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    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
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Archive for St. Patrick’s Day

ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Irish Cereal Milk

Irish Cereal Milk Cocktail-Lexington BrassNYC-230

Cereal milk with a shot of Irish whiskey.
Photo courtesy Lexington Brass | NYC.

 

You might not drink this Irish Cereal Milk cocktail for breakfast; or then, you might. But it sure is a fun snack for after work, or even dessert on St. Patrick’s Day.

The recipe comes from Lexington Brass restaurant in midtown Manhattan.

RECIPE: IRISH CEREAL MILK COCKTAIL

Ingredients Per Drink

  • 2 ounces Jameson Irish whiskey
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup
  • 2 ounces Cinnamon Toast Crunch milk (instructions below)
  • Garnish: Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal
  • Optional garnish: cinnamon stick, or a sprinkle of
    ground cinnamon
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MAKE Cinnamon Toast Crunch milk: Soak the cereal in 3 ounces of milk for 30 minutes, then strain out the cereal (and eat it, if you like). (The cereal will absorb some of the milk, which is why we recommend starting with 3 ounces to end up with the 2 ounces for the drink.)

    2. FILL a rocks glass with ice; pour in whiskey and simple syrup. Top off with Cinnamon Toast Crunch Milk and stir.

    3. GARNISH with fresh Cinnamon Toast Crunch pieces and an optional cinnamon stick. Serve with a straw and a spoon.

      

    Comments

    ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Pot O’ Goldtini

    If you can’t find a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, you can drink a shot of gold from a bottle of Goldschläger.

    Goldschläger, created in Switzerland, is cinnamon schnapps with gold flakes of gold flakes floating throughout the bottle.

    While there are many Goldschläger cocktails, we think the nicest way to enjoy it is after St. Patrick’s dinner, with or without a cup of coffee.

    FLECKING YOUR DRINK WITH GOLD

    You can use Goldschläger to make a gold-flecked Martini, or you can buy gold flakes and make your own

  • Gold flakes, made from 24 karat edible gold, are available online. They’re pricey, $34 for a small container, so we have a “Plan B”: two different options that are far more affordable, and also edible (although not made of real gold)
  •  

    goldschlager-shot-230

    How about cinnamon shots: cinnamon-flavored Goldschlager liqueur with real gold flakes? Photo courtesy Goldschlager.

  • Wilton’s edible gold stars are far more affordable. A .04-ounce container is an affordable $5.39.
  • The most affordable gold flakes we’ve found—but haven’t seen in person, are these from CK Products. A full ounce is just $5.29.
  •  

    gold-flakes-martini-trendhunter-230

    A Pot O’Goldtini: a Martini with Goldschläger. Photo courtesy Trendhunter.com.

     

    The gold flakes can be used for any culinary purpose, from garnishing candy, chocolate and baked goods to pasta and risotto. How about gold-flecked sushi with gold-flecked saké?

    For drinks, think Champagne with gold flakes for a special toast; or a gold-flecked lemon-lime soda mocktail for the kids. If you’re in the chips, make gold flake drink rimmers.
     
    RECIPE: GOLDSCHLÄGER POT O’ GOLDTINI

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 2.5 ounces vodka
  • 1/2 ounce Goldschläger
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients in a mixing glass filled with ice cubes.

    2. SHAKE and strain into a Martini glass.

     

    CLASSIC MARTINI POT O’ GOLDTINI

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 2.5 ounces vodka or gin
  • 1/2 ounce dry vermouth
  • Optional: dash of lemon, orange or other bitters (optional)
  • Optional: lemon twist for garnish
  •  
    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the ingredients in a mixing glass filled with ice cubes.

    2. SHAKE and strain into a Martini glass.
     

    If you meet any leprechauns, invite them to join you.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Guinness Beef Stew

    Here’s hearty, family-style fare for St. Patrick’s Day: Guinness beef stew, courtesy of QVC’s David Venable.

