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Archive for Chinese New Year

CHINESE NEW YEAR: Chinese Long Beans

It’s Chinese New Year: The Year Of The Horse begins today (the actual year is 4712). Make a Chinese-inspired dish.

Chef Daniel Boulud take Chinese long beans, steamed them and tied them into knots, topped with chicken (see the photo below).

What a fun way to get people to eat more green beans!

Our recipe, below, is much simpler, and the Chinese-style beans can be served with any dish that pair with green beans.

You can find Chinese long beans in Asian markets, or plan ahead and grow your own yard-long string beans with these string bean seeds from Burpee.

You can substitute regular green beans, which are just as tasty, if not as striking in appearance.

 

Chinese long beans. Photo courtesy Burpee.

 

RECIPE: CHINESE LONG BEANS

Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 1 tablespoon peanut or sesame oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound fresh green beans, trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 2 tablespoons oyster sauce*
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  •  
    *Available in the Asian products section of most supermarkets, in Asian specialty stores and online; Lee Kum Kee is a quality brand. See more about oyster sauce below. You can substitute Hoisin sauce, but it gives the dish a sweeter flavor than the pungent oyster sauce.

     

    Daniel Boulud’s long bean knots with
    chicken. Photo by Richard Patterson |
    RichardPattersonPhoto.com | Restaurant
    Daniel.

     

    Preparation

    1. HEAT peanut oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the garlic, and cook until the edges begin to brown, about 20 seconds.

    2. ADD the beans; cook and stir until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes.

    3. STIR in the sugar, oyster sauce and soy sauce. Continue cooking/stirring for several minutes until the beans have attained the desired degree of tenderness.
     
    WHAT IS A CHINESE LONG BEAN?

    Its botanical name is Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis. It is best known as the long bean or Chinese yardlong bean, but also as the asparagus bean, bora, long-podded cowpea, pea bean, snake bean and yardlong bean. The pods are actually about half a yard long; the subspecies name sesquipedalis means “one and a half feet long” (half a yard).

     

    While its flavor is similar to the green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), it is from a different genus. In fact, it is a member of the cowpea species, which includes blackeyed peas.

     
    WHAT IS OYSTER SAUCE?

    A popular condiment in Chinese and Filipino cuisines, oyster sauce is often used in stir fries and as a topping for steamed vegetables.

    The viscous sauce is prepared from oysters and brine. A true oyster sauce is aromatic with intense flavor, and is expensive. Most oyster sauces on the market are cheaper, diluted solutions of concentrated ones. There are also vegan versions made from mushrooms.

    Oyster sauce was invented in 1888 by Mr. Lee Kam-Sheung of Nam Shui Village in Guangdong Province, Chinas, an island where oysters were abundant.

    Originally born in another village, Lee was a farmer who had to leave town following threats from local gangsters. He opened a restaurant in his new village, using the local oysters to make stock. One day he forgot about a pot of stock on the stove, and when he returned to it the stock had boiled down to a thick, aromatic and delicious sauce: a happy accident!*

    His company, Lee Kum Kee, continues to produce oyster sauce along with a wide variety of fine Asian condiments.

    *Source: Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship in Hong Kong: A Casebook, edited by Ali F. Farhoomand. Here’s the page reference.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Chinese Steamed Dumplings With A Twist

    buffalo-chicken-dumplings-IMUSA-230

    Buffalo chicken dumplings: fusion food.
    Photo and recipe courtesy IMUSA USA.

     

    The Chinese New Year begins on January 31st; the Super Bowl is February 2nd. Here’s a dish that combines both concepts: Buffalo Chicken Steamed Dumplings.

    The recipe for this fusion food—Chinese steamed dumplings crossed with Buffalo chicken wings—was developed by IMUSA USA. The company manufacturers cookware for international cuisine, including the bamboo steaming basket in the photo.

