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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for Beer & Hard Cider

PRODUCT: Game Of Thrones Beer

Blonde Ale is the first in the new Game Of
Thrones beer line. Photo courtesy Brewery
Ommegang.

 

For Game Of Thrones fans, there’s an answer to the question of what Joffrey Baratheon might have drunk as he sat on the Iron Throne—or at the dinner table.

Brewery Ommegang and HBO, producer of the hit series, are partnering on a series of beers inspired by the drama. After much collaboration, they launched the first Iron Throne beer, a blonde ale, in tandem with the third season.

While Joffrey is a teen, everyone, including young children, drank beer until modern times. Before reliable municipal water supplies, water from available sources—wells, lakes and rivers—harbored disease-causing microbes. Because the water is boiled during brewing, the microbes were destroyed, making beer the safe choice.

We haven’t been able track down a bottle of Game Of Thrones beer: The store locator on the website only tells you what retailers carry any beers from Brewery Ommegang. Your best bet may be to email or call the brewery: info@ommegang.com, 800.544.1809.

 
DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ALE AND A LAGER?

Brush up on the different types of beers in our Beer Glossary.
 
 
*The line is not distributed in Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota,West Virginia and Wyoming.

  

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TIP OF THE DAY: Irish Red Ale

It’s as comforting as an evening in an Irish pub, says Samuel Adams about its Irish Red Ale, which brings together a roasted malt sweetness with a light but earthy hoppiness.

So head out and pick up some Irish Red to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

Irish Red Ale is a refreshing, lighter beer style closely related to English Bitters. As with all recipes, there are numerous variations; but all tend to have the characteristic deep red color and mild flavor.

In Ireland, the brew is called Irish Red Ale, Red Ale, or Irish Ale. Imports from Ireland include Beamish Red Ale, Caffrey’s Irish Ale, Murphy’s Irish Red and Smithwick’s.

Among American-brewed Irish Reds, look for Goose Island’s Kilgubbin Red Ale, Great Lakes Brewing’s Conway’s Irish Ale and Saranac Brewery’s Irish Red Ale.

 

Look for Irish Red in the bottle. Photo courtesy Samuel Adams.

 
According to Beersmith.com, some experts characterize Irish Red as a sub-category of English Bitters or Pale Ales. Others, including the Beer Judge Certification Program, believe Irish Red stands as its own distinct style.

Adding to confusion, some American craft brewers have taken American Amber Ales, added coloring or a bit of roasted malt and called them Irish Red as well.

What’s the difference between an Amber Ale and an Irish Red?

The recipes are very similar. The main difference is the measure of bitterness in the beer. Amber Ales use more hops to achieve more bitterness. The secondary difference is the origin of the hops and the type of malts: Irish Red use more English malts (often toasted malts) and hops, American Amber Ales use more American malts and hops.

For beer drinkers who prefer less hop influence, Irish Reds offer virtually no hop aroma low to moderate hop flavor, as well as low to moderate malty aroma and flavor. They have a very clean finish with a low buttery or toffee flavor. The use of roasted barley for coloring often results in a slight roasted finish and also creates a dry finish for the beer. Unlike English Ales, Irish Red has no ester (fruity) flavors.

As you lift a glass, remember to says “cheers” in Gaelic: sláinte (pronounced SLAWN-cheh)
 
LEARN YOUR BEERS

Check out the different types of beers and beer terminology in our Beer Glossary.

  

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TIP OF THE DAY: Christmas Ale & Beer

Still looking something special for Christmas?

Whether for your own guests, as Christmas gifts or host/hostess gifts, pick up some Christmas beers.

Anchor Christmas Ale and Samuel Adams have good national distribution for their holiday brews, and your regional microbrewer no doubt has a seasonal special ale, beer, porter or stout. Here’s a list of Christmas brews.

A Christmas ale is typically rich and dark ale, brewed with special holiday spices and often, a higher alcohol content to ward off the winter chill. However, even wheat beers, the lightest style, get the holiday treatment.

Different brewers use cinnamon, clove, coriander, ginger, nutmeg and/or vanilla, and perhaps a touch of honey.

Christmas ale makes a holiday beer drinking more special. It’s a welcome holiday gift, stocking stuffer or host gift for beer lovers.

 

Merry Mischief is a gingerbread-spiced beer from Samuel Adams. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

 

A trio of yeasty treats for Christmas. Photo
by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

 

We received an assortment of the Samuel Adams holiday beers, and enjoyed these festive brews:

Cranberry Lambic is a crisp fruit beer that delivers rich cranberry flavor along with notes of banana, clove and nutmeg. While many people enjoy a lambic with dessert, some astringency and tartness makes this beer companionable to any course. It’s perfect with roast turkey.