    Guinness adds a deep richness to the broth of this stew without imparting the full flavor of the beer itself. For more beer flavor, serve one as the beverage. If you have a different favorite stout, you can substitute it for the Guinness.

    Instead of potatoes, rice or noodles, serve the stew with a whole grain like barley, and mashed cauliflower.

    RECIPE: GUINNESS BEEF STEW

    Ingredients

  • 3–1/2 tablespoons all–purpose flour
  • 1–1/4 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 1–1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat, cut into 1–1/2″ cubes
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped
  • 2–1/2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2–1/2 cups beef stock
  • 2 cups Guinness beer
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 1 bag (16 ounces) baby carrots
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  •  

    guinness-beef-stew-qvc-230

    Serve a Guinness or other stout with this hearty beef stew, cooked in two cups of Guinness. Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE the flour, salt, and black pepper in a medium–size bowl. Add the beef cubes and toss until completely coated.

    2. HEAT the vegetable oil in heavy large stockpot or Dutch oven over medium–high heat. Working in batches, brown the beef cubes, on all sides, about 5–7 minutes. Add the garlic, onion, and celery, and cook for 3–5 minutes.

    3. STIR in the dried thyme, bay leaves, beef stock, Guinness, and tomato paste. Bring the mixture to a boil and reduce the heat to low. Cover the pot and simmer for 1–1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.

    4. ADD the potatoes, baby carrots, salt, and pepper. Stir to distribute evenly. Cover and simmer on low heat, until the vegetables and beef are very tender, about 45 minutes. Sprinkle with the parsley right before serving.
     
    WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BEER AND STOUT?

    Stout is a type of beer. Other major categories include ale, lager, porter; there are many subcategories.

    Stout is dark beer produced from long-roasted malt, barley, hops, water and yeast. Different styles include imperial stout, dry/Irish stout, milk stout and oatmeal stout, among others. They are typically higher in alcohol: 7% or 8%, although some can be higher.

    By comparison, lager, the style most often drunk in the U.S., is a type of beer that is fermented and conditioned at low temperatures. The yeasts used for lager are different from those used for stout. Different styles include pale lager and dark lager.

    For more beer types, check out our Beer Glossary.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Drink Your Kale!

    It’s the perfect smoothie for St. Patrick’s Day and a way to drink kale.

    This “Lean, Mean, Green Smoothie” is from chef David Venable at QVC. It’s a more healthful libation than green beer and Irish coffee.

    “This smoothie is packed with good-for-you fruits and vegetables, but tastes like a sweet treat,” says David. “The bright color is perfectly festive and would be a great way to start your St. Paddy’s Day. Be sure to serve this in clear glasses so that everyone can see your holiday spirit!”

    RECIPE: GREEN SMOOTHIE

    Ingredients For 2 Servings

  • 1-1/2 cups seedless green grapes
  • 1-1/2 cups honeydew chunks (1/2″ chunks)
  • 1 cup loosely packed chopped kale, stems removed
  • 1 cup loosely packed baby spinach, stems removed
  • 1 banana, peeled
  • 1/2 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and halved
  • 1 ripe pear, cored and quartered
  • 3/4 cup cold water
  • 1-2 cups ice
  •  

    green-smoothie-davidvenableQVC-230

    This “lean, mean, green smoothie” is ready for St. Patrick’s Day. Photo courtesy QVC.

     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE the grapes, honeydew, kale, spinach, banana, avocado, pear, water, and ice in a blender, in the order listed.

    2. BLEND on high speed until the mixture is smooth and pourable. Serve immediately.

      

    Comments

    ST. PATRICK’S DAY RECIPE: Guinness Chocolate Mousse & Truffles

    guinnes-Chocolate-Mousse-guinnessstorehouse-230

    Chocolate mousse with Guinness. Photo
    courtesy Guinness Storehouse.

     

    When you’re Justin O’Connor, executive chef at Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, you work Guinness stout into every recipe, from Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes to soup.

    Guinness, which has chocolaty notes, is a great match with chocolate desserts. Whip one up for St. Patrick’s Day, and serve it with a small glass of Guinness.

    RECIPE: GUINNESS CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 10 egg yolks
  • 10 egg whites, whisked
  • 1½ cups dark chocolate
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup superfine sugar
  • ½ cup Guinness Draught
  • Optional topping: whipped cream (try these five
    spice or salted caramel whipped cream recipes)
  • Garnish: fresh raspberries or other seasonal berries
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MELT the dark chocolate and butter in a bain-marie and add in the Guinness.

    2. BEAT the egg yolks and superfine sugar until light and fluffy. Mix in the melted chocolate mixture in with egg yolks and slowly fold in the whisked egg whites until everything is smooth.

    3. TRANSFER the mousse to serving dishes and chill. Serve with fresh raspberries or other seasonal berries.

     

    RECIPE: CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

    Ingredients For 25 Truffles

  • 4-1/3 cups dark chocolate in small chunks
  • 1-2/3 cups cream
  • ½ cup Guinness
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • Dessicated coconut (a.k.a. coconut powder), cocoa powder or powdered subgar
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the cream and Guinness to a saucepan and bring to a boil. Add the chocolate and grated orange zest. Mix together until the chocolate is fully melted; then leave the chocolate mix until it is cool to the touch, but not set.

    2. TAKE generous teaspoons of the mixture and roll in your hands to form small round truffles. Dust in cocoa powder or coconut powder. Allow to set in the fridge for 2-3 hours.

     

    chocolate-truffles-Guinness-230

    Chocolate truffles with Guinness. Photo courtesy Guinness Storehouse.

     

    PREFER ICE CREAM?

    Check out this chocolate stout float.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Warm Spinach Mascarpone Dip

    Among our Eatin’ O’ The Green recipes for St. Patrick’s Day, this warm spinach dish is very popular. Who doesn’t love a spinach dip, with its glimmer of healthful green spinach blended into a creamy (and not so healthful) base?

    This recipe, from Vermont Creamery,is made even richer with mascarpone.

    It’s delicious as a kick-back snack with Irish beer; or with wine and savory cocktails like the Martini.

    RECIPE: WARM SPINACH MASCARPONE DIP

    Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 16 ounces frozen chopped spinach
  • 8 ounces mascarpone
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Dippers: baguette slices, crackers, pita chips, toasts
  •  

    spinach-mascarpone-dip-vermontcreamery-230

    Warm and creamy, it’s Popeye’s favorite dip. Photo courtesy Vermont Creamery.

     

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F.

    2. COOK the onion with olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat, until translucent.

    3. ADD frozen spinach and heat until spinach is hot but still green. Add mascarpone, salt, pepper, cayenne, Parmesan cheese and stir. Pour the mixture into a small casserole or baking dish.

    4. BAKE for 30 minutes until bubbling around the edges. Serve warm with pita chips or a sliced baguette. Or add a note of healthfulness with raw veggies (crudités).

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Upside Down Irish Whiskey Cake

    Irish whiskey cake: an upside down apple
    cake with a mascarpone filling. Photo
    courtesy Betty Crocker.

     

    This cake was originally pitched to us as a holiday fruitcake—an upside-down apple cake with whiskey-soaked fruit. But we liked the idea of it for St. Patrick’s Day as well.

    The recipe, from Betty Crocker, was developed with Betty Crocker SuperMoist Yellow Cake Mix. But if you prefer your own homemade cake mix with butter instead of vegetable oil, you can make the cake from scratch.

