D, and is Fair Trade Certified, which means that it’s a feel-good product, right for the holiday season.

    Fair trade certification allows farmers to receive higher prices than they would in the conventional market. It means that the farmers are paid a fair price for their product and are not exploited by middlemen who pay them less than their crop is worth.

    Read more about Fair Trade.

     

    25 WAYS TO GLAMORIZE A CUP OF COCOA

    From adding flavors—banana, cinnamon, chai, hot spices, mint—to liqueurs, we’ve got 25 ways to make an already delicious cup of cocoa even more memorable.

    Check ‘em out.
     
    THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COCOA & HOT
    CHOCOLATE

    December 12th is National Cocoa Day. What’s the difference between cocoa and hot chocolate?

    Most people use the terms interchangeably, but they’re actually different.

    Cocoa is a drink made from cocoa powder.

    Hot chocolate is a drink made from actual chocolate, usually ground or shaved into small bits. Chocolate has more cocoa butter than cocoa powder, so it makes a richer drink, all things being equal (the same type of milk, e.g.).

     

    Enjoy Peppermint Hot Chocolate for the holidays, with hints of vanilla and cinnamon. Photo courtesy Lake Champlain Chocolates.

     

    To make any cup of cocoa or hot chocolate richer, you can:

  • Use half and half, or half milk and half cream.
  • Stir in a pat of unsweetened butter—really! It’s a chef’s secret trick.
  •  
    Visit our Cocoa Section for brand reviews, recipes and more about man’s favorite chocolate drink.

    Or take our Cocoa Trivia Quiz.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate

    Salted caramel hot chocolate. Photo courtesy Starbucks.

     

    What’s trending in hot chocolate? Salted chocolate caramel hot chocolate or cocoa (here’s the difference between hot chocolate and cocoa).

    We’ve seen prepared drinks and/or mixes from Dunkin Donuts, Starbucks and Williams-Sonoma. But you can try your hand making it from scratch at home:

    RECIPE: SALTED CARAMEL HOT CHOCOLATE

    Ingredients For 2 Servings (Mugs)

  • 16 ounces milk (for an extra-rich version, use half and half)
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate, chopped
  • 4 ounces chocolate caramels, chopped-or-caramel syrup*
  • Pinch sea salt
  • Whipped cream for garnish
  • Optional garnish: caramel and/or chocolate syrup†
  •  
    *The caramels create a thicker, richer drink than the caramel syrup.
    †The syrup has visual appeal, but the drink is plenty sweet without it.
     
    Preparation

    1. HEAT half the milk and all the chopped chocolate in a small pot over medium heat until the chocolate is melted, whisking regularly. Whisk in the remaining milk and the chopped caramels, and continue whisking until the all the chocolate and caramel are dissolved.

    ALTERNATIVE: Instead of using chopped caramels, add 2 tablespoons of caramel syrup to each mug. Add the hot chocolate and stir.

    2. GARNISH with with whipped cream, drizzle optional caramel syrup and top with a pinch of sea salt.

    3. TWEAK the recipe until you have your ideal. We prefer a less sweet drink, so we use chocolate with a cacao content of 70% or higher (the higher the percentage of cacao, the less sugar in the chocolate). We also like the salt stirred into the hot chocolate, instead of on top of the whipped cream. We had some fine chocolate salt caramels on hand and used them instead of supermarket-variety chocolate caramels. They are ideal for this recipe, but a pricey way to enjoy the caramels! The intrepid among us can make chocolate salt caramels from scratch with this recipe.

    Let us know what your “perfect recipe” is.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY & GIFT: Hot Chocolate On A Stick ~ Party Favor & Place Setting

    Christmas hot chocolate on a stick. Swirl
    it in milk or water. Photo courtesy The Ticket
    Kitchen.

     

    The Hot Chocolate On A Stick from The Ticket Kitchen was a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week earlier this year. Made from the finest French couverture chocolate, it creates a delicious and interactive cup of hot chocolate in milk or water.

    The Ticket Kitchen in San Francisco molds blocks of chocolate onto stirring sticks and serves them up in different flavors, currently:

  • Belgian Milk Chocolate
  • Bolivian Single Origin (66% semisweet)
  • French Truffle (dark chocolate)
  • Peanut Butter (dark chocolate with a peanut butter cup)
  • Peppermint (milk chocolate with a peppermint stick)
  • Salted Caramel (caramelly milk chocolate topped with sea salt)
  • Spiced Ginger (spiced dark chocolate with a piece of crystallized ginger)
  • 3 Chili (dark chocolate topped with a blend of ancho, cayenne and chipotle)
  • Vanilla Mint (milk chocolate with an Andes Mint)
  • Venezuela Single Origin (68% semisweet)
  •  

    They all make great gifts, but two of the flavors are perfect for holiday entertaining:

    Spiced Ginger Hot Chocolate on a Stick (60% Cacao). Rich dark chocolate is blended with ginger, cinnamon and seasonal spices to make a magnificient mulled mug of winter hot chocolate. You can nibble on the crystallized ginger garnish or blend it into the beverage. More information.

    Peppermint Hot Chocolate On A Stick. Finest Belgian milk chocolate is garnished with an old fashioned peppermint stick come together to make a perfect mug of peppermint hot chocolate. More information.

    Gift boxes are available in sets of 1, 2, 4, 5 or 12 sticks, with or without accoutrements such as mugs and handmade marshmallows.

    To see the full line, visit TheTicketKitchen.com.

     

    Add a name tag to use as a place setting and party favor. Look hard and you’ll see the piece of crystallized ginger on the Spiced Ginger flavor. The chocolate itself has gingerbread spices. Photo courtesy Ticket Kitchen.

     

      

    Comments

    « Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact