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Archive for Rosh Hashanah

TIP OF THE DAY: Organic Honey From Whole Foods Markets

September is National Honey Month, a good reason to focus on our favorite ways to use honey.

Even if you’re not Jewish, you can start this week with a Rosh Hashanah tradition:

Celebrate the Jewish New Year with a traditional snack of apples and honey. The custom ushers in a sweet new year.

We never thought to dip apples and honey until we were invited to our neighbors’ home one Rosh Hashanah 10 years ago. It’s become a favorite treat.

TIP: Instead of placing the honey into a small dish for dipping, as in the photo, think of hollowing out a large apple and placing it, filled with honey, in the center of a plate of apple slices.

We recently discovered that there’s a special prayer to recite before the honey and apples are consumed. THE NIBBLE doesn’t publish religious content, but we were so charmed by the thought of a prayer of thanks for honey and apples that we couldn’t resist:

 

Honey and apples are a Rosh Hashanah tradition. Photo courtesy Voices-Magazine.Blogspot.com.

 

  • Recite the first part of the prayer: Blessed are you Lord, our God, Ruler of the world, Creator of the fruit of the tree. (In Hebrew: Baruch atah Ado-nai, Ehlo-haynu melech Ha-olam, Borai p’ree ha’aritz.)
  • Take a bite of an apple slice dipped in honey.
  • Recite the second part of the prayer: May it be Your will, Adonai, our God and the God of our forefathers, that You renew for us a good and sweet year. (In Hebrew: Y’hee ratzon mee-l’fanekha, Adonai Elohaynu v’elohey avoteynu sh’tichadeish aleinu shanah tovah um’tuqah.
  • Enjoy the rest of the apples and honey.
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    The new 365 Organic Mountain Forest Honey
    line. Photo courtesy Whole Foods Market.

     

    CERTIFIED ORGANIC HONEY FROM WHOLE FOODS

    Just in time for fall apple-dipping, Whole Foods Market has introduced 365 Everyday Value Mountain Forest Honey, U.S. Grade A in four varieties:

  • Light Amber
  • Amber
  • Raw Honey
  • White Raw Honey
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    Organic honey is made from the nectar of plants in fields that have not been treated with chemical pesticide. The fields must be pesticide-free for 20 miles in every direction of the beehives.

     

    In addition to organic certification, the honeys are also Whole Trade, a certification similar to Fair Trade. It ensures that the products were produced in a way that ensures fair prices to producers, safe and healthy working conditions for farm workers and environmentally-friendly production. (More about Fair Trade and similar certifying organizations).

    RECIPES WITH HONEY

    Try honey in these delicious recipes from Whole Foods:

  • Honey Lime Salmon Kabobs
  • Honey Mustard Coleslaw
  • Baklava With Honey Syrup
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    MORE BUZZ ABOUT HONEY

    Here’s everything you need to know about honey: types, storing and using, pairing, trivia, history, and more recipes.

    Have a sweet September.

      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Flavored Challah Bread

    Chocolate-stuffed babka and olive-
    stuffed challah from Motzi. Photo by
    Sue Ding | THE NIBBLE.

     

    Challah was the type of bread tithed to priests* in ancient Israeli temples. A portion of the challah loaf was sanctified and the rest was consumed. Challah became the customary bread to serve with Sabbath and holiday meals.

    Motzi has updated the traditional plain challah by stuffing it with delicious things: sundried tomatoes, roasted red peppers, olives, pumpkin and chocolate (not all in one loaf, of course).

    With the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, commencing on Wednesday, September 28th, it’s a perfect time to try these delicious stuffed challahs, or send them as gifts (just $5.00 a loaf).

    When we sat down to try our order, we never dreamed that five loaves of bread would disappear so quickly.

    Fortunately, the products freeze well, so on our next order, we paced ourselves.

  • Read the full review.
  • Discover a world of delicious bread types in our Bread Glossary.
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    The line is certified kosher by OU.
     
    *Where were the rabbis? Long before rabbis were in charge of Jewish congregations, priests were in charge of the temples. The roots of Judaism date back to the Bronze Age (3300 to 1200 B.C.E.). Rabbinic Judaism (today’s Judaism) developed during the 3rd to 6th centuries C.E., after the codification of the Talmud (the central text of Judaism that covers customs, ethics, history, law and philosophy). “Rabbi” means “teacher of the Talmud.”

      

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    COOKING VIDEO: Challah Bread Recipe

     

    Challah, the traditional Jewish bread, dates to ancient Israel.

    The word itself refers to a tithe of bread that was given to the priests, who had no income. A portion of the dough was sanctified, and the remainder was used for ordinary consumption.

    It became customary to serve challah with all Sabbath and holiday meals. Before cutting the bread, a blessing for the food (a motzi) is recited.

    Challah arrived in America with Jewish immigrants. The word is pronounced CHAH-luh, with a guttural ch as in the German word ach (here’s an audio pronunciation).

  • Read our review of Motzi Challah, delicious flavored challah. Our favorite, Sundried Tomato Challah, is an irresistable challah-pizza fusion.
  • Try this delicious honey challah recipe, in addition to the recipe in the video. Most commercial challah is parve, so it can be eaten with meat and other non-dairy foods. Both of these recipes use butter, which gives the challah an even lovelier flavor.
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