  • Prepare it in advance. You can prepare the dried fruit the night before, bake the cake layers, and/or whip up (and refrigerate) the topping the day before. Assemble the cake on the day you serve it.
  • Single layer option. Instead of a layer cake, you can make two single layer cakes. Place a single cake layer, apple side up, on a cake stand. Top with a dollop of the mascarpone topping and garnish as desired.
  • Substitute whiskey. You can use Bourbon or other whiskey instead of the Irish whiskey.
  •  
    RECIPE: UPSIDE DOWN IRISH WHISKEY CAKE

    Ingredients

    For The Fruit Cake

  • 1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped dried apricots
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange peel
  • 3 tablespoons Irish whiskey
  • 3 red apples, unpeeled, quartered, cored, very thinly (1/4 inch) sliced
  • 1 box yellow cake mix
  • 1 cup water
  • 3/4 cup slivered almonds, finely ground*
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger
  •  

    Filling & Topping

  • 1/4 cup apple jelly
  • 2 ounces mascarpone cheese, softened
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Optional garnishes: fresh raspberries† or
    cranberries, thin orange slices
  •  

    Preparation

    1. MIX dried cranberries, apricots, orange peel and bourbon in a medium bowl. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour or overnight.

    2. PREHEAT oven to 350°F (325°F for a dark or nonstick pan). Generously grease bottom and sides of two 8-inch round cake pans with shortening.

    3. LINE bottom of each pan with cooking parchment paper. Grease parchment paper with shortening. Line bottom and side of each pan with overlapping apple slices, cutting slices as necessary to line side of each pan.

     

    Mascarpone-230

    In the U.S., mascarpone is sold in eight-ounce tubs. Super-rich and thick, in Italy it is served with berries instead of the American favorite, whipped cream. Photo by Melody Lan | THE NIBBLE.

     

    4. BEAT cake mix, water, ground almonds, oil and eggs with electric mixer on low speed until moistened, then on medium speed 2 minutes, scraping the bowl occasionally. Stir in soaked dried fruit and ginger. Gently pour into pans over apple slices.

    5. BAKE 40 to 45 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Immediately turn pans upside down to release cakes onto cooling racks.

    6. MAKE glaze: In small microwavable bowl, microwave apple jelly uncovered on High 15 to 30 seconds, stirring every 15 seconds, until hot. Brush over apples on top and side of each cake to make shiny. Cool completely, about 1 hour. Meanwhile, in medium bowl…

    7. MAKE filling: Beat mascarpone cheese, whipping cream and sugar with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

    8. ASSEMBLE on a serving plate: Place one cake, apple side up. Top with whipped cream mixture. Gently place remaining cake layer on top of cream, apple side up. Garnish with fresh cranberries/arils and orange slices and toasted sliced almonds. Cut into slices with serrated knife. Cover and refrigerate any remaining cake.

     
    *Grind the slivered almonds in small food processor, or very finely chop with knife.

    †You can roll the raspberries in sugar—ideally superfine sugar—for a special effect.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Irish Beer

    murphys_stout-bkgd-mully1.wordpress-230

    A glass of Murphy’s shows off the chocolaty
    color. It also has chocolaty flavors, and a
    sweetness which makes it an ideal “dessert
    beer.” Photo courtesy Murphy’s.

     

    Many people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with beer. But this is not the occasion to pull out your favorite American craft beers or mass-market standards such as Bud, Coors or Miller.

    No, this is time for Irish beer.

    You’ve got two choices here:

  • Imported beers brewed in Ireland
  • Irish-style beers brewed in the U.S.
  •  
    There is no one style of Irish beer. The brews range from light and crisp to strong, rich and full-bodied for sipping, to light and crisp. So whatever your style of choice, you’ll find an Irish beer or two that fits the bill.

    But lager is the style of choice in the Emerald Isle, accounting for 60% of the beer sold. Stout is the second favorite at 34%, and ale comprises the remaining 6% is Ale. [Source: Irish Beer Market Survey 2010]

    How about an Irish beer tasting party for St. Patrick’s Day? The selection will depend on what’s available in your area, but here are brands to look for.

     
    Irish Lager

  • Harp Lager, perhaps the best-known Irish lager in the U.S., is a crisp, light lager, clean and refreshing.
  • Porterhouse Bohemia is a black lager style that’s relatively new to Ireland. The recipe was developed by a Czech brewer using Pilsner Urquell yeast, but delivers the roasted chocolate flavor that Irish stout drinkers crave.
  •  
    *Not all oyster stouts are made with oysters. The name indicates a style of stout, popular with the oysters served at pubs.