    RECIPE: BUFFALO CHICKEN STEAMED
    DUMPLINGS

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • ½ small onion
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 3 tablespoons curly parsley
  • ½ cup celery
  • ½ cup crumbled blue cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • Dumpling wrappers (you can use won ton
    wrappers)
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 cup Buffalo style hot sauce, like Frank’s
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • Preparation

    1. MIX first 9 ingredients (chicken through pepper) by hand in a medium bowl until evenly combined.

    2. ASSEMBLE dumplings by placing dumpling wrapper on a flat surface. Roll a small ball of the chicken mixture between your hands, about a tablespoon, and place in the center of the wonton wrapper.

    3. DIP a finger in a cup of water and run it around the edges of the wrapper. Pick up a wrapper and chicken ball with one hand (between your thumb and index finger) and begin pinching hard around the wrapper until it tightly wraps the chicken ball. Re-pinch if necessary.

    4. SPRAY the steaming basket with non-stick spray and add the dumplings. Steam for 10 minutes until fully cooked.

    5. MAKE the hot sauce by gently heating the hot sauce and the butter. Spoon some sauce on a plate and place dumplings on top. Garnish with more crumbled blue cheese, if desired.

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Asian Wings

    We like Buffalo Wings, but we’re ready for something new (even newer than these fun Deconstructed Buffalo Wings and this Buffalo Chicken Pizza).

    So we jumped on this Asian-inspired wings recipe from Chef Lorena Garcia. Plan ahead: They need to marinate overnight (and can be prepped up to three days in advance).

    RECIPE: GINGER ORANGE CHICKEN WINGS

    Ingredients For Approximately 30 Wings

  • ½ cup of orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ cup hoisin sauce
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pounds of chicken wings
  • 3 scallions, slivered
  • Optional plate garnish: lemon or lime wedges
  •  

    Chicken wings are given the Peking Duck treatment, with hoisin sauce and scallions.

     

    Preparation

    1. PLACE orange juice concentrate, lemon juice, hoisin sauce, sugar, canola oil, ginger and garlic in a large resalable plastic bag. Seal and shake to mix.

    2. ADD chicken wings; seal and shake to coat evenly.

    3. REFRIGERATE overnight, or up to 3 days.

    4. PREHEAT oven to 400°F. Line a large sheet pan with aluminum foil. Spread wings on foil.

    5. BAKE for 45 minutes, until brown and shiny. Transfer to serving platter, sprinkle with scallions and serve.

      

    Comments

    CHINESE NEW YEAR: Godiva Chocolate For The Year Of The Horse

    Lady Godiva rides in for the Lunar New Year.
    The image is larger than the actual
    chocolates. Photo courtesy Godiva.

     

    Some foodies end the Christmas-New Year holiday season in anticipation of Valentine’s Day. But don’t forget about Chinese New Year, celebrated by Chinese, Koreans and Vietnamese, who follow a different calendar than Western cultures. (There are actually a dozen different lunar holidays in Asia).

    Eating sweets symbolizes the beginning of a “sweet year.”

    The Year Of The Horse, begins on Friday, January 31st. If you were born in 2002, 1990, 1978, 1966, 1954, 1942, 1930 or 1918, this is your lunar year. If you follow astrology, you can check on what this means for your health, wealth, relationships and career.

    But regardless of whether your zodiac animal is a horse or one of the others (dog, dragon, monkey, ox, pig/boar, tiger, rabbit, rat, rooster, sheep, snake), you can treat yourself to a box of Godiva’s truly wonderful lunar year chocolates.

    This year’s selection from Godiva Chocolatier includes three spectacular pieces:

  • Dark Caramel Pear: crunchy caramel pear ganache with a touch of vanilla in a blend of milk and& dark chocolate, enrobed in dark chocolate.
  • Milk Cherry Almond: crunchy almond praliné, sour cherry and a hint of honey blended with milk chocolate, enrobed in milk chocolate.
  • White Pineapple Macadamia: nutty macadamia cream and sweet pineapple blended with white chocolate ganache, enrobed in white chocolate.
  •  
    Each offers a cascade of flavors and textures that are so much more glorious than the words used to describe them. They are exquisite chocolates, and we loved all three equally.

    The recipes were developed in Asia for the Asian consumer, and reflect those flavor preferences. The chocolates are less sweet than American-developed flavors—a boon for those domestic palates that have evolved to prefer a more moderate level of sweetness.
     
    Where To Purchase

    You can purchase the chocolates in Lunar New Year gift boxes, along with other Godiva pieces—20 pieces total for $50.00 and 32 pieces total for $120. They can be purchased in Godiva boutiques and online at Godiva.com.

    But our recommendation is to head to a Godiva boutique for a hand-packed box of 100% Year Of The Horse Collection. Seriously, we couldn’t get enough of them. They’ll only be in stores through January 31st.

    On days when you’re not eating the chocolate, check out the Lunar New Year specials at your local Asian restaurants.

     

    GODIVA CHOCOLATE MARZIPAN HEARTS

    Available only through Valentine’s Day (while supplies last) is another special treat: marvelous marzipan hearts, covered with your choice of dark or milk chocolate.

    Oh, how delicious! As with the Year Of The Horse collection, we couldn’t stop eating them.

    They’re available in Godiva boutiques only. Here’s a store locator: If you’re a marzipan lover, you’ll want more than a few.

    You may want to call first to make sure they haven’t run out; although there are plenty of other choices. But if your heart is set on marzipan hearts, you can always make your own with this recipe from AnEdibleMosaic.com.

     

    Photo courtesy AnEdibleMosaic.com.

     

      

    Comments

    RECIPE: Dirty Santa Coffee Cocktail

    What happens when you mix hot coffee, milk, bourbon and Marshmallow Fluff? You get The Dirty Santa cocktail (hey, we don’t name them!).

    Given the number of people who love a good cup of coffee, this could be a holiday hit.

    The drink is on the menu of Joe and Misses Doe, a casual restaurant in Manhattan’s East Village.

    RECIPE: DIRTY SANTA COFFEE COCKTAIL

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • Strong coffee
  • 1.5 ounces whole milk (or substitute)
  • .5 ounce simple syrup (recipe)
  • Marhmallow Fluff or other marshmallow creme
  • 1.5 ounces bourbon
  •  

    The Dirty Santa served in a trendy, pint-size drinking jar. Libbey sells a dozen for just $16.50.

     
    Preparation

    1. FILL a microwaveable safe mug 3/4 of the way with coffee. Add milk, and syrup.

    2. COVER the whole top of the mug with Fluff to seal in the liquid.

    3. MICROWAVE for 2 minutes.

    4. POKE a hole in fluff and pour in bourbon.
     
    EDITOR’S NOTE

    We have a responsibility to maintain the accuracy of the English language, even if few other people seem to care about it. So Joe: It’s not Misses Doe, it’s Missus Doe.

    Misses are what happens when you fail to hit the ball, or overlook opportunities.

    Missus, or the missus, is the informal term of address for a wife.

    Teaching moment: Don’t carve anything in stone until you check a dictionary. Dictionary.com is an easy click away.

      

    Comments

    FOOD FUN: Christmas Sushi & Sashimi

    Delicious Christmas trees. Photo courtesy
    Bemka.com.

     

    Sushi and sashimi fans: Delight your fellow enthusiasts with these hors d’oeuvre:

    RECIPE: SASHIMI TARTARE CHRISTMAS TREES

    Ingredients

  • Cucumber slices
  • Waffle potato chips (you can substitute conventional chips)
  • Tuna tartare and/or salmon tartare (recipe below)
  • Garnish: chives and/or wasabi tobiko caviar
  • Optional garnish: slices of yellow grape tomato for top of trees
  •  
    EASY TARTARE RECIPE

    Ingredients

  • 1 pound sushi grade tuna or salmon, finely diced
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon wasabi powder
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted
  • 1/8 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • Pinch salt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BLEND together olive oil, wasabi, sesame seeds, pepper and salt. Add fish and toss until evenly coated.

    2. ADJUST seasoning as desired with additional wasabi powder, pepper and/or salt.

    3. ASSEMBLE on cucumber and potato chip bases as shown in photo.

     

    RECIPE: CALIFORNIA ROLL SNOWMAN

    The photo shows a non-edible scarf and hat. We’ve substituted edible versions in our recipe.