Holiday Porter is a rich, robust, smooth and malty: Four different types of malted barley plus a dash of flaked oats are used in the brew. The deep roasted flavors pair well with hearty or spicy fare.

Merry Mischief is a rich, smooth and sweet dark gingerbread stout with the enticing aromas of the holidays. The intensity of cinnamon, clove, ginger and nutmeg evoke the flavor of fresh gingerbread. Although it can be enjoyed with most foods, we especially liked it with gingerbread cookies and carrot cake.

 

White Christmas is a crisp, unfiltered white ale blended with holiday spices: cinnamon, nutmeg and orange peel. Citrusy, wheaty and spicy, it pairs well with lighter fair, from salad (add dried cranberries and goat cheese) to dessert (try it with cheesecake or a fruit tart).

Winter Lager is a full-bodied, malty, spicy lager with a deep ruby color and a “holiday” aroma of cinnamon and ginger; there’s also a hint of orange peel. The spices and roasty sweetness of the malts pair beautifully with Thai food and other spicy dishes where the chile heat needs to be subdued.

Head to your nearest store and stock up.

DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BEER?

Browse through our Beer Glossary.

  

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PRODUCT: Omission Gluten Free Beer

Omission beer is gluten-free and delicious. Photo courtesy Omission Beer.

 

Beer drinkers with gluten sensitivities—or anyone looking to cut back on gluten—have an early holiday gift: Omission Beer.

Gluten is found in many common cereal grains including barley and wheat—typical beer ingredients.

On a mission to make a great-tasting beer without the gluten, the Omission team used traditional beer ingredients to handcraft the brew. They also developed a proprietary process that removes all the gluten.

Unlike some earlier gluten-free beers, it contains all of the standard beer ingredients: barley, hops, water and yeast. And the aroma and taste will should please just about everyone.

 

  • Omission Lager, brewed in the traditional lager style, is refreshing and crisp, with an ABV of 4.6%.
  • Omission Pale Ale is bold and hoppy American Pale Ale, amber and redolent of Cascade hops. The floral aroma is complimented by caramel malt body, with an ABV of 5.8%.
  •  
    At a recent NIBBLE editorial tasting, it was all thumbs-up for Omission Beer.

    A six-pack or two would make a great gift for a gluten-averse pal.

    Here’s the store locator. Learn more about Omission beer on the company website.

    Brush up on your beer vocabulary in our Beer Glossary.

    Find more of our favorite beers in our Beer Section.

      

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    PRODUCT: Sam Adams Utopias 10th Anniversary

    It’s rare, it’s expensive, it’s exciting: Samuel
    Adams Utopias. Photo courtesy Boston
    Brewing Company.

     

    Boston Beer Company has launched its 10th anniversary batch of Samuel Adams Utopias, a barrel-aged, limited edition, limited release brew. Only 15,000 bottles have been made.

    At a suggested retail price of $160, you probably can’t give it as a gift to all your beer-loving friends; but connoisseurs of craft beer will really appreciate a taste. Buy a bottle and invite them for a sip.

    This is no burger-and-pizza beer. Utopias is best enjoyed at room temperature in a snifter, as an after dinner drink like port or cognac. In fact, company founder Jim Koch considers Utopias to be on a par with the very best ports, cognacs and sherries.

    Packaged in a brew-kettle-style decanter, Utopias contains between 28% and 30% alcohol by volume (ABV). The purpose is not to break the beer alcohol barrier, says Koch, but “to make a wonderful, unique beverage.”

     

    THE BIRTH OF A BEER

    The concept for Utopias developed 20 years ago, as the company sought to push the boundaries of ABV by creating a triple bock beer, with more intensity and alcohol than double bock beer. (Dopplebock is German for extra-strong, a beer of about 7.5% alcohol by volume, or stronger, and commercial beers had not been made beyond a ceiling of 14%).

    In addition to higher alcohol, the flavors of Utopias are greatly deepened by wood aging. The barrels used for aging are considered an ingredient, and individual barrels are hand-selected as carefully as hops, for flavor level. After years of experimentation with different woods (bourbon barrels, scotch barrels, etc.), the brewers decided that rum barrels provide the most desired flavors for this beer.

    The 2012 tenth anniversary blend includes beer from the original barrels of 20 years ago, the 1999 millennium bottling and other years. Koch finds flavors of vanilla, fig, cocoa, wood, dark fruits like raisins and bright fruits cherry and raspberry.

    The flavor is not just unlike any other beer; it’s unlike any other beverage in the world.

    Here’s a video of Boston Brewing Company founder Jim Koch discussing Utopias.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Throw An Oktoberfest Celebration

    Oktoberfest beer with a spicy cheese dip.
    Photo courtesy Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.

     

    Each year, many people look forward to Oktoberfest, an annual 16-day beer festival held since 1810 in Munich, Germany—the country’s renowned Bavaria region, comprising southeast Germany.

    Oktoberfest is said to be the world’s largest fair, with more than 6 million people attending—15% of the beer fans come from outside Germany. Other cities around the world hold their own Oktoberfests, modeled after the original.

    While it’s called Oktoberfest (German for October feast), the event begins in late September and ends in early October.

    As you can imagine, large quantities of Oktoberfest beer are consumed—almost 7 million liters were served during the 16-day festival in 2007. The traditional style of Oktoberfest beer is Märzen,* an amber-red, smooth, mildly sweet lager with a malty aroma, which originated in Bavaria.

     

    To be designated Oktoberfest beer in Germany, the beer must conform to the Reinheitsgebot (the German beer purity law), which dictates a minimum of 6% alcohol (by comparison, America’s Budweiser has 5%). The beer must also be brewed within the city limits of Munich.

    Traditional foods served with the beer include:

  • Cheese noodles (Käsespätzle, a noodle casserole with cheese and onions—here’s a recipe)
  • Grilled chicken (Hendl)
  • Grilled fish (Steckerlfisch)
  • Grilled ham hock (Schweinshaxe)
  • Potato dumplings (Knödel)
  • Potato pancakes (Reiberdatschi)
  • Pretzels (Brezeln)
  • Roast pork (Schweinebraten), and of course,
  • Sauerkraut and Blaukraut (red cabbage sauerkraut) with
  • Sausages (Würstl, including the Bavarian specialty Weisswurst, a white sausage made from veal and pork, seasoned with bacon, lemon, onions and parsley)
  •  
    *For German speakers who wonder why a beer named for the month of March (März in German) is celebrated in October: Märzen was originally brewed in March and laid down in caves before the summer heat made brewing impossible. At the end of September, any remaining kegs were consumed during the two-week Oktoberfest. While some modern brewers make Märzen seasonally for Oktoberfest, others brew it year-round.

     

    TIME TO PARTY

    There’s still time for you to have an Oktoberfest celebration. You don’t need to adhere to the German schedule: Consider that you’ve all of October.

    For an adult Halloween party, combine the two events and do a tasting of Oktoberfest beers, fall beers and pumpkin beers/ales.

  • Brown Ales
  • Dunkelweizen
  • English/India Pale Ales
  • Harvest Beers/Ales
  • Oktoberfest/Märzen beers
  • Pumpkin Beers/Ales
  •  
    (Check out all the different types of beer in our Beer Glossary.)

     

    Oktoberfest beer from Wisconsin: Leinenkugel’s Oktoberfest beer with sausage and sauerkraut. Photo courtesy Leinenkugel.

     

    Here’s a recipe from the Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Company of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, for brats steamed in Oktoberfest beer.

    BRATS COOKED IN BEER

    Enjoy Leinenkugel’s recipe for Oktoberfest-Infused Bratwurst, brats boiled in beer, then grilled.

    Ingredients

  • 1 dozen brats
  • 1 dozen brat buns
  • Oktoberfest beer, to cover†
  • 1 medium large sweet onion, sliced
  • 1 green pepper, sliced
  • 1 yellow pepper, sliced
  • 1 red pepper, sliced
  • 2 ounces butter
  •  
    †We used 5 bottles.
     
    Preparation

    1. Place brats in a Dutch oven with sliced onions, peppers and butter; cover the brats with beer. Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until brats are cooked. Remove brats and set aside remaining beer mixture.

    2. Grill brats until golden brown and return to beer mixture until ready to serve.

    3. Serve brats on fresh brat buns, plain or toasted, with your favorite toppings: ketchup, mustard, onions, peppers (chopped bell peppers or jalapeños) and sauerkraut.
     
    HOW MUCH BEER DO YOU NEED FOR A CROWD?

    If you’re planning a large event, use the handy calculator at Kegerators.com. We calculated that for a party of 25 guests consuming 3-5 beers apiece, we’d need 1 keg, 35 pounds of ice for a room temperature keg, and 30 cups, “Assumes 17% breakage, excluding drinking games.”

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Pumpkin Beer & Other Fall Craft Beers

    Invite Fat Jack and Oktoberfest to a fall beer
    tasting. Photo by Elvira Kalviste | THE
    NIBBLE.

