Warm Potato Salad Recipes - Hot Potato Salad | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: Warm Or Hot Potato Salad – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
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TIP OF THE DAY: Warm Or Hot Potato Salad

Hot Asian Potato Salad With Shishito Peppers
[1] Warm potato salad Japanese-style. The recipe is below (photo © Idaho Potato Commission).

Shishito Peppers
[2] Hot, but not too hot, shishito peppers (photo © Spoon Fork Bacon).

Shichimi Togarashi
[3] Shichimi togarashi is the Japanese seven spice blend. Here’s more about it (photo © Colourbox).

Grated Ginger
[4] Grated ginger (photo © Luxury Travel Thailand).

Fingerling Potatoes
[5] Fingerling potatoes (photo © The Roasted Root).

 

While cold potato salad rules the summer, the cool weather calls for warm potato salad.

Warm potato salad combines sliced potatoes, often with vegetables. They bypass the mayo and dairy dressings (buttermilk, sour cream, yogurt) for a warm vinaigrette:

  • Bacon vinaigrette
  • Balsamic vinaigrette
  • Mustard vinaigrette or vinaigrette recipe of choice
  •  
    The best-known of the warm potato salads is the Southern German potato salad that is served with sausages and other meats.

    It layers the flavors with red onions, chives or scallions, parsley and dill in a mustard vinaigrette.
     
    While warm potato salad is a dinner side, you can certainly serve it with a sandwich or a burger at lunch—warm or cold from the fridge.

    September is National Potato Month, so start cooking those spuds*!
     
     
    RECIPE: WARM POTATO SALAD JAPANESE-STYLE WITH SHISHITO PEPPERS & SHICHIMI TOGARASHI

    This recipe was developed for the Idaho Potato Commission by Cheryl Bennett of Pooks Pantry.

    Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Idaho® fingerling potatoes
  • 4 ounces shishito peppers (photo #2)
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons shichimi togarashi (photo #3)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 400°F. Wash the potatoes and slice them in half lengthwise.

    2. TOSS the potatoes in a medium bowl with the canola, shichimi togarashi, shishito peppers and a pinch of salt and pepper.

    3. LAY the potatoes on a parchment-lined sheet pan and roast until they are easily pierced with a knife (30 minutes). Meanwhile…

    4. MELT the butter and add the grated ginger to it. Let it sit to infuse the flavor while the potatoes are roasting.

    5. REMOVE the potatoes from the oven when they are done, and let them cool enough to handle. Toss them in the ginger butter and serve warm.
     
     
    RECIPE: SHICHIMI TOGARASHI

    You can buy shichimi togarashi as a blended spice mix (photo #3), or make your own.

    A seven-ingredient spice blend, shichi means “seven” in Japanese, togarashi is red pepper.

    Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon dried orange peel
  • 1 tablespoon ground red chile pepper
  • 1 teaspoon flaked nori
  • 2 teaspoons black sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons white sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  •  
    Preparation

    1. GRIND the ingredients together to a coarse consistency. Store in an airtight container.
     
     
    MORE WARM POTATO SALAD RECIPES

  • Baked Fully Loaded Potato Salad
  • Beer-Roasted Potato Salad
  • Corned Beef & Cabbage Potato Salad
  • Create Your Own Warm Potato Salad Recipe
  • Dinner Potato Salad With Sirloin & Green Beans
  • German Potato Salad With Bacon Vinaigrette
  • Green Bean & Potato Salad
  • Grilled Potato Salad With Bacon, Corn & Jalapeño
  • Grilled Potato Salad With Blue Cheese & Bacon</li>
  • Grilled Potato salad With Hot Dogs
  • Ratatouille Potato Salad
  • Green Bean & Potato Salad
  • Warm Potato Salad & Acorn Squash
  • Warm Potato Salad With Bacon & Arugula
  • ________________

    *Why are potatoes called spuds?

    Among other definitions, a spud is a sharp, narrow spade used to dig up large rooted plants, like potatoes. Around the mid-19th century, farmers began using the term as slang to refer to potatoes themselves [source].

     

      




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