    Ingredients

  • California rolls, purchased or homemade
  • Black sesame seeds or black caviar roe (e.g. lumpfish caviar) for face
  • Toothpicks
  • Optional nose: a small piece of carrot
  • Optional garnish: red “scarf” cut from a roasted red bell pepper (pimento) or a green scarf made from the top portion of a green onion
  • Optional garnish: “hat” made from small square crackers
  •  
    Preparation

    You can assemble a standing snowman by slightly flattening the bottom piece, or simply arrange it flat on a dark colored plate (for contrast with the white rice).

     

    Stack California rolls to make a snowman. Photo courtesy Genji Sushi.

     

    1. CREATE the face on the top piece: eyes, nose and mouth. Use the bit of carrot as an optional nose.

    2. STACK three California roll pieces. For a standing snowman, use toothpicks to join the pieces.

    3. ADD toothpicks as arms.

    4. ADD optional “clothing”: red scarf and hat. For a hat, affix two crackers in a perpendicular fashion with cream cheese. If using a green onion scarf, blanch it in boiling water to make it easier to tie.
     
    Check out all the different types of sushi in our beautiful Sushi Glossary.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: A Holiday Hot Toddy

    Mulled cider can be a cocktail (add gin
    or whisky) or mocktail. Photo courtesy Zaya
    Rum.

     

    The expression “cup of good cheer” that comes to us from Merrie Olde England refers to hot mulled cider and wine. Whether or not you have a fireplace, horse and sleigh, invite friends over to share that cup, and have one waiting as Thanksgiving guests arrive.

    Warm alcoholic beverages such as glögg, mulled wine and toddies originated in Northern Europe, where beer, cider, wine and spirits were mulled (heated) with sugar and spices to add some cheer to cold winter days (before central heating, no less).

    Serve a toddy (or one of the related drinks below) instead of egg nog and you’ll save big on calories. A hot toddy is just as festive and is made with mostly water instead of mostly cream and eggs!

    HOT TODDY & ITS RELATIVES

  • Glögg (pronounced like the “eu” sound in French—here’s an audio file pronunciation from a native Swede) is the Scandinavian form of mulled wine, sweetened with sugar and spiced with bitter orange peel, cardamom, cinnamon sticks, cloves, ginger, vanilla pods, and often, almonds and raisins.
  •  

  • Hot Buttered Rum is a rum toddy, a favorite drink in Colonial America. The classic recipe contains butter, which adds creaminess and body. Many people use the term “hot buttered rum” when they mean “toddy,” so if you care one way or the other, ask if it contains butter.
  • Hot Cider can be made with or without spirits. You can serve it plain, mulled (with spices) or with gin or other favorite spirit.
  • Mulled Wine is hot and sweet: “Mulled” means to heat, sweeten and flavor with spices. Ale and cider are also mulled.
  • Toddy is a cocktail made with alcohol, boiling water, sugar and spices. Toddies can be made with any spirit—bourbon, brandy, tequila, Scotch and other whiskeys are popular. Back in Merrie Olde England, bourbon and tequila—New World spirits—were not part of the repertoire.
  •  
    While it’s not related to any of the hot drinks above, we’ll add another to the list to clarify the difference:

  • Nog, a beverage made with beaten eggs (“egg nog” is a redundancy, like “hot toddy” [a toddy is made with boiling water] and in another category, “shrimp scampi” [scampi is Italian for “shrimp”]).
  •  
    We have more history and recipes for all of these hot cocktails.

     

    MORE HOLIDAY CHEER

    This recipe comes from Laphroaig, using its 10-Year-Old Scotch Whisky. We’re big Laphroaig fans—we love that peaty, smoky taste—but you can use whatever Scotch you have. If you’re not a Scotch drinker, substitute your favorite spirit.

    Instead of added spices, this recipe uses ginger liqueur.