     

    We received an email from Innis & Gunn, an Edinburgh brewer that ages beer in oak bourbon barrels, announcing that their Spiced Rum Aged beer has arrived in the U.S.

    It was a reminder that it’s time to switch to “fall beer.” Just as cooks make lighter or heavier recipes based on the weather, so do brewers. Some of the delights of the fall season are pumpkin beer and other spiced beers.

    These beers aren’t sweet pumpkin pie, but you can certainly serve them with the pie. No matter how you serve them, you’re in for a treat: The pumpkin adds body, smoothness and richness to the beer, and the seasonal spices add complex notes.

    One of Samuel Adams’ Small Batch Series, Fat Jack Double Pumpkin Ale adds 28 pounds of pumpkin to each barrel, along with allspice, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, The AVB* is a hefty 8.5% (by comparison, Budweiser is 5% ABV). Along with toasty smoked malts, this delectable brew salutes fall with layers and layers of flavor.

     

    Samuel Adams also makes an Oktoberfest beer with those same roasted malts. After a sweet start, the roasty malt comes up; the beer finishes with a hoppy, biscuity taste we enjoy.

    So when you’re next at the supermarket, roll down the beer aisle and see what fall treats await. Entertain your friends with a fall beer tasting to determine the best pumpkin beer, spiced beer, and other types you find.

    CRAFT BEER TRENDS

    Industry reports from chain stores selling beer across the USA show that:

  • More than half of the 25 top selling SKUs† for import and craft beers—including three of the top five SKUs—were seasonal beers or variety packs. These specialty products are from craft brewers, who produce small batches and have the flexibility to make seasonal and other special brews. This parade of new beers has developed fans who are continually on the lookout for new and exciting brews.
  • At the end of 2011, there were 6,607 beer SKUs in chain stores nationwide (not every store carries every SKU; some SKUs are only available locally/regionally). A whopping 743 new SKUs were introduced during 2011. Not only are there a lot of beer choices in the marketplace, but the rate of new launches is accelerating.
  • According to the data, the average chain branch carries 1,202 SKUs (that sounds incredible!). A growing number of beers are competing for limited shelf-space. Retailers carry what sells the best, so support your favorites!
  •  
    DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BEER?

    Check out our Beer Glossary.
     
     
    *Alcohol by volume.

    †A SKU, pronounced “skew” and short for stock-keeping unit, is a number/code used to identify each unique product or item for sale in a store. Different sizes of the exact same product (8 ounces versus 16 ounces, for example) are different SKUs.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Serve Hard Cider

    For Memorial Day festivities, we cut our beer purchases in half and substituted hard cider—specifically, the Crisp Apple variety of Angry Orchard Cider.

    Think of an elegant apple cider, made from a very complex blend of both culinary (eating) apples and bittersweet “angry” apples. Then, add a lengthy fermentation process, including oak aging for complexity and balance.

    Angry Orchard is made by a brewer that knows how to satisfy: Boston Beer Company, makers of Samuel Adams beer. (Read the full review.)

    Th cider was a hit.

    So for summer entertaining, consider a hard cider tasting. Following our Memorial Day success, we’re gathering up different hard cider brands and for a multibrand tasting.

    Magners (made in Ireland) and Woodchuck (from Vermont) are brands found most often in our local supemarkets, but check in wine stores for artisan brands (if your state’s wine stores don’t sell cider, they may be able to send you somewhere that does).

     

    Angry Orchard’s Crisp Apple Cider is our new favorite refreshment. Image courtesy Angry Orchard.

     

    WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT HARD CIDER (FOR STARTERS)

    “Apple cider” is a redundant term: By definition, the term cider indicates a beverage made from apples. Cider made from pears is called perry.

    Hard cider has been fermented into an alcoholic beverage. Fresh apple cider is raw apple juice that has not undergone a filtration process. Apple juice has been filtered to remove solids and pasteurized so that it will stay fresh longer.

  • Varietals. Certain grapes make better wine. While wine can be made from any grape, good wine is made from tried-and-true varietals. The same is true with cider.
  • Bubbles. We prefer our cider bubbly, but not all hard ciders have bubbles. They often require an added step: added carbon dioxide (like soda) or a dosage, which a bit of sugar and yeast that causes a second fermentation (like Champagne).
  • Style. Ciders are made wherever apples are grown. As with beer, styles vary widely. The French style tends to be light and subtle; English ciders are typically higher in alcohol and drier, with bolder apple flavor. American ciders are made in a broad variety of styles, from dry and semi-dry to sweet.
  • Pairings. Depending on the style, cider can start the meal as an apéritif; sweeter styles can conclude the meal with dessert. We enjoy lighter styles of cider with fresh cheeses; sushi; with oysters and other raw bar seafood; grilled or poached fish; seafood-based luncheon salads and green salads. Heavier cider styles go better with poultry, meat-based luncheon salads and sandwiches; we enjoy them with blue cheeses. As with beer, any cider can be enjoyed whenever you’re thirsty.
     