     

    Irish Stout

  • Beamish is a bit lighter and spicier than the iconic Guinness, dark and chocolaty.
  • Guinness Draught, the most famous of Irish beers, is rich and creamy with roasty malts and hints of chocolate. Compare it with the stonger Extra Stout and Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, hoppier like an I.P.A. and higher in alcohol.
  • Murphy’s Irish Stout (photo above), lighter and sweeter than the first two, has caramel, chocolate and espresso flavors that make it just right for dessert. Seriously—try it with an apple tart.
  • Ohara’s Irish Stout is an old-school style: robust, full-bodied and hoppy with roasty notes from the barley and a subtle sweetness. O’Hara’s Celtic Stout has a very different profile: smooth and dry with flavors of coffee and licorice.
  • Porterhouse Oyster Stout is actually brewed with fresh oysters, shucked into the tank*. The oyster flavor is very subtle (it has been compared to the brininess in an Asian fish sauce), and oyster lovers might prefer that those oysters were in front of them on the half shell. But they do create a different flavor profile, which includes some conventional stout flavors (creamy, roasty, malty).
  •  

    murphys-irish-red-230

    Irish red ale has a ruby hue—naturally, from roasted barley or in lesser brews, from artificial coloring. Photo courtesy Murphy’s Irish Ale.

     

    Irish Ale

  • Kilkenny Irish Cream Ale, smooth and creamy, dates back to the 14th century. Brewed by Guinness, the amber ale has been described as a less hoppy Smithwick’s. It has a creamy head like Guinness, a malty aroma and flavor and is sweet and creamy on the palate, offset by a touch of bitterness.
  • Murphy’s Irish Red (photo above) does have a red hue, generated by small amounts of roasted barley (caveat: some manufacturers artificially color their “Irish red” beers red). In America, darker amber ales are sometimes labeled (or mis-labeled) as red ales. Murphy’s Irish Red is the real deal: dry, crisp, hoppy and highly carbonated. It delivers hints of caramel and fruit.
  • O’Hara’s Irish Wheat, a golden wheat ale, is a lighter thirst-quencher in the style of Belgian wheat beers. It delivers notes of bananas, peaches and plums.
  • Smithwick’s Irish Ale dates back to the 14th century; Smithwick’s is Ireland’s oldest operating brewery (and the largest ale producer in Ireland). With a similar profile to Murphy’s, it delivers a deep caramel maltiness and a hint of hops and roasted barley, coffee and sweet fruits.
  •  
    DON’T LIKE BEER?

    Look for Irish hard cider. It’s a relative newcomer—the first large commercial batches were brewed in the mid-1930s by William Magner. Cider now accounts for 12% of Ireland’s “beer market,” much of that Magner’s Irish Cider, which can be found in the U.S.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Beer Flavored Jelly Beans

    beer-jelly-belly-230

    Chew, don’t chug, these beer-flavored jelly
    beans. Photo courtesy Jelly Belly.

     

    What if your kid’s first beer was a jelly bean?

    Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, Jelly Belly Candy Company has launched the first beer-flavored jelly bean, called Draft Beer.

    Beer has been a oft-requested flavor for decades. After years of working on the formulation, the non-alcoholic product is ready for St. Patrick’s Day, Easter baskets and beyond.

    Jelly Belly sent us a sample and yes, it does taste like beer. The irridescent pale gold jelly beans are alcohol free, yet deliver a beer aroma and subtle beer flavor.

  • A 16-ounce re-sealable bag (approximately 400 jelly beans) is $8.99.
  • If you really want to tie one on, a 10-pound bulk box is $85.99.
  •  
    Stock up for National Jelly Bean Day, April 22nd. (Here’s the history of the jelly bean.)

     
    WANT THEM IN GREEN?

    There’s a limited edition of the Draft Beer Jelly Belly, colored green for St. Patrick’s day, available exclusively at Jelly Belly Visitor and Tour Centers in California and Wisconsin.