    SCOTCH TODDY

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1 part Scotch
  • ½ part ginger liqueur
  • 3 parts hot apple cider
  •  

    Cider and gin. Photo courtesy TheBar.com.

  • Garnishes: lemon wedge studded with cloves, dash of fresh ground cinnamon
  •  
    Preparation

    1. BUILD drink in a pre-heated coffee mug.

    2. GARNISH and serve.

     

    HOT GIN CIDER

    This drink, from Tanqueray London Dry Gin, is especially attractive in a tall glass mug, as in the photo below.

    Ingredients Per Drink

  • 1.25 ounces London Dry Gin
  • .5 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 3 dashes simple syrup
  • 3 dashes bitters
  • Hot apple cider
  • Optional garnish: cinnamon stick or lemon wheel
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE first five ingredients in a glass. Top with hot apple cider and stir.

    2. GARNISH with cinnamon stick and serve.
     
    Want a cool, not hot, holiday celebration drink? Here’s an option from Cruzan Rum.

    RECIPE: SPICED HOLLY HIGHBALL

    Ingredients

  • 5 cranberries
  • Handful of mint leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon agave or honey
  • 1.5 parts aged dark rum
  • Ice
  • Club soda
  • Garnish: mint sprig
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MUDDLE the cranberries, mint, spice and agave. Add rum and shake well.

    2. STRAIN over ice into a highball glass. Top with club soda and garnish with a mint sprig and three cranberries.

      

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Red Cooking For Chinese New Year

    More than a billion Chinese people rang in the new year on February 10th (it’s the Year Of The Snake). This most important of Chinese holidays is celebrated for 15 days. So you’ve got plenty of time to whip up something special.

    You might not think of Pork and Potato Stew as a Chinese dish—it sounds pretty European. But the recipe below is authentically Chinese, using the technique of red cooking—also called Chinese stewing, red stewing, red braising and flavor potting.

    It can be made in a slow cooker (less to clean up!) and will likely become a popular dish at your table year-round.

    Red cooking is a traditional, slow braising Chinese cooking technique. A homey stew is made with soy sauce, sherry, and stock, plus meat and vegetables. This satisfying comfort food brings warmth to a chilly evening.

     

    Chinese comfort food: pork and potato stew. Photo courtesy PotatoGoodness.com.

     

    The term “red cooking” describes how the old-fashioned, unfiltered soy sauce originally used in the recipe can take on a reddish cast when long-stewed. Modern, supermarket soy sauces rarely achieve this color, but it doesn’t change the tastiness of the dish. If you want to be authentic, pick up a bottle of heavy, old-style soy sauce at a Chinese grocer or online.

     

    Chard is an under-appreciated vegetable in
    the U.S. This recipe is a good excuse to try
    it. Photo courtesy FreshDirect.com.

     

    PORK & POTATO STEW

    Makes 8 portions.

    Ingredients

  • 2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth*
  • 6 tablespoons dry sherry
  • 1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce*
  • 1/4 cup minced, peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated orange zest
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2-1/4 pounds boneless pork loin, trimmed and cut into 1-inch
    cubes
  • 2 pounds very small yellow-fleshed potatoes, halved
  • 9 medium scallions, cut into 2-inch strips
  • 2 serrano chiles, seeded and minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, slivered
  • 3 star anise pods
  • Three 4-inch cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1-1/2 pounds Swiss chard, mustard greens, or turnip greens, rinsed (but not dried) and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the broth, soy sauce, ginger, sherry, orange zest, and honey in a large pot and stir until the honey dissolves. Add the pork, potatoes, scallions, chiles, garlic, star anise, and cinnamon sticks. Stir well and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat.

    2. COVER, reduce heat to low and simmer slowly until the pork is meltingly tender, stirring occasionally, about 2 hours. (Alternatively, stir all these ingredients in a slow cooker, cover, and cook on low about 8 to 9 hours.) Meanwhile…

    3. HEAT the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the greens and vinegar. Cover, reduce heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until wilted and tender, about 12 to 15 minutes. Cover and keep warm on the stove.

    4. SERVE: Discard the star anise pods and cinnamon sticks. Divide the greens among serving bowls, then ladle the stew over the greens.

    Per serving: calories 424, fat 10g, cholesterol 110mg, sodium 846mg, vitamin C 82mg, fiber 5g, protein 44g potassium 1239mg.

      

    Comments

    CHINESE NEW YEAR: Ginger Fried Rice Recipe From Jean-Georges Vongerichten

    The Year of the Dragon is considered the luckiest year in the Chinese Zodiac.

    And it began yesterday, when millions of Chinese, Koreans, Vietnamese and other Asians rang in the New Year with fireworks, feasts and family gatherings.

    We considered ourselves lucky with a seat at a delicious dinner at Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market restaurant in New York City.

    We left with this recipe for Jean-Georges’ signature Ginger Fried Rice. It was on the menu when he opened the restaurant in 2004 (Year Of The Monkey), and has remained a popular dish to this day.

    Made with leftover jasmine rice, fried egg, leeks and fresh ginger, this crowd pleaser is a delicious side with almost anything. It’s also equally enjoyable as a cold or warm rice salad with strips or cubes of chicken or other meat, shrimp, scallops or other seafood.

    Plan ahead when you make the rice, and make enough protein for leftovers to go with the Ginger Fried Rice.

     

    Now you don’t have to go to Spice Market to
    enjoy the Ginger Fried Rice. Photo courtesy
    Spice Market.

     

    GINGER FRIED RICE RECIPE FROM SPICE MARKET NEW YORK

    Yield: 4 servings

    Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup peanut oil
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons minced ginger
  • Salt
  • 2 cups thinly sliced leeks—white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
  • 4 cups day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine rice, at room temperature
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 4 teaspoons soy sauce
  •  
    Preparation

    1. In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.

    2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.

    3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through. Season to taste with salt.

    4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.

    5. Divide rice among four dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle with 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil and 1 teaspoon soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger over everything and serve.
     
    HOW MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF RICE HAVE YOU TRIED?

    Check out our Rice Glossary.

      

    Comments

    FOOD HOLIDAY: Chinese New Year Gifts

    America’s chocolatiers celebrate The Year
    Of The Rabbit. Photo courtesy
    Charles Chocolates.

     

    It seems that everyone we know celebrates the Chinese New Year (lunar new year) with a Chinese banquet.

    Some of America’s chocolatiers have joined the festivities, creating special confections for the holiday: this year, celebrated on February 3rd.*

    *Chinese New Year begins according to the Chinese calendar, which consists of both Gregorian and lunar-solar calendar systems. Because the track of the new moon changes from year to year, Chinese New Year can begin anytime between late January and mid-February.

    To celebrate the Year Of The Rabbit, Charles Chocolates offers a gift set that includes a box of 10 orange ganache rabbits and a box of 20 tea-infused truffles, each topped with a Chinese character that indicates the type of tea inside. (If you don’t read Chinese, a guide explains which are baochong, jasmine, lichee, osmanthus and oolong.)

     

    If you only want one item, go for the rabbits. It is, after all, the rabbit’s year.

    Purchase both boxes for $45.00 (a $5.00 savings) or the rabbits only for $20.00, at CharlesChocolates.com.

      

    We love to give gifts from Burdick Chocolate. The flavors are sophisticated and the wood boxes are keepers after the chocolate is gone.

    For Chinese New Year, the box is filled with five chocolate rabbits and eight honey and lemon pepper truffles. The milk chocolate rabbits are filled with a spicy almond ganache; the dark chocolate rabbits with tangerine ganache.

    The box is stamped with a gold “Good Luck” wax seal and tied with a red-and-gold ribbon imprinted with “Gung Hay Fat Choy” in Chinese characters (which means “wishing you great happiness and prosperity”).

    The box is $25.00 at BurdickChocolate.com.

    Celebrate with either or both. Just be sure to get your order in now so the rabbits arrive in time for the Year Of The Rabbit.

     

    Rabbits and truffles with elegant flavors.
    Photo courtesy Burdick Chocolate.

    Comments

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