    For Labor Day, we’ll be hosting a perry tasting—a hard cider-type beverage made from pears instead of apples.

  • Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Have Fun With The History Of Food

    If you love food, you may love learning more about it. Museums mount enlightening exhibits that put the history of our mainstay foods in perspective.

    Take beer. The New York Historical Society has just opened an exhibit called Beer Here, Brewing New York’s History. Chock full of artifacts, the exhibit runs through September 2, 2012.

    At the conclusion of the exhibit, you step into a “tavern” to taste some outstanding craft beers from New York brewers. The selection varies daily. We happened to catch the new Small Batch IPA from Heartland Brewery, a brewpub with seven Manhattan locations. The IPA’s complex layering of herbal and floral flavors and aromas is simply thrilling.

    But you don’t have to be in Manhattan to find an exhibit on beer, hot dogs, tacos and other favorite foods. Check with your local museums, historical societies and academic institutions to see what they may be cooking up.

     

    Engraving of a 16th century brewery. Image courtesy Wikimedia.

     

    THE IMPORTANCE OF BEER IN CITIES

    As cities grew and local water supplies became polluted, microbes in the water caused disease in the population. People could not safely consume water that had not been boiled.

    But beer making boils the water and kills the pathogens. Plus, in the 19th centuries it was discovered that the hops used to flavor beer had antipathogenic and preservative properties (and were even made into medicines).

    Beer was one of the most common beverages in the Middle Ages, consumed daily by all social classes in the northern and eastern parts of Europe. Beer also provided a considerable amount of the daily calorie intake. Until clean municipal water supplies were developed in the 19th century, even young children drank beer.

    In addition to serving as a vital source of nourishment, beer was a steady source of tax revenue.

     

    The Lightning closure, was invented in the
    1870s and is still in use today, upgraded with
    a ceramic cap and a rubber gasket, and is called a swing top.
    Check out more historic bottle closures. Photo courtesy SHA.org.

     

    Beer Trivia

  • Party time, 10,000 C.E. People were brewing beer 12,000 years ago, about the time when mankind began to transition from a nomadic lifestyle to agricultural communities. Women became the primary brewers, among their many household duties.
  • Four simple ingredients. Beer is made from water, a fermentable starch source, brewer’s yeast to produce the fermentation (conversion into alcohol) and a flavoring such as hops (the cone-shaped flower clusters from the hops plant, Humulus lupulus.
  • Grain of choice: malted barley. In the U.S. and Europe, malted barley is fermented into beer. But the first beer brewed in the Colonies, in colonial Virginia in 1587, was made from local corn. In other parts of the world, agave, cassava root, millet, potato and sorghum are used (among other sources).
  • Fast forward to the year 1587 in colonial Virginia; Europeans produced the first homebrew made from corn in what would become the United States.
  •  

  • You have the right to homebrew. On October 14, 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed H.R. 1337, which exempted beer brewed at home for personal use from taxation. This exemption encouraged many people to homebrew, some of whom went on to establish the roughly 2,000 craft breweries in America today…and an estimated 1,000,000 homebrewers.
  •  
    Thanks to the American Homebrewers Association for the beer trivia.

    As you enjoy a cold one, consider brewing your own. We really enjoyed making beer with a Mr. Beer kit.

      

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    PRODUCT: Personalized Beer Labels

    Personalize a six-pack: a great gift idea. Photo courtesy Pinhole Press.

     

    Give your favorite beer lover a memorable six-pack: one with custom, personalized beer labels. If you’re looking for something different for college graduation or Father’s Day gifts, this could be it!

    Pinhole Press, which specializes in gift items customized with your photos (calendars, journals, magnets and the like), has a beer label option that’s sure to make an occasion more festive.

    You simply upload your photo and text and get 15 labels in return ($11.99). Add the cost of a six-pack, and you’ve created a memorable yet affordable gift.

    Order yours at PinholePress.com.

    Prefer Wine To Beer?

    Custom wine bottle labels are available in a broad selection of designs, including some for baby showers, weddings and other celebratory occasions (9 labels, $9.99).

    Cheers!

     

      

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