    All Jelly Belly jelly bean flavors are dairy free, fat free, gluten free, OU kosher, peanut free and vegetarian.

    Bottoms up!

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: National Oreo Day

    Today is National Oreo Day, honoring the world’s most popular cookie. We almost feel like ditching work to celebrate—with Oreo cheesecake, cookies and cream ice cream and an Oreo milkshake—and then running a marathon to work off the calories.

    However, we’re limiting ourselves to one Oreo-packed chocolate bar from Chocomize, a chocolate e-heaven where you can take your favorite type of chocolate bar (dark, milk, white) and top it with your favorite candies, nuts, spices and special luxuries (gold leaf, anyone?).

    You pay a base price for the bar ($4.50, or $6.50 for a heart shape), and then for each add-on topping—up to 5 selections from a menu of 90 options.

    If you don’t like to make choices, there are plenty of ready-made choices, like the Cookie Bar in the photo.

    In honor of National Oreo Day, Chocomize has two special offers running through March 10th:

  • FREE Oreo pieces. You can add Oreo cookie pieces for FREE to any chocolate bar you make.
  •  

    oreo-white-chocolate-230

    The popular Cookie Bar: Belgian white chocolate bar with Oreos and malted milk balls. Photo courtesy Chocomize.

     

  • FREE chocolate bar with $40 order. Any order of $40+ gets a FREE Cookie Bar with the code OREO. The Cookie Bar, one of Chocomize’s most popular, is Belgian white chocolate, cookie dough bits and Oreo cookie pieces.
  •  

    oreos-stack-froyo-230

    Imagine if lemon meringue had been the
    favorite flavor of Oreos! Photo courtesy
    Froyo.

     

    OREO HISTORY

    Oreos are 102 years old. According to Time magazine, the National Biscuit Company (later shortened to Nabisco) sold its first Oreo sandwich cookies to a Hoboken grocer on On March 6, 1912. They weren’t an original concept: Sunshine’s Hydrox cookies* (among others) preceded them in 1908.

    There were two original Oreo flavors: original (chocolate) and lemon meringue. The original was far more popular, and Nabisco discontinued lemon meringue in the 1920s.

    Today Oreo is the world’s most popular cookie, sold in more than 100 countries†. More than 450 billion Oreos have been sold to date.

    Yes, there were other chocolate sandwich cookies. But what made Oreos stand out was the thick, creamy filling invented by Sam J. Porcello, the principal food scientist at Nabisco. (He also created the “stuf” in Double Stuf Oreos and the chocolate-covered and white chocolate-covered Oreos. Now that’s bragging rights for generations of kids, grandkids and great-grands to come.)

     

    WHAT ABOUT THE DESIGN ON THE COOKIES?

    Nabisco says that an unnamed “design engineer” created the current Oreo design, which was updated in 1952‡. Other sources name him as William A. Turnier, who worked in the engineering department creating the dies that stamped designs onto cookies.

    Here’s the story of the design and its meaning.
     
    THE NAME IS A MYSTERY

    No one knows for certain the origin of the name “Oreo.” Some believe it was derived from the French word for gold, “or,” because the original packaging was mostly gold.

    The bigger curiosity to us is, in The Wizard Of Oz film, why did the guards at the castle of the Wicked Witch Of The West sing a chorus of “Oreo?”

     
    *The Oreo became kosher in 1998, when the lard in the original recipe was replaced with vegetable shortening. Prior to then, Sunshine Bakeries’ Hydrox cookies had long been the kosher alternative. But most people preferred the taste of Oreos, and Hydrox cookies were discontinued by Keebler in 2003.

    †In terms of sales, the top five Oreo-nibbling countries are the U.S., China, Venezuela, Canada and Indonesia. In some countries, like China, Nabisco’s parent company, Kraft, reformulated the recipe to appeal to local tastes, including green tea Oreos.

    ‡The current design replaced a design of a ring of laurels, two turtledoves and a thicker, more mechanical “Oreo” font.